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  • Linux.com: Q&A on Oracle's Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel

    - by monica.kumar
    Linux.com recently published a Q&A on Oracle's Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for Linux. The interview highlights the key benefits of Oracle's new offering and also offers an insight into our long and ongoing commitment to advancing Linux. Here are some excerpts from the Q&A: All enhancements made in the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel are open source and have been made available to the Linux community. Oracle Linux, including both the kernels, is free to download, use and distribute. You can download the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel at http://public-yum.oracle.com Source code is available, including a public git repository with full changelog and individual patches and checkins for convenience. Read the entire interview. Visit the Oracle Linux Homepage.

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  • What a Performance! MySQL 5.5 and InnoDB 1.1 running on Oracle Linux

    - by zeynep.koch(at)oracle.com
    The MySQL performance team in Oracle has recently completed a series of benchmarks comparing Read / Write and Read-Only performance of MySQL 5.5 with the InnoDB and MyISAM storage engines. Compared to MyISAM, InnoDB delivered 35x higher throughput on the Read / Write test and 5x higher throughput on the Read-Only test, with 90% scalability across 36 CPU cores. A full analysis of results and MySQL configuration parameters are documented in a new whitepaperIn addition to the benchmark, the new whitepaper, also includes:- A discussion of the use-cases for each storage engine- Best practices for users considering the migration of existing applications from MyISAM to InnoDB- A summary of the performance and scalability enhancements introduced with MySQL 5.5 and InnoDB 1.1.The benchmark itself was based on Sysbench, running on AMD Opteron "Magny-Cours" processors, and Oracle Linux with the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel You can learn more about MySQL 5.5 and InnoDB 1.1 from here and download it from here to test whether you witness performance gains in your real-world applications.  By Mat Keep

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  • LIVE WEBCAST March 24 2pm PT- Why Switch from Red Hat and SUSE Linux to Oracle Linux?

    - by Zeynep Koch
    Oracle has been offering affordable Linux support since 2006 and more than 6,000 customers already use it. Oracle's Unbreakable Linux support program draws on the expertise of a world-class support organization that understands how to diagnose and solve Linux issues integrated with the applications being deployed on it. Find out how you can save 50-90% on your support costs. Join Oracle's Monica Kumar, Sr.Director of Linux, Oracle VM and MySQL and Avi Miller, Principal Sales Consultant, Linux and Virtualization on Thursday, March 24, 2pm PT to hear:The "Why and how" of switching to Oracle LinuxTesting and integration with systems and applicationsFree management and high availability toolsReal life customer scenariosIf you are going to get free access to the most advanced Linux operating system, along with world-class support at a fraction of the cost, better testing and integration with your server and applications, why wouldn't you do it? Register Now

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  • How Linux is Built [Video]

    - by Asian Angel
    Many of the devices that we use each day such as computers, mobile phones, televisions, and more run on Linux, but how is Linux built? This wonderful video from The Linux Foundation shows just how it is done. How Linux is Built [via OMG! Ubuntu!] How To Customize Your Android Lock Screen with WidgetLocker The Best Free Portable Apps for Your Flash Drive Toolkit How to Own Your Own Website (Even If You Can’t Build One) Pt 3

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  • apt-get install and update fail

    - by sepehr
    I've got a problem with apt-get update and apt-get install ... commands . every time update or installing fails and errors are : Get:1 http://dl.google.com stable Release.gpg [198B] Ign http://dl.google.com/linux/chrome/deb/ stable/main Translation-en_US Get:2 http://dl.google.com stable Release [1,347B] Get:3 http://dl.google.com stable/main Packages [1,227B] Err http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution Release.gpg Could not connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:80 (37.221.173.214). - connect (110: Connection timed out) Err http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org/ revolution/main Translation-en_US Unable to connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org/ revolution/microverse Translation-en_US Unable to connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org/ revolution/non-free Translation-en_US Unable to connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org/ revolution/testing Translation-en_US Unable to connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution Release.gpg Could not connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:80 (37.221.173.214). - connect (110: Connection timed out) Err http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org/ revolution/main Translation-en_US Unable to connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org/ revolution/microverse Translation-en_US Unable to connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org/ revolution/non-free Translation-en_US Unable to connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org/ revolution/testing Translation-en_US Unable to connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Ign http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution Release Ign http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution Release Ign http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/main Packages Ign http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/main Packages Ign http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/microverse Packages Ign http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/non-free Packages Ign http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/testing Packages Ign http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/microverse Packages Ign http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/non-free Packages Ign http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/testing Packages Ign http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/main Packages Ign http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/microverse Packages Ign http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/non-free Packages Ign http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/main Packages Ign http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/microverse Packages Ign http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/non-free Packages Ign http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/testing Packages Err http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/main Packages Unable to connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/microverse Packages Unable to connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Ign http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/testing Packages Err http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/main Packages Unable to connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/microverse Packages Unable to connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/non-free Packages Unable to connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/testing Packages Unable to connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/non-free Packages Unable to connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/testing Packages Unable to connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution Release.gpg Could not connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:80 (37.221.173.214). - connect (110: Connection timed out) Err http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org/ revolution/main Translation-en_US Unable to connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org/ revolution/microverse Translation-en_US Unable to connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org/ revolution/non-free Translation-en_US Unable to connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org/ revolution/testing Translation-en_US Unable to connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Ign http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution Release Ign http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/main Packages Ign http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/microverse Packages Ign http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/non-free Packages Ign http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/testing Packages Ign http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/main Packages Ign http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/microverse Packages Ign http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/non-free Packages Ign http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/testing Packages Err http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/main Packages Unable to connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/microverse Packages Unable to connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/non-free Packages Unable to connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Err http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org revolution/testing Packages Unable to connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: Fetched 2,772B in 1min 3s (44B/s) W: Failed to fetch http://all.repository.backtrack- \linux.org/dists/revolution/Release.gpg Could not connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:80 (37.221.173.214). - connect (110: Connection timed out) W: Failed to fetch http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/main/i18n/Translation-en_US.bz2 Unable to connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/microverse/i18n/Translation-en_US.bz2 Unable to connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/non-free/i18n/Translation-en_US.bz2 Unable to connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/testing/i18n/Translation-en_US.bz2 Unable to connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/Release.gpg Could not connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:80 (37.221.173.214). - connect (110: Connection timed out) W: Failed to fetch http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/main/i18n/Translation-en_US.bz2 Unable to connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/microverse/i18n/Translation-en_US.bz2 Unable to connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/non-free/i18n/Translation-en_US.bz2 Unable to connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/testing/i18n/Translation-en_US.bz2 Unable to connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/Release.gpg Could not connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:80 (37.221.173.214). - connect (110: Connection timed out) W: Failed to fetch http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/main/i18n/Translation-en_US.bz2 Unable to connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/microverse/i18n/Translation-en_US.bz2 Unable to connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/non-free/i18n/Translation-en_US.bz2 Unable to connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/testing/i18n/Translation-en_US.bz2 Unable to connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/main/binary-i386/Packages.gz Unable to connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/microverse/binary-i386/Packages.gz Unable to connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/non-free/binary-i386/Packages.gz Unable to connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/main/binary-i386/Packages.gz Unable to connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/microverse/binary-i386/Packages.gz Unable to connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/non-free/binary-i386/Packages.gz Unable to connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://all.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/testing/binary-i386/Packages.gz Unable to connect to all.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://32.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/testing/binary-i386/Packages.gz Unable to connect to 32.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/main/binary-i386/Packages.gz Unable to connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/microverse/binary-i386/Packages.gz Unable to connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/non-free/binary-i386/Packages.gz Unable to connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: W: Failed to fetch http://source.repository.backtrack-linux.org/dists/revolution/testing/binary-i386/Packages.gz Unable to connect to source.repository.backtrack-linux.org:http: E: Some index files failed to download, they have been ignored, or old ones used instead. I Don't know how to get out of this ! I want to install RPM and YUM package on my backtrack ! I also searched over internet for answer . in backtrack forums or any other sites or weblogs i could'nt find a good answer ! can anyone help ??

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  • Build-Essentials installation failing

    - by Brickman
    I am having trouble accessing the several critical header files that show to be a part of the build process. The "Ubuntu Software Center" shows "Build Essentials" as installed: Next I did the following two commands, which did not improve the problem: ~$ sudo apt-get install build-essential [sudo] password for: Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state information... Done build-essential is already the newest version. 0 upgraded, 0 newly installed, 0 to remove and 0 not upgraded. :~$ sudo apt-get install -f Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state information... Done 0 upgraded, 0 newly installed, 0 to remove and 0 not upgraded. :~$ Dump of headers after installation attempts. > /usr/include/boost/interprocess/detail/atomic.hpp > /usr/include/boost/interprocess/smart_ptr/detail/sp_counted_base_atomic.hpp > /usr/include/qt4/Qt/qatomic.h /usr/include/qt4/Qt/qbasicatomic.h > /usr/include/qt4/QtCore/qatomic.h > /usr/include/qt4/QtCore/qbasicatomic.h > /usr/share/doc/git-annex/html/bugs/git_annex_unlock_is_not_atomic.html > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/alpha/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/arc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/arm/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/arm64/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/avr32/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/blackfin/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/cris/include/arch-v10/arch/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/cris/include/arch-v32/arch/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/cris/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/frv/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/h8300/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/hexagon/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/ia64/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/m32r/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/m68k/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/metag/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/microblaze/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/mips/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/mn10300/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/parisc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/powerpc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/s390/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/score/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/sh/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/sparc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/tile/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/x86/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/arch/xtensa/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/include/asm-generic/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/include/asm-generic/bitops/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/include/asm-generic/bitops/ext2-atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/include/asm-generic/bitops/non-atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15/include/linux/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-15-generic/include/linux/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/alpha/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/arc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/arm/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/arm64/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/avr32/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/blackfin/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/cris/include/arch-v10/arch/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/cris/include/arch-v32/arch/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/cris/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/frv/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/h8300/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/hexagon/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/ia64/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/m32r/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/m68k/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/metag/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/microblaze/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/mips/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/mn10300/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/parisc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/powerpc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/s390/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/score/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/sh/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/sparc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/tile/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/x86/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/arch/xtensa/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/include/asm-generic/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/include/asm-generic/bitops/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/include/asm-generic/bitops/ext2-atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/include/asm-generic/bitops/non-atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17/include/linux/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-17-generic/include/linux/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/alpha/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/arc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/arm/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/arm64/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/avr32/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/blackfin/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/cris/include/arch-v10/arch/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/cris/include/arch-v32/arch/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/cris/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/frv/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/h8300/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/hexagon/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/ia64/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/m32r/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/m68k/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/metag/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/microblaze/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/mips/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/mn10300/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/parisc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/powerpc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/s390/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/score/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/sh/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/sparc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/tile/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/x86/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/arch/xtensa/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/include/asm-generic/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/include/asm-generic/bitops/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/include/asm-generic/bitops/ext2-atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/include/asm-generic/bitops/non-atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18/include/linux/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-18-generic/include/linux/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/alpha/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/arc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/arm/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/arm64/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/avr32/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/blackfin/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/cris/include/arch-v10/arch/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/cris/include/arch-v32/arch/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/cris/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/frv/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/h8300/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/hexagon/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/ia64/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/m32r/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/m68k/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/metag/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/microblaze/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/mips/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/mn10300/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/parisc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/powerpc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/s390/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/score/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/sh/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/sparc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/tile/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/x86/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/arch/xtensa/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/include/asm-generic/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/include/asm-generic/bitops/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/include/asm-generic/bitops/ext2-atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/include/asm-generic/bitops/non-atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19/include/linux/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-19-generic/include/linux/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/alpha/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/arc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/arm/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/arm64/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/avr32/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/blackfin/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/cris/include/arch-v10/arch/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/cris/include/arch-v32/arch/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/cris/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/frv/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/h8300/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/hexagon/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/ia64/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/m32r/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/m68k/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/metag/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/microblaze/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/mips/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/mn10300/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/parisc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/powerpc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/s390/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/score/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/sh/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/sparc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/tile/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/x86/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/arch/xtensa/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/include/asm-generic/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/include/asm-generic/bitops/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/include/asm-generic/bitops/ext2-atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/include/asm-generic/bitops/non-atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20/include/linux/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-20-generic/include/linux/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/alpha/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/arc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/arm/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/arm64/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/avr32/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/blackfin/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/cris/include/arch-v10/arch/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/cris/include/arch-v32/arch/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/cris/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/frv/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/h8300/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/hexagon/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/ia64/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/m32r/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/m68k/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/metag/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/microblaze/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/mips/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/mn10300/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/parisc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/powerpc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/s390/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/score/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/sh/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/sparc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/tile/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/x86/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/arch/xtensa/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/include/asm-generic/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/include/asm-generic/bitops/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/include/asm-generic/bitops/ext2-atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/include/asm-generic/bitops/non-atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22/include/linux/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.11.0-22-generic/include/linux/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/alpha/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/arc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/arm/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/arm64/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/avr32/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/blackfin/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/cris/include/arch-v10/arch/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/cris/include/arch-v32/arch/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/cris/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/frv/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/hexagon/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/ia64/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/m32r/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/m68k/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/metag/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/microblaze/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/mips/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/mn10300/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/parisc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/powerpc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/s390/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/score/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/sh/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/sparc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/tile/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/x86/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/arch/xtensa/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/include/asm-generic/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/include/asm-generic/bitops/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/include/asm-generic/bitops/ext2-atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/include/asm-generic/bitops/non-atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404/include/linux/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404-generic/include/linux/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-headers-3.14.4-031404-lowlatency/include/linux/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/alpha/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/arc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/arm/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/arm64/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/avr32/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/blackfin/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/cris/include/arch-v10/arch/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/cris/include/arch-v32/arch/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/cris/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/frv/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/h8300/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/hexagon/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/ia64/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/m32r/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/m68k/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/metag/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/microblaze/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/mips/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/mn10300/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/parisc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/powerpc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/s390/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/score/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/sh/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/sparc/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/tile/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/x86/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/arch/xtensa/include/asm/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/include/asm-generic/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/include/asm-generic/bitops/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/include/asm-generic/bitops/ext2-atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/include/asm-generic/bitops/non-atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/include/linux/atomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/ubuntu/lttng/lib/ringbuffer/vatomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/ubuntu/lttng/wrapper/ringbuffer/vatomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/ubuntu/lttng-modules/lib/ringbuffer/vatomic.h > /usr/src/linux-lts-saucy-3.11.0/ubuntu/lttng-modules/wrapper/ringbuffer/vatomic.h Yes, I know there are multiple headers of the same type here, but they are different versions. Version "linux-headers-3.14.4-031404" shows to be the latest. Ubuntu shows "Nothing needed to be installed." However, the following C/C++ headers files show to be missing for Eclipse and QT4. #include <linux/version.h> #include <linux/module.h> #include <linux/socket.h> #include <linux/miscdevice.h> #include <linux/list.h> #include <linux/vmalloc.h> #include <linux/slab.h> #include <linux/init.h> #include <asm/uaccess.h> #include <asm/atomic.h> #include <linux/delay.h> #include <linux/usb.h> This problem appears on my 32-bit version of Ubuntu and on both of my 64-bit versions. What I am doing wrong?

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  • Oracle Linux 6 DVDs Now Available

    - by sergio.leunissen
    On Sunday 6 February 2011, Oracle Linux 6 was released on the Unbreakable Linux Network for customers with an Oracle Linux support subscription. Shortly after that, the Oracle Linux 6 RPMs were made available on our public yum server. Today we published the installation DVD images on edelivery.oracle.com/linux. Oracle Linux 6 is free to download, install and use. The full release notes are here, but similar to my recent post about Oracle Linux 5.6, I wanted to highlight a few items about this release. Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel As is the case with Oracle Linux 5.6, the default installed kernel on x86_64 platform in Oracle Linux 6 is the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel. If you haven't already, I highly recommend you watch the replay of this webcast by Chris Mason on the performance improvements made in this kernel. # uname -r 2.6.32-100.28.5.el6.x86_64 The Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel is delivered via the package kernel-uek: [[email protected] ~]# yum info kernel-uek ... Installed Packages Name : kernel-uek Arch : x86_64 Version : 2.6.32 Release : 100.28.5.el6 Size : 84 M Repo : installed From repo : anaconda-OracleLinuxServer-201102031546.x86_64 Summary : The Linux kernel URL : http://www.kernel.org/ License : GPLv2 Description: The kernel package contains the Linux kernel (vmlinuz), the core of : any Linux operating system. The kernel handles the basic functions : of the operating system: memory allocation, process allocation, : device input and output, etc. ext4 file system The ext4 or fourth extended filesystem replaces ext3 as the default filesystem in Oracle Linux 6. # mount /dev/mapper/VolGroup-lv_root on / type ext4 (rw) proc on /proc type proc (rw) sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw) devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,gid=5,mode=620) tmpfs on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw,rootcontext="system_u:object_r:tmpfs_t:s0") /dev/sda1 on /boot type ext4 (rw) none on /proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc type binfmt_misc (rw) Red Hat compatible kernel Oracle Linux 6 also includes a Red Hat compatible kernel built directly from RHEL source. It's already installed, so booting it is a matter of editing /etc/grub.conf # rpm -qa | grep kernel-2.6.32 kernel-2.6.32-71.el6.x86_64 Oracle Linux 6 no longer includes a Red Hat compatible kernel with Oracle bug fixes. The only Red Hat compatible kernel included is the one built directly from RHEL source. Yum-only access to Unbreakable Linux Network (ULN) Oracle Linux 6 uses yum exclusively for access to Unbreakable Linux Network. To register your system with ULN, use the following command: # uln_register No Itanium Support Oracle Linux 6 is not supported on the Itanium (ia64) platform. Next Steps Read the release notes Download Oracle Linux 6 for free Discuss on the Oracle Linux forum

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  • The Oracle Enterprise Linux Software and Hardware Ecosystem

    - by sergio.leunissen
    It's been nearly four years since we launched the Unbreakable Linux support program and with it the free Oracle Enterprise Linux software. Since then, we've built up an extensive ecosystem of hardware and software partners. Oracle works directly with these vendors to ensure joint customers can run Oracle Enterprise Linux. As Oracle Enterprise Linux is fully--both source and binary--compatible with Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), there is minimal work involved for software and hardware vendors to test their products with it. We develop our software on Oracle Enterprise Linux and perform full certification testing on Oracle Enterprise Linux as well. Due to the compatibility between Oracle Enterprise Linux and RHEL, Oracle also certifies its software for use on RHEL, without any additional testing. Oracle Enterprise Linux tracks RHEL by publishing freely downloadable installation media on edelivery.oracle.com/linux and updates, bug fixes and security errata on Unbreakable Linux Network (ULN). At the same time, Oracle's Linux kernel team is shaping the future of enterprise Linux distributions by developing technologies and features that matter to customers who deploy Linux in the data center, including file systems, memory management, high performance computing, data integrity and virtualization. All this work is contributed to the Linux and Xen communities. The list below is a sample of the partners who have certified their products with Oracle Enterprise Linux. If you're interested in certifying your software or hardware with Oracle Enterprise Linux, please contact us via [email protected] Chip Manufacturers Intel, Intel Enabled Server Acceleration Alliance AMD Server vendors Cisco Unified Computing System Dawning Dell Egenera Fujitsu HP Huawei IBM NEC Sun/Oracle Storage Systems, Volume Management and File Systems 3Par Compellent EMC VPLEX FalconStor Fusion-io Hitachi Data Systems HP Storage Array Systems Lustre Network Appliance OCFS2 PillarData Symantec Veritas Storage Foundation Networking: Switches, Host Bus Adapters (HBAs), Converged Network Adapters (CNAs), InfiniBand Brocade Emulex Mellanox QLogic Voltaire SOA and Middleware ActiveState ActivePerl, ActivePython Tibco Zend Backup, Recovery & Replication Arkeia Network Backup Suite BakBone NetVault CommVault Simpana 8 EMC Networker, Replication Manager FalconStor Continuous Data Protector HP Data Protector NetApp Snapmanager Quest LiteSpeed Engine Steeleye Data Replication, Disaster Recovery Symantec NetBackup, Veritas Volume Replicator, Symantec Backup Exec Zmanda Amanda Enterprise Data Center Automation BMC CA Unicenter HP Server Automation (formerly Opsware), System Management Homepage Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center Quest Vizioncore vFoglight Pro TeamQuest Manager Clustering & High Availability FUJITSU x10sure NEC Express Cluster X Steeleye Lifekeeper Symantec Cluster Server Univa UniCluster Virtualization Platforms and Cloud Providers Amazon EC2 Citrix XenServer Rackspace Cloud VirtualBox VMWare ESX Security Management ArcSight: Enterprise Security Manager, Logger CA Access Control Centrify Suite Ecora Auditor FoxT Manager Likewise: Unix Account Management Lumension Endpoint Management and Security Suite QualysGuard Suite Quest Privilege Manager McAfee Application Control, Change ControlIntegrity Monitor, Integrity Control, PCI Pro Solidcore S3 Symantec Enterprise Security Manager (ESM) Tripwire Trusted Computer Solutions

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  • How to keep asm output from Linux kernel module build

    - by fastmonkeywheels
    I'm working on a Linux kernel module for a 2.6.x kernel and I need to view the assembly output, though it's currently being done as a temporary file an deleted afterwords. I'd like to have the assembly output mixed with my C source file so I can easily trace where my problem lies. This is for an ARMv6 core and apparently objdump doesn't support this architecture. I've included my makefile below. ETREP=/xxSourceTreexx/ GNU_BIN=$(ETREP)/arm-none-linux-gnueabi/bin CROSS_COMPILE := $(GNU_BIN)/arm-none-linux-gnueabi- ARCH := arm KDIR=$(ETREP)/linux-2.6.31/ MAKE= CROSS_COMPILE=$(CROSS_COMPILE) ARCH=$(ARCH) make obj-m += xxfile1xx.o all: $(MAKE) -C $(KDIR) M=$(PWD) modules clean: $(MAKE) -C $(KDIR) M=$(PWD) clean

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  • Updating Debian kernel

    - by Devator
    I'm trying to update my Debian machine to 2.6.32-46 (which is the new stable). However, after doing apt-get update my apt-cache search linux-image shows me: linux-headers-2.6.32-5-486 - Header files for Linux 2.6.32-5-486 linux-headers-2.6.32-5-686-bigmem - Header files for Linux 2.6.32-5-686-bigmem linux-headers-2.6.32-5-686 - Header files for Linux 2.6.32-5-686 linux-headers-2.6.32-5-amd64 - Header files for Linux 2.6.32-5-amd64 linux-headers-2.6.32-5-openvz-686 - Header files for Linux 2.6.32-5-openvz-686 linux-headers-2.6.32-5-vserver-686-bigmem - Header files for Linux 2.6.32-5-vser ver-686-bigmem linux-headers-2.6.32-5-vserver-686 - Header files for Linux 2.6.32-5-vserver-686 linux-headers-2.6.32-5-xen-686 - Header files for Linux 2.6.32-5-xen-686 linux-image-2.6.32-5-486 - Linux 2.6.32 for old PCs linux-image-2.6.32-5-686-bigmem-dbg - Debugging infos for Linux 2.6.32-5-686-big mem linux-image-2.6.32-5-686-bigmem - Linux 2.6.32 for PCs with 4GB+ RAM linux-image-2.6.32-5-686 - Linux 2.6.32 for modern PCs linux-image-2.6.32-5-amd64 - Linux 2.6.32 for 64-bit PCs linux-image-2.6.32-5-openvz-686-dbg - Debugging infos for Linux 2.6.32-5-openvz- 686 linux-image-2.6.32-5-openvz-686 - Linux 2.6.32 for modern PCs, OpenVZ support linux-image-2.6.32-5-vserver-686-bigmem-dbg - Debugging infos for Linux 2.6.32-5 -vserver-686-bigmem linux-image-2.6.32-5-vserver-686-bigmem - Linux 2.6.32 for PCs with 4GB+ RAM, Li nux-VServer support linux-image-2.6.32-5-vserver-686 - Linux 2.6.32 for modern PCs, Linux-VServer su pport linux-image-2.6.32-5-xen-686-dbg - Debugging infos for Linux 2.6.32-5-xen-686 linux-image-2.6.32-5-xen-686 - Linux 2.6.32 for modern PCs, Xen dom0 support linux-image-2.6-486 - Linux 2.6 for old PCs (meta-package) linux-image-2.6-686-bigmem - Linux 2.6 for PCs with 4GB+ RAM (meta-package) linux-image-2.6-686 - Linux 2.6 for modern PCs (meta-package) linux-image-2.6-amd64 - Linux 2.6 for 64-bit PCs (meta-package) linux-image-2.6-openvz-686 - Linux 2.6 for modern PCs (meta-package), OpenVZ sup port linux-image-2.6-vserver-686-bigmem - Linux 2.6 for PCs with 4GB+ RAM (meta-packa ge), Linux-VServer support linux-image-2.6-vserver-686 - Linux 2.6 for modern PCs (meta-package), Linux-VSe rver support linux-image-2.6-xen-686 - Linux 2.6 for modern PCs (meta-package), Xen dom0 supp ort linux-image-486 - Linux for old PCs (meta-package) linux-image-686-bigmem - Linux for PCs with 4GB+ RAM (meta-package) linux-image-686 - Linux for modern PCs (meta-package) linux-image-amd64 - Linux for 64-bit PCs (meta-package) linux-image-openvz-686 - Linux for modern PCs (meta-package), OpenVZ support linux-image-vserver-686-bigmem - Linux for PCs with 4GB+ RAM (meta-package), Lin ux-VServer support linux-image-vserver-686 - Linux for modern PCs (meta-package), Linux-VServer sup port linux-image-xen-686 - Linux for modern PCs (meta-package), Xen dom0 support So, 2.6.32-46 doesn't seem to be found. How can I update to this kernel? My sources.list: ###### Debian Main Repos deb http://ftp.nl.debian.org/debian/ squeeze main contrib deb-src http://ftp.nl.debian.org/debian/ squeeze main contrib ###### Debian Update Repos deb http://security.debian.org/ squeeze/updates main contrib deb http://ftp.nl.debian.org/debian/ squeeze-proposed-updates main contrib deb-src http://security.debian.org/ squeeze/updates main contrib deb-src http://ftp.nl.debian.org/debian/ squeeze-proposed-updates main contrib

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  • NFS mount share from Linux AD authentication to Linux with NIS authentication

    - by user137862
    I have two machines: Linux with AD authentication and running NFS server Linux with NIS authentication Problem: When I try to mount any share from first machine (AD authentication) to second (NIS authentication) I always get somehing like this drwxrws---+ 13 16777260 16777222 4096 Sep 21 09:42 software In fact I can't access to this folder because on NIS machine I don't have the user with such UID/GID Question: May somebody know how resolve this problem?

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  • How is the Linux repository administrated?

    - by David
    I am amazed by the Linux project and I would like to learn how they administrate the code, given the huge number of developers. I found the Linux repository on GitHub, but I do not understand how it is administrated. For example the following commit: https://github.com/torvalds/linux/commit/31fd84b95eb211d5db460a1dda85e004800a7b52 Notice the following part: So one authored and Torvalds committed. How is this possible. I thought that it was only possible to have either pull or pushing rights, but here it seems like there is an approval stage. I should mention that the specific problem I am trying to solve is that we use pull requests to our repo. The problem we are facing is that while a pull request is waiting to get merged, it is often broken by a commit. This leads to a seemingly never ending work to adapt the fork in order to make the pull request merge smoothly. Do Linux solve this by giving lots of people pushing rights (at least there are currently just three pull requests but hundreds of commits per day).

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  • Migrating from IBM AIX/DB2 Power systems to Oracle Technologies

    - by zeynep.koch(at)oracle.com
    If you are planning to migrate from  IBM DB2 on AIX Power Systems to more open and better-performing computing environment--one that offers enhanced flexibility, clustering, availability, and security, as well as lower maintenance than download this guide that outlines migrating to Oracle Database 11g and Oracle Linux running on Oracle's Sun Fire X4800 server.This guide shows you how to:Move sample applications with an IBM DB2 on an IBM Power System to Oracle Database 11g Release 2Install Oracle Linux and Oracle Database Release 2 on the Oracle's Sun Fire X4800 serverMigrate user databases from the IBM Power System to Oracle's Sun Fire X4800 serverDownload

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  • Serial connection over a single USB cable (Windows to linux, or linux to linux)

    - by andyortlieb
    I'm helping out with a project for an embedded device that only has USB and no serial. This device is running Linux. These days, when we need to connect to a serial port on a device we typically use a USB to serial adapter (on something like a phone system or a load balancing device, etc). I would like to know if it is possible to have the host device behave as though it were a serial adapter, thus removing the need for one. Given the nature of USB, is this approach even necessary? To recap, I would like to be able to connect a single A-to-A USB cable from my workstation (be it windows or linux) to this device, for the purpose of administration (especially initial setup), using minicom, putty or hyperterminal. Thanks

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  • Easy software installation on Linux(Ubuntu/ Linux mint)

    - by Aash Maharoon
    When a software is installed, it has to be done with the terminal and coding. There are some steps to do which can be difficult for a new user(comes from windows OS). In Windows OS, we can set paths for installation directory, uninstall easily and installation GUI application comes with the software which is very easy to do with using mouse only. I am new to Linux and love to use it. Is there any methodologies or softwares which can be very user friendly for application installation with GUI support ? or only the terminal should be used ?

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  • Trying to make a custom Arch-based Linux distro with larch

    - by strangeronyourtrain
    I'm all set up with a spiffy Arch installation in a virtual machine, and now I want to turn it into a live ISO. When I heard about larch, I thought it would be the perfect tool to turn my existing installation into something I could distribute. However, I can't get larch to install properly. I followed the installation instructions on the website, which said to download and run the larch-setup script. When I run it, though, it installs the larch profiles and libraries but doesn't install the executable programs. Here's a screenshot of the errors I get when larch-setup tries to install the executables. I'd greatly appreciate any clues to what is going wrong here, or suggestions for alternative ways to turn my customized Arch installation into an ISO! Thanks!

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  • Oracle Database Smart Flash Cache: Only on Oracle Linux and Oracle Solaris

    - by sergio.leunissen
    Oracle Database Smart Flash Cache is a feature that was first introduced with Oracle Database 11g Release 2. Only available on Oracle Linux and Oracle Solaris, this feature increases the size of the database buffer cache without having to add RAM to the system. In effect, it acts as a second level cache on flash memory and will especially benefit read-intensive database applications. The Oracle Database Smart Flash Cache white paper concludes: Available at no additional cost, Database Smart Flash Cache on Oracle Solaris and Oracle Linux has the potential to offer considerable benefit to users of Oracle Database 11g Release 2 with disk-bound read-mostly or read-only workloads, through the simple addition of flash storage such as the Sun Storage F5100 Flash Array or the Sun Flash Accelerator F20 PCIe Card. Read the white paper.

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  • The Best Free Tools for Creating a Bootable Windows or Linux USB Drive

    - by Lori Kaufman
    If you need to install Windows or Linux and you don’t have access to a CD/DVD drive, a bootable USB drive is the solution. You can boot to the USB drive, using it to run the OS setup program, just like a CD or DVD. We have collected some links to free programs that allow you to easily setup a USB drive to install Windows or Linux on a computer. NOTE: If you have problems getting the BIOS on your computer to let you boot from a USB drive, see our article about booting from a USB drive even if your BIOS won’t let you. What Is the Purpose of the “Do Not Cover This Hole” Hole on Hard Drives? How To Log Into The Desktop, Add a Start Menu, and Disable Hot Corners in Windows 8 HTG Explains: Why You Shouldn’t Use a Task Killer On Android

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  • Racing MMO for Linux - 2D or 3D - Massively Multiplayer Online Racing Games for Linux

    - by Paulocoghi
    I really like multiplayer racing games, like Need for Speed World or similar. I wonder if there is any MMO racing game for Linux (2D or 3D). Browser-based games are also accepted. Note: I tried this question in the Gaming Q&A of StackExchange (see link below), but one user said that my question was off-topic. http://gaming.stackexchange.com/questions/16329/racing-mmo-for-linux-2d-or-3d-massively-multiplayer-online-racing-games

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  • Oracle Linux Forum

    - by rickramsey
    This forum includes live chat so you can tell Wim, Lenz, and the gang what you really think. Linux Forum - Tuesday March 27 Since Oracle recently made Release 2 of its Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel available (see Lenz's blog), we're following up with an online forum with Oracle's Linux executives and engineers. Topics will be: 9:30 - 9:45 am PT Oracle's Linux Strategy Edward Screven, Oracle's Chief Corporate Architect and Wim Coekaerts, Senior VP of Linux and Virtualization Engineering, will explain Oracle's Linux strategy, the benefits of Oracle Linux, Oracle's role in the Linux community, and the Oracle Linux roadmap. 9:45 - 10:00 am PT Why Progressive Insurance Chose Oracle Linux John Dome, Lead Systems Engineer at Progressive Insurance, outlines why they selected Oracle Linux with the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel to reduce cost and increase the performance of database applications. 10:00 - 11:00 am PT What's New in Oracle Linux Oracle engineers walk you through new features in Oracle Linux, including zero-downtime updates with Ksplice, Btrfs and OCFS2, DTrace for Linux, Linux Containers, vSwitch and T-Mem. 11:00 am - 12:00 pm PT Get More Value from your Linux Vendor Why Oracle Linux delivers more value than Red Hat Enterprise Linux, including better support at lower cost, best practices for deployments, extreme performance for cloud deployments and engineered systems, and more. Date: Tuesday, March 27, 2012 Time: 9:30 AM PT / 12:30 PM ET Duration: 2.5 hours Register here. - Rick

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  • Oracle Linux Delivers Top CPU Benchmark Results on Sun Blades

    - by sergio.leunissen
    From the Performance and Best Practices blog: Fresh SPEC CPU2006 results for Sun Blade X6275 M2 Server Modules running Oracle Linux 5.5. The highlights: The dual-node Sun Blade X6275 M2 server module, equipped with two Intel Xeon X5670 2.93 GHz processors per node and running the Oracle Enterprise Linux 5.5 operating system delivered the best SPECint_rate2006 and SPECfp_rate2006 benchmark results for all systems with Intel Xeon processor 5000 sequence. With a SPECint_rate2006 benchmark result of 679, the Sun Blade X6275 M2 server module, with two compute nodes per blade, delivers maximum performance for space constrained environments. Comparing Oracle's dual-node blade to HP's dual-node blade server, based on their single node performance, the Sun Blade X6275 M2 server module SPECfp_rate2006 score of 241 outperforms the best published HP ProLiant BL2X220c G5 server score by 3.2x. A single node of a Sun Blade X6275 M2 server module using 2.93 GHz Intel Xeon X5670 processors delivered 37% improvement in SPECint_rate2006 benchmark results and 22% improvement in SPECfp_rate2006 benchmark results compared to the previous generation Sun Blade X6275 server module. Both nodes of a Sun Blade X6275 M2 server module using 2.93 GHz Intel Xeon X5670 processors delivered 59% improvement on the SPECint_rate2006 benchmark and 40% improvement on the SPECfp_rate2006 benchmark compared to the previous generation Sun Blade X6275 server module.

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  • Oracle Linux at Oracle Openworld 2011

    - by Zeynep Koch
    In the Oracle Linux track, you'll learn how organizations of all sizes, in all industries, worldwide, are realizing the true benefits of complete and integrated solutions with Oracle Linux and Oracle's world-class Linux support program. Find out what Oracle is doing to simplify the development, deployment, and management of Linux solutions via significant testing initiatives including the Oracle Validated Configurations program. Also discover how Oracle is driving the enterprise Linux technology roadmap with new features and enhancements, making Linux a faster, better operating system for all. Meet Oracle's Linux engineers, experts, customers, and partners, and get answers to all your Linux questions. Here are the Linux sessions and demos that you don't want to miss. · Oracle Linux Strategy and Roadmap · New Features in Oracle Linux · End-to-End Data Integrity Solution for Linux · Debugging and Configuration Best Practices for Oracle Linux · Demos · Hands-on-Labs Register by July 29 and get a $500 discount.http://bit.ly/kSjDMD

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  • The Oracle Linux Advantage

    - by Monica Kumar
    It has been a while since we've summed up the Oracle Linux advantage over other Linux products. Wim Coekaerts' new blog entries prompted me to write this article. Here are some highlights. Best enterprise Linux - Since launching UEK almost 18 months ago, Oracle Linux has leap-frogged the competition in terms of the latest innovations, better performance, reliability, and scalability. Complete enterprise Linux solution: Not only do we offer an enterprise Linux OS but it comes with management and HA tools that are integrated and included for free. In addition, we offer the entire "apps to disk" solution for Linux if a customer wants a single source. Comprehensive testing with enterprise workloads: Within Oracle, 1000s of servers run incredible amount of QA on Oracle Linux amounting to100,000 hours everyday. This helps in making Oracle Linux even better for running enterprise workloads. Free binaries and errata: Oracle Linux is free to download including patches and updates. Highest quality enterprise support: Available 24/7 in 145 countries, Oracle has been offering affordable Linux support since 2006. The support team is a large group of dedicated professionals globally that are trained to support serious mission critical environments; not only do they know their products, they also understand the inter-dependencies with database, apps, storage, etc. Best practices to accelerate database and apps deployment: With pre-installed, pre-configured Oracle VM Templates, we offer virtual machine images of Oracle's enterprise software so you can easily deploy them on Oracle Linux. In addition, Oracle Validated Configurations offer documented tips for configuring Linux systems to run Oracle database. We take the guesswork out and help you get to market faster. More information on all of the above is available on the Oracle Linux Home Page. Wim Coekaerts did a great job of detailing these advantages in two recent blog posts he published last week. Blog article: Oracle Linux components http://bit.ly/JufeCD Blog article: More Oracle Linux options: http://bit.ly/LhY0fU These are must reads!

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