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  • Microsoft Tech-Ed North America 2010 - SQL Server Upgrade, 2000 - 2005 - 2008: Notes and Best Practi

    - by ssqa.net
    It is just a week to go for Tech-Ed North America 2010 in New Orleans, this time also I'm speaking at this conference on the subject - SQL Server Upgrade, 2000 - 2005 - 2008: Notes and Best Practices from the Field... more from here .. It is a coincedence that this is the 2nd time the same talk has been selected in Tech-Ed North America for the topic I have presented in SQLBits before....(read more)

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  • What are best practices when switching between projects/coming back to projects frequently?

    - by dj444
    The nature of my job is that I have to switch back and forth between projects every few weeks. I find that one of the biggest impediments to my productivity is the ramp-up time to getting all the relevant pieces of code "back in my head" again after not seeing it for a period. This happens to a smaller and larger extent for briefer breaks / longer breaks. Obviously, good design, documentation, commenting, and physical structure all help with this (not to mention switching between projects as infrequently as possible). But I'm wondering if there are practices/tools that I may be missing out on. What are your specific practices for improving on this?

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  • Steps to Mitigate Database Security Worst Practices

    - by Troy Kitch
    The recent Top 6 Database Security Worst Practices webcast revealed the Top 6, and a bonus 7th , database security worst practices: Privileged user "all access pass" Allow application bypass Minimal and inconsistent monitoring/auditing Not securing application data from OS-level user No SQL injection defense Sensitive data in non-production environments Not securing complete database environment These practices are uncovered in the 2010 IOUG Data Security Survey. As part of the webcast we looked at each one of these practices and how you can mitigate them with the Oracle Defense-in-Depth approach to database security. There's a lot of additional information to glean from the webcast, so I encourage you to check it out here and see how your organization measures up.

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  • Best practices that you disagree with

    - by SnOrfus
    'Best practices' is a bit of a fuzzy term. Recently I've gone through another wave of self-improvement in my coding practices (mostly brought on by reading Clean Code) and I find that some of the things I disagree with. I'd hate to take things at face value and not think about them critically, but I wonder whether or not my thinking is wrong. So I wonder, what are some best practies or practices that you've seen that many of your peers seem to agree with that you disagree with? For the time being, I'm speaking strictly of coding practices.

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  • Activation Error while testing Exception Handling Application Block

    - by CletusLoomis
    I'm getting the following error while testing my EHAB implementation: {"Activation error occured while trying to get instance of type ExceptionPolicyImpl, key "LogPolicy""} System.Exception Stack Trace: StackTrace " at Microsoft.Practices.ServiceLocation.ServiceLocatorImplBase.GetInstance(Type serviceType, String key) in c:\Home\Chris\Projects\CommonServiceLocator\main\Microsoft.Practices.ServiceLocation\ServiceLocatorImplBase.cs:line 53 at Microsoft.Practices.ServiceLocation.ServiceLocatorImplBase.GetInstance[TService](String key) in c:\Home\Chris\Projects\CommonServiceLocator\main\Microsoft.Practices.ServiceLocation\ServiceLocatorImplBase.cs:line 103 at Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.ExceptionPolicy.GetExceptionPolicy(Exception exception, String policyName) in e:\Builds\EntLib\Latest\Source\Blocks\ExceptionHandling\Src\ExceptionHandling\ExceptionPolicy.cs:line 131 at Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.ExceptionPolicy.HandleException(Exception exceptionToHandle, String policyName) in e:\Builds\EntLib\Latest\Source\Blocks\ExceptionHandling\Src\ExceptionHandling\ExceptionPolicy.cs:line 55 at Blackbox.Exception.ExceptionMain.LogException(Exception pException) in C:_Work_Black Box\Blackbox.Exception\ExceptionMain.vb:line 14 at BlackBox.Business.BusinessMain.TestExceptionHandling() in C:_Work_Black Box\BlackBox.Business\BusinessMain.vb:line 16 at Blackbox.Service.Service1.TestExceptionHandling() in C:_Work_Black Box\Blackbox.Service\Service.svc.vb:line 43" String Inner Exception: InnerException {"Resolution of the dependency failed, type = "Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.ExceptionPolicyImpl", name = "LogPolicy". Exception occurred while: Calling constructor Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.TraceListeners.FormattedEventLogTraceListener(System.String source, System.String log, System.String machineName, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.Formatters.ILogFormatter formatter). Exception is: ArgumentException - Event log names must consist of printable characters and cannot contain \, *, ?, or spaces At the time of the exception, the container was: Resolving Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.ExceptionPolicyImpl,LogPolicy Resolving parameter "policyEntries" of constructor Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.ExceptionPolicyImpl(System.String policyName, System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable1[[Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.ExceptionPolicyEntry, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling, Version=5.0.414.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35]] policyEntries) Resolving Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.ExceptionPolicyEntry,LogPolicy.All Exceptions Resolving parameter "handlers" of constructor Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.ExceptionPolicyEntry(System.Type exceptionType, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.PostHandlingAction postHandlingAction, System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable1[[Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.IExceptionHandler, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling, Version=5.0.414.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35]] handlers, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.Instrumentation.IExceptionHandlingInstrumentationProvider instrumentationProvider) Resolving Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.Logging.LoggingExceptionHandler,LogPolicy.All Exceptions.Logging Exception Handler (mapped from Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.IExceptionHandler, LogPolicy.All Exceptions.Logging Exception Handler) Resolving parameter "writer" of constructor Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.Logging.LoggingExceptionHandler(System.String logCategory, System.Int32 eventId, System.Diagnostics.TraceEventType severity, System.String title, System.Int32 priority, System.Type formatterType, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.LogWriter writer) Resolving Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.LogWriterImpl,LogWriter.default (mapped from Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.LogWriter, (none)) Resolving parameter "structureHolder" of constructor Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.LogWriterImpl(Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.LogWriterStructureHolder structureHolder, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.Instrumentation.ILoggingInstrumentationProvider instrumentationProvider, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.ILoggingUpdateCoordinator updateCoordinator) Resolving Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.LogWriterStructureHolder,LogWriterStructureHolder.default (mapped from Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.LogWriterStructureHolder, (none)) Resolving parameter "traceSources" of constructor Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.LogWriterStructureHolder(System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable1[[Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.Filters.ILogFilter, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging, Version=5.0.414.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35]] filters, System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable1[[System.String, mscorlib, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089]] traceSourceNames, System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable1[[Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.LogSource, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging, Version=5.0.414.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35]] traceSources, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.LogSource allEventsTraceSource, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.LogSource notProcessedTraceSource, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.LogSource errorsTraceSource, System.String defaultCategory, System.Boolean tracingEnabled, System.Boolean logWarningsWhenNoCategoriesMatch, System.Boolean revertImpersonation) Resolving Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.LogSource,General Resolving parameter "traceListeners" of constructor Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.LogSource(System.String name, System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable1[[System.Diagnostics.TraceListener, System, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089]] traceListeners, System.Diagnostics.SourceLevels level, System.Boolean autoFlush, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.Instrumentation.ILoggingInstrumentationProvider instrumentationProvider) Resolving Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.TraceListeners.ReconfigurableTraceListenerWrapper,Event Log Listener (mapped from System.Diagnostics.TraceListener, Event Log Listener) Resolving parameter "wrappedTraceListener" of constructor Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.TraceListeners.ReconfigurableTraceListenerWrapper(System.Diagnostics.TraceListener wrappedTraceListener, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.ILoggingUpdateCoordinator coordinator) Resolving Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.TraceListeners.FormattedEventLogTraceListener,Event Log Listener?implementation (mapped from System.Diagnostics.TraceListener, Event Log Listener?implementation) Calling constructor Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.TraceListeners.FormattedEventLogTraceListener(System.String source, System.String log, System.String machineName, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.Formatters.ILogFormatter formatter) "} System.Exception My web.config is as follows: <?xml version="1.0"?> <configuration> <configSections> <section name="loggingConfiguration" type="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.Configuration.LoggingSettings, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging, Version=5.0.414.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35" requirePermission="true" /> <section name="exceptionHandling" type="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.Configuration.ExceptionHandlingSettings, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling, Version=5.0.414.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35" requirePermission="true" /> </configSections> <loggingConfiguration name="" tracingEnabled="true" defaultCategory="General"> <listeners> <add name="Event Log Listener" type="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.TraceListeners.FormattedEventLogTraceListener, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging, Version=5.0.414.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35" listenerDataType="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.Configuration.FormattedEventLogTraceListenerData, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging, Version=5.0.414.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35" source="Enterprise Library Logging" formatter="Text Formatter" log="C:\Blackbox.log" machineName="." traceOutputOptions="LogicalOperationStack, DateTime, Timestamp, Callstack" /> </listeners> <formatters> <add type="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging.Formatters.TextFormatter, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Logging, Version=5.0.414.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35" template="Timestamp: {timestamp}{newline}&#xA;Message: {message}{newline}&#xA;Category: {category}{newline}&#xA;Priority: {priority}{newline}&#xA;EventId: {eventid}{newline}&#xA;Severity: {severity}{newline}&#xA;Title:{title}{newline}&#xA;Machine: {localMachine}{newline}&#xA;App Domain: {localAppDomain}{newline}&#xA;ProcessId: {localProcessId}{newline}&#xA;Process Name: {localProcessName}{newline}&#xA;Thread Name: {threadName}{newline}&#xA;Win32 ThreadId:{win32ThreadId}{newline}&#xA;Extended Properties: {dictionary({key} - {value}{newline})}" name="Text Formatter" /> </formatters> <categorySources> <add switchValue="All" name="General"> <listeners> <add name="Event Log Listener" /> </listeners> </add> </categorySources> <specialSources> <allEvents switchValue="All" name="All Events" /> <notProcessed switchValue="All" name="Unprocessed Category" /> <errors switchValue="All" name="Logging Errors &amp; Warnings"> <listeners> <add name="Event Log Listener" /> </listeners> </errors> </specialSources> </loggingConfiguration> <exceptionHandling> <exceptionPolicies> <add name="LogPolicy"> <exceptionTypes> <add name="All Exceptions" type="System.Exception, mscorlib, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089" postHandlingAction="NotifyRethrow"> <exceptionHandlers> <add name="Logging Exception Handler" type="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.Logging.LoggingExceptionHandler, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.Logging, Version=5.0.414.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35" logCategory="General" eventId="100" severity="Error" title="Enterprise Library Exception Handling" formatterType="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.TextExceptionFormatter, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling" priority="0" /> </exceptionHandlers> </add> </exceptionTypes> </add> <add name="WcfExceptionShielding"> <exceptionTypes> <add name="InvalidOperationException" type="System.InvalidOperationException, mscorlib, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089" postHandlingAction="ThrowNewException"> <exceptionHandlers> <add type="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.WCF.FaultContractExceptionHandler, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.ExceptionHandling.WCF, Version=5.0.414.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35" exceptionMessageResourceType="" exceptionMessageResourceName="This is the message" exceptionMessage="This is the exception" faultContractType="Blackbox.Service.WCFFault, Blackbox.Service, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null" name="Fault Contract Exception Handler"> <mappings> <add source="{Guid}" name="Id" /> <add source="{Message}" name="MessageText" /> </mappings> </add> </exceptionHandlers> </add> </exceptionTypes> </add> </exceptionPolicies> </exceptionHandling> <connectionStrings> <add name="CompassEntities" connectionString="metadata=~\bin\CompassModel.csdl|~\bin\CompassModel.ssdl|~\bin\CompassModel.msl;provider=Devart.Data.Oracle;provider connection string=&quot;User Id=foo;Password=foo;Server=foo64mo;Home=OraClient11g_home1;Persist Security Info=True&quot;" providerName="System.Data.EntityClient" /> <add name="BlackboxEntities" connectionString="metadata=~\bin\BlackboxModel.csdl|~\bin\BlackboxModel.ssdl|~\bin\BlackboxModel.msl;provider=System.Data.SqlClient;provider connection string=&quot;Data Source=sqldev1\cps;Initial Catalog=FundServ;Integrated Security=True;MultipleActiveResultSets=True&quot;" providerName="System.Data.EntityClient" /> </connectionStrings> <system.web> <compilation debug="true" strict="false" explicit="true" targetFramework="4.0" /> </system.web> <system.serviceModel> <behaviors> <serviceBehaviors> <behavior> <!-- To avoid disclosing metadata information, set the value below to false and remove the metadata endpoint above before deployment --> <serviceMetadata httpGetEnabled="true"/> <!-- To receive exception details in faults for debugging purposes, set the value below to true. Set to false before deployment to avoid disclosing exception information --> <serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="false"/> </behavior> </serviceBehaviors> </behaviors> <serviceHostingEnvironment multipleSiteBindingsEnabled="true" /> </system.serviceModel> <system.webServer> <modules runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests="true"/> </system.webServer> </configuration> My code is as follows: Public Shared Function LogException(ByVal pException As System.Exception) As Boolean Return ExceptionPolicy.HandleException(pException, "LogPolicy") End Function Any assistance is appreciated.

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  • Best Practices vs Reality

    - by RonHill
    On a scale depicting how closely best practices are followed, with "always" on one end and "never" on the other, my current company falls uncomfortably close to the latter. Just a couple trivial examples: We have no code review process There is very little documentation despite a very large code base (and some of it is blatantly incorrect/misleading) Untested/buggy/uncompilable code is frequently checked in to source control It is comically complicated to create a debuggable build for some of our components because of its underlying architecture. Unhandled exceptions are not uncommon in our releases Empty Catch{ } blocks are everywhere. Now, with the understanding that it's neither practical nor realistic to follow ALL best practices ALL the time, my question is this: How closely have commonly accepted best practices been followed at the companies you've worked for? I'm kind of a noob--this is only the second company I've worked for--so I'm not sure if I'm just more of an anal retentive coder or if I've just ended up at mediocre companies. My guess (hope?) is the latter, but a coworker with way more experience than me says every company he's ever worked for is like this. Given the obvious benefits of following most best practices most of the time, I find it hard to believe it's like this everywhere. Am I wrong?

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  • Batch Best Practices and Technical Best Practices Updated

    - by ACShorten
    The Batch Best Practices for Oracle Utilities Application Framework based products (Doc Id: 836362.1) and Technical Best Practices for Oracle Utilities Application Framework Based Products (Doc Id: 560367.1) have been updated with updated and new advice for the various versions of the Oracle Utilities Application Framework based products. These documents cover the following products: Oracle Utilities Customer Care And Billing (V2 and above) Oracle Utilities Meter Data Management (V2 and above) Oracle Utilities Mobile Workforce Management (V2 and above) Oracle Utilities Smart Grid Gateway (V2 and above) – All editions Oracle Enterprise Taxation Management (all versions) Oracle Enterprise Taxation and Policy Management (all versions) Whilst there is new advice, some of which has been posted on this blog, a lot of sections have been updated for advice based upon feedback from customers, partners, consultants, our development teams and our hard working Support personnel. All whitepapers are available from My Oracle Support.

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  • SQLAuthority News – Best Practices for Data Warehousing with SQL Server 2008 R2

    - by pinaldave
    An integral part of any BI system is the data warehouse—a central repository of data that is regularly refreshed from the source systems. The new data is transferred at regular intervals  by extract, transform, and load (ETL) processes. This whitepaper talks about what are best practices for Data Warehousing. This whitepaper discusses ETL, Analysis, Reporting as well relational database. The main focus of this whitepaper is on mainly ‘architecture’ and ‘performance’. Download Best Practices for Data Warehousing with SQL Server 2008 R2 Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Best Practices, Data Warehousing, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Documentation, SQL Download, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • Best/Bad practices for code sharing?

    - by sunpech
    The more I explore Github, the more I like it. I really enjoy how coding is becoming more social. I'm curious as to if there are any bad practices that programmers should avoid in sharing their code with each other. And in naming bad practices, what are the best practices for code sharing? For example: Is it a bad practice for a single repo to have multiple scripts/projects named 'MiscProjects'? Where this repo, as the name suggest, is a collection of miscellaneous small scripts and projects. This may resemble how a programmer organizes projects on his/her local storage, but it's possibly not optimal for code sharing? Maybe if a good README/documentation is done, it would be better? Or as long as it's well documented, anything goes?

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  • Your thoughts on Best Practices for Scientific Computing?

    - by John Smith
    A recent paper by Wilson et al (2014) pointed out 24 Best Practices for scientific programming. It's worth to have a look. I would like to hear opinions about these points from experienced programmers in scientific data analysis. Do you think these advices are helpful and practical? Or are they good only in an ideal world? Wilson G, Aruliah DA, Brown CT, Chue Hong NP, Davis M, Guy RT, Haddock SHD, Huff KD, Mitchell IM, Plumbley MD, Waugh B, White EP, Wilson P (2014) Best Practices for Scientific Computing. PLoS Biol 12:e1001745. http://www.plosbiology.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pbio.1001745 Box 1. Summary of Best Practices Write programs for people, not computers. (a) A program should not require its readers to hold more than a handful of facts in memory at once. (b) Make names consistent, distinctive, and meaningful. (c) Make code style and formatting consistent. Let the computer do the work. (a) Make the computer repeat tasks. (b) Save recent commands in a file for re-use. (c) Use a build tool to automate workflows. Make incremental changes. (a) Work in small steps with frequent feedback and course correction. (b) Use a version control system. (c) Put everything that has been created manually in version control. Don’t repeat yourself (or others). (a) Every piece of data must have a single authoritative representation in the system. (b) Modularize code rather than copying and pasting. (c) Re-use code instead of rewriting it. Plan for mistakes. (a) Add assertions to programs to check their operation. (b) Use an off-the-shelf unit testing library. (c) Turn bugs into test cases. (d) Use a symbolic debugger. Optimize software only after it works correctly. (a) Use a profiler to identify bottlenecks. (b) Write code in the highest-level language possible. Document design and purpose, not mechanics. (a) Document interfaces and reasons, not implementations. (b) Refactor code in preference to explaining how it works. (c) Embed the documentation for a piece of software in that software. Collaborate. (a) Use pre-merge code reviews. (b) Use pair programming when bringing someone new up to speed and when tackling particularly tricky problems. (c) Use an issue tracking tool. I'm relatively new to serious programming for scientific data analysis. When I tried to write code for pilot analyses of some of my data last year, I encountered tremendous amount of bugs both in my code and data. Bugs and errors had been around me all the time, but this time it was somewhat overwhelming. I managed to crunch the numbers at last, but I thought I couldn't put up with this mess any longer. Some actions must be taken. Without a sophisticated guide like the article above, I started to adopt "defensive style" of programming since then. A book titled "The Art of Readable Code" helped me a lot. I deployed meticulous input validations or assertions for every function, renamed a lot of variables and functions for better readability, and extracted many subroutines as reusable functions. Recently, I introduced Git and SourceTree for version control. At the moment, because my co-workers are much more reluctant about these issues, the collaboration practices (8a,b,c) have not been introduced. Actually, as the authors admitted, because all of these practices take some amount of time and effort to introduce, it may be generally hard to persuade your reluctant collaborators to comply them. I think I'm asking your opinions because I still suffer from many bugs despite all my effort on many of these practices. Bug fix may be, or should be, faster than before, but I couldn't really measure the improvement. Moreover, much of my time has been invested on defence, meaning that I haven't actually done much data analysis (offence) these days. Where is the point I should stop at in terms of productivity? I've already deployed: 1a,b,c, 2a, 3a,b,c, 4b,c, 5a,d, 6a,b, 7a,7b I'm about to have a go at: 5b,c Not yet: 2b,c, 4a, 7c, 8a,b,c (I could not really see the advantage of using GNU make (2c) for my purpose. Could anyone tell me how it helps my work with MATLAB?)

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  • What are the maven-2 best practices

    - by c0mrade
    Hello everyone, Maven is very impressive tool, I've used it for few weeks now and almost every day I learn something new about maven. What do you think are the best practices? I found this relevant on the google http://www.sonatype.com/people/2009/01/maven-continuous-integration-best-practices/ , others are not relevant at all, and maven apache documentation is not good organized so its hard to pick up on things if you don't know what you are looking for. Any suggestions ?

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  • What popular "best practices" are not always best, and why?

    - by SnOrfus
    "Best practices" are everywhere in our industry. A Google search on "coding best practices" turns up nearly 1.5 million results. The idea seems to bring comfort to many; just follow the instructions, and everything will turn out fine. When I read about a best practice - for example, I just read through several in Clean Code recently - I get nervous. Does this mean that I should always use this practice? Are there conditions attached? Are there situations where it might not be a good practice? How can I know for sure until I've learned more about the problem? Several of the practices mentioned in Clean Code did not sit right with me, but I'm honestly not sure if that's because they're potentially bad, or if that's just my personal bias talking. I do know that many prominent people in the tech industry seem to think that there are no best practices, so at least my nagging doubts place me in good company. The number of best practices I've read about are simply too numerous to list here or ask individual questions about, so I would like to phrase this as a general question: Which coding practices that are popularly labeled as "best practices" can be sub-optimal or even harmful under certain circumstances? What are those circumstances and why do they make the practice a poor one? I would prefer to hear about specific examples and experiences.

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  • Best Practices around Oracle VM with RAC: RAC SIG webcast - Thursday, March 18th -

    - by adam.hawley
    The RAC SIG will be hosting an interesting webcast this Thursday, March 18th at 9am pacific time (5pm GMT) on: Best Practices around Oracle VM with RAC The adaptation of virtualization technology has risen tremendously and continues to grow due to the rapid change and growth rate of IT infrastructures. With this in mind, this seminar focuses on configuration best practices, examining how Oracle RAC scales & performs in a virtualized environment, and evaluating Oracle VM Server's ease of use. Roger Lopez from Dell IT will be presenting. This Week's Webcast Connection Info: ==================================== Webcast URL (use Internet Explorer): https://ouweb.webex.com/ouweb/k2/j.php?ED=134103137&UID=1106345812&RT=MiM0 Voice can either be heard via the webconference or via the following dial in: Participant Dial-In 877-671-0452 International Dial-In 706-634-9644 International Dial-In No Link http://www.intercall.com/national/oracleuniversity/gdnam.html Intercall Password 86336

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  • Best Practices for Building a Virtualized SPARC Computing Environment

    - by Scott Elvington
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Oracle just published Best Practices for Building a Virtualized SPARC Computing Environment, a white paper that provides guidance on the complete hardware and software stack for deploying and managing your physical and virtual SPARC infrastructure. The solution is based on Oracle SPARC T4 servers, Oracle Solaris 11 with Oracle VM for SPARC 2.2, Sun ZFS storage appliances, Sun 10GbE 72 port switches and Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center 12c. The paper emphasizes the value and importance of planning the resources (compute, network and storage) that will comprise the virtualized environment to achieve the desired capacity, performance and availability characteristics. The document also details numerous operational best practices that will help you deliver on those characteristics with unique capabilities provided by Enterprise Manager Ops Center including policy-based guest placement, pool resource balancing and automated guest recovery in the event of server failure. Plenty of references to supplementary documentation are included to help point you to additional resources. Whether you’re building the first stages of your private cloud or a general-purpose virtualized SPARC computing environment, these documented best practices will help ensure success. Please join Phil Bullinger and Steve Wilson from Oracle to learn more about breakthrough efficiency in private cloud infrastructure and how SPARC based virtualization can help you get started on your cloud journey. Stay Connected: Twitter |  Face book |  You Tube |  Linked in |  Newsletter

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  • SQLAuthority News – Pluralsight Course Review – Practices for Software Startups – Part 1 of 2

    - by pinaldave
    This is first part of the two part series of Practices for Software Startup Pluralsight Course. The course is written by Stephen Forte (Blog | Twitter). Stephen Forte is the Chief Strategy Officer of the venture backed company, Telerik, a leading vendor of developer and team productivity tools. Stephen is also a Certified Scrum Master, Certified Scrum Professional, PMP, and also speaks regularly at industry conferences around the world. He has written several books on application and database development.  Stephen is also a board member of the Scrum Alliance. Startups – Everybodies Dream Start-up companies are an important topic right now – everyone wants to start their own business.  It is also important to remember that all companies were a start up at one point – from your corner store to the giants like Microsoft and Apple.  Research proves that not every start-up succeeds, in fact, most will fail before their first year.  There are many reasons for this, and this could be due to the fact that there are many stages to a start-up company, and stumbling at any of these stages can lead to failure.  It is important to understand what makes a start-up company succeed at all its hurdles to become successful.  It is even important to define success.  For most start-ups this would mean becoming their own independently functioning company or to be bought out for a hefty profit by a larger company.  The idea of making a hefty profit by living your dream is extremely important, and you can even think of start-ups as the new craze.  That’s why studying them is so important – they are very popular, but things have changed a lot since their inception. Starting the Startups Beginning a start-up company used to be difficult, but now facilities and information is widely available, and it is much easier.  But that means it is much easier to fail, also.  Previously to start your own company, everything was planned and organized, resources were ensured and backed up before beginning; even the idea of starting your own business was a big thing.  Now anybody can do it, and the steps are simple and outlines everywhere – you can get online software and easily outsource , cloud source, or crowdsource a lot of your material.  But without the type of planning previously required, things can often go badly. New Products – New Ideas – New World There are so many fantastic new products, but they don’t reach success all the time.  I find start-up companies very interesting, and whenever I meet someone who is interested in the subject or already starting their own company, I always ask what they are doing, their plans, goals, market, etc.  I am sorry to say that in most cases, they cannot answer my questions.  It is true that many fantastic ideas fail because of bad decisions.  These bad decisions were not made intentionally, but people were simply unaware of what they should be doing.  This will always lead to failure.  But I am happy to say that all these issues can be gone because Pluralsight is now offering a course all about start-ups by Stephen Forte.  Stephen is a start up leader.  He has successfully started many companies and most are still going strong, or have gone on to even bigger and better things. Beginning Course on Startup I have always thought start-ups are a fascinating subject, and decided to take his course, but it is three hours long.  This would be hard to fit into my busy work day all at once, so I decided to do half of his course before my daughter wakes up, and the other half after she goes to sleep.  The course is divided into six modules, so this would be easy to do.  I began the first chapter early in the morning, at 5 am.  Stephen jumped right into the middle of the subject in the very first module – designing your business plan.  The first question you will have to answer to yourself, to others, and to investors is: What is your product and when will we be able to see it?  So a very important concept is a “minimal viable product.”  This means setting goals for yourself and your product.  We all have large dreams, but your minimal viable product doesn’t have to be your final vision at the very first.  For example: Apple is a giant company, but it is still evolving.  Steve Jobs didn’t envision the iPhone 6 at the very beginning.  He had to start at the first iPhone and do his market research, and the idea evolved into the technology you see now.  So for yourself, you should decide a beginning and stop point.  Do your market research.  Determine who you want to reach, what audience you want for your product.  You can have a great idea that simply will not work in the market, do need, bottlenecks, lack of resources, or competition.  There is a lot of research that needs to be done before you even write a business plan, and Stephen covers it in the very first chapter. The Team – Unique Key to Success After jumping right into the subject in the very first module, I wondered what Stephen could have in store for me for the rest of the course.  Chapter number two is building a team.  Having a team is important regardless of what your startup is.  You can be a true visionary with endless ideas and energy, but one person can still not do everything.  It is important to decide from the very beginning if you will have cofounders, team leaders, and how many employees you’ll need.  Even more important, you’ll need to decide what kind of team you want – what personalities, skills, and type of energy you want each of your employees to bring.  Do you want to have an A+ team with a B- idea, or do you have a B- idea that needs an A+ team to sell it?  Stephen asks all the hard questions!  I was especially impressed by his insight on developing.  You have to decide if you need developers, how many, and what their skills should be. I found this insight extremely useful for everyday usage, not just for start-up companies.  I would apply this kind of information in management at any position.  An amazing team will build an amazing product – and that doesn’t matter if you’re a start-up company or a small team working for a much larger business. Customer Development – The Ultimate Obective Chapter three was about customer development. According to Stephen, there are four different steps to develop a customer base.  The first question to ask yourself is if you are envisioning a large customer base buying a few products each, or a small, dedicated base that buys a lot of your product – quantity vs. Quality.  He also discusses how to earn, retain, and get more customers.  He also says that each customer should be placed in a different role – some will be like investors, who regularly spend with you and invest their money in your business.  It is then your job to take that investment and turn it into a better product in the future.  You need to deal with their money properly – think of it is as theirs as investors, not yours as profit.  At the end of this module I felt that only Stephen could provide this kind of insight, and then he listed all the resources he took his information from.  I have never seen a group of people so passionate about their customers. It was indeed a long day for me. In tomorrow’s part 2 we will discuss rest of the three module and also will see a quick video of the Practices for Software Startup Pluralsight Course. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Best Practices, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQLAuthority News – Pluralsight Course Review – Practices for Software Startups – Part 2 of 2

    - by pinaldave
    This is the second part of the two part series of Practices for Software Startup Pluralsight Course. Please read the first part of this series over here. The course is written by Stephen Forte (Blog | Twitter). Stephen Forte is the Chief Strategy Officer of the venture backed company, Telerik. Personal Learning Schedule After these three sessions it was 6:30 am and time to do my own blog.  But for the rest of the day, I kept thinking about the course, and wanted to go back and finish.  I was wishing that I had woken up at 3 am so I could finish all at one go.  All day long I was digesting what I had learned.  At 10 pm, after my daughter had gone to bed, I sighed on again.  I was not disappointed by the long wait.  As I mentioned before, Stephen has started four to six companies, and all of them are very successful today. Here is the video I promised yesterday – it discusses the importance of Right Sizing Your Startup. The Heartbeat of Startup – Technology Stephen has combined all technology knowledge into one 30 minute session.  He discussed  how to start your project, how to deal with opinions, and how to deal with multiple ideas – every start up has multiple directions it can go. He spent a lot of time emphasized deciding which direction to go and how to decide which will be the best for you.  He called it a continuous development cycle. One of the biggest hazards for a start-up company is one person deciding the direction the company will go, until down the road another team member announces that there is a glitch in their part of the work and that everyone will have to start over.  Even though a team of two or five people can move quickly, often the decision has gone too long and cannot be easily fixed.   Stephen used an example from his own life:  he was biased for one type of technology, and his teammate for another.  In the end they opted for his teammate’s  choice , and in the end it was a good decision, even though he was unfamiliar with that particular program.  He argues that technology should not be a barrier to progress, that you cannot rely on your experience only.  This really spoke to me because I am a big fan of SQL, but I know there is more out there, and I should be more open to it.  I give my thanks to Stephen, I learned something in this module besides startups. Money, Success and Epic Win! The longest, but most interesting, the module was funding your start-up.  You need to fund the start-up right at the very beginning, if not done right you will run into trouble.  The good news is that a few years ago start-ups required a lot more money – think millions of dollars – but now start-ups can get off the ground for thousands.  Stephen used an example of a company that years ago would have needed a million dollars, but today could be started for $600.  It is true that things have changed, but you still need money.  For $600 you can start small and add dynamically, as needed.  But the truth is that if you have $600, $6000, or $6 million, it will be spent.  Don’t think of it as trying to save money, think of it as investing in your future.   You will need money, and you will need to (quickly) decide what you do with the money: shares, stakeholders, investing in a team, hiring a CEO.  This is so important because once you have money and start the company, the company IS your money.  It is your biggest currency – having a percentage of ownership in the company.  Investors will want percentages as repayment for their investment, and they will want a say in the business as well.  You will have to decide how far you will dilute your shares, and how the company will be divided, if at all.  If you don’t plan in advance, you will find that after gaining three or four investors, suddenly you are the minority owner in your own dream.  You need to understand funding carefully.  This single module is worth all the money you would have spent on the whole course alone.  I encourage everyone to listen to this single module even if they don’t watch any of the others.     Press End to Start the Game – Exists! The final module is exit strategies.  You did all this work, dealt with all political and legal issues.  What are you going to get out of it? The answer is simple: money.  Maybe you want your company to be bought out, for you talent to bring you a profit.  You can sell the company to someone and still head it.  Many options are available.  You could sell and still work as an employee but no longer own the company.  There are many exit strategies.  This is where all your hard work comes into play.  It is important not to feel fooled at any step.  There are so many good ideas that end up in the garbage because of poor planning, so that if you find yourself successful, you don’t want to blow it at this step!  The exit is important.  I thought that this aspect of the course was completely unique, and I loved Stephen’s point of view.  I was lost deep in thought after this module ended.  I actually took two hours worth of notes on this section alone – and it was only a three hour course.  I am planning on attending this course one more time next week, just to catch up on all the small bits of wisdom I’m sure I missed. Thank you Stephen for bringing your real world experience with us!  I recommend that everyone attends this course, even if they don’t want to begin their own start-up company. It was indeed a long day for me. Do not forget to read part 1 of this story and attend course Practices for Software Startup Pluralsight Course. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Best Practices, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • About best practices of JMS integration using TIBCO .Net client

    - by Waheed Sayed
    I'm working on an integration project where I'm talking to JMS framework using TIBCO .Net client. A colleague is recommdending a design decision based on a fear of receiving too many messages suddenly in a way that our application can't handle it. We are using Asynchronous mode while receiving messages. I'm new to that topic so I couldn't find quick best practices to support his clam or mine. Any suggestions? How can I test this subject?

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  • EBS + 11g Database Upgrade Best Practices Whitepaper Available

    - by Steven Chan
    I returned from OAUG/Collaborate with a cold and multiple overlapping development crises.  Fun.  Now that those are (mostly) out of the way, it's time to get back to clearing out my article backlog.  Premier Support for the 10gR2 database ends in July 2010.  If you haven't already started planning your 11g database upgrade, we recommend that you start soon.  We have certified both the 11gR1 (11.1.0.7) and 11gR2 (11.2.0.1) databases with Oracle E-Business Suite; see this blog's Certification summary to links to articles with the details.Our Applications Performance Group has reminded me that they have a whitepaper loaded with practical tips intended to make your 11g database upgrade easier.  No vacuous marketing rhetoric here -- this is strictly written for DBAs.  A must-read if you haven't already upgraded to either 11gR1 or 11gR2, and highly recommended even if you have.  You can download this whitepaper here:Upgrade to 11g Performance Best Practices (PDF, 184K)

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  • Sensitive Data Storage - Best Practices

    - by Kenneth
    I recently started working on a personal project where I was connecting to a database using Java. This got me thinking. I have to provide the login information for a database account on the DB server in order to access the database. But if I hard code it in then it would be possible for someone to decompile the program and extract that login info. If I store it in an external setup file then the same problem exists only it would be even easier for them to get it. I could encrypt the data before storing it in either place but it seems like that's not really a fail safe either and I'm no encryption expert by any means. So what are some best practices for storing sensitive setup data for a program?

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  • Best practices to work on several programming projects simultaneously

    - by Mahbubur R Aaman
    Most of the time I have to work on several projects simultaneously. I want to provide my best output at every project. What practices would be the best for me work on each project with better output? EDIT: It is better to follow http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000022.html But every companies does not follow JOEL methodologies. In this situation, what should i do? EDIT: I am a lead programmer. I have to lead several projects. Need to solve several programming problems of programmers. In this situation, what should i do?

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  • Constructor parameter validation in C# - Best practices

    - by MPelletier
    What is the best practice for constructor parameter validation? Suppose a simple bit of C#: public class MyClass { public MyClass(string text) { if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(text)) throw new ArgumentException("Text cannot be empty"); // continue with normal construction } } Would it be acceptable to throw an exception? The alternative I encountered was pre-validation, before instantiating: public class CallingClass { public MyClass MakeMyClass(string text) { if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(text)) { MessageBox.Show("Text cannot be empty"); return null; } else { return new MyClass(text); } } }

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  • Oracle Communications Data Model

    - by jean-pierre.dijcks
    I've mentioned OCDM in previous posts but found the following (see end of the post) podcast on the topic and figured it is worthwhile to spread the news some more. ORetailDM and OCommunicationsDM are the two data models currently available from Oracle. Both are intended to capture: Business best practices and industry knowledge Pre-built advanced analytics intended to predict future events before they happen (like the Churn model shown below) Oracle technology best practices to ensure optimal performance of the model All of this typically comes with a reduced time to implementation, or as the marketing slogan goes, reduced time to value. Here are the links: Podcast on OCDM OTN pages for OCDM and ORDM

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  • Best Practices for Renaming, Refactoring, and Breaking Changes with Teams

    - by David in Dakota
    What are some Best Practices for refactoring and renaming in team environments? I bring this up with a few scenarios in mind: If a library that is commonly referenced is refactored to introduce a breaking change to any library or project that references it. E.g. arbitrarily changing the name of a method. If projects are renamed and solutions must be rebuilt with updated references to them. If project structure is changed to be "more organized" by introducing folders and moving existing projects or solutions to new locations. Some additional thoughts/questions: Should changes like this matter or is resulting pain an indication of structure gone awry? Who should take responsibility for fixing errors related to a breaking change? If a developer makes a breaking change should they be responsible for going into affected projects and updating them or should they alert other developers and prompt them to change things? Is this something that can be done on a scheduled basis or is it something that should be done as frequently as possible? If a refactoring is put off for too long it is increasingly difficult to reconcile but at the same time in a day spending 1 hour increments fixing a build because of changes happening elsewhere. Is this a matter of a formal communication process or can it be organic?

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  • On improving commit practices

    - by greengit
    I was thinking about ways to improving my commit practices. Is there any co-relation between no. of source code lines and no. of commits? In a recent project that I was involved in, I was going at 30 commits per 1000 lines. One typical file from the project has these stats language: JavaScript total commits that include this file: 32 total lines: 1408 source lines: 1140 comment lines: 98 no. of function declarations: 28 other declarations: 8 Another file has these... Language: Python total commits that include this file: 17 total lines: 933 source lines: 730 comment lines: 80 classes: 1 methods: 10 I also think that no. of commits is more related to no. of features or no. of changes to the code and less to the no. of lines. The general git community motto is make short commits and commit often. So, do you really think about you commit strategy before you start the project. For that matter, is there anything like commit strategy? If so, what's yours?

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