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  • Setup Reverse DNS with Cpanel and WHM?

    - by m3d
    I needed to set-up a reverse DNS via cpanel. I followed the steps in this tutorial but it didn't work: http://docs.cpanel.net/twiki/bin/view/11_30/WHMDocs/RdnsForBind. I use my own name servers registered with go-daddy. But I am with VPS hosting company. I did use a new serial number and exactly as the tutorial however didnt seems to be working When I check this via windows nslookup {ip-address} I still get the my hosting company name, when reversed.

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  • DNS servers not set properly? Site failing to load by hostname, though loads fine by IP

    - by Crashalot
    We run www.tekiki.com. Some users, including us, cannot reach www.tekiki.com because of DNS issues. The site resolves fine on the desktop, but it fails from our iPhones and iPads. This doesn't happen to everyone. We noticed the problem yesterday, then set our DNS servers to Cloudflare's DNS servers, hoping that would fix things. Accessing the site by IP addr loads the site fine. Two questions: 1) Does anyone know what the solution is? 2) Should we use other DNS servers besides Cloudflare?

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  • Updating Windows DNS records from a remote windows DNS server

    - by Luckyboy
    Does anyone know if it is possible for a windows 2003 DNS server to update the records for a domain so that it contains all the records of a domain of of a remotely based DNS server? Im almost certain that doesn't quite explain the problem so I shall illustrate with an example: We have two offices, both are based about 100 miles apart. One deals with IT (Intranet development etc.) while the other is a call centre that uses the Intranet systems. Currently each office has its own DNS server, with the IT office's and call centre's DNS servers containing entries for intranet site. The difference is that the IT DNS server records point to the various servers that host the Intranet sites (e.g. intranetsite1 - 192.168.1.10, intranetsite2 - 192.168.1.11) while all of the entries in the call centre's DNS point to the IT office's DNS server (intranetsite1 - [it office ip address], intranetsite2 - [it office ip address]). Is there any way that the call centre's DNS server could automatically add all DNS records hosted by the IT office's DNS, translating the IP addresses to the IP address of the IT office?

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  • DNS slow after losing DNS Server

    - by Tim
    We have set up a small Windows Server 2008 R2 network with a domain controller which is also acting as the DNS server for the network (we opted to install DNS when setting up the domain). This network isn't connected to the Internet in any way, so all machines have been configured to use the IP address of the domain controller as their primary DNS and no secondary DNS server has been configured. If we shut down or unplug the network cable from the domain controller, DNS lookups become quite slow and the performance of the network suffers. For example, running a ping command using a hostname takes around 5-6 seconds to resolve the name. I presume this is because it is looking for the DNS, then falling back to some other method of resolving the names as the DNS server is now gone. All the machines have static IP addresses so we are considering just putting all entries in the HOSTS file of each machine. However, it would be nice to have a centralised DNS in case we one day change the IP of one of the machines. Is there a better way to speed this up?

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  • Using local DNS and public DNS during site development

    - by ChrisFM
    I'm a web designer and I often develop new sites for existing businesses. Sometimes I find it useful to point my DNS address (for my personal computer) to the development servers local DNS (instead of Googles 8.8.8.8 or the default isp's address). I like this as it let's me see that the new site's internal links, etc, operate before switching over the authorative DNS from the old site. However outgoing links (Like a Google map) would not route with my local dns. The first thing I thought was, oh I just need to fill out my DNS directory with Google and every other domain I might need to link to, wait... that sounds insane. I was wondering if anyone could give me insight into a better way or more functional way to get use local DNS addresses when they're available and public supplied DNS address when they are not? Kinda like a DNS to 'roll-over'? Or maybe a completely different approach to development all together. Thanks in advance for your insight. All the best!

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  • DNS Server address configured inside Router not working

    - by Charandeep Singh
    Well, I have an ISP router in which I have configured DNS Servers to use (Primary & Secondary) like Google DNS. It works just fine. But now I have setup a computer with DNS server (Simple DNS Plus). I got it working by settings my internal DNS Server IP Address in computer. i.e. 192.168.1.3 So, instead of settings my internal DNS IP Address in every computer in my network, I want to setup DNS Server into my router. So on every DHCP request, computer get DNS Server to use. So I configured it like this: Primary DNS: 192.168.1.3 Secondry DNS: (left blank) After applying and DNS Requests stop resolving. But strange part is DNS request does goes to DNS Server but maybe not returned back, because all DNS request were available in cache logs. I don't know why this is not working, let me know if you have any solution or wordaround for this. Thanks! Update 1: NSLOOKUP Result C:\Users\user>nslookup google.com DNS request timed out. timeout was 2 seconds. Server: UnKnown Address: 192.168.1.1 DNS request timed out. timeout was 2 seconds. DNS request timed out. timeout was 2 seconds. DNS request timed out. timeout was 2 seconds. DNS request timed out. timeout was 2 seconds. *** Request to UnKnown timed-out

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  • Dynamic DNS updates for Linux and Mac OS X machines with a Windows DNS server

    - by DanielGibbs
    My network has a Windows machine running Server 2008 R2 which provides DHCP and DNS. I'm not particularly familiar with Windows domains, but the domain is set to home.local and that is the DNS domain name provided with DHCP leases. Everything works fine for Windows machines, they get the lease and update the server with their hostname and the server creates a DNS records for windowshostname.home.local. I am having problems obtaining the same functionality on Linux (Debian) and Mac OS X (Mountain Lion) machines. They receive DHCP just fine, but DNS entries are not being created on the server for them. On the Mac OS X machine, hostname gives an output of machostname.local, and on the Linux machine hostname --fqdn also gives an output of linuxhostname.local. I'm assuming that the server is not creating DNS entries because the domain does not match that of the server (home.local). I don't want to statically configure these machines to be part of the home.local domain, I just want them to pick it up from DHCP and be able to have entries in the DNS server. How should I go about doing this?

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  • Best criteria for choosing a DNS provider : Redundancy, Locations, Cost, IPV6, Reliability

    - by antoinet
    What criteria should I use to choose a good DNS provider? Redundancy - Your DNS service should use at least 4 nameservers. You should also check for the use of anycast servers such as Amazon Route 53 and dyn.com services. Worldwide server location - Servers shall be located worldwide, not just in one country! Ipv6 support - It shall be possible to declare an AAAA entry to your server if it supports IPV6 Cost is of course an issue. Some service are free, Amazon Route 53 seems quite cheap. Reliability : SLA is also important, it demonstrate that reliability is measured. Your dns provider shall then state for a refund in case a failure is encountered. Anything else? For reference, a couple of links for more information: http://serverfault.com/questions/216330/why-should-i-use-amazon-route-53-over-my-registrars-dns-servers http://aws.amazon.com/route53/ http://dyn.com/dns/

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  • How ISP or dns server find the nameserevr [on hold]

    - by IT researcher
    I saw some articles about how DNS propagation happens.I know that ISP or DNS server(such as google public dns) cache the ip address of website which it uses to convert domain name to ip address. But my doubt is from where these ISP or dns serevr know which nameserver to go for particular domain name. for example a domain.com has two name servers ns1.domain.com and ns2.domain.com. But how the ISP server or dns server know that it uses these name server and i have to send request to this name server.So where does this record mainatined?

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  • Strange DNS issue with internal Windows DNS

    - by Brady
    I've encountered a strange issue with our internal Windows DNS infrastructure. We have a website hosted on Amazon EC2 with the DNS running on Amazon Route 53. In the publicly facing DNS we have the wildcard record setup as an A record Alias pointing to an AWS Elastic Load Balancer sitting in front of our EC2 instances. For those who are not aware, the A record Alias behaves like a CNAME record, however no extra lookup is required on the client side (See http://docs.amazonwebservices.com/Route53/latest/DeveloperGuide/CreatingAliasRRSets.html for more information). We have a secondary domain that has the www subdomain as a CNAME pointing to a subdomain on the primary domain, which resolves against the wildcard entry. For example the subdomain www.secondary.com is a CNAME to sub1.primary.com, but there is no explicit entry for sub1.primary.com, so it resolves to wildcard record. This setup work without issue publicly. The issue comes in our internal DNS at our corporate office where we use the same primary domain for some internal only facing sites. In this setup we have two Active Directory DNS servers with one Server 2003 and one Server 2008 R2 instance. The zone is an AD integrated zone, but it is not the AD domain. In the internal DNS we have the wildcard record pointing to a third external domain, that is also hosted on Route 53 with an A record Alias pointing to the same ELB instance. For example, *.primary.com is a CNAME to tertiary.com, so in effect you have www.secondary.com as a CNAME to *.primary.com, which is a CNAME to tertiary.com. In this setup, attempting to resolve www.secondary.com will fail. Clearing the cache on the Server 2003 instance will allow it to resolve once, but subsequent attempts will fail. It fails even with a clean cache against the 2008 R2 server. It seems that only Windows clients are affected. A Mac running OSX Mountain Lion does not experience this issue. I'm even able to replicate the issue using nslookup. Against the 2003 server, with a freshly cleaned cache, I recieve the appropriate response from www.secondary.com: Non-authoritative answer: Name: subdomain.primary.com Address: x.x.x.x (Public IP) Aliases: www.secondary.com Subsequent checks simply return: Non-authoritative answer: Name: www.secondary.com If you set the type to CNAME you get the appropriate responses all the time. www.secondary.com gives you: Non-authoritative answer: www.secondary.com canonical name = subdomain.primary.com And subdomain.primary.com gives you: subdomain.primary.com canonical name = tertiary.com And setting type back to A gives you the appropriate response for tertiary.com: Non-authoritative answer: Name: tertiary.com Address: x.x.x.x (Public IP) Against the 2008 R2 server things are a little different. Even with a clean cache, www.secondary.com returns just: Non-authoritative answer: Name: www.secondary.com The CNAME records are returned appropriately. www.secondary.com returns: Non-authoritative answer: www.secondary.com canonical name = subdomain.primary.com And subdomain.primary.com gives you: subdomain.primary.com canonical name = tertiary.com tertiary.com internet address = x.x.x.x (Public IP) tertiary.com AAAA IPv6 address = x::x (Public IPv6) And setting type back to A gives you the appropriate response for tertiary.com: Non-authoritative answer: Name: tertiary.com Address: x.x.x.x (Public IP) Requests directly against subdomain.primary.com work correctly.

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  • BIND9 / DNS Zone / Dedicated Server / Unique Reverse DNS

    - by user2832131
    I locate a dedicated server in a datacenter with no DNS Zone setup. Datacenter panel have 1 textfield only you can fill one Reverse DNS only. According with datacenter instructions here... [instructions]: http://www.wiki.hetzner.de/index.php/DNS-Reverse-DNS/en#How_can_I_assign_several_names_to_my_IP_address.2C_if_different_domains_are_hosted_on_my_server.3F How_can_I_assign_several_names_to_my_IP_address ...I need to install BIND9 in order to configure other records like CNAME and MX. Ok, I've installed BIND9, created a Master Zone. And following this example, I put it in the Zone File: [example]: http://wiki.hetzner.de/index.php/DNS_Zonendatei/en example $ttl 86400 @ IN SOA ns1.first-ns.de. postmaster.robot.first-ns.de. ( 1383411730 14400 1800 604800 86400 ) @ IN NS ns1.first-ns.de. @ IN NS robotns2.second-ns.de. @ IN NS robotns3.second-ns.com. localhost IN A 127.0.0.1 @ IN A 144.86.786.651 www IN A 144.86.786.651 loopback IN CNAME localhost But when I point my domain to ns1.first-ns.de, DNS Register says "time out". Am I missing something? I created a Master zone. Should it be a Slave zone? named.conf: include "/etc/bind/named.conf.options"; include "/etc/bind/named.conf.local"; include "/etc/bind/named.conf.default-zones"; named.conf.options: options { directory "/var/cache/bind"; dnssec-validation auto; auth-nxdomain no; # conform to RFC1035 listen-on-v6 { any; }; }; named.conf.local: zone "mydomain.com" { type master; file "/var/lib/bind/mydomain.com.hosts"; allow-update {any;}; allow-transfer {any;}; allow-query {any;}; }; named.conf.default-zones: zone "." { type hint; file "/etc/bind/db.root"; }; zone "localhost" { type master; file "/etc/bind/db.local"; }; zone "127.in-addr.arpa" { type master; file "/etc/bind/db.127"; }; zone "0.in-addr.arpa" { type master; file "/etc/bind/db.0"; }; zone "255.in-addr.arpa" { type master; file "/etc/bind/db.255"; }; Problem is that I'm moving my site, and can't update the new NS server due to a 'timeout' message when filling new datacenter NS. I'm filling: MASTER: ns1.first-ns.de SLAVE1: robotns2.second-ns.de SLAVE2: robotns3.second-ns.com

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  • Creating a DNS Server

    - by c.adhityaa
    OK, I am a complete newbie to all this, so please bear with me. I want to create a DNS Server (like Google does - 8.8.8.8). I understand that a DNS Server is a Server that gives a IP on being given a hostname, ie. when I ask it what is the IP of google.com, it says "64.233.160.0". So, what I want to do is create a similar one that holds records of what translates to what. I thought of this since it looks to be similar to a webserver - ask for a page and it gives back the page. That is, when my machine has the IP xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx and people chose xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx as their Primary DNS Server, then when they ask "www.google.com", I sould be able to tell "64.233.160.0". So, how do I create this DNS Server that is accessible to everyone in the world ? It would be easier if we have something like EasyPHP which is the analogue to a webserver here. I am sorry if I have caused any trauma because this might seem rubbish to experts ;) Adhityaa

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  • Master/Slave DNS setup vs. rsync'ed DNS servers

    - by Jakobud
    We currently have primary and secondary DNS servers on our corporate network. They are setup in a master/slave type setup, where the slave gets its DNS information from the master. I'm trying to figure out what the real advantage is for the master/slave setup instead of just setting up an automated rsync between the two to keep the DNS settings matched. Can anyone shed some light on this? Or is it just a preferential thing? If that is the case, it seems like the rsync setup would be much easier to setup, maintain and understand.

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  • OS X Server DNS management

    - by Sorin Buturugeanu
    I have an OS X 10.6 Server running, which has PHP, Apache, MySQL, and DNS running on it. I want to take the DNS management out of the Server Admin App. I know that the DNS configuration files (the ones BIND uses) are plain text files (which have to obey some rules, obviously). The main reason for this is because I wanted to setup DKIM for one of my domains, and I had to add a TXT record to the subdomain pm._domainkey.example.com. Server Admin did not let me add that subdomain, because of the "invalid" underscore character. I searched for web based DNS management tools (the ones that I would install on my server and would allow me to manage my DNS records), but I couldn't find any good ones. (There were a couple that I managed to install, but they didn't see the configuration that I already had setup in Server Admin). Now I'm looking into editing the config files directly, but I don't know where they're located. This is a test / development server, so messing it up wouldn't be such a disaster. I know "I shouldn't do this", but I want to :). Thanks for your help.

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  • Creating a DNS Server

    - by c.adhityaa
    OK, I am a complete newbie to all this, so please bear with me. I want to create a DNS Server (like Google does - 8.8.8.8). I understand that a DNS Server is a Server that gives a IP on being given a hostname, ie. when I ask it what is the IP of google.com, it says "64.233.160.0". So, what I want to do is create a similar one that holds records of what translates to what. I thought of this since it looks to be similar to a webserver - ask for a page and it gives back the page. That is, when my machine has the IP xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx and people chose xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx as their Primary DNS Server, then when they ask "www.google.com", I sould be able to tell "64.233.160.0". So, how do I create this DNS Server that is accessible to everyone in the world ? It would be easier if we have something like EasyPHP which is the analogue to a webserver here. I am sorry if I have caused any trauma because this might seem rubbish to experts ;) Adhityaa

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  • Cheapest service to host a DNS server?

    - by mmdave
    Apologies for sounding dumb. I'm still trying to figure my way around. I specifically need to setup a public DNS server and would like to know which would be the cheapest datacenter with the minimum configuration of a server to make it work... i'm not looking to create an openDNS like service which handles millions of queries, but what is the minimum i'll need if i wanted to do that ?? Thanks!

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  • How to setup PTR (Reverse DNS) at Godaddy DNS manager

    - by PokemonCraft
    My hosting provider already did PTR setup. Now i have to setup it at my DNS holder i guess. What am i supposed to do at my Godaddy account. thank you. my ip : 64.250.113.235 and you can check my ptr record from here http://mxkit.com/webmaster-tools/ptr-check result Ptr records for 64.250.113.235 are: Server: 10.0.80.11 Address: 10.0.80.11#53 Non-authoritative answer: 235.113.250.64.in-addr.arpa name = notification.pokemoncraft.com.

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  • HostGator hosting account and DNS servers

    - by fxuser
    I have a hosting package on HostGator on domain example.com I also got a VPS server from Digital Ocean and have setup the DNS Details on the server there (A Record pointing on DO server IP with @ as hostname) and have also setup the DNS Servers on my domain DNS Settings which is hosted on HostGator. All seem okay right now... It's been 3-4 hours I think till I made these changes and when I point to example.com I still get on the active hosting package files instead of the server files. Do I need to cancel the hosting package first before I can make this work? EDIT: If I'm in the wrong site please move it to the correct one.

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  • DNS propogation question with name server change

    - by Brian
    The registrar I have is networksolutions.com, and for quite a while, the name servers were pointing to Site5.com, where hosting is for one of my domains. I wanted to bring DNS control back to networksolutions, so I pointed the name servers back to networksolutions and added in all my A records. However, I noticed that the site soon became unreachable. I'm curious as to why this happened? If the domain was pointing to either the old name servers or the new ones, it would still have the proper A records and whatnot. Is this because when I changed name servers, a request was made to delete them completely, and then the DNS servers worldwide have to wait for network solutions to send out the new ones or something? I was hoping this would be a switch with zero downtime, such as a normal A record change.

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  • Assigning a home DNS to be secondary only?

    - by Sanarothe
    Hi. I have a small domain lab set up at home, including DNS/DHCP on the Win2008 server. I'd like to be able to refer to my domain clients by name, but I find that I get a slowdown when using an internal DNS. Win DNS refers to my ISP's upstream dns (I also tried Google's DNS servers for a little while) but it feels like there's an extra couple seconds for each request when I'm using anything except the DNS servers fetched via DHCP from my ISP. I tried adding my local DNS to my router's DHCP (Need to use router to fetch DHCP info from ISP, even though none of it ever changes, since I'm behind NAT) So, my question is: Is there any way to set my internal DNS server to be secondary to a dynamically retrieved upstream DNS? I want the internal server to be queried only if the ISP dns fails, or to be queried only for a certain TLD (.iv right now. I guess for best practices I should change it to .internal)

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  • Transfer DNS zones from master to slave (MS DNS to BIND9)

    - by Bryan
    Hello, I have a problem with DNS servers. My master dns server runs on Microsoft DNS server and now I want to start slave DNS server on Linux Bind9. The problems is that master MS DNS server can't validate slave DNS server (bind9) and can't resolve FQDN. Maybe, I missed something... firewall, dns configuration and network looks like ok. And the second question is: How I can make full transfer of dns zones to slave dns server? from MS DNS to BIND9 Thanks in advance. Regards, Bryan

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  • Domain registration and DNS, what am I actually paying for? [on hold]

    - by jozxyqk
    Long story short I'm quite confused as to exactly what is offered by domain registration and dns service sites. When I go to the url "http://google.com", my PC connects to a name server and gets the IP for "google.com", then connects to the IP and says, give me the page for "http://google.com". AFAIK there are many name servers and they all cache these bits of information in some hierarchical network, but ultimately a DNS record must come from a single source (not sure what this is called). There are different kinds of records, that might not an IP but an alias/redirect to other records for example. Lets say I want my own domain name for some server. Maybe it even has a static IP but I want a nicer thing for people to remember, or my ISP assigns dynamic IPs and I want a URL that always works, or my website is hosted on a shared machine so the browser needs to send "http://mydnsname.com" to the webserver to distinguish it from other requests to the same IP but for different sites. Registering a domain costs a small amount of money per year. Where does this money go, not that I'm complaining :P? Is that really all it costs to maintain the entire DNS system of nameservers? If I just register the domain and nothing else, what do I get? Is that just reserving a name or hosting WHOIS information or have I paid for a dns recrord to be hosted? Can a domain alone have a record, such as an IP or be an alias to another? A bunch of sites out there offer other services, in addition to domain registration (I'm assuming they register the domain through another party for me). One example is "dynamic DNS" (DDNS), but isn't this just a regular DNS record that's updated regularly? Does it cost extra to update more often? Without a DDNS, can a DNS record still point to an IP? I've also seen the term "managed DNS" and have no idea where that fits in.

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  • My new DNS change works from America but not Sweden

    - by Dougie
    Several hours ago i changed nameserver and DNS info on one of my domains at my domainregistar. When i access the domain from my home computers and when my friends access the domain they get to the old ip-adress hosting the dead site(We all live in Sweden). But when i access the website from my mobile phone or through google.com/translate or North American proxies the website is shown like it should. Why is this?, does it take time for change to take effect for diffrent locations/countries? I find it very strange and would like to start using my site now. Do you think it will change or could i've been doing something wrong?

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  • What is a "Public DNS registered IP address"?

    - by Emma
    I've been reading this ICANN agreement on new TLDs and it has this section on DNS service availability, which i don't completely understand: Refers to the ability of the group of listed-as-authoritative name servers of a particular domain name (e.g., a TLD), to answer DNS queries from DNS probes. For the service to be considered available at a particular moment, at least, two of the delegated name servers registered in the DNS must have successful results from “DNS tests” to each of their public-DNS registered “IP addresses” to which the name server resolves. If 51% or more of the DNS testing probes see the service as unavailable during a given time, the DNS service will be considered unavailable. I'm not 100% sure of the part in bold: does "public" refer to the DNS or to the IP addesses? It looks like there's a mistake and that the hyphen should have been after "DNS". So basically does it mean "the public IP addresses registered in the DNS"?

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  • Avoiding DNS timeouts when a dns server fails

    - by user65124
    Hi there. We have a small datacenter with about a hundred hosts pointing to 3 internal dns servers (bind 9). Our problem comes when one of the internal dns servers becomes unavailable. At that point all the clients that point to that server start performing very slowly. The problem seems to be that the stock linux resolver doesn't really have the concept of "failing over" to a different dns server. You can adjust the timeout and number of retries it uses, (and set rotate so it will work through the list), but no matter what settings one uses our services perform much more slowly if a primary dns server becomes unavailable. At the moment this is one of the largest sources of service disruptions for us. My ideal answer would be something like "RTFM: tweak /etc/resolv.conf like this...", but if that's an option I haven't seen it. I was wondering how other folks handled this issue? I can see 3 possible types of solutions: Use linux-ha/Pacemaker and failover ips (so the dns IP VIPs are "always" available). Alas, we don't have a good fencing infrastructure, and without fencing pacemaker doesn't work very well (in my experience Pacemaker lowers availability without fencing). Run a local dns server on each node, and have resolv.conf point to localhost. This would work, but it would give us a lot more services to monitor and manage. Run a local cache on each node. Folks seem to consider nscd "broken", but dnrd seems to have the right feature set: it marks dns servers as up or down, and won't use 'down' dns servers. Any-casting seems to work only at the ip routing level, and depends on route updates for server failure. Multi-casting seemed like it would be a perfect answer, but bind does not support broadcasting or multi-casting, and the docs I could find seem to suggest that multicast dns is more aimed at service discovery and auto-configuration rather than regular dns resolving. Am I missing an obvious solution?

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