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  • Consume WCF Service InProcess using Agatha and WCF

    - by REA_ANDREW
    I have been looking into this lately for a specific reason.  Some integration tests I want to write I want to control the types of instances which are used inside the service layer but I want that control from the test class instance.  One of the problems with just referencing the service is that a lot of the time this will by default be done inside a different process.  I am using StructureMap as my DI of choice and one of the tools which I am using inline with RhinoMocks is StructureMap.AutoMocking.  With StructureMap the main entry point is the ObjectFactory.  This will be process specific so if I decide that the I want a certain instance of a type to be used inside the ServiceLayer I cannot configure the ObjectFactory from my test class as that will only apply to the process which it belongs to. This is were I started thinking about two things: Running a WCF in process Being able to share mocked instances across processes A colleague in work pointed me to a project which is for the latter but I thought that it would be a better solution if I could run the WCF Service in process.  One of the projects which I use when I think about WCF Services is AGATHA, and the one which I have to used to try and get my head around doing this. Another asset I have is a book called Programming WCF Services by Juval Lowy and if you have not heard of it or read it I would definately recommend it.  One of the many topics that is inside this book is the type of configuration you need to communicate with a service in the same process, and it turns out to be quite simple from a config point of view. <system.serviceModel> <services> <service name="Agatha.ServiceLayer.WCF.WcfRequestProcessor"> <endpoint address ="net.pipe://localhost/MyPipe" binding="netNamedPipeBinding" contract="Agatha.Common.WCF.IWcfRequestProcessor"/> </service> </services> <client> <endpoint name="MyEndpoint" address="net.pipe://localhost/MyPipe" binding="netNamedPipeBinding" contract="Agatha.Common.WCF.IWcfRequestProcessor"/> </client> </system.serviceModel>   You can see here that I am referencing the Agatha object and contract here, but also that my binding and the address is something called Named Pipes.  THis is sort of the “Magic” which makes it happen in the same process. Next I need to open the service prior to calling the methods on a proxy which I also need.  My initial attempt at the proxy did not use any Agatha specific coding and one of the pains I found was that you obviously need to give your proxy the known types which the serializer can be aware of.  So we need to add to the known types of the proxy programmatically.  I came across the following blog post which showed me how easy it was http://bloggingabout.net/blogs/vagif/archive/2009/05/18/how-to-programmatically-define-known-types-in-wcf.aspx. First Pass So with this in mind, and inside a console app this was my first pass at consuming a service in process.  First here is the proxy which I made making use of the Agatha IWcfRequestProcessor contract. public class InProcProxy : ClientBase<Agatha.Common.WCF.IWcfRequestProcessor>, Agatha.Common.WCF.IWcfRequestProcessor { public InProcProxy() { } public InProcProxy(string configurationName) : base(configurationName) { } public Agatha.Common.Response[] Process(params Agatha.Common.Request[] requests) { return Channel.Process(requests); } public void ProcessOneWayRequests(params Agatha.Common.OneWayRequest[] requests) { Channel.ProcessOneWayRequests(requests); } } So with the proxy in place I could then use this after opening the service so here is the code which I use inside the console app make the request. static void Main(string[] args) { ComponentRegistration.Register(); ServiceHost serviceHost = new ServiceHost(typeof(Agatha.ServiceLayer.WCF.WcfRequestProcessor)); serviceHost.Open(); Console.WriteLine("Service is running...."); using (var proxy = new InProcProxy()) { foreach (var operation in proxy.Endpoint.Contract.Operations) { foreach (var t in KnownTypeProvider.GetKnownTypes(null)) { operation.KnownTypes.Add(t); } } var request = new GetProductsRequest(); var responses = proxy.Process(new[] { request }); var response = (GetProductsResponse)responses[0]; Console.WriteLine("{0} Products have been retrieved", response.Products.Count); } serviceHost.Close(); Console.WriteLine("Finished"); Console.ReadLine(); } So what I used here is the KnownTypeProvider of Agatha to easily get all the types I need for the service/proxy and add them to the proxy.  My Request handler for this was just a test one which always returned 2 products. public class GetProductsHandler : RequestHandler<GetProductsRequest,GetProductsResponse> { public override Agatha.Common.Response Handle(GetProductsRequest request) { return new GetProductsResponse { Products = new List<ProductDto> { new ProductDto{}, new ProductDto{} } }; } } Second Pass Now after I did this I started reading up some more on some resources including more by Davy Brion and others on Agatha.  Now it turns out that the work I did above to create a derived class of the ClientBase implementing Agatha.Common.WCF.IWcfRequestProcessor was not necessary due to a nice class which is present inside the Agatha code base, RequestProcessorProxy which takes care of this for you! :-) So disregarding that class I made for the proxy and changing my code to use it I am now left with the following: static void Main(string[] args) { ComponentRegistration.Register(); ServiceHost serviceHost = new ServiceHost(typeof(Agatha.ServiceLayer.WCF.WcfRequestProcessor)); serviceHost.Open(); Console.WriteLine("Service is running...."); using (var proxy = new RequestProcessorProxy()) { var request = new GetProductsRequest(); var responses = proxy.Process(new[] { request }); var response = (GetProductsResponse)responses[0]; Console.WriteLine("{0} Products have been retrieved", response.Products.Count); } serviceHost.Close(); Console.WriteLine("Finished"); Console.ReadLine(); }   Cheers for now, Andy References Agatha WCF InProcess Without WCF StructureMap.AutoMocking Cross Process Mocking Agatha Programming WCF Services by Juval Lowy

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  • How fast are my services? Comparing basicHttpBinding and ws2007HttpBinding using the SO-Aware Test Workbench

    - by gsusx
    When working on real world WCF solutions, we become pretty aware of the performance implications of the binding and behavior configuration of WCF services. However, whether it’s a known fact the different binding and behavior configurations have direct reflections on the performance of WCF services, developers often struggle to figure out the real performance behavior of the services. We can attribute this to the lack of tools for correctly testing the performance characteristics of WCF services...(read more)

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  • Using multiple distinct TCP security binding configurations in a single WCF IIS-hosted WCF service a

    - by Sandor Drieënhuizen
    I have a set of IIS7-hosted net.tcp WCF services that serve my ASP.NET MVC web application. The web application is accessed over the internet. WCF Services (IIS7) <--> ASP.NET MVC Application <--> Client Browser The services are username authenticated, the account that a client (of my web application) uses to logon ends up as the current principal on the host. I want one of the services to be authenticated differently, because it serves the view model for my logon view. When it's called, the client is obviously not logged on yet. I figure Windows authentication serves best or perhaps just certificate based security (which in fact I should use for the authenticated services as well) if the services are hosted on a machine that is not in the same domain as the web application. That's not the point here though. Using multiple TCP bindings is what's giving me trouble. I tried setting it up like this: <bindings> <netTcpBinding> <binding> <security mode="TransportWithMessageCredential"> <message clientCredentialType="UserName"/> </security> </binding> <binding name="public"> <security mode="Transport"> <message clientCredentialType="Windows"/> </security> </binding> </netTcpBinding> </bindings> The thing is that both bindings don't seem to want live together in my host. When I remove either of them, all's fine but together they produce the following exception on the client: The requested upgrade is not supported by 'net.tcp://localhost:8081/Service2.svc'. This could be due to mismatched bindings (for example security enabled on the client and not on the server). In the server trace log, I find the following exception: Protocol Type application/negotiate was sent to a service that does not support that type of upgrade. Am I looking into the right direction or is there a better way to solve this?

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  • SO-Aware at the Atlanta Connected Systems User Group

    - by gsusx
    Today my colleague Don Demsak will be presenting a session about WCF management, testing and governance using SO-Aware and the SO-Aware Test Workbench at the Connected Systems User Group in Atlanta . Don is a very engaging speaker and has prepared some very cool demos based on lessons of real world WCF solutions. If you are in the ATL area and interested in WCF, AppFabric, BizTalk you should definitely swing by Don’s session . Don’t forget to heckle him a bit (you can blame it for it ;) )...(read more)

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  • Create a WCF REST Client Proxy Programatically (in C#)

    - by Tawani
    I am trying to create a REST Client proxy programatically in C# using the code below but I keep getting a CommunicationException error. Am I missing something? public static class WebProxyFactory { public static T Create<T>(string url) where T : class { ServicePointManager.Expect100Continue = false; WebHttpBinding binding = new WebHttpBinding(); binding.MaxReceivedMessageSize = 1000000; WebChannelFactory<T> factory = new WebChannelFactory<T>(binding, new Uri(url)); T proxy = factory.CreateChannel(); return proxy; } public static T Create<T>(string url, string userName, string password) where T : class { ServicePointManager.Expect100Continue = false; WebHttpBinding binding = new WebHttpBinding(); binding.Security.Mode = WebHttpSecurityMode.TransportCredentialOnly; binding.Security.Transport.ClientCredentialType = HttpClientCredentialType.Basic; binding.UseDefaultWebProxy = false; binding.MaxReceivedMessageSize = 1000000; WebChannelFactory<T> factory = new WebChannelFactory<T>(binding, new Uri(url)); ClientCredentials credentials = factory.Credentials; credentials.UserName.UserName = userName; credentials.UserName.Password = password; T proxy = factory.CreateChannel(); return proxy; } } So that I can use it as follows: IMyRestService proxy = WebProxyFactory.Create<IMyRestService>(url, usr, pwd); var result = proxy.GetSomthing(); // Fails right here

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  • Using WCF DLL with VB6 ?

    - by Steven2ic
    I have a VB6 application that needs to communicate with a VS2008 VB.NET WCF server. I have built a VB.NET WCF DLL to be used on the client side, and it --almost-- works with the VB6 application. When I try to run the VB6 app in debug mode, I get "Could not find endpoint element with name 'NetTCPBinding_IComPortManager' and contract 'IComPortManager' in the ServiceModel client configuration section." Using a dummy VB.Net client app, with the same WCF DLL works fine. I presume that the VB6 app/WCF DLL is not finding app.config. Where should app.config be ? Is there a way to tell WCF where to find app.config ?

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  • WCF Binding Created In Code

    - by Daniel
    Hello I've a must to create wcf service with parameter. I'm following this http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/wcf/thread/8f18aed8-8e34-48ea-b8be-6c29ac3b4f41 First this is that I don't know how can I set this custom behavior "MyServiceBehavior" in my Web.config in ASP.NET MVC app that will host it. As far as I know behaviors must be declared in section in wcf.config. How can I add reference there to my behavior class from service assembly? An second thing is that I the following example the create local host, but how I can add headers used in constructor when I use service reference and it will already create instance of web service, right? Regards, Daniel Skowronski

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  • Using a service registry that doesn’t suck Part III: Service testing is part of SOA governance

    - by gsusx
    This is the third post of this series intended to highlight some of the principles of modern SOA governance solution. You can read the first two parts here: Using a service registry that doesn’t suck part I: UDDI is dead Using a service registry that doesn’t suck part II: Dear registry, do you have to be a message broker? This time I’ve decided to focus on what of the aspects that drives me ABSOLUTELY INSANE about traditional SOA Governance solutions: service testing or I should I say the lack of...(read more)

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  • Using a service registry that doesn’t suck part II: Dear registry, do you have to be a message broker?

    - by gsusx
    Continuing our series of posts about service registry patterns that suck, we decided to address one of the most common techniques that Service Oriented (SOA) governance tools use to enforce policies. Scenario Service registries and repositories serve typically as a mechanism for storing service policies that model behaviors such as security, trust, reliable messaging, SLAs, etc. This makes perfect sense given that SOA governance registries were conceived as a mechanism to store and manage the policies...(read more)

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  • We are hiring (take a minute to read this, is not another BS talk ;) )

    - by gsusx
    I really wanted to wait until our new website was out to blog about this but I hope you can put up with the ugly website for a few more days J. Tellago keeps growing and, after a quick break at the beginning of the year, we are back in hiring mode J. We are currently expanding our teams in the United States and Argentina and have various positions open in the following categories. .NET developers: If you are an exceptional .NET programmer with a passion for creating great software solutions working...(read more)

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  • Tellago & Tellago Studios at Microsoft TechReady

    - by gsusx
    This week Microsoft is hosting the first edition of their annual TechReady conference. Even though TechReady is an internal conference, Microsoft invited us to present a not one but two sessions about some our recent work. We are particularly proud of the fact that one of those sessions is about our SO-Aware service registry. We see this as a recognition to the growing popularity of SO-Aware as the best Agile SOA governance solution in the Microsoft platform. Well, on Tuesday I had the opportunity...(read more)

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  • Agile SOA Governance: SO-Aware and Visual Studio Integration

    - by gsusx
    One of the major limitations of traditional SOA governance platforms is the lack of integration as part of the development process. Tools like HP-Systinet or SOA Software are designed to operate by models on which the architects dictate the governance procedures and policies and the rest of the team members follow along. Consequently, those procedures are frequently rejected by developers and testers given that they can’t incorporate it as part of their daily activities. Having SOA governance products...(read more)

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  • WCF: Manually configuring Binding and Endpoint causes SerciveChannel Faulted State

    - by Matthias
    Hi there, I've created a ComVisible assembly to be used in a classic-asp application. The assembly should act as a wcf client and connect to a wcf service host (inside a windows service) on the same machine using named pipes. The wcf service host works fine with other clients, so the problem must be within this assembly. In order to get things work I added a service reference to the ComVisible assembly and proxy classes and the corresponding app.config settings were generated for me. Everything fine so far except that the app config would not be recognized when doing an CreateObject with my assembly in the asp code. I went and tried to hardcode (just for testing) the Binding and Endpoint and pass those two to the constructor of my ClientBase derived proxy using this code: private NetNamedPipeBinding clientBinding = null; private EndpointAddress clientAddress = null; clientBinding = new NetNamedPipeBinding(); clientBinding.OpenTimeout = new TimeSpan(0, 1, 0); clientBinding.CloseTimeout = new TimeSpan(0, 0, 10); clientBinding.ReceiveTimeout = new TimeSpan(0, 2, 0); clientBinding.SendTimeout = new TimeSpan(0, 1, 0); clientBinding.TransactionFlow = false; clientBinding.TransferMode = TransferMode.Buffered; clientBinding.TransactionProtocol = TransactionProtocol.OleTransactions; clientBinding.HostNameComparisonMode = HostNameComparisonMode.StrongWildcard; clientBinding.MaxBufferPoolSize = 524288; clientBinding.MaxBufferSize = 65536; clientBinding.MaxConnections = 10; clientBinding.MaxReceivedMessageSize = 65536; clientAddress = new EndpointAddress("net.pipe://MyService/"); MyServiceClient client = new MyServiceClient(clientBinding, clientAddress); client.Open(); // do something with the client client.Close(); But this causes the following error: The communication object, System.ServiceModel.Channels.ServiceChannel, cannot be used for communication because it is in the faulted state. The environment is .Net Framework 3.5 / C#. What am I missing here?

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  • how to enable WCF Session with wsHttpBidning with Transport only Security

    - by Mubashar Ahmad
    Dear Devs I have a WCF Service currently deployed with basicHttpBindings and SSL enabled. But now i need to enable wcf sessions(not asp sessions) so i moved service to wsHttpBidnings but sessions are not enabled I have set [ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode = InstanceContextMode.PerSession)] But when i set SessionMode=SessionMode.Required on service contract it says Contract requires Session, but Binding 'WSHttpBinding' doesn't support it or isn't configured properly to support it. following is the definition of WSHttpBinding <wsHttpBinding> <binding name="wsHttpBinding"> <readerQuotas maxStringContentLength="10240" /> <reliableSession enabled="false" /> <security mode="Transport"> <transport clientCredentialType="None"> <extendedProtectionPolicy policyEnforcement="Never" /> </transport> </security> </binding> </wsHttpBinding> please help me with this

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  • Calling a WCF service from another WCF service

    - by ultraman69
    Hi ! I have a WCF service hosted on a windows service on my Server1. It also has IIS on this machine. I call the service from a web app and it works fine. But within this service, I have to call another WCF sevice (also hosted on a windows service) located on Server2. The security credentials are set to "Message" and "Username". I have an error like "SOAP protcol negociation failed". It's a problem with my server certificate public key that doesn't seem to be recognise. However, if I call the service on the Server2 from Server1 in a console app, it works fine. I followed this tutorial to set up my certificates : http://www.codeproject.com/KB/WCF/wcf_certificates.aspx Here's the config file from my service on Server1 that tries to call the second one : <endpoint address="" binding="wsHttpBinding" contract="Microsoft.ServiceModel.Samples.ITraitement" /> <endpoint address="mex" binding="mexHttpBinding" contract="IMetadataExchange" /> </service> </services> <client> <endpoint address="http://Server2:8000/servicemodelsamples/service" behaviorConfiguration="myClientBehavior" binding="wsHttpBinding" bindingConfiguration="MybindingCon" contract="Microsoft.ServiceModel.Samples.ICalculator" name=""> <identity> <dns value="ODWCertificatServeur" /> </identity> </endpoint> </client> <bindings> <wsHttpBinding> <binding name="MybindingCon"> <security mode="Message"> <message clientCredentialType="UserName" /> </security> </binding> </wsHttpBinding> </bindings> <behaviors> <serviceBehaviors> <behavior name="ServiceTraitementBehavior"> <serviceMetadata httpGetEnabled="True"/> <serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="True" /> </behavior> </serviceBehaviors> <endpointBehaviors> <behavior name="myClientBehavior"> <clientCredentials> <clientCertificate findValue="MachineServiceTraitement" x509FindType="FindBySubjectName" storeLocation="LocalMachine" storeName="My" /> <serviceCertificate> <authentication certificateValidationMode="ChainTrust" revocationMode="NoCheck"/> </serviceCertificate> </clientCredentials> </behavior> </endpointBehaviors> </behaviors> And here's the config file from the web app that calls the service on Server1 : <system.serviceModel> <bindings> <wsHttpBinding> <binding name="WSHttpBinding_ITraitement" closeTimeout="00:01:00" openTimeout="00:01:00" receiveTimeout="00:10:00" sendTimeout="00:01:00" bypassProxyOnLocal="false" transactionFlow="false" hostNameComparisonMode="StrongWildcard" maxBufferPoolSize="524288" maxReceivedMessageSize="65536" messageEncoding="Text" textEncoding="utf-8" useDefaultWebProxy="true" allowCookies="false"> <readerQuotas maxDepth="32" maxStringContentLength="8192" maxArrayLength="16384" maxBytesPerRead="4096" maxNameTableCharCount="16384" /> <reliableSession ordered="true" inactivityTimeout="00:10:00" enabled="false" /> <security mode="Message"> <transport clientCredentialType="Windows" proxyCredentialType="None" realm="" /> <message clientCredentialType="Windows" negotiateServiceCredential="true" algorithmSuite="Default" establishSecurityContext="true" /> </security> </binding> </wsHttpBinding> </bindings> <client> <endpoint address="http://localhost:8020/ServiceTraitementPC" binding="wsHttpBinding" bindingConfiguration="WSHttpBinding_ITraitement" contract="ITraitement" name="WSHttpBinding_ITraitement"> </endpoint> </client> Any idea why it works if if I call it in a console app and not from my service ? Maybe it has something to do with the certificateValidationMode="ChainTrust" ?

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  • Configuring multiple distinct WCF binding configurations causes an exception to be thrown

    - by Sandor Drieënhuizen
    I have a set of IIS7-hosted net.tcp WCF services that serve my ASP.NET MVC web application. The web application is accessed over the internet. WCF Services (IIS7) <--> ASP.NET MVC Application <--> Client Browser The services are username authenticated, the account that a client (of my web application) uses to logon ends up as the current principal on the host. I want one of the services to be authenticated differently, because it serves the view model for my logon view. When it's called, the client is obviously not logged on yet. I figure Windows authentication serves best or perhaps just certificate based security (which in fact I should use for the authenticated services as well) if the services are hosted on a machine that is not in the same domain as the web application. That's not the point here though. Using multiple TCP bindings is what's giving me trouble. I tried setting it up like this: <bindings> <netTcpBinding> <binding> <security mode="TransportWithMessageCredential"> <message clientCredentialType="UserName"/> </security> </binding> <binding name="public"> <security mode="Transport"> <message clientCredentialType="Windows"/> </security> </binding> </netTcpBinding> </bindings> The thing is that both bindings don't seem to want live together in my host. When I remove either of them, all's fine but together they produce the following exception on the client: The requested upgrade is not supported by 'net.tcp://localhost:8081/Service2.svc'. This could be due to mismatched bindings (for example security enabled on the client and not on the server). In the server trace log, I find the following exception: Protocol Type application/negotiate was sent to a service that does not support that type of upgrade. Am I looking into the right direction or is there a better way to solve this?

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  • WCF client endpoint identity - configuration question

    - by Roel
    Hi all, I'm having a strange situation here. I got it working, but I don't understand why. Situation is as follows: There is a WCF service which my application (a website) has to call. The WCF service exposes a netTcpBinding and requires Transport Security (Windows). Client and server are in the same domain, but on different servers. So generating a client results in the following config (mostly defaults) <system.serviceModel> <bindings> <netTcpBinding> <binding name="MyTcpEndpoint" ...> <reliableSession ordered="true" inactivityTimeout="00:10:00" enabled="false" /> <security mode="Transport"> <transport clientCredentialType="Windows" protectionLevel="EncryptAndSign"/> <message clientCredentialType="Windows" /> </security> </binding> </netTcpBinding> </bindings> <client> <endpoint address="net.tcp://localhost:xxxxx/xxxx/xxx/1.0" binding="netTcpBinding" bindingConfiguration="MyTcpEndpoint" contract="Service.IMyService" name="TcpEndpoint"/> </client> </system.serviceModel> When I run the website and make the call to the service, I get the following error: System.ServiceModel.Security.SecurityNegotiationException: Either the target name is incorrect or the server has rejected the client credentials. ---> System.Security.Authentication.InvalidCredentialException: Either the target name is incorrect or the server has rejected the client credentials. ---> System.ComponentModel.Win32Exception: The logon attempt failed --- End of inner exception stack trace --- at System.Net.Security.NegoState.EndProcessAuthentication(IAsyncResult result) at System.Net.Security.NegotiateStream.EndAuthenticateAsClient(IAsyncResult asyncResult) at System.ServiceModel.Channels.WindowsStreamSecurityUpgradeProvider.WindowsStreamSecurityUpgradeInitiator.InitiateUpgradeAsyncResult.OnCompleteAuthenticateAsClient(IAsyncResult result) at System.ServiceModel.Channels.StreamSecurityUpgradeInitiatorAsyncResult.CompleteAuthenticateAsClient(IAsyncResult result) --- End of inner exception stack trace --- Server stack trace: at System.ServiceModel.AsyncResult.End[TAsyncResult](IAsyncResult result) at System.ServiceModel.Channels.ServiceChannel.SendAsyncResult.End(SendAsyncResult result) at System.ServiceModel.Channels.ServiceChannel.EndCall(String action, Object[] outs, IAsyncResult result) .... Now, if I just alter the configuration of the client like so: <endpoint address="net.tcp://localhost:xxxxx/xxxx/xxx/1.0" binding="netTcpBinding" bindingConfiguration="MyTcpEndpoint" contract="Service.IMyService" name="TcpEndpoint"> <identity> <dns /> </identity> </endpoint> everything works and my server happily reports that it got called by the service account which hosts the AppPool for my website. All good. My question now is: why does this work? What does this do? I got to this solution by mere trial-and-error. To me it seems that all the <dns /> tag does is tell the client to use the default DNS for authentication, but doesn't it do that anyway? Thanks for providing me with some insight.

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  • How to configure multiple WCF binding configurations for the same scheme

    - by Sandor Drieënhuizen
    I have a set of IIS7-hosted net.tcp WCF services that serve my ASP.NET MVC web application. The web application is accessed over the internet. WCF Services (IIS7) <--> ASP.NET MVC Application <--> Client Browser The services are username authenticated, the account that a client (of my web application) uses to logon ends up as the current principal on the host. I want one of the services to be authenticated differently, because it serves the view model for my logon view. When it's called, the client is obviously not logged on yet. I figure Windows authentication serves best or perhaps just certificate based security (which in fact I should use for the authenticated services as well) if the services are hosted on a machine that is not in the same domain as the web application. That's not the point here though. Using multiple TCP bindings is what's giving me trouble. I tried setting it up like this in my client configuration: <bindings> <netTcpBinding> <binding> <security mode="TransportWithMessageCredential"> <message clientCredentialType="UserName"/> </security> </binding> <binding name="public"> <security mode="Transport"> <message clientCredentialType="Windows"/> </security> </binding> </netTcpBinding> </bindings> <client> <endpoint contract="Server.IService1" binding="netTcpBinding" address="net.tcp://localhost:8081/Service1.svc"/> <endpoint contract="Server.IService2" binding="netTcpBinding" address="net.tcp://localhost:8081/Service2.svc"/> </client> The server configuration is this: <bindings> <netTcpBinding> <binding portSharingEnabled="true"> <security mode="TransportWithMessageCredential"> <message clientCredentialType="UserName"/> </security> </binding> <binding name="public"> <security mode="Transport"> <message clientCredentialType="Windows"/> </security> </binding> </netTcpBinding> </bindings> <services> <service name="Service1"> <endpoint contract="Server.IService1, Library" binding="netTcpBinding" address=""/> </service> <service name="Service2"> <endpoint contract="Server.IService2, Library" binding="netTcpBinding" address=""/> </service> </services> <serviceHostingEnvironment> <serviceActivations> <add relativeAddress="Service1.svc" service="Server.Service1"/> <add relativeAddress="Service2.svc" service="Server.Service2"/> </serviceActivations> </serviceHostingEnvironment> The thing is that both bindings don't seem to want live together in my host. When I remove either of them, all's fine but together they produce the following exception on the client: The requested upgrade is not supported by 'net.tcp://localhost:8081/Service2.svc'. This could be due to mismatched bindings (for example security enabled on the client and not on the server). In the server trace log, I find the following exception: Protocol Type application/negotiate was sent to a service that does not support that type of upgrade. Am I looking into the right direction or is there a better way to solve this?

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  • Configuring multiple WCF binding configurations for the same scheme doesn't work

    - by Sandor Drieënhuizen
    I have a set of IIS7-hosted net.tcp WCF services that serve my ASP.NET MVC web application. The web application is accessed over the internet. WCF Services (IIS7) <--> ASP.NET MVC Application <--> Client Browser The services are username authenticated, the account that a client (of my web application) uses to logon ends up as the current principal on the host. I want one of the services to be authenticated differently, because it serves the view model for my logon view. When it's called, the client is obviously not logged on yet. I figure Windows authentication serves best or perhaps just certificate based security (which in fact I should use for the authenticated services as well) if the services are hosted on a machine that is not in the same domain as the web application. That's not the point here though. Using multiple TCP bindings is what's giving me trouble. I tried setting it up like this in my client configuration: <bindings> <netTcpBinding> <binding> <security mode="TransportWithMessageCredential"> <message clientCredentialType="UserName"/> </security> </binding> <binding name="public"> <security mode="Transport"> <message clientCredentialType="Windows"/> </security> </binding> </netTcpBinding> </bindings> <client> <endpoint contract="Server.IService1" binding="netTcpBinding" address="net.tcp://localhost:8081/Service1.svc"/> <endpoint contract="Server.IService2" binding="netTcpBinding" bindingConfiguration="public" address="net.tcp://localhost:8081/Service2.svc"/> </client> The server configuration is this: <bindings> <netTcpBinding> <binding portSharingEnabled="true"> <security mode="TransportWithMessageCredential"> <message clientCredentialType="UserName"/> </security> </binding> <binding name="public"> <security mode="Transport"> <message clientCredentialType="Windows"/> </security> </binding> </netTcpBinding> </bindings> <services> <service name="Service1"> <endpoint contract="Server.IService1, Library" binding="netTcpBinding" address=""/> </service> <service name="Service2"> <endpoint contract="Server.IService2, Library" binding="netTcpBinding" bindingConfiguration="public" address=""/> </service> </services> <serviceHostingEnvironment> <serviceActivations> <add relativeAddress="Service1.svc" service="Server.Service1"/> <add relativeAddress="Service2.svc" service="Server.Service2"/> </serviceActivations> </serviceHostingEnvironment> The thing is that both bindings don't seem to want live together in my host. When I remove either of them, all's fine but together they produce the following exception on the client: The requested upgrade is not supported by 'net.tcp://localhost:8081/Service2.svc'. This could be due to mismatched bindings (for example security enabled on the client and not on the server). In the server trace log, I find the following exception: Protocol Type application/negotiate was sent to a service that does not support that type of upgrade. Am I looking into the right direction or is there a better way to solve this?

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  • How to configurie multiple distinct WCF binding configurations for the same scheme

    - by Sandor Drieënhuizen
    I have a set of IIS7-hosted net.tcp WCF services that serve my ASP.NET MVC web application. The web application is accessed over the internet. WCF Services (IIS7) <--> ASP.NET MVC Application <--> Client Browser The services are username authenticated, the account that a client (of my web application) uses to logon ends up as the current principal on the host. I want one of the services to be authenticated differently, because it serves the view model for my logon view. When it's called, the client is obviously not logged on yet. I figure Windows authentication serves best or perhaps just certificate based security (which in fact I should use for the authenticated services as well) if the services are hosted on a machine that is not in the same domain as the web application. That's not the point here though. Using multiple TCP bindings is what's giving me trouble. I tried setting it up like this in my client configuration: <bindings> <netTcpBinding> <binding> <security mode="TransportWithMessageCredential"> <message clientCredentialType="UserName"/> </security> </binding> <binding name="public"> <security mode="Transport"> <message clientCredentialType="Windows"/> </security> </binding> </netTcpBinding> </bindings> <client> <endpoint contract="Server.IService1" binding="netTcpBinding" address="net.tcp://localhost:8081/Service1.svc"/> <endpoint contract="Server.IService2" binding="netTcpBinding" address="net.tcp://localhost:8081/Service2.svc"/> </client> The server configuration is this: <bindings> <netTcpBinding> <binding portSharingEnabled="true"> <security mode="TransportWithMessageCredential"> <message clientCredentialType="UserName"/> </security> </binding> <binding name="public"> <security mode="Transport"> <message clientCredentialType="Windows"/> </security> </binding> </netTcpBinding> </bindings> <services> <service name="Service1"> <endpoint contract="Server.IService1, Library" binding="netTcpBinding" address=""/> </service> <service name="Service2"> <endpoint contract="Server.IService2, Library" binding="netTcpBinding" address=""/> </service> </services> <serviceHostingEnvironment> <serviceActivations> <add relativeAddress="Service1.svc" service="Server.Service1"/> <add relativeAddress="Service2.svc" service="Server.Service2"/> </serviceActivations> </serviceHostingEnvironment> The thing is that both bindings don't seem to want live together in my host. When I remove either of them, all's fine but together they produce the following exception on the client: The requested upgrade is not supported by 'net.tcp://localhost:8081/Service2.svc'. This could be due to mismatched bindings (for example security enabled on the client and not on the server). In the server trace log, I find the following exception: Protocol Type application/negotiate was sent to a service that does not support that type of upgrade. Am I looking into the right direction or is there a better way to solve this?

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  • WCF Maximum message size quota exceeded problem - Guru needed

    - by Rire1979
    The maximum message size quota for incoming messages (65536) has been exceeded. To increase the quota, use the MaxReceivedMessageSize property on the appropriate binding element. Let me begin by saying that I can fix the problem by increasing the size of MaxReceivedMessageSize and the appropriate buffer. However it looks to me that this solution is not ideal because it's impossible to establish an upper bound to the size of the message as data changes daily. Setting it to the maximum size of two gigs feels like the wrong approach ... It may matter... or not: I'm using the MSN ad center API v6. Can an experienced WCF professional confirm this is indeed the approach we'll have to make do with? Is it as bad as it looks? Thank you.

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  • How to trace WCF serialization issues / exceptions

    - by Fabiano
    Hi I occasionally run into the problem that an application exception is thrown during the WCF-serialization (after returning a DataContract from my OperationContract). The only (and less meaningfull) message I get is System.ServiceModel.CommunicationException : The underlying connection was closed: The connection was closed unexpectedly. without any insight to the inner exception, which makes it really hard to find out what caused the error during serialization. Does someone know a good way how you can trace, log and debug these exceptions? Or even better can I catch the exception, handle them and send a defined FaulMessage to the client? thank you

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  • Wcf IInstanceProvider Behaviour never calling Realease() ?

    - by Jon
    Hi, I'm implementing my own IInstanceProvider class to override the creation and realease of new service instances but the Release() method never gets called on my implemented class? It's implemented using an IServiceBehavior to attach to the exposed endpoint. No matter how hard we hammer the service the Relaease() method nevers gets called. We have the service running a per call instanceContext mode with 50 instance max. The deconstruct of the service instance gets called but not on all created instance and this looks like the gargageCollection rather than wcf realeasing and disposing. Any ideas why the Release() method never gets called? Thanks in Advance, Jon

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