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  • [ASP.NET 4.0] Persisting Row Selection in Data Controls

    - by HosamKamel
    Data Control Selection Feature In ASP.NET 2.0: ASP.NET Data Controls row selection feature was based on row index (in the current page), this of course produce an issue if you try to select an item in the first page then navigate to the second page without select any record you will find the same row (with the same index) selected in the second page! In the sample application attached: Select the second row in the books GridView. Navigate to second page without doing any selection You will find the second row in the second page selected. Persisting Row Selection: Is a new feature which replace the old selection mechanism which based on row index to be based on the row data key instead. This means that if you select the third row on page 1 and move to page 2, nothing is selected on page 2. When you move back to page 1, the third row is still selected. Data Control Selection Feature In ASP.NET 3.5 SP1: The Persisting Row Selection was initially supported only in Dynamic Data projects Data Control Selection Feature In ASP.NET 4.0: Persisted selection is now supported for the GridView and ListView controls in all projects. You can enable this feature by setting the EnablePersistedSelection property, as shown below: Important thing to note, once you enable this feature you have to set the DataKeyNames property too because as discussed the full approach is based on the Row Data Key Simple feature but  is a much more natural behavior than the behavior in earlier versions of ASP.NET. Download Demo Project

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  • What is New in ASP.NET 4.0 Code Access Security

    - by HosamKamel
    ASP.NET Code Access Security (CAS) is a feature that helps protect server applications on hosting multiple Web sites, ASP.NET lets you assign a configurable trust level that corresponds to a predefined set of permissions. ASP.NET has predefined ASP.NET Trust Levels and Policy Files that you can assign to applications, you also can assign custom trust level and policy files. Most web hosting companies run ASP.NET applications in Medium Trust to prevent that one website affect or harm another site etc. As .NET Framework's Code Access Security model has evolved, ASP.NET 4.0 Code Access Security also has introduced several changes and improvements.   A Full post addresses the new changes in ASP.NET 4.0 is published at Asp.Net QA Team Here http://weblogs.asp.net/asptest/archive/2010/04/23/what-is-new-in-asp-net-4-0-code-access-security.aspx

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  • Dividing web.config into multiple files in asp.net

    - by Jalpesh P. Vadgama
    When you are having different people working on one project remotely you will get some problem with web.config, as everybody was having different version of web.config. So at that time once you check in your web.config with your latest changes the other people have to get latest that web.config and made some specific changes as per their local environment. Most of people who have worked things from remotely has faced that problem. I think most common example would be connection string and app settings changes. For this kind of situation this will be a best solution. We can divide particular section of web.config into the multiple files. For example we could have separate ConnectionStrings.config file for connection strings and AppSettings.config file for app settings file. Most of people does not know that there is attribute called ‘configSource’ where we can  define the path of external config file and it will load that section from that external file. Just like below. <configuration> <appSettings configSource="AppSettings.config"/> <connectionStrings configSource="ConnectionStrings.config"/> </configuration> And you could have your ConnectionStrings.config file like following. <connectionStrings> <add name="DefaultConnection" connectionString="Data Source=(LocalDb)\v11.0;Initial Catalog=aspnet-WebApplication1-20120523114732;Integrated Security=True" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" /> </connectionStrings> Same way you have another AppSettings.Config file like following. <appSettings> <add key="aspnet:UseTaskFriendlySynchronizationContext" value="true" /> <add key="ValidationSettings:UnobtrusiveValidationMode" value="WebForms" /> </appSettings> That's it. Hope you like this post. Stay tuned for more..

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  • Entity Framework Code-First to Provide Replacement for ASP.NET Profile Provider

    - by Ken Cox [MVP]
    A while back, I coordinated a project to add support for the SQL Table Profile Provider in ASP.NET 4 Web Applications.  We urged Microsoft to improve ASP.NET’s built-in Profile support so our workaround wouldn’t be necessary. Instead, Microsoft plans to provide a replacement for ASP.NET Profile in a forthcoming release. In response to my feature suggestion on Connect, Microsoft says we should look for something even better using Entity Framework: “When code-first is officially released the final piece of a full replacement of the ASP.NET Profile will have arrived. Once code-first for EF4 is released, developers will have a really easy and very approachable way to create any arbitrary class, and automatically have the .NET Framework create a table to provide storage for that class. Furthermore developer will also have full LINQ-query capabilities against code-first classes. “ The downside is that there won’t be a way to retrofit this Profile replacement to pre- ASP.NET 4 Web applications. At least there’ll still be the MVP workaround code. It looks like it’s time for me to dig into a CTP of EF Code-First to see what’s available.   Scott Guthrie has been blogging about Code-First Development with Entity Framework 4. It’s not clear when the EF Code-First is coming, but my guess is that it’ll be part of the VS 2010/.NET 4 service pack.

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  • How do i return integers from a string ?

    - by kannan.ambadi
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Suppose you are passing a string(for e.g.: “My name has 1 K, 2 A and 3 N”)  which may contain integers, letters or special characters. I want to retrieve only numbers from the input string. We can implement it in many ways such as splitting the string into an array or by using TryParse method. I would like to share another idea, that’s by using Regular expressions. All you have to do is, create an instance of Regular Expression with a specified pattern for integer. Regular expression class defines a method called Split, which splits the specified input string based on the pattern provided during object initialization.     We can write the code as given below:   public static int[] SplitIdSeqenceValues(object combinedArgs)         {             var _argsSeperator = new Regex(@"\D+", RegexOptions.Compiled);               string[] splitedIntegers = _argsSeperator.Split(combinedArgs.ToString());               var args = new int[splitedIntegers.Length];               for (int i = 0; i < splitedIntegers.Length; i++)                 args[i] = MakeSafe.ToSafeInt32(splitedIntegers[i]);                           return args;         }    It would be better, if we set to RegexOptions.Compiled so that the regular expression will have performance boost by faster compilation.   Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Happy Programming  :))   

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  • ASP.NET MVC 3 RTM Released

    - by shiju
     The ASP.NET team has released RTM version of ASP.NET MVC 3. You can download the ASP.NET MVC 3 RTM from here and source code of ASP.NET MVC 3 can download from here. Microsoft has released the following products along with ASP.NET MVC 3.NuGetIIS Express 7.5SQL Server Compact Edition 4Web Deploy and Web Farm Framework 2.0Orchard 1.0WebMatrix 1.0 You can read more details from ScottGu's blog post Announcing release of ASP.NET MVC 3, IIS Express, SQL CE 4, Web Farm Framework, Orchard, WebMatrix .You can upgrade your ASP.NET MVC 2 projects to ASP.NET MVC 3 using MVC 3 Project Upgrade Tool. You can read more details about the MVC 3 Upgrade Tool from here. Demo Web App using ASP.NET MVC 3 RTM  You can download a demo web app using ASP.NET MVC 3 RTM from here. The demo app is explained in the below blog postsDeveloping web apps using ASP.NET MVC 3, Razor and EF Code First - Part 1Developing web apps using ASP.NET MVC 3, Razor and EF Code First - Part 2

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  • ASP.Net Web API in Visual Studio 2010

    - by sreejukg
    Recently for one of my project, it was necessary to create couple of services. In the past I was using WCF, since my Services are going to be utilized through HTTP, I was thinking of ASP.Net web API. So I decided to create a Web API project. Now the real issue is that ASP.Net Web API launched after Visual Studio 2010 and I had to use ASP.Net web API in VS 2010 itself. By default there is no template available for Web API in Visual Studio 2010. Microsoft has made available an update that installs ASP.Net MVC 4 with web API in Visual Studio 2010. You can find the update from the below url. http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=30683 Though the update denotes ASP.Net MVC 4, this also includes ASP.Net Web API. Download the installation media and start the installer. As usual for any update, you need to agree on terms and conditions. The installation starts straight away, once you clicked the Install button. If everything goes ok, you will see the success message. Now open Visual Studio 2010, you can see ASP.Net MVC 4 Project template is available for you. Now you can create ASP.Net Web API project using Visual Studio 2010. When you create a new ASP.Net MVC 4 project, you can choose the Web API template. Further reading http://www.asp.net/web-api/overview/getting-started-with-aspnet-web-api/tutorial-your-first-web-api http://www.asp.net/mvc/mvc4

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  • Using TypeScript in ASP.NET MVC Projects

    - by shiju
    In the previous blog post Microsoft TypeScript : A Typed Superset of JavaScript, I have given a brief introduction on TypeScript. In this post, I will demonstrate how to use TypeScript with ASP.NET MVC projects and how we can compile TypeScript within the ASP.NET MVC projects. Using TypeScript with ASP.NET MVC 3 Projects The Visual Studio plug-in for TypeScript provides an ASP.NET MVC 3 project template for TypeScript that lets you to compile TypeScript from the Visual Studio. The following screen shot shows the TypeScript template for ASP.NET MVC 3 project The “TypeScript Internet Application” template is just a ASP.NET MVC 3 internet application project template which will allows to compile TypeScript programs to JavaScript when you are building your ASP.NET MVC projects. This project template will have the following section in the .csproject file <None Include="Scripts\jquery.d.ts" /> <TypeScriptCompile Include="Scripts\site.ts" /> <Content Include="Scripts\site.js"> <DependentUpon>site.ts</DependentUpon> </Content> .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } <Target Name="BeforeBuild"> <Exec Command="&amp;quot;$(PROGRAMFILES)\ Microsoft SDKs\TypeScript\0.8.0.0\tsc&amp;quot; @(TypeScriptCompile ->'&quot;%(fullpath)&quot;', ' ')" /> </Target> .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } The “BeforeBuild” target will allows you to compile TypeScript programs when you are building your ASP.NET MVC projects. The TypeScript project template will provide a typing reference file for the jQuery library named “jquery.d.ts”. The following default app.ts file referenced to jquery.d.ts 1: ///<reference path='jquery.d.ts' /> 2:   3: $(document).ready(function () { 4:   5: $(".btn-slide").click(function () { 6: $("#main").slideToggle("slow"); 7: $(this).toggleClass("active"); 8: }); 9:   10: }); .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } Using TypeScript with ASP.NET MVC 4 Projects The current preview version of TypeScript is not providing a project template for ASP.NET MVC 4 projects. But you can use TypeScript with ASP.NET MVC 4 projects by editing the project’s .csproject file. You can take the necessary settings from ASP.NET MVC 3 project file. I have just added the following section in the end of the .csproj file of a ASP.NET MVC 4 project, which will allows to compile all TypeScript when building ASP.NET MVC 4 project. <ItemGroup> <TypeScriptCompile Include="$(ProjectDir)\**\*.ts" /> </ItemGroup> <Target Name="BeforeBuild"> <Exec Command="&amp;quot;$(PROGRAMFILES)\ Microsoft SDKs\TypeScript\0.8.0.0\tsc&amp;quot; @(TypeScriptCompile ->'&quot;%(fullpath)&quot;', ' ')" /> </Target> .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; }

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  • ASP.NET Podcast Show #148 - ASP.NET WebForms to build a Mobile Web Application

    - by Wallym
    Check the podcast site for the original url. This is the video and source code for an ASP.NET WebForms app that I wrote that is optimized for the iPhone and mobile environments.  Subscribe to everything. Subscribe to WMV. Subscribe to M4V for iPhone/iPad. Subscribe to MP3. Download WMV. Download M4V for iPhone/iPad. Download MP3. Link to iWebKit. Source Code: <%@ Page Title="MapSplore" Language="C#" MasterPageFile="iPhoneMaster.master" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeFile="Default.aspx.cs" Inherits="AT_iPhone_Default" %> <asp:Content ID="Content1" ContentPlaceHolderID="head" Runat="Server"></asp:Content><asp:Content ID="Content2" ContentPlaceHolderID="Content" Runat="Server" ClientIDMode="Static">    <asp:ScriptManager ID="sm" runat="server"         EnablePartialRendering="true" EnableHistory="false" EnableCdn="true" />    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://maps.google.com/maps/api/js?sensor=true"></script>    <script  language="javascript"  type="text/javascript">    <!--    Sys.WebForms.PageRequestManager.getInstance().add_endRequest(endRequestHandle);    function endRequestHandle(sender, Args) {        setupMapDiv();        setupPlaceIveBeen();    }    function setupPlaceIveBeen() {        var mapPlaceIveBeen = document.getElementById('divPlaceIveBeen');        if (mapPlaceIveBeen != null) {            var PlaceLat = document.getElementById('<%=hdPlaceIveBeenLatitude.ClientID %>').value;            var PlaceLon = document.getElementById('<%=hdPlaceIveBeenLongitude.ClientID %>').value;            var PlaceTitle = document.getElementById('<%=lblPlaceIveBeenName.ClientID %>').innerHTML;            var latlng = new google.maps.LatLng(PlaceLat, PlaceLon);            var myOptions = {                zoom: 14,                center: latlng,                mapTypeId: google.maps.MapTypeId.ROADMAP            };            var map = new google.maps.Map(mapPlaceIveBeen, myOptions);            var marker = new google.maps.Marker({                position: new google.maps.LatLng(PlaceLat, PlaceLon),                map: map,                title: PlaceTitle,                clickable: false            });        }    }    function setupMapDiv() {        var mapdiv = document.getElementById('divImHere');        if (mapdiv != null) {            var PlaceLat = document.getElementById('<%=hdPlaceLat.ClientID %>').value;            var PlaceLon = document.getElementById('<%=hdPlaceLon.ClientID %>').value;            var PlaceTitle = document.getElementById('<%=hdPlaceTitle.ClientID %>').value;            var latlng = new google.maps.LatLng(PlaceLat, PlaceLon);            var myOptions = {                zoom: 14,                center: latlng,                mapTypeId: google.maps.MapTypeId.ROADMAP            };            var map = new google.maps.Map(mapdiv, myOptions);            var marker = new google.maps.Marker({                position: new google.maps.LatLng(PlaceLat, PlaceLon),                map: map,                title: PlaceTitle,                clickable: false            });        }     }    -->    </script>    <asp:HiddenField ID="Latitude" runat="server" />    <asp:HiddenField ID="Longitude" runat="server" />    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1/jquery.min.js%22%3E%3C/script>    <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">        $(document).ready(function () {            GetLocation();            setupMapDiv();            setupPlaceIveBeen();        });        function GetLocation() {            if (navigator.geolocation != null) {                navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition(getData);            }            else {                var mess = document.getElementById('<%=Message.ClientID %>');                mess.innerHTML = "Sorry, your browser does not support geolocation. " +                    "Try the latest version of Safari on the iPhone, Android browser, or the latest version of FireFox.";            }        }        function UpdateLocation_Click() {            GetLocation();        }        function getData(position) {            var latitude = position.coords.latitude;            var longitude = position.coords.longitude;            var hdLat = document.getElementById('<%=Latitude.ClientID %>');            var hdLon = document.getElementById('<%=Longitude.ClientID %>');            hdLat.value = latitude;            hdLon.value = longitude;        }    </script>    <asp:Label ID="Message" runat="server" />    <asp:UpdatePanel ID="upl" runat="server">        <ContentTemplate>    <asp:Panel ID="pnlStart" runat="server" Visible="true">    <div id="topbar">        <div id="title">MapSplore</div>    </div>    <div id="content">        <ul class="pageitem">            <li class="menu">                <asp:LinkButton ID="lbLocalDeals" runat="server" onclick="lbLocalDeals_Click">                <asp:Image ID="imLocalDeals" runat="server" ImageUrl="~/Images/ArtFavor_Money_Bag_Icon.png" Height="30" />                <span class="name">Local Deals.</span>                <span class="arrow"></span>                </asp:LinkButton>                </li>            <li class="menu">                <asp:LinkButton ID="lbLocalPlaces" runat="server" onclick="lbLocalPlaces_Click">                <asp:Image ID="imLocalPlaces" runat="server" ImageUrl="~/Images/Andy_Houses_on_the_horizon_-_Starburst_remix.png" Height="30" />                <span class="name">Local Places.</span>                <span class="arrow"></span>                </asp:LinkButton>                </li>            <li class="menu">                <asp:LinkButton ID="lbWhereIveBeen" runat="server" onclick="lbWhereIveBeen_Click">                <asp:Image ID="imImHere" runat="server" ImageUrl="~/Images/ryanlerch_flagpole.png" Height="30" />                <span class="name">I've been here.</span>                <span class="arrow"></span>                </asp:LinkButton>                </li>            <li class="menu">                <asp:LinkButton ID="lbMyStats" runat="server">                <asp:Image ID="imMyStats" runat="server" ImageUrl="~/Images/Anonymous_Spreadsheet.png" Height="30" />                <span class="name">My Stats.</span>                <span class="arrow"></span>                </asp:LinkButton>                </li>            <li class="menu">                <asp:LinkButton ID="lbAddAPlace" runat="server" onclick="lbAddAPlace_Click">                <asp:Image ID="imAddAPlace" runat="server" ImageUrl="~/Images/jean_victor_balin_add.png" Height="30" />                <span class="name">Add a Place.</span>                <span class="arrow"></span>                </asp:LinkButton>                </li>            <li class="button">                <input type="button" value="Update Your Current Location" onclick="UpdateLocation_Click()">                </li>        </ul>    </div>    </asp:Panel>    <div>    <asp:Panel ID="pnlCoupons" runat="server" Visible="false">        <div id="topbar">        <div id="title">MapSplore</div>        <div id="leftbutton">            <asp:LinkButton runat="server" Text="Return"                 ID="ReturnFromDeals" OnClick="ReturnFromDeals_Click" /></div></div>    <div class="content">    <asp:ListView ID="lvCoupons" runat="server">        <LayoutTemplate>            <ul class="pageitem" runat="server">                <asp:PlaceHolder ID="itemPlaceholder" runat="server" />            </ul>        </LayoutTemplate>        <ItemTemplate>            <li class="menu">                <asp:LinkButton ID="lbBusiness" runat="server" Text='<%#Eval("Place.Name") %>' OnClick="lbBusiness_Click">                    <span class="comment">                    <asp:Label ID="lblAddress" runat="server" Text='<%#Eval("Place.Address1") %>' />                    <asp:Label ID="lblDis" runat="server" Text='<%# Convert.ToString(Convert.ToInt32(Eval("Place.Distance"))) + " meters" %>' CssClass="smallText" />                    <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceId" runat="server" Value='<%#Eval("PlaceId") %>' />                    <asp:HiddenField ID="hdGeoPromotionId" runat="server" Value='<%#Eval("GeoPromotionId") %>' />                    </span>                    <span class="arrow"></span>                </asp:LinkButton></li></ItemTemplate></asp:ListView><asp:GridView ID="gvCoupons" runat="server" AutoGenerateColumns="false">            <HeaderStyle BackColor="Silver" />            <AlternatingRowStyle BackColor="Wheat" />            <Columns>                <asp:TemplateField AccessibleHeaderText="Business" HeaderText="Business">                    <ItemTemplate>                        <asp:Image ID="imPlaceType" runat="server" Text='<%#Eval("Type") %>' ImageUrl='<%#Eval("Image") %>' />                        <asp:LinkButton ID="lbBusiness" runat="server" Text='<%#Eval("Name") %>' OnClick="lbBusiness_Click" />                        <asp:LinkButton ID="lblAddress" runat="server" Text='<%#Eval("Address1") %>' CssClass="smallText" />                        <asp:Label ID="lblDis" runat="server" Text='<%# Convert.ToString(Convert.ToInt32(Eval("Distance"))) + " meters" %>' CssClass="smallText" />                        <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceId" runat="server" Value='<%#Eval("PlaceId") %>' />                        <asp:HiddenField ID="hdGeoPromotionId" runat="server" Value='<%#Eval("GeoPromotionId") %>' />                        <asp:Label ID="lblInfo" runat="server" Visible="false" />                    </ItemTemplate>                </asp:TemplateField>            </Columns>        </asp:GridView>    </div>    </asp:Panel>    <asp:Panel ID="pnlPlaces" runat="server" Visible="false">    <div id="topbar">        <div id="title">            MapSplore</div><div id="leftbutton">            <asp:LinkButton runat="server" Text="Return"                 ID="ReturnFromPlaces" OnClick="ReturnFromPlaces_Click" /></div></div>        <div id="content">        <asp:ListView ID="lvPlaces" runat="server">            <LayoutTemplate>                <ul id="ulPlaces" class="pageitem" runat="server">                    <asp:PlaceHolder ID="itemPlaceholder" runat="server" />                    <li class="menu">                        <asp:LinkButton ID="lbNotListed" runat="server" CssClass="name"                            OnClick="lbNotListed_Click">                            Place not listed                            <span class="arrow"></span>                            </asp:LinkButton>                    </li>                </ul>            </LayoutTemplate>            <ItemTemplate>            <li class="menu">                <asp:LinkButton ID="lbImHere" runat="server" CssClass="name"                     OnClick="lbImHere_Click">                <%#DisplayName(Eval("Name")) %>&nbsp;                <%# Convert.ToString(Convert.ToInt32(Eval("Distance"))) + " meters" %>                <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceId" runat="server" Value='<%#Eval("PlaceId") %>' />                <span class="arrow"></span>                </asp:LinkButton></li></ItemTemplate></asp:ListView>    </div>    </asp:Panel>    <asp:Panel ID="pnlImHereNow" runat="server" Visible="false">        <div id="topbar">        <div id="title">            MapSplore</div><div id="leftbutton">            <asp:LinkButton runat="server" Text="Places"                 ID="lbImHereNowReturn" OnClick="lbImHereNowReturn_Click" /></div></div>            <div id="rightbutton">            <asp:LinkButton runat="server" Text="Beginning"                ID="lbBackToBeginning" OnClick="lbBackToBeginning_Click" />            </div>        <div id="content">        <ul class="pageitem">        <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceId" runat="server" />        <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceLat" runat="server" />        <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceLon" runat="server" />        <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceTitle" runat="server" />        <asp:Button ID="btnImHereNow" runat="server"             Text="I'm here" OnClick="btnImHereNow_Click" />             <asp:Label ID="lblPlaceTitle" runat="server" /><br />        <asp:TextBox ID="txtWhatsHappening" runat="server" TextMode="MultiLine" Rows="2" style="width:300px" /><br />        <div id="divImHere" style="width:300px; height:300px"></div>        </div>        </ul>    </asp:Panel>    <asp:Panel runat="server" ID="pnlIveBeenHere" Visible="false">        <div id="topbar">        <div id="title">            Where I've been</div><div id="leftbutton">            <asp:LinkButton ID="lbIveBeenHereBack" runat="server" Text="Back" OnClick="lbIveBeenHereBack_Click" /></div></div>        <div id="content">        <asp:ListView ID="lvWhereIveBeen" runat="server">            <LayoutTemplate>                <ul id="ulWhereIveBeen" class="pageitem" runat="server">                    <asp:PlaceHolder ID="itemPlaceholder" runat="server" />                </ul>            </LayoutTemplate>            <ItemTemplate>            <li class="menu" runat="server">                <asp:LinkButton ID="lbPlaceIveBeen" runat="server" OnClick="lbPlaceIveBeen_Click" CssClass="name">                    <asp:Label ID="lblPlace" runat="server" Text='<%#Eval("PlaceName") %>' /> at                    <asp:Label ID="lblTime" runat="server" Text='<%#Eval("ATTime") %>' CssClass="content" />                    <asp:HiddenField ID="hdATID" runat="server" Value='<%#Eval("ATID") %>' />                    <span class="arrow"></span>                </asp:LinkButton>            </li>            </ItemTemplate>        </asp:ListView>        </div>        </asp:Panel>    <asp:Panel runat="server" ID="pnlPlaceIveBeen" Visible="false">        <div id="topbar">        <div id="title">            I've been here        </div>        <div id="leftbutton">            <asp:LinkButton ID="lbPlaceIveBeenBack" runat="server" Text="Back" OnClick="lbPlaceIveBeenBack_Click" />        </div>        <div id="rightbutton">            <asp:LinkButton ID="lbPlaceIveBeenBeginning" runat="server" Text="Beginning" OnClick="lbPlaceIveBeenBeginning_Click" />        </div>        </div>        <div id="content">            <ul class="pageitem">            <li>            <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceIveBeenPlaceId" runat="server" />            <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceIveBeenLatitude" runat="server" />            <asp:HiddenField ID="hdPlaceIveBeenLongitude" runat="server" />            <asp:Label ID="lblPlaceIveBeenName" runat="server" /><br />            <asp:Label ID="lblPlaceIveBeenAddress" runat="server" /><br />            <asp:Label ID="lblPlaceIveBeenCity" runat="server" />,             <asp:Label ID="lblPlaceIveBeenState" runat="server" />            <asp:Label ID="lblPlaceIveBeenZipCode" runat="server" /><br />            <asp:Label ID="lblPlaceIveBeenCountry" runat="server" /><br />            <div id="divPlaceIveBeen" style="width:300px; height:300px"></div>            </li>            </ul>        </div>                </asp:Panel>         <asp:Panel ID="pnlAddPlace" runat="server" Visible="false">                <div id="topbar"><div id="title">MapSplore</div><div id="leftbutton"><asp:LinkButton ID="lbAddPlaceReturn" runat="server" Text="Back" OnClick="lbAddPlaceReturn_Click" /></div><div id="rightnav"></div></div><div id="content">    <ul class="pageitem">        <li id="liPlaceAddMessage" runat="server" visible="false">        <asp:Label ID="PlaceAddMessage" runat="server" />        </li>        <li class="bigfield">        <asp:TextBox ID="txtPlaceName" runat="server" placeholder="Name of Establishment" />        </li>        <li class="bigfield">        <asp:TextBox ID="txtAddress1" runat="server" placeholder="Address 1" />        </li>        <li class="bigfield">        <asp:TextBox ID="txtCity" runat="server" placeholder="City" />        </li>        <li class="select">        <asp:DropDownList ID="ddlProvince" runat="server" placeholder="Select State" />          <span class="arrow"></span>              </li>        <li class="bigfield">        <asp:TextBox ID="txtZipCode" runat="server" placeholder="Zip Code" />        </li>        <li class="select">        <asp:DropDownList ID="ddlCountry" runat="server"             onselectedindexchanged="ddlCountry_SelectedIndexChanged" />        <span class="arrow"></span>        </li>        <li class="bigfield">        <asp:TextBox ID="txtPhoneNumber" runat="server" placeholder="Phone Number" />        </li>        <li class="checkbox">            <span class="name">You Here Now:</span> <asp:CheckBox ID="cbYouHereNow" runat="server" Checked="true" />        </li>        <li class="button">        <asp:Button ID="btnAdd" runat="server" Text="Add Place"             onclick="btnAdd_Click" />        </li>    </ul></div>        </asp:Panel>        <asp:Panel ID="pnlImHere" runat="server" Visible="false">            <asp:TextBox ID="txtImHere" runat="server"                 TextMode="MultiLine" Rows="3" Columns="40" /><br />            <asp:DropDownList ID="ddlPlace" runat="server" /><br />            <asp:Button ID="btnHere" runat="server" Text="Tell Everyone I'm Here"                 onclick="btnHere_Click" /><br />        </asp:Panel>     </div>    </ContentTemplate>    </asp:UpdatePanel> </asp:Content> Code Behind .cs file: using System;using System.Collections.Generic;using System.Linq;using System.Web;using System.Web.Security;using System.Web.UI;using System.Web.UI.HtmlControls;using System.Web.UI.WebControls;using LocationDataModel; public partial class AT_iPhone_Default : ViewStatePage{    private iPhoneDevice ipd;     protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        LocationDataEntities lde = new LocationDataEntities();        if (!Page.IsPostBack)        {            var Countries = from c in lde.Countries select c;            foreach (Country co in Countries)            {                ddlCountry.Items.Add(new ListItem(co.Name, co.CountryId.ToString()));            }            ddlCountry_SelectedIndexChanged(ddlCountry, null);            if (AppleIPhone.IsIPad())                ipd = iPhoneDevice.iPad;            if (AppleIPhone.IsIPhone())                ipd = iPhoneDevice.iPhone;            if (AppleIPhone.IsIPodTouch())                ipd = iPhoneDevice.iPodTouch;        }    }    protected void btnPlaces_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {    }    protected void btnAdd_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        bool blImHere = cbYouHereNow.Checked;        string Place = txtPlaceName.Text,            Address1 = txtAddress1.Text,            City = txtCity.Text,            ZipCode = txtZipCode.Text,            PhoneNumber = txtPhoneNumber.Text,            ProvinceId = ddlProvince.SelectedItem.Value,            CountryId = ddlCountry.SelectedItem.Value;        int iProvinceId, iCountryId;        double dLatitude, dLongitude;        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        if ((!String.IsNullOrEmpty(ProvinceId)) &&            (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(CountryId)))        {            iProvinceId = Convert.ToInt32(ProvinceId);            iCountryId = Convert.ToInt32(CountryId);            if (blImHere)            {                dLatitude = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value);                dLongitude = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);                da.StorePlace(Place, Address1, String.Empty, City,                    iProvinceId, ZipCode, iCountryId, PhoneNumber,                    dLatitude, dLongitude);            }            else            {                da.StorePlace(Place, Address1, String.Empty, City,                    iProvinceId, ZipCode, iCountryId, PhoneNumber);            }            liPlaceAddMessage.Visible = true;            PlaceAddMessage.Text = "Awesome, your place has been added. Add Another!";            txtPlaceName.Text = String.Empty;            txtAddress1.Text = String.Empty;            txtCity.Text = String.Empty;            ddlProvince.SelectedIndex = -1;            txtZipCode.Text = String.Empty;            txtPhoneNumber.Text = String.Empty;        }        else        {            liPlaceAddMessage.Visible = true;            PlaceAddMessage.Text = "Please select a State and a Country.";        }    }    protected void ddlCountry_SelectedIndexChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        string CountryId = ddlCountry.SelectedItem.Value;        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(CountryId))        {            int iCountryId = Convert.ToInt32(CountryId);            LocationDataModel.LocationDataEntities lde = new LocationDataModel.LocationDataEntities();            var prov = from p in lde.Provinces where p.CountryId == iCountryId                        orderby p.ProvinceName select p;                        ddlProvince.Items.Add(String.Empty);            foreach (Province pr in prov)            {                ddlProvince.Items.Add(new ListItem(pr.ProvinceName, pr.ProvinceId.ToString()));            }        }        else        {            ddlProvince.Items.Clear();        }    }    protected void btnImHere_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        int i = 0;        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        double Lat = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value),            Lon = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);        List<Place> lp = da.NearByLocations(Lat, Lon);        foreach (Place p in lp)        {            ListItem li = new ListItem(p.Name, p.PlaceId.ToString());            if (i == 0)            {                li.Selected = true;            }            ddlPlace.Items.Add(li);            i++;        }        pnlAddPlace.Visible = false;        pnlImHere.Visible = true;    }    protected void lbImHere_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        string UserName = Membership.GetUser().UserName;        ListViewItem lvi = (ListViewItem)(((LinkButton)sender).Parent);        HiddenField hd = (HiddenField)lvi.FindControl("hdPlaceId");        long PlaceId = Convert.ToInt64(hd.Value);        double dLatitude = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value);        double dLongitude = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        Place pl = da.GetPlace(PlaceId);        pnlImHereNow.Visible = true;        pnlPlaces.Visible = false;        hdPlaceId.Value = PlaceId.ToString();        hdPlaceLat.Value = pl.Latitude.ToString();        hdPlaceLon.Value = pl.Longitude.ToString();        hdPlaceTitle.Value = pl.Name;        lblPlaceTitle.Text = pl.Name;    }    protected void btnHere_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        string UserName = Membership.GetUser().UserName;        string WhatsH = txtImHere.Text;        long PlaceId = Convert.ToInt64(ddlPlace.SelectedValue);        double dLatitude = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value);        double dLongitude = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        da.StoreUserAT(UserName, PlaceId, WhatsH,            dLatitude, dLongitude);    }    protected void btnLocalCoupons_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        double dLatitude = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value);        double dLongitude = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();     }    protected void lbBusiness_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        string UserName = Membership.GetUser().UserName;        GridViewRow gvr = (GridViewRow)(((LinkButton)sender).Parent.Parent);        HiddenField hd = (HiddenField)gvr.FindControl("hdPlaceId");        string sPlaceId = hd.Value;        Int64 PlaceId;        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(sPlaceId))        {            PlaceId = Convert.ToInt64(sPlaceId);        }    }    protected void lbLocalDeals_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        double dLatitude = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value);        double dLongitude = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        pnlCoupons.Visible = true;        pnlStart.Visible = false;        List<GeoPromotion> lgp = da.NearByDeals(dLatitude, dLongitude);        lvCoupons.DataSource = lgp;        lvCoupons.DataBind();    }    protected void lbLocalPlaces_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        double Lat = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value);        double Lon = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);        List<LocationDataModel.Place> places = da.NearByLocations(Lat, Lon);        lvPlaces.DataSource = places;        lvPlaces.SelectedIndex = -1;        lvPlaces.DataBind();        pnlPlaces.Visible = true;        pnlStart.Visible = false;    }    protected void ReturnFromPlaces_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        pnlPlaces.Visible = false;        pnlStart.Visible = true;    }    protected void ReturnFromDeals_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        pnlCoupons.Visible = false;        pnlStart.Visible = true;    }    protected void btnImHereNow_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        long PlaceId = Convert.ToInt32(hdPlaceId.Value);        string UserName = Membership.GetUser().UserName;        string WhatsHappening = txtWhatsHappening.Text;        double UserLat = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value);        double UserLon = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        da.StoreUserAT(UserName, PlaceId, WhatsHappening,             UserLat, UserLon);    }    protected void lbImHereNowReturn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        pnlImHereNow.Visible = false;        pnlPlaces.Visible = true;    }    protected void lbBackToBeginning_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        pnlStart.Visible = true;        pnlImHereNow.Visible = false;    }    protected void lbWhereIveBeen_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        string UserName = Membership.GetUser().UserName;        pnlStart.Visible = false;        pnlIveBeenHere.Visible = true;        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        lvWhereIveBeen.DataSource = da.UserATs(UserName, 0, 15);        lvWhereIveBeen.DataBind();    }    protected void lbIveBeenHereBack_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        pnlIveBeenHere.Visible = false;        pnlStart.Visible = true;    }     protected void lbPlaceIveBeen_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        LinkButton lb = (LinkButton)sender;        ListViewItem lvi = (ListViewItem)lb.Parent.Parent;        HiddenField hdATID = (HiddenField)lvi.FindControl("hdATID");        Int64 ATID = Convert.ToInt64(hdATID.Value);        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        pnlIveBeenHere.Visible = false;        pnlPlaceIveBeen.Visible = true;        var plac = da.GetPlaceViaATID(ATID);        hdPlaceIveBeenPlaceId.Value = plac.PlaceId.ToString();        hdPlaceIveBeenLatitude.Value = plac.Latitude.ToString();        hdPlaceIveBeenLongitude.Value = plac.Longitude.ToString();        lblPlaceIveBeenName.Text = plac.Name;        lblPlaceIveBeenAddress.Text = plac.Address1;        lblPlaceIveBeenCity.Text = plac.City;        lblPlaceIveBeenState.Text = plac.Province.ProvinceName;        lblPlaceIveBeenZipCode.Text = plac.ZipCode;        lblPlaceIveBeenCountry.Text = plac.Country.Name;    }     protected void lbNotListed_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        SetupAddPoint();        pnlPlaces.Visible = false;    }     protected void lbAddAPlace_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        SetupAddPoint();    }     private void SetupAddPoint()    {        double lat = Convert.ToDouble(Latitude.Value);        double lon = Convert.ToDouble(Longitude.Value);        DataAccess da = new DataAccess();        var zip = da.WhereAmIAt(lat, lon);        if (zip.Count > 0)        {            var z0 = zip[0];            txtCity.Text = z0.City;            txtZipCode.Text = z0.ZipCode;            ddlProvince.ClearSelection();            if (z0.ProvinceId.HasValue == true)            {                foreach (ListItem li in ddlProvince.Items)                {                    if (li.Value == z0.ProvinceId.Value.ToString())                    {                        li.Selected = true;                        break;                    }                }            }        }        pnlAddPlace.Visible = true;        pnlStart.Visible = false;    }    protected void lbAddPlaceReturn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        pnlAddPlace.Visible = false;        pnlStart.Visible = true;        liPlaceAddMessage.Visible = false;        PlaceAddMessage.Text = String.Empty;    }    protected void lbPlaceIveBeenBack_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        pnlIveBeenHere.Visible = true;        pnlPlaceIveBeen.Visible = false;            }    protected void lbPlaceIveBeenBeginning_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)    {        pnlPlaceIveBeen.Visible = false;        pnlStart.Visible = true;    }    protected string DisplayName(object val)    {        string strVal = Convert.ToString(val);         if (AppleIPhone.IsIPad())        {            ipd = iPhoneDevice.iPad;        }        if (AppleIPhone.IsIPhone())        {            ipd = iPhoneDevice.iPhone;        }        if (AppleIPhone.IsIPodTouch())        {            ipd = iPhoneDevice.iPodTouch;        }        return (iPhoneHelper.DisplayContentOnMenu(strVal, ipd));    }} iPhoneHelper.cs file: using System;using System.Collections.Generic;using System.Linq;using System.Web; public enum iPhoneDevice{    iPhone, iPodTouch, iPad}/// <summary>/// Summary description for iPhoneHelper/// </summary>/// public class iPhoneHelper{ public iPhoneHelper() {  //  // TODO: Add constructor logic here  // } // This code is stupid in retrospect. Use css to solve this problem      public static string DisplayContentOnMenu(string val, iPhoneDevice ipd)    {        string Return = val;        string Elipsis = "...";        int iPadMaxLength = 30;        int iPhoneMaxLength = 15;        if (ipd == iPhoneDevice.iPad)        {            if (Return.Length > iPadMaxLength)            {                Return = Return.Substring(0, iPadMaxLength - Elipsis.Length) + Elipsis;            }        }        else        {            if (Return.Length > iPhoneMaxLength)            {                Return = Return.Substring(0, iPhoneMaxLength - Elipsis.Length) + Elipsis;            }        }        return (Return);    }}  Source code for the ViewStatePage: using System;using System.Data;using System.Data.SqlClient;using System.Configuration;using System.Web;using System.Web.Security;using System.Web.UI;using System.Web.UI.WebControls;using System.Web.UI.WebControls.WebParts;using System.Web.UI.HtmlControls; /// <summary>/// Summary description for BasePage/// </summary>#region Base class for a page.public class ViewStatePage : System.Web.UI.Page{     PageStatePersisterToDatabase myPageStatePersister;        public ViewStatePage()        : base()    {        myPageStatePersister = new PageStatePersisterToDatabase(this);    }     protected override PageStatePersister PageStatePersister    {        get        {            return myPageStatePersister;        }    } }#endregion #region This class will override the page persistence to store page state in a database.public class PageStatePersisterToDatabase : PageStatePersister{    private string ViewStateKeyField = "__VIEWSTATE_KEY";    private string _exNoConnectionStringFound = "No Database Configuration information is in the web.config.";     public PageStatePersisterToDatabase(Page page)        : base(page)    {    }     public override void Load()    {         // Get the cache key from the web form data        System.Int64 key = Convert.ToInt64(Page.Request.Params[ViewStateKeyField]);         Pair state = this.LoadState(key);         // Abort if cache object is not of type Pair        if (state == null)            throw new ApplicationException("Missing valid " + ViewStateKeyField);         // Set view state and control state        ViewState = state.First;        ControlState = state.Second;    }     public override void Save()    {         // No processing needed if no states available        if (ViewState == null && ControlState != null)            return;         System.Int64 key;        IStateFormatter formatter = this.StateFormatter;        Pair statePair = new Pair(ViewState, ControlState);         // Serialize the statePair object to a string.        string serializedState = formatter.Serialize(statePair);         // Save the ViewState and get a unique identifier back.        key = SaveState(serializedState);         // Register hidden field to store cache key in        // Page.ClientScript does not work properly with Atlas.        //Page.ClientScript.RegisterHiddenField(ViewStateKeyField, key.ToString());        ScriptManager.RegisterHiddenField(this.Page, ViewStateKeyField, key.ToString());    }     private System.Int64 SaveState(string PageState)    {        System.Int64 i64Key = 0;        string strConn = String.Empty,            strProvider = String.Empty;         string strSql = "insert into tblPageState ( SerializedState ) values ( '" + SqlEscape(PageState) + "');select scope_identity();";        SqlConnection sqlCn;        SqlCommand sqlCm;        try        {            GetDBConnectionString(ref strConn, ref strProvider);            sqlCn = new SqlConnection(strConn);            sqlCm = new SqlCommand(strSql, sqlCn);            sqlCn.Open();            i64Key = Convert.ToInt64(sqlCm.ExecuteScalar());            if (sqlCn.State != ConnectionState.Closed)            {                sqlCn.Close();            }            sqlCn.Dispose();            sqlCm.Dispose();        }        finally        {            sqlCn = null;            sqlCm = null;        }        return i64Key;    }     private Pair LoadState(System.Int64 iKey)    {        string strConn = String.Empty,            strProvider = String.Empty,            SerializedState = String.Empty,            strMinutesInPast = GetMinutesInPastToDelete();        Pair PageState;        string strSql = "select SerializedState from tblPageState where tblPageStateID=" + iKey.ToString() + ";" +            "delete from tblPageState where DateUpdated<DateAdd(mi, " + strMinutesInPast + ", getdate());";        SqlConnection sqlCn;        SqlCommand sqlCm;        try        {            GetDBConnectionString(ref strConn, ref strProvider);            sqlCn = new SqlConnection(strConn);            sqlCm = new SqlCommand(strSql, sqlCn);             sqlCn.Open();            SerializedState = Convert.ToString(sqlCm.ExecuteScalar());            IStateFormatter formatter = this.StateFormatter;             if ((null == SerializedState) ||                (String.Empty == SerializedState))            {                throw (new ApplicationException("No ViewState records were returned."));            }             // Deserilize returns the Pair object that is serialized in            // the Save method.            PageState = (Pair)formatter.Deserialize(SerializedState);             if (sqlCn.State != ConnectionState.Closed)            {                sqlCn.Close();            }            sqlCn.Dispose();            sqlCm.Dispose();        }        finally        {            sqlCn = null;            sqlCm = null;        }        return PageState;    }     private string SqlEscape(string Val)    {        string ReturnVal = String.Empty;        if (null != Val)        {            ReturnVal = Val.Replace("'", "''");        }        return (ReturnVal);    }    private void GetDBConnectionString(ref string ConnectionStringValue, ref string ProviderNameValue)    {        if (System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings.Count > 0)        {            ConnectionStringValue = System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["ApplicationServices"].ConnectionString;            ProviderNameValue = System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["ApplicationServices"].ProviderName;        }        else        {            throw new ConfigurationErrorsException(_exNoConnectionStringFound);        }    }    private string GetMinutesInPastToDelete()    {        string strReturn = "-60";        if (null != System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["MinutesInPastToDeletePageState"])        {            strReturn = System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["MinutesInPastToDeletePageState"].ToString();        }        return (strReturn);    }}#endregion AppleiPhone.cs file: using System;using System.Collections.Generic;using System.Linq;using System.Web; /// <summary>/// Summary description for AppleIPhone/// </summary>public class AppleIPhone{ public AppleIPhone() {  //  // TODO: Add constructor logic here  // }     static public bool IsIPhoneOS()    {        return (IsIPad() || IsIPhone() || IsIPodTouch());    }     static public bool IsIPhone()    {        return IsTest("iPhone");    }     static public bool IsIPodTouch()    {        return IsTest("iPod");    }     static public bool IsIPad()    {        return IsTest("iPad");    }     static private bool IsTest(string Agent)    {        bool bl = false;        string ua = HttpContext.Current.Request.UserAgent.ToLower();        try        {            bl = ua.Contains(Agent.ToLower());        }        catch { }        return (bl);        }} Master page .cs: using System;using System.Collections.Generic;using System.Linq;using System.Web;using System.Web.UI;using System.Web.UI.HtmlControls;using System.Web.UI.WebControls; public partial class MasterPages_iPhoneMaster : System.Web.UI.MasterPage{    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)    {            HtmlHead head = Page.Header;            HtmlMeta meta = new HtmlMeta();            if (AppleIPhone.IsIPad() == true)            {                meta.Content = "width=400,user-scalable=no";                head.Controls.Add(meta);             }            else            {                meta.Content = "width=device-width, user-scalable=no";                meta.Attributes.Add("name", "viewport");            }            meta.Attributes.Add("name", "viewport");            head.Controls.Add(meta);            HtmlLink cssLink = new HtmlLink();            HtmlGenericControl script = new HtmlGenericControl("script");            script.Attributes.Add("type", "text/javascript");            script.Attributes.Add("src", ResolveUrl("~/Scripts/iWebKit/javascript/functions.js"));            head.Controls.Add(script);            cssLink.Attributes.Add("rel", "stylesheet");            cssLink.Attributes.Add("href", ResolveUrl("~/Scripts/iWebKit/css/style.css") );            cssLink.Attributes.Add("type", "text/css");            head.Controls.Add(cssLink);            HtmlGenericControl jsLink = new HtmlGenericControl("script");            //jsLink.Attributes.Add("type", "text/javascript");            //jsLink.Attributes.Add("src", ResolveUrl("~/Scripts/jquery-1.4.1.min.js") );            //head.Controls.Add(jsLink);            HtmlLink appleIcon = new HtmlLink();            appleIcon.Attributes.Add("rel", "apple-touch-icon");            appleIcon.Attributes.Add("href", ResolveUrl("~/apple-touch-icon.png"));            HtmlMeta appleMobileWebAppStatusBarStyle = new HtmlMeta();            appleMobileWebAppStatusBarStyle.Attributes.Add("name", "apple-mobile-web-app-status-bar-style");            appleMobileWebAppStatusBarStyle.Attributes.Add("content", "black");            head.Controls.Add(appleMobileWebAppStatusBarStyle);    }     internal string FindPath(string Location)    {        string Url = Server.MapPath(Location);        return (Url);    }}

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  • April 14th Links: ASP.NET, ASP.NET MVC, ASP.NET Web API and Visual Studio

    - by ScottGu
    Here is the latest in my link-listing blog series: ASP.NET Easily overlooked features in VS 11 Express for Web: Good post by Scott Hanselman that highlights a bunch of easily overlooked improvements that are coming to VS 11 (and specifically the free express editions) for web development: unit testing, browser chooser/launcher, IIS Express, CSS Color Picker, Image Preview in Solution Explorer and more. Get Started with ASP.NET 4.5 Web Forms: Good 5-part tutorial that walks-through building an application using ASP.NET Web Forms and highlights some of the nice improvements coming with ASP.NET 4.5. What is New in Razor V2 and What Else is New in Razor V2: Great posts by Andrew Nurse, a dev on the ASP.NET team, about some of the new improvements coming with ASP.NET Razor v2. ASP.NET MVC 4 AllowAnonymous Attribute: Nice post from David Hayden that talks about the new [AllowAnonymous] filter introduced with ASP.NET MVC 4. Introduction to the ASP.NET Web API: Great tutorial by Stephen Walher that covers how to use the new ASP.NET Web API support built-into ASP.NET 4.5 and ASP.NET MVC 4. Comprehensive List of ASP.NET Web API Tutorials and Articles: Tugberk Ugurlu links to a huge collection of articles, tutorials, and samples about the new ASP.NET Web API capability. Async Mashups using ASP.NET Web API: Nice post by Henrik on how you can use the new async language support coming with .NET 4.5 to easily and efficiently make asynchronous network requests that do not block threads within ASP.NET. ASP.NET and Front-End Web Development Visual Studio 11 and Front End Web Development - JavaScript/HTML5/CSS3: Nice post by Scott Hanselman that highlights some of the great improvements coming with VS 11 (including the free express edition) for front-end web development. HTML5 Drag/Drop and Async Multi-file Upload with ASP.NET Web API: Great post by Filip W. that demonstrates how to implement an async file drag/drop uploader using HTML5 and ASP.NET Web API. Device Emulator Guide for Mobile Development with ASP.NET: Good post from Rachel Appel that covers how to use various device emulators with ASP.NET and VS to develop cross platform mobile sites. Fixing these jQuery: A Guide to Debugging: Great presentation by Adam Sontag on debugging with JavaScript and jQuery.  Some really good tips, tricks and gotchas that can save a lot of time. ASP.NET and Open Source Getting Started with ASP.NET Web Stack Source on CodePlex: Fantastic post by Henrik (an architect on the ASP.NET team) that provides step by step instructions on how to work with the ASP.NET source code we recently open sourced. Contributing to ASP.NET Web Stack Source on CodePlex: Follow-on to the post above (also by Henrik) that walks-through how you can submit a code contribution to the ASP.NET MVC, Web API and Razor projects. Overview of the WebApiContrib project: Nice post by Pedro Reys on the new open source WebApiContrib project that has been started to deliver cool extensions and libraries for use with ASP.NET Web API. Entity Framework Entity Framework 5 Performance Improvements and Performance Considerations for EF5:  Good articles that describes some of the big performance wins coming with EF5 (which will ship with both .NET 4.5 and ASP.NET MVC 4). Automatic compilation of LINQ queries will yield some significant performance wins (up to 600% faster). ASP.NET MVC 4 and EF Database Migrations: Good post by David Hayden that covers the new database migrations support within EF 4.3 which allows you to easily update your database schema during development - without losing any of the data within it. Visual Studio What's New in Visual Studio 11 Unit Testing: Nice post by Peter Provost (from the VS team) that talks about some of the great improvements coming to VS11 for unit testing - including built-in VS tooling support for a broad set of unit test frameworks (including NUnit, XUnit, Jasmine, QUnit and more) Hope this helps, Scott

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  • ASP.Net MVC 2 Auto Complete Textbox With Custom View Model Attribute & EditorTemplate

    - by SeanMcAlinden
    In this post I’m going to show how to create a generic, ajax driven Auto Complete text box using the new MVC 2 Templates and the jQuery UI library. The template will be automatically displayed when a property is decorated with a custom attribute within the view model. The AutoComplete text box in action will look like the following:   The first thing to do is to do is visit my previous blog post to put the custom model metadata provider in place, this is necessary when using custom attributes on the view model. http://weblogs.asp.net/seanmcalinden/archive/2010/06/11/custom-asp-net-mvc-2-modelmetadataprovider-for-using-custom-view-model-attributes.aspx Once this is in place, make sure you visit the jQuery UI and download the latest stable release – in this example I’m using version 1.8.2. You can download it here. Add the jQuery scripts and css theme to your project and add references to them in your master page. Should look something like the following: Site.Master <head runat="server">     <title><asp:ContentPlaceHolder ID="TitleContent" runat="server" /></title>     <link href="../../Content/Site.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />     <link href="../../css/ui-lightness/jquery-ui-1.8.2.custom.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />     <script src="../../Scripts/jquery-1.4.2.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>     <script src="../../Scripts/jquery-ui-1.8.2.custom.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script> </head> Once this is place we can get started. Creating the AutoComplete Custom Attribute The auto complete attribute will derive from the abstract MetadataAttribute created in my previous post. It will look like the following: AutoCompleteAttribute using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Web.Mvc; using System.Web.Routing; namespace Mvc2Templates.Attributes {     public class AutoCompleteAttribute : MetadataAttribute     {         public RouteValueDictionary RouteValueDictionary;         public AutoCompleteAttribute(string controller, string action, string parameterName)         {             this.RouteValueDictionary = new RouteValueDictionary();             this.RouteValueDictionary.Add("Controller", controller);             this.RouteValueDictionary.Add("Action", action);             this.RouteValueDictionary.Add(parameterName, string.Empty);         }         public override void Process(ModelMetadata modelMetaData)         {             modelMetaData.AdditionalValues.Add("AutoCompleteUrlData", this.RouteValueDictionary);             modelMetaData.TemplateHint = "AutoComplete";         }     } } As you can see, the constructor takes in strings for the controller, action and parameter name. The parameter name will be used for passing the search text within the auto complete text box. The constructor then creates a new RouteValueDictionary which we will use later to construct the url for getting the auto complete results via ajax. The main interesting method is the method override called Process. With the process method, the route value dictionary is added to the modelMetaData AdditionalValues collection. The TemplateHint is also set to AutoComplete, this means that when the view model is parsed for display, the MVC 2 framework will look for a view user control template called AutoComplete, if it finds one, it uses that template to display the property. The View Model To show you how the attribute will look, this is the view model I have used in my example which can be downloaded at the end of this post. View Model using System.ComponentModel; using Mvc2Templates.Attributes; namespace Mvc2Templates.Models {     public class TemplateDemoViewModel     {         [AutoComplete("Home", "AutoCompleteResult", "searchText")]         [DisplayName("European Country Search")]         public string SearchText { get; set; }     } } As you can see, the auto complete attribute is called with the controller name, action name and the name of the action parameter that the search text will be passed into. The AutoComplete Template Now all of this is in place, it’s time to create the AutoComplete template. Create a ViewUserControl called AutoComplete.ascx at the following location within your application – Views/Shared/EditorTemplates/AutoComplete.ascx Add the following code: AutoComplete.ascx <%@ Control Language="C#" Inherits="System.Web.Mvc.ViewUserControl" %> <%     var propertyName = ViewData.ModelMetadata.PropertyName;     var propertyValue = ViewData.ModelMetadata.Model;     var id = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();     RouteValueDictionary urlData =         (RouteValueDictionary)ViewData.ModelMetadata.AdditionalValues.Where(x => x.Key == "AutoCompleteUrlData").Single().Value;     var url = Mvc2Templates.Views.Shared.Helpers.RouteHelper.GetUrl(this.ViewContext.RequestContext, urlData); %> <input type="text" name="<%= propertyName %>" value="<%= propertyValue %>" id="<%= id %>" class="autoComplete" /> <script type="text/javascript">     $(function () {         $("#<%= id %>").autocomplete({             source: function (request, response) {                 $.ajax({                     url: "<%= url %>" + request.term,                     dataType: "json",                     success: function (data) {                         response(data);                     }                 });             },             minLength: 2         });     }); </script> There is a lot going on in here but when you break it down it’s quite simple. Firstly, the property name and property value are retrieved through the model meta data. These are required to ensure that the text box input has the correct name and data to allow for model binding. If you look at line 14 you can see them being used in the text box input creation. The interesting bit is on line 8 and 9, this is the code to retrieve the route value dictionary we added into the model metada via the custom attribute. Line 11 is used to create the url, in order to do this I created a quick helper class which looks like the code below titled RouteHelper. The last bit of script is the code to initialise the jQuery UI AutoComplete control with the correct url for calling back to our controller action. RouteHelper using System.Web.Mvc; using System.Web.Routing; namespace Mvc2Templates.Views.Shared.Helpers {     public static class RouteHelper     {         const string Controller = "Controller";         const string Action = "Action";         const string ReplaceFormatString = "REPLACE{0}";         public static string GetUrl(RequestContext requestContext, RouteValueDictionary routeValueDictionary)         {             RouteValueDictionary urlData = new RouteValueDictionary();             UrlHelper urlHelper = new UrlHelper(requestContext);                          int i = 0;             foreach(var item in routeValueDictionary)             {                 if (item.Value == string.Empty)                 {                     i++;                     urlData.Add(item.Key, string.Format(ReplaceFormatString, i.ToString()));                 }                 else                 {                     urlData.Add(item.Key, item.Value);                 }             }             var url = urlHelper.RouteUrl(urlData);             for (int index = 1; index <= i; index++)             {                 url = url.Replace(string.Format(ReplaceFormatString, index.ToString()), string.Empty);             }             return url;         }     } } See it in action All you need to do to see it in action is pass a view model from your controller with the new AutoComplete attribute attached and call the following within your view: <%= this.Html.EditorForModel() %> NOTE: The jQuery UI auto complete control expects a JSON string returned from your controller action method… as you can’t use the JsonResult to perform GET requests, use a normal action result, convert your data into json and return it as a string via a ContentResult. If you download the solution it will be very clear how to handle the controller and action for this demo. The full source code for this post can be downloaded here. It has been developed using MVC 2 and Visual Studio 2010. As always, I hope this has been interesting/useful. Kind Regards, Sean McAlinden.

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  • Fixing the Model Binding issue of ASP.NET MVC 4 and ASP.NET Web API

    - by imran_ku07
            Introduction:                     Yesterday when I was checking ASP.NET forums, I found an important issue/bug in ASP.NET MVC 4 and ASP.NET Web API. The issue is present in System.Web.PrefixContainer class which is used by both ASP.NET MVC and ASP.NET Web API assembly. The details of this issue is available in this thread. This bug can be a breaking change for you if you upgraded your application to ASP.NET MVC 4 and your application model properties using the convention available in the above thread. So, I have created a package which will fix this issue both in ASP.NET MVC and ASP.NET Web API. In this article, I will show you how to use this package.           Description:                     Create or open an ASP.NET MVC 4 project and install ImranB.ModelBindingFix NuGet package. Then, add this using statement on your global.asax.cs file, using ImranB.ModelBindingFix;                     Then, just add this line in Application_Start method,   Fixer.FixModelBindingIssue(); // For fixing only in MVC call this //Fixer.FixMvcModelBindingIssue(); // For fixing only in Web API call this //Fixer.FixWebApiModelBindingIssue(); .                     This line will fix the model binding issue. If you are using Html.Action or Html.RenderAction then you should use Html.FixedAction or Html.FixedRenderAction instead to avoid this bug(make sure to reference ImranB.ModelBindingFix.SystemWebMvc namespace). If you are using FormDataCollection.ReadAs extension method then you should use FormDataCollection.FixedReadAs instead to avoid this bug(make sure to reference ImranB.ModelBindingFix.SystemWebHttp namespace). The source code of this package is available at github.          Summary:                     There is a small but important issue/bug in ASP.NET MVC 4. In this article, I showed you how to fix this issue/bug by using a package. Hopefully you will enjoy this article too.

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  • .NET Reflector 6, .NET Reflector Pro, TestDriven.NET, .NET 4.0 and Mono

    - by Bart Read
    By now you may well have noticed that .NET Reflector 6 and .NET Reflector Pro are out in the wild. The official launch happened today, although we actually put the software out last Thursday as part of a phased release plan to ensure that everything went smoothly today which, so far, it seems to have done. Clive and Alex have already talked extensively about what the new version and the Pro extension do, so I'm not going to go into any detail here, but I've linked to their blogs at the bottom. What...(read more)

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  • May 20th Links: ASP.NET MVC, ASP.NET, .NET 4, VS 2010, Silverlight

    - by ScottGu
    Here is the latest in my link-listing series.  Also check out my VS 2010 and .NET 4 series and ASP.NET MVC 2 series for other on-going blog series I’m working on. [In addition to blogging, I am also now using Twitter for quick updates and to share links. Follow me at: twitter.com/scottgu] ASP.NET MVC How to Localize an ASP.NET MVC Application: Michael Ceranski has a good blog post that describes how to localize ASP.NET MVC 2 applications. ASP.NET MVC with jTemplates Part 1 and Part 2: Steve Gentile has a nice two-part set of blog posts that demonstrate how to use the jTemplate and DataTable jQuery libraries to implement client-side data binding with ASP.NET MVC. CascadingDropDown jQuery Plugin for ASP.NET MVC: Raj Kaimal has a nice blog post that demonstrates how to implement a dynamically constructed cascading dropdownlist on the client using jQuery and ASP.NET MVC. How to Configure VS 2010 Code Coverage for ASP.NET MVC Unit Tests: Visual Studio enables you to calculate the “code coverage” of your unit tests.  This measures the percentage of code within your application that is exercised by your tests – and can give you a sense of how much test coverage you have.  Gunnar Peipman demonstrates how to configure this for ASP.NET MVC projects. Shrinkr URL Shortening Service Sample: A nice open source application and code sample built by Kazi Manzur that demonstrates how to implement a URL Shortening Services (like bit.ly) using ASP.NET MVC 2 and EF4.  More details here. Creating RSS Feeds in ASP.NET MVC: Damien Guard has a nice post that describes a cool new “FeedResult” class he created that makes it easy to publish and expose RSS feeds from within ASP.NET MVC sites. NoSQL with MongoDB, NoRM and ASP.NET MVC Part 1 and Part 2: Nice two-part blog series by Shiju Varghese on how to use MongoDB (a document database) with ASP.NET MVC.  If you are interested in document databases also make sure to check out the Raven DB project from Ayende. Using the FCKEditor with ASP.NET MVC: Quick blog post that describes how to use FCKEditor – an open source HTML Text Editor – with ASP.NET MVC. ASP.NET Replace Html.Encode Calls with the New HTML Encoding Syntax: Phil Haack has a good blog post that describes a useful way to quickly update your ASP.NET pages and ASP.NET MVC views to use the new <%: %> encoding syntax in ASP.NET 4.  I blogged about the new <%: %> syntax – it provides an easy and concise way to HTML encode content. Integrating Twitter into an ASP.NET Website using OAuth: Scott Mitchell has a nice article that describes how to take advantage of Twiter within an ASP.NET Website using the OAuth protocol – which is a simple, secure protocol for granting API access. Creating an ASP.NET report using VS 2010 Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3: Raj Kaimal has a nice three part set of blog posts that detail how to use SQL Server Reporting Services, ASP.NET 4 and VS 2010 to create a dynamic reporting solution. Three Hidden Extensibility Gems in ASP.NET 4: Phil Haack blogs about three obscure but useful extensibility points enabled with ASP.NET 4. .NET 4 Entity Framework 4 Video Series: Julie Lerman has a nice, free, 7-part video series on MSDN that walks through how to use the new EF4 capabilities with VS 2010 and .NET 4.  I’ll be covering EF4 in a blog series that I’m going to start shortly as well. Getting Lazy with System.Lazy: System.Lazy and System.Lazy<T> are new features in .NET 4 that provide a way to create objects that may need to perform time consuming operations and defer the execution of the operation until it is needed.  Derik Whittaker has a nice write-up that describes how to use it. LINQ to Twitter: Nifty open source library on Codeplex that enables you to use LINQ syntax to query Twitter. Visual Studio 2010 Using Intellitrace in VS 2010: Chris Koenig has a nice 10 minute video that demonstrates how to use the new Intellitrace features of VS 2010 to enable DVR playback of your debug sessions. Make the VS 2010 IDE Colors look like VS 2008: Scott Hanselman has a nice blog post that covers the Visual Studio Color Theme Editor extension – which allows you to customize the VS 2010 IDE however you want. How to understand your code using Dependency Graphs, Sequence Diagrams, and the Architecture Explorer: Jennifer Marsman has a nice blog post describes how to take advantage of some of the new architecture features within VS 2010 to quickly analyze applications and legacy code-bases. How to maintain control of your code using Layer Diagrams: Another great blog post by Jennifer Marsman that demonstrates how to setup a “layer diagram” within VS 2010 to enforce clean layering within your applications.  This enables you to enforce a compiler error if someone inadvertently violates a layer design rule. Collapse Selection in Solution Explorer Extension: Useful VS 2010 extension that enables you to quickly collapse “child nodes” within the Visual Studio Solution Explorer.  If you have deeply nested project structures this extension is useful. Silverlight and Windows Phone 7 Building a Simple Windows Phone 7 Application: A nice tutorial blog post that demonstrates how to take advantage of Expression Blend to create an animated Windows Phone 7 application. If you haven’t checked out my Windows Phone 7 Twitter Tutorial I also recommend reading that. Hope this helps, Scott P.S. If you haven’t already, check out this month’s "Find a Hoster” page on the www.asp.net website to learn about great (and very inexpensive) ASP.NET hosting offers.

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  • Mobile enabled web apps with ASP.NET MVC 3 and jQuery Mobile

    - by shiju
    In my previous blog posts, I have demonstrated a simple web app using ASP.NET MVC 3 and EF Code First. In this post, I will be focus on making this application for mobile devices. A single web site will be used for both mobile browsers and desktop browsers. If users are accessing the web app from mobile browsers, users will be redirect to mobile specific pages and will get normal pages if users are accessing from desktop browsers. In this demo app, the mobile specific pages are maintained in an ASP.NET MVC Area named Mobile and mobile users will be redirect to MVC Area Mobile. Let’s add a new area named Mobile to the ASP.NET MVC app. For adding Area, right click the ASP.NET MVC project and  select Area from Add option. Our mobile specific pages using jQuery Mobile will be maintained in the Mobile Area. ASP.NET MVC Global filter for redirecting mobile visitors to Mobile area Let’s add an ASP.NET MVC Global filter for redirecting mobile visitors to Mobile area. The below Global filter is taken from the sample app http://aspnetmobilesamples.codeplex.com/ created by the ASP.NET team. The below filer will redirect the Mobile visitors to an ASP.NET MVC Area Mobile. public class RedirectMobileDevicesToMobileAreaAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute     {         protected override bool AuthorizeCore(System.Web.HttpContextBase httpContext)         {             // Only redirect on the first request in a session             if (!httpContext.Session.IsNewSession)                 return true;               // Don't redirect non-mobile browsers             if (!httpContext.Request.Browser.IsMobileDevice)                 return true;               // Don't redirect requests for the Mobile area             if (Regex.IsMatch(httpContext.Request.Url.PathAndQuery, "/Mobile($|/)"))                 return true;               return false;         }           protected override void HandleUnauthorizedRequest(AuthorizationContext filterContext)         {             var redirectionRouteValues = GetRedirectionRouteValues(filterContext.RequestContext);             filterContext.Result = new RedirectToRouteResult(redirectionRouteValues);         }           // Override this method if you want to customize the controller/action/parameters to which         // mobile users would be redirected. This lets you redirect users to the mobile equivalent         // of whatever resource they originally requested.         protected virtual RouteValueDictionary GetRedirectionRouteValues(RequestContext requestContext)         {             return new RouteValueDictionary(new { area = "Mobile", controller = "Home", action = "Index" });         }     } Let’s add the global filer RedirectMobileDevicesToMobileAreaAttribute to the global filter collection in the Application_Start() of Global.asax.cs file   GlobalFilters.Filters.Add(new RedirectMobileDevicesToMobileAreaAttribute(), 1); Now your mobile visitors will be redirect to the Mobile area. But the browser detection logic in the RedirectMobileDevicesToMobileAreaAttribute filter will not be working in some modern browsers and some conditions. But the good news is that ASP.NET’s browser detection feature is extensible and will be greatly working with the open source framework 51Degrees.mobi. 51Degrees.mobi is a Browser Capabilities Provider that will be working with ASP.NET’s Request.Browser and will provide more accurate and detailed information. For more details visit the documentation page at http://51degrees.codeplex.com/documentation. Let’s add a reference to 51Degrees.mobi library using NuGet We can easily add the 51Degrees.mobi from NuGet and this will update the web.config for necessary configuartions. Mobile Web App using jQuery Mobile Framework jQuery Mobile Framework is built on top of jQuery that provides top-of-the-line JavaScript in a unified User Interface that works across the most-used smartphone web browsers and tablet form factors. It provides an easy way to develop user interfaces for mobile web apps. The current version of the framework is jQuery Mobile Alpha 3. We need to include the following files to use jQuery Mobile. The jQuery Mobile CSS file (jquery.mobile-1.0a3.min.css) The jQuery library (jquery-1.5.min.js) The jQuery Mobile library (jquery.mobile-1.0a3.min.js) Let’s add the required jQuery files directly from jQuery CDN . You can download the files and host them on your own server. jQuery Mobile page structure The basic jQuery Mobile page structure is given below <!DOCTYPE html> <html>   <head>   <title>Page Title</title>   <link rel="stylesheet" href="http://code.jquery.com/mobile/1.0a3/jquery.mobile-1.0a1.min.css" />   <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.5.min.js"></script>   <script src="http://code.jquery.com/mobile/1.0a3/jquery.mobile-1.0a3.min.js"></script> </head> <body> <div data-role="page">   <div data-role="header">     <h1>Page Title</h1>   </div>   <div data-role="content">     <p>Page content goes here.</p>      </div>   <div data-role="footer">     <h4>Page Footer</h4>   </div> </div> </body> </html> The data- attributes are the new feature of HTML5 so that jQuery Mobile will be working on browsers that supporting HTML 5. You can get a detailed browser support details from http://jquerymobile.com/gbs/ . In the Head section we have included the Core jQuery javascript file and jQuery Mobile Library and the core CSS Library for the UI Element Styling. These jQuery files are minified versions and will improve the performance of page load on Mobile Devices. The jQuery Mobile pages are identified with an element with the data-role="page" attribute inside the <body> tag. <div data-role="page"> </div> Within the "page" container, any valid HTML markup can be used, but for typical pages in jQuery Mobile, the immediate children of a "page" are div element with data-roles of "header", "content", and "footer". <div data-role="page">     <div data-role="header">...</div>     <div data-role="content">...</div>     <div data-role="footer">...</div> </div> The div data-role="content" holds the main content of the HTML page and will be used for making user interaction elements. The div data-role="header" is header part of the page and div data-role="footer" is the footer part of the page. Creating Mobile specific pages in the Mobile Area Let’s create Layout page for our Mobile area <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head>     <title>@ViewBag.Title</title>     <link rel="stylesheet" href="http://code.jquery.com/mobile/1.0a3/jquery.mobile-1.0a3.min.css" />     <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.5.min.js"></script>     <script src="http://code.jquery.com/mobile/1.0a3/jquery.mobile-1.0a3.min.js"></script>     </head>      <body> @RenderBody()    </body> </html> In the Layout page, I have given reference to jQuery Mobile JavaScript files and the CSS file. Let’s add an Index view page Index.chtml @{     ViewBag.Title = "Index"; } <div data-role="page"> <div data-role="header">      <h1>Expense Tracker Mobile</h1> </div> <div data-role="content">   <ul data-role="listview">     <li>@Html.Partial("_LogOnPartial")</li>      <li>@Html.ActionLink("Home", "Index", "Home")</li>      <li>@Html.ActionLink("Category", "Index", "Category")</li>                          <li>@Html.ActionLink("Expense", "Index", "Expense")</li> </ul> </div> <div data-role="footer">           Shiju Varghese | <a href="http://weblogs.asp.net/shijuvarghese">Blog     </a> | <a href="http://twitter.com/shijucv">Twitter</a>   </div> </div>   In the Index page, we have used data-role “listview” for showing our content as List View Let’s create a data entry screen create.cshtml @model MyFinance.Domain.Category @{     ViewBag.Title = "Create Category"; }   <div data-role="page"> <div data-role="header">      <h1>Create Category</h1>     [email protected]("Home", "Index","Home",null, new { @class = "ui-btn-right" })      </div>       <div data-role="content"> [email protected] (Html.BeginForm("Create","Category",FormMethod.Post))     {       <div data-role="fieldcontain"> [email protected](model => model.Name) [email protected](model => model.Name)        <div> [email protected](m => m.Name)        </div>         </div>         <div data-role="fieldcontain"> [email protected](model => model.Description) [email protected](model => model.Description)                   </div>                    <div class="ui-body ui-body-b">         <button type="submit" data-role="button" data-theme="b">Save</button>       </div>     }        </div> </div>   In jQuery Mobile, the form elements should be placed inside the data-role="fieldcontain" The below screen shots show the pages rendered in mobile browser Index Page Create Page Source Code You can download the source code from http://efmvc.codeplex.com   Summary We have created a single  web app for desktop browsers and mobile browsers. If a user access the site from desktop browsers, users will get normal web pages and get mobile specific pages if users access from mobile browsers. If users are accessing the website from mobile devices, we will redirect to a ASP.NET MVC area Mobile. For redirecting to the Mobile area, we have used a Global filer for the redirection logic and used open source framework 51Degrees.mobi for the better support for mobile browser detection. In the Mobile area, we have created the pages using jQuery Mobile and users will get mobile friendly web pages. We can create great mobile web apps using ASP.NET MVC  and jQuery Mobile Framework.

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  • ASP.NET MVC 3 - New Features

    - by imran_ku07
    Introduction:          ASP.NET MVC 3 just released by ASP.NET MVC team which includes some new features, some changes, some improvements and bug fixes. In this article, I will show you the new features of ASP.NET MVC 3. This will help you to get started using the new features of ASP.NET MVC 3. Full details of this announcement is available at Announcing release of ASP.NET MVC 3, IIS Express, SQL CE 4, Web Farm Framework, Orchard, WebMatrix.   Description:       New Razor View Engine:              Razor view engine is one of the most coolest new feature in ASP.NET MVC 3. Razor is speeding things up just a little bit more. It is much smaller and lighter in size. Also it is very easy to learn. You can say ' write less, do more '. You can get start and learn more about Razor at Introducing “Razor” – a new view engine for ASP.NET.         Granular Request Validation:             Another biggest new feature in ASP.NET MVC 3 is Granular Request Validation. Default request validator will throw an exception when he see < followed by an exclamation(like <!) or < followed by the letters a through z(like <s) or & followed by a pound sign(like &#123) as a part of querystring, posted form, headers and cookie collection. In previous versions of ASP.NET MVC, you can control request validation using ValidateInputAttriubte. In ASP.NET MVC 3 you can control request validation at Model level by annotating your model properties with a new attribute called AllowHtmlAttribute. For details see Granular Request Validation in ASP.NET MVC 3.       Sessionless Controller Support:             Sessionless Controller is another great new feature in ASP.NET MVC 3. With Sessionless Controller you can easily control your session behavior for controllers. For example, you can make your HomeController's Session as Disabled or ReadOnly, allowing concurrent request execution for single user. For details see Concurrent Requests In ASP.NET MVC and HowTo: Sessionless Controller in MVC3 – what & and why?.       Unobtrusive Ajax and  Unobtrusive Client Side Validation is Supported:             Another cool new feature in ASP.NET MVC 3 is support for Unobtrusive Ajax and Unobtrusive Client Side Validation.  This feature allows separation of responsibilities within your web application by separating your html with your script. For details see Unobtrusive Ajax in ASP.NET MVC 3 and Unobtrusive Client Validation in ASP.NET MVC 3.       Dependency Resolver:             Dependency Resolver is another great feature of ASP.NET MVC 3. It allows you to register a dependency resolver that will be used by the framework. With this approach your application will not become tightly coupled and the dependency will be injected at run time. For details see ASP.NET MVC 3 Service Location.       New Helper Methods:             ASP.NET MVC 3 includes some helper methods of ASP.NET Web Pages technology that are used for common functionality. These helper methods includes: Chart, Crypto, WebGrid, WebImage and WebMail. For details of these helper methods, please see ASP.NET MVC 3 Release Notes. For using other helper methods of ASP.NET Web Pages see Using ASP.NET Web Pages Helpers in ASP.NET MVC.       Child Action Output Caching:             ASP.NET MVC 3 also includes another feature called Child Action Output Caching. This allows you to cache only a portion of the response when you are using Html.RenderAction or Html.Action. This cache can be varied by action name, action method signature and action method parameter values. For details see this.       RemoteAttribute:             ASP.NET MVC 3 allows you to validate a form field by making a remote server call through Ajax. This makes it very easy to perform remote validation at client side and quickly give the feedback to the user. For details see How to: Implement Remote Validation in ASP.NET MVC.       CompareAttribute:             ASP.NET MVC 3 includes a new validation attribute called CompareAttribute. CompareAttribute allows you to compare the values of two different properties of a model. For details see CompareAttribute in ASP.NET MVC 3.       Miscellaneous New Features:                    ASP.NET MVC 2 includes FormValueProvider, QueryStringValueProvider, RouteDataValueProvider and HttpFileCollectionValueProvider. ASP.NET MVC 3 adds two additional value providers, ChildActionValueProvider and JsonValueProvider(JsonValueProvider is not physically exist).  ChildActionValueProvider is used when you issue a child request using Html.Action and/or Html.RenderAction methods, so that your explicit parameter values in Html.Action and/or Html.RenderAction will always take precedence over other value providers. JsonValueProvider is used to model bind JSON data. For details see Sending JSON to an ASP.NET MVC Action Method Argument.           In ASP.NET MVC 3, a new property named FileExtensions added to the VirtualPathProviderViewEngine class. This property is used when looking up a view by path (and not by name), so that only views with a file extension contained in the list specified by this new property is considered. For details see VirtualPathProviderViewEngine.FileExtensions Property .           ASP.NET MVC 3 installation package also includes the NuGet Package Manager which will be automatically installed when you install ASP.NET MVC 3. NuGet makes it easy to install and update open source libraries and tools in Visual Studio. See this for details.           In ASP.NET MVC 2, client side validation will not trigger for overridden model properties. For example, if have you a Model that contains some overridden properties then client side validation will not trigger for overridden properties in ASP.NET MVC 2 but client side validation will work for overridden properties in ASP.NET MVC 3.           Client side validation is not supported for StringLengthAttribute.MinimumLength property in ASP.NET MVC 2. In ASP.NET MVC 3 client side validation will work for StringLengthAttribute.MinimumLength property.           ASP.NET MVC 3 includes new action results like HttpUnauthorizedResult, HttpNotFoundResult and HttpStatusCodeResult.           ASP.NET MVC 3 includes some new overloads of LabelFor and LabelForModel methods. For details see LabelExtensions.LabelForModel and LabelExtensions.LabelFor.           In ASP.NET MVC 3, IControllerFactory includes a new method GetControllerSessionBehavior. This method is used to get controller's session behavior. For details see IControllerFactory.GetControllerSessionBehavior Method.           In ASP.NET MVC 3, Controller class includes a new property ViewBag which is of type dynamic. This property allows you to access ViewData Dictionary using C # 4.0 dynamic features. For details see ControllerBase.ViewBag Property.           ModelMetadata includes a property AdditionalValues which is of type Dictionary. In ASP.NET MVC 3 you can populate this property using AdditionalMetadataAttribute. For details see AdditionalMetadataAttribute Class.           In ASP.NET MVC 3 you can also use MvcScaffolding to scaffold your Views and Controller. For details see Scaffold your ASP.NET MVC 3 project with the MvcScaffolding package.           If you want to convert your application from ASP.NET MVC 2 to ASP.NET MVC 3 then there is an excellent tool that automatically converts ASP.NET MVC 2 application to ASP.NET MVC 3 application. For details see MVC 3 Project Upgrade Tool.           In ASP.NET MVC 2 DisplayAttribute is not supported but in ASP.NET MVC 3 DisplayAttribute will work properly.           ASP.NET MVC 3 also support model level validation via the new IValidatableObject interface.           ASP.NET MVC 3 includes a new helper method Html.Raw. This helper method allows you to display unencoded HTML.     Summary:          In this article I showed you the new features of ASP.NET MVC 3. This will help you a lot when you start using ASP MVC 3. I also provide you the links where you can find further details. Hopefully you will enjoy this article too.  

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  • VB.NET IF() Coalesce and “Expression Expected” Error

    - by Jeff Widmer
    I am trying to use the equivalent of the C# “??” operator in some VB.NET code that I am working in. This StackOverflow article for “Is there a VB.NET equivalent for C#'s ?? operator?” explains the VB.NET IF() statement syntax which is exactly what I am looking for... and I thought I was going to be done pretty quickly and could move on. But after implementing the IF() statement in my code I started to receive this error: Compiler Error Message: BC30201: Expression expected. And no matter how I tried using the “IF()” statement, whenever I tried to visit the aspx page that I was working on I received the same error. This other StackOverflow article Using VB.NET If vs. IIf in binding/rendering expression indicated that the VB.NET IF() operator was not available until VS2008 or .NET Framework 3.5.  So I checked the Web Application project properties but it was targeting the .NET Framework 3.5: So I was still not understanding what was going on, but then I noticed the version information in the detailed compiler output of the error page: This happened to be a C# project, but with an ASPX page with inline VB.NET code (yes, it is strange to have that but that is the project I am working on).  So even though the project file was targeting the .NET Framework 3.5, the ASPX page was being compiled using the .NET Framework 2.0.  But why?  Where does this get set?  How does ASP.NET know which version of the compiler to use for the inline code? For this I turned to the web.config.  Here is the system.codedom/compilers section that was in the web.config for this project: <system.codedom>     <compilers>         <compiler language="c#;cs;csharp" extension=".cs" warningLevel="4" type="Microsoft.CSharp.CSharpCodeProvider, System, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">             <providerOption name="CompilerVersion" value="v3.5" />             <providerOption name="WarnAsError" value="false" />         </compiler>     </compilers> </system.codedom> Keep in mind that this is a C# web application project file but my aspx file has inline VB.NET code.  The web.config does not have any information for how to compile for VB.NET so it defaults to .NET 2.0 (instead of 3.5 which is what I need). So the web.config needed to include the VB.NET compiler option.  Here it is with both the C# and VB.NET options (I copied the VB.NET config from a new VB.NET Web Application project file).     <system.codedom>         <compilers>             <compiler language="c#;cs;csharp" extension=".cs" warningLevel="4" type="Microsoft.CSharp.CSharpCodeProvider, System, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">                 <providerOption name="CompilerVersion" value="v3.5" />                 <providerOption name="WarnAsError" value="false" />             </compiler>       <compiler language="vb;vbs;visualbasic;vbscript" extension=".vb" warningLevel="4" type="Microsoft.VisualBasic.VBCodeProvider, System, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">         <providerOption name="CompilerVersion" value="v3.5"/>         <providerOption name="OptionInfer" value="true"/>         <providerOption name="WarnAsError" value="false"/>       </compiler>     </compilers>     </system.codedom>   So the inline VB.NET code on my aspx page was being compiled using the .NET Framework 2.0 when it really needed to be compiled with the .NET Framework 3.5 compiler in order to take advantage of the VB.NET IF() coalesce statement.  Without the VB.NET web.config compiler option, the default is to compile using the .NET Framework 2.0 and the VB.NET IF() coalesce statement does not exist (at least in the form that I want it in).  FYI, there is an older IF statement in VB.NET 2.0 compiler which is why it is giving me the unusual “Expression Expected” error message – see this article for when VB.NET got the new updated version. EDIT (2011-06-20): I had made a wrong assumption in the first version of this blog post.  After a little more research and investigation I was able to figure out that the issue was in the web.config and not with the IIS App Pool.  Thanks to the comment from James which forced me to look into this again.

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  • SimpleMembership, Membership Providers, Universal Providers and the new ASP.NET 4.5 Web Forms and ASP.NET MVC 4 templates

    - by Jon Galloway
    The ASP.NET MVC 4 Internet template adds some new, very useful features which are built on top of SimpleMembership. These changes add some great features, like a much simpler and extensible membership API and support for OAuth. However, the new account management features require SimpleMembership and won't work against existing ASP.NET Membership Providers. I'll start with a summary of top things you need to know, then dig into a lot more detail. Summary: SimpleMembership has been designed as a replacement for traditional the previous ASP.NET Role and Membership provider system SimpleMembership solves common problems people ran into with the Membership provider system and was designed for modern user / membership / storage needs SimpleMembership integrates with the previous membership system, but you can't use a MembershipProvider with SimpleMembership The new ASP.NET MVC 4 Internet application template AccountController requires SimpleMembership and is not compatible with previous MembershipProviders You can continue to use existing ASP.NET Role and Membership providers in ASP.NET 4.5 and ASP.NET MVC 4 - just not with the ASP.NET MVC 4 AccountController The existing ASP.NET Role and Membership provider system remains supported as is part of the ASP.NET core ASP.NET 4.5 Web Forms does not use SimpleMembership; it implements OAuth on top of ASP.NET Membership The ASP.NET Web Site Administration Tool (WSAT) is not compatible with SimpleMembership The following is the result of a few conversations with Erik Porter (PM for ASP.NET MVC) to make sure I had some the overall details straight, combined with a lot of time digging around in ILSpy and Visual Studio's assembly browsing tools. SimpleMembership: The future of membership for ASP.NET The ASP.NET Membership system was introduces with ASP.NET 2.0 back in 2005. It was designed to solve common site membership requirements at the time, which generally involved username / password based registration and profile storage in SQL Server. It was designed with a few extensibility mechanisms - notably a provider system (which allowed you override some specifics like backing storage) and the ability to store additional profile information (although the additional  profile information was packed into a single column which usually required access through the API). While it's sometimes frustrating to work with, it's held up for seven years - probably since it handles the main use case (username / password based membership in a SQL Server database) smoothly and can be adapted to most other needs (again, often frustrating, but it can work). The ASP.NET Web Pages and WebMatrix efforts allowed the team an opportunity to take a new look at a lot of things - e.g. the Razor syntax started with ASP.NET Web Pages, not ASP.NET MVC. The ASP.NET Web Pages team designed SimpleMembership to (wait for it) simplify the task of dealing with membership. As Matthew Osborn said in his post Using SimpleMembership With ASP.NET WebPages: With the introduction of ASP.NET WebPages and the WebMatrix stack our team has really be focusing on making things simpler for the developer. Based on a lot of customer feedback one of the areas that we wanted to improve was the built in security in ASP.NET. So with this release we took that time to create a new built in (and default for ASP.NET WebPages) security provider. I say provider because the new stuff is still built on the existing ASP.NET framework. So what do we call this new hotness that we have created? Well, none other than SimpleMembership. SimpleMembership is an umbrella term for both SimpleMembership and SimpleRoles. Part of simplifying membership involved fixing some common problems with ASP.NET Membership. Problems with ASP.NET Membership ASP.NET Membership was very obviously designed around a set of assumptions: Users and user information would most likely be stored in a full SQL Server database or in Active Directory User and profile information would be optimized around a set of common attributes (UserName, Password, IsApproved, CreationDate, Comment, Role membership...) and other user profile information would be accessed through a profile provider Some problems fall out of these assumptions. Requires Full SQL Server for default cases The default, and most fully featured providers ASP.NET Membership providers (SQL Membership Provider, SQL Role Provider, SQL Profile Provider) require full SQL Server. They depend on stored procedure support, and they rely on SQL Server cache dependencies, they depend on agents for clean up and maintenance. So the main SQL Server based providers don't work well on SQL Server CE, won't work out of the box on SQL Azure, etc. Note: Cory Fowler recently let me know about these Updated ASP.net scripts for use with Microsoft SQL Azure which do support membership, personalization, profile, and roles. But the fact that we need a support page with a set of separate SQL scripts underscores the underlying problem. Aha, you say! Jon's forgetting the Universal Providers, a.k.a. System.Web.Providers! Hold on a bit, we'll get to those... Custom Membership Providers have to work with a SQL-Server-centric API If you want to work with another database or other membership storage system, you need to to inherit from the provider base classes and override a bunch of methods which are tightly focused on storing a MembershipUser in a relational database. It can be done (and you can often find pretty good ones that have already been written), but it's a good amount of work and often leaves you with ugly code that has a bunch of System.NotImplementedException fun since there are a lot of methods that just don't apply. Designed around a specific view of users, roles and profiles The existing providers are focused on traditional membership - a user has a username and a password, some specific roles on the site (e.g. administrator, premium user), and may have some additional "nice to have" optional information that can be accessed via an API in your application. This doesn't fit well with some modern usage patterns: In OAuth and OpenID, the user doesn't have a password Often these kinds of scenarios map better to user claims or rights instead of monolithic user roles For many sites, profile or other non-traditional information is very important and needs to come from somewhere other than an API call that maps to a database blob What would work a lot better here is a system in which you were able to define your users, rights, and other attributes however you wanted and the membership system worked with your model - not the other way around. Requires specific schema, overflow in blob columns I've already mentioned this a few times, but it bears calling out separately - ASP.NET Membership focuses on SQL Server storage, and that storage is based on a very specific database schema. SimpleMembership as a better membership system As you might have guessed, SimpleMembership was designed to address the above problems. Works with your Schema As Matthew Osborn explains in his Using SimpleMembership With ASP.NET WebPages post, SimpleMembership is designed to integrate with your database schema: All SimpleMembership requires is that there are two columns on your users table so that we can hook up to it – an “ID” column and a “username” column. The important part here is that they can be named whatever you want. For instance username doesn't have to be an alias it could be an email column you just have to tell SimpleMembership to treat that as the “username” used to log in. Matthew's example shows using a very simple user table named Users (it could be named anything) with a UserID and Username column, then a bunch of other columns he wanted in his app. Then we point SimpleMemberhip at that table with a one-liner: WebSecurity.InitializeDatabaseFile("SecurityDemo.sdf", "Users", "UserID", "Username", true); No other tables are needed, the table can be named anything we want, and can have pretty much any schema we want as long as we've got an ID and something that we can map to a username. Broaden database support to the whole SQL Server family While SimpleMembership is not database agnostic, it works across the SQL Server family. It continues to support full SQL Server, but it also works with SQL Azure, SQL Server CE, SQL Server Express, and LocalDB. Everything's implemented as SQL calls rather than requiring stored procedures, views, agents, and change notifications. Note that SimpleMembership still requires some flavor of SQL Server - it won't work with MySQL, NoSQL databases, etc. You can take a look at the code in WebMatrix.WebData.dll using a tool like ILSpy if you'd like to see why - there places where SQL Server specific SQL statements are being executed, especially when creating and initializing tables. It seems like you might be able to work with another database if you created the tables separately, but I haven't tried it and it's not supported at this point. Note: I'm thinking it would be possible for SimpleMembership (or something compatible) to run Entity Framework so it would work with any database EF supports. That seems useful to me - thoughts? Note: SimpleMembership has the same database support - anything in the SQL Server family - that Universal Providers brings to the ASP.NET Membership system. Easy to with Entity Framework Code First The problem with with ASP.NET Membership's system for storing additional account information is that it's the gate keeper. That means you're stuck with its schema and accessing profile information through its API. SimpleMembership flips that around by allowing you to use any table as a user store. That means you're in control of the user profile information, and you can access it however you'd like - it's just data. Let's look at a practical based on the AccountModel.cs class in an ASP.NET MVC 4 Internet project. Here I'm adding a Birthday property to the UserProfile class. [Table("UserProfile")] public class UserProfile { [Key] [DatabaseGeneratedAttribute(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)] public int UserId { get; set; } public string UserName { get; set; } public DateTime Birthday { get; set; } } Now if I want to access that information, I can just grab the account by username and read the value. var context = new UsersContext(); var username = User.Identity.Name; var user = context.UserProfiles.SingleOrDefault(u => u.UserName == username); var birthday = user.Birthday; So instead of thinking of SimpleMembership as a big membership API, think of it as something that handles membership based on your user database. In SimpleMembership, everything's keyed off a user row in a table you define rather than a bunch of entries in membership tables that were out of your control. How SimpleMembership integrates with ASP.NET Membership Okay, enough sales pitch (and hopefully background) on why things have changed. How does this affect you? Let's start with a diagram to show the relationship (note: I've simplified by removing a few classes to show the important relationships): So SimpleMembershipProvider is an implementaiton of an ExtendedMembershipProvider, which inherits from MembershipProvider and adds some other account / OAuth related things. Here's what ExtendedMembershipProvider adds to MembershipProvider: The important thing to take away here is that a SimpleMembershipProvider is a MembershipProvider, but a MembershipProvider is not a SimpleMembershipProvider. This distinction is important in practice: you cannot use an existing MembershipProvider (including the Universal Providers found in System.Web.Providers) with an API that requires a SimpleMembershipProvider, including any of the calls in WebMatrix.WebData.WebSecurity or Microsoft.Web.WebPages.OAuth.OAuthWebSecurity. However, that's as far as it goes. Membership Providers still work if you're accessing them through the standard Membership API, and all of the core stuff  - including the AuthorizeAttribute, role enforcement, etc. - will work just fine and without any change. Let's look at how that affects you in terms of the new templates. Membership in the ASP.NET MVC 4 project templates ASP.NET MVC 4 offers six Project Templates: Empty - Really empty, just the assemblies, folder structure and a tiny bit of basic configuration. Basic - Like Empty, but with a bit of UI preconfigured (css / images / bundling). Internet - This has both a Home and Account controller and associated views. The Account Controller supports registration and login via either local accounts and via OAuth / OpenID providers. Intranet - Like the Internet template, but it's preconfigured for Windows Authentication. Mobile - This is preconfigured using jQuery Mobile and is intended for mobile-only sites. Web API - This is preconfigured for a service backend built on ASP.NET Web API. Out of these templates, only one (the Internet template) uses SimpleMembership. ASP.NET MVC 4 Basic template The Basic template has configuration in place to use ASP.NET Membership with the Universal Providers. You can see that configuration in the ASP.NET MVC 4 Basic template's web.config: <profile defaultProvider="DefaultProfileProvider"> <providers> <add name="DefaultProfileProvider" type="System.Web.Providers.DefaultProfileProvider, System.Web.Providers, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35" connectionStringName="DefaultConnection" applicationName="/" /> </providers> </profile> <membership defaultProvider="DefaultMembershipProvider"> <providers> <add name="DefaultMembershipProvider" type="System.Web.Providers.DefaultMembershipProvider, System.Web.Providers, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35" connectionStringName="DefaultConnection" enablePasswordRetrieval="false" enablePasswordReset="true" requiresQuestionAndAnswer="false" requiresUniqueEmail="false" maxInvalidPasswordAttempts="5" minRequiredPasswordLength="6" minRequiredNonalphanumericCharacters="0" passwordAttemptWindow="10" applicationName="/" /> </providers> </membership> <roleManager defaultProvider="DefaultRoleProvider"> <providers> <add name="DefaultRoleProvider" type="System.Web.Providers.DefaultRoleProvider, System.Web.Providers, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35" connectionStringName="DefaultConnection" applicationName="/" /> </providers> </roleManager> <sessionState mode="InProc" customProvider="DefaultSessionProvider"> <providers> <add name="DefaultSessionProvider" type="System.Web.Providers.DefaultSessionStateProvider, System.Web.Providers, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35" connectionStringName="DefaultConnection" /> </providers> </sessionState> This means that it's business as usual for the Basic template as far as ASP.NET Membership works. ASP.NET MVC 4 Internet template The Internet template has a few things set up to bootstrap SimpleMembership: \Models\AccountModels.cs defines a basic user account and includes data annotations to define keys and such \Filters\InitializeSimpleMembershipAttribute.cs creates the membership database using the above model, then calls WebSecurity.InitializeDatabaseConnection which verifies that the underlying tables are in place and marks initialization as complete (for the application's lifetime) \Controllers\AccountController.cs makes heavy use of OAuthWebSecurity (for OAuth account registration / login / management) and WebSecurity. WebSecurity provides account management services for ASP.NET MVC (and Web Pages) WebSecurity can work with any ExtendedMembershipProvider. There's one in the box (SimpleMembershipProvider) but you can write your own. Since a standard MembershipProvider is not an ExtendedMembershipProvider, WebSecurity will throw exceptions if the default membership provider is a MembershipProvider rather than an ExtendedMembershipProvider. Practical example: Create a new ASP.NET MVC 4 application using the Internet application template Install the Microsoft ASP.NET Universal Providers for LocalDB NuGet package Run the application, click on Register, add a username and password, and click submit You'll get the following execption in AccountController.cs::Register: To call this method, the "Membership.Provider" property must be an instance of "ExtendedMembershipProvider". This occurs because the ASP.NET Universal Providers packages include a web.config transform that will update your web.config to add the Universal Provider configuration I showed in the Basic template example above. When WebSecurity tries to use the configured ASP.NET Membership Provider, it checks if it can be cast to an ExtendedMembershipProvider before doing anything else. So, what do you do? Options: If you want to use the new AccountController, you'll either need to use the SimpleMembershipProvider or another valid ExtendedMembershipProvider. This is pretty straightforward. If you want to use an existing ASP.NET Membership Provider in ASP.NET MVC 4, you can't use the new AccountController. You can do a few things: Replace  the AccountController.cs and AccountModels.cs in an ASP.NET MVC 4 Internet project with one from an ASP.NET MVC 3 application (you of course won't have OAuth support). Then, if you want, you can go through and remove other things that were built around SimpleMembership - the OAuth partial view, the NuGet packages (e.g. the DotNetOpenAuthAuth package, etc.) Use an ASP.NET MVC 4 Internet application template and add in a Universal Providers NuGet package. Then copy in the AccountController and AccountModel classes. Create an ASP.NET MVC 3 project and upgrade it to ASP.NET MVC 4 using the steps shown in the ASP.NET MVC 4 release notes. None of these are particularly elegant or simple. Maybe we (or just me?) can do something to make this simpler - perhaps a NuGet package. However, this should be an edge case - hopefully the cases where you'd need to create a new ASP.NET but use legacy ASP.NET Membership Providers should be pretty rare. Please let me (or, preferably the team) know if that's an incorrect assumption. Membership in the ASP.NET 4.5 project template ASP.NET 4.5 Web Forms took a different approach which builds off ASP.NET Membership. Instead of using the WebMatrix security assemblies, Web Forms uses Microsoft.AspNet.Membership.OpenAuth assembly. I'm no expert on this, but from a bit of time in ILSpy and Visual Studio's (very pretty) dependency graphs, this uses a Membership Adapter to save OAuth data into an EF managed database while still running on top of ASP.NET Membership. Note: There may be a way to use this in ASP.NET MVC 4, although it would probably take some plumbing work to hook it up. How does this fit in with Universal Providers (System.Web.Providers)? Just to summarize: Universal Providers are intended for cases where you have an existing ASP.NET Membership Provider and you want to use it with another SQL Server database backend (other than SQL Server). It doesn't require agents to handle expired session cleanup and other background tasks, it piggybacks these tasks on other calls. Universal Providers are not really, strictly speaking, universal - at least to my way of thinking. They only work with databases in the SQL Server family. Universal Providers do not work with Simple Membership. The Universal Providers packages include some web config transforms which you would normally want when you're using them. What about the Web Site Administration Tool? Visual Studio includes tooling to launch the Web Site Administration Tool (WSAT) to configure users and roles in your application. WSAT is built to work with ASP.NET Membership, and is not compatible with Simple Membership. There are two main options there: Use the WebSecurity and OAuthWebSecurity API to manage the users and roles Create a web admin using the above APIs Since SimpleMembership runs on top of your database, you can update your users as you would any other data - via EF or even in direct database edits (in development, of course)

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  • ASP.NET Universal Providers (System.Web.Providers)

    - by shiju
    Microsoft Web Platform and Tools (WPT)  team has announced the release of ASP.NET Universal Providers that allows you to use Session, Membership, Roles and Profile providers along with all editions of SQL Server 2005 and later. This support includes Sql Server Express, Sql Server CE and Sql Azure.ASP.NET Universal Providers is available as a NuGet package and the following command will install the package via NuGet. PM> Install-Package System.Web.Providers The support for Sql Azure will help the Azure developers to easily migrate their ASP.NET applications to Azure platform. System.Web.Providers.DefaultMembershipProvider is the equivalent name for the current SqlMembershipProvider and you can put right connectionstring name in the configuration and it will work with any version of Sql Server based on the copnnection string. System.Web.Providers.DefaultProfileProvider is the equivalent provider name for existing System.Web.Profile.SqlProfileProvider and  System.Web.Providers.DefaultRoleProvider is the equivalent provider name for the existing System.Web.Security.SqlRoleProvider.

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  • Writing Unit Tests for ASP.NET Web API Controller

    - by shiju
    In this blog post, I will write unit tests for a ASP.NET Web API controller in the EFMVC reference application. Let me introduce the EFMVC app, If you haven't heard about EFMVC. EFMVC is a simple app, developed as a reference implementation for demonstrating ASP.NET MVC, EF Code First, ASP.NET Web API, Domain-Driven Design (DDD), Test-Driven Development (DDD). The current version is built with ASP.NET MVC 4, EF Code First 5, ASP.NET Web API, Autofac, AutoMapper, Nunit and Moq. All unit tests were written with Nunit and Moq. You can download the latest version of the reference app from http://efmvc.codeplex.com/ Unit Test for HTTP Get Let’s write a unit test class for verifying the behaviour of a ASP.NET Web API controller named CategoryController. Let’s define mock implementation for Repository class, and a Command Bus that is used for executing write operations.  [TestFixture] public class CategoryApiControllerTest { private Mock<ICategoryRepository> categoryRepository; private Mock<ICommandBus> commandBus; [SetUp] public void SetUp() {     categoryRepository = new Mock<ICategoryRepository>();     commandBus = new Mock<ICommandBus>(); } The code block below provides the unit test for a HTTP Get operation. [Test] public void Get_All_Returns_AllCategory() {     // Arrange        IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> fakeCategories = GetCategories();     categoryRepository.Setup(x => x.GetCategoryWithExpenses()).Returns(fakeCategories);     CategoryController controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage()                 {                     Properties = { { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, new HttpConfiguration() } }                 }     };     // Act     var categories = controller.Get();     // Assert     Assert.IsNotNull(categories, "Result is null");     Assert.IsInstanceOf(typeof(IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense>),categories, "Wrong Model");             Assert.AreEqual(3, categories.Count(), "Got wrong number of Categories"); }        The GetCategories method is provided below: private static IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> GetCategories() {     IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> fakeCategories = new List<CategoryWithExpense> {     new CategoryWithExpense {CategoryId=1, CategoryName = "Test1", Description="Test1Desc", TotalExpenses=1000},     new CategoryWithExpense {CategoryId=2, CategoryName = "Test2", Description="Test2Desc",TotalExpenses=2000},     new CategoryWithExpense { CategoryId=3, CategoryName = "Test3", Description="Test3Desc",TotalExpenses=3000}       }.AsEnumerable();     return fakeCategories; } In the unit test method Get_All_Returns_AllCategory, we specify setup on the mocked type ICategoryrepository, for a call to GetCategoryWithExpenses method returns dummy data. We create an instance of the ApiController, where we have specified the Request property of the ApiController since the Request property is used to create a new HttpResponseMessage that will provide the appropriate HTTP status code along with response content data. Unit Tests are using for specifying the behaviour of components so that we have specified that Get operation will use the model type IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> for sending the Content data. The implementation of HTTP Get in the CategoryController is provided below: public IQueryable<CategoryWithExpense> Get() {     var categories = categoryRepository.GetCategoryWithExpenses().AsQueryable();     return categories; } Unit Test for HTTP Post The following are the behaviours we are going to implement for the HTTP Post: A successful HTTP Post  operation should return HTTP status code Created An empty Category should return HTTP status code BadRequest A successful HTTP Post operation should provide correct Location header information in the response for the newly created resource. Writing unit test for HTTP Post is required more information than we write for HTTP Get. In the HTTP Post implementation, we will call to Url.Link for specifying the header Location of Response as shown in below code block. var response = Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.Created, category); string uri = Url.Link("DefaultApi", new { id = category.CategoryId }); response.Headers.Location = new Uri(uri); return response; While we are executing Url.Link from unit tests, we have to specify HttpRouteData information from the unit test method. Otherwise, Url.Link will get a null value. The code block below shows the unit tests for specifying the behaviours for the HTTP Post operation. [Test] public void Post_Category_Returns_CreatedStatusCode() {     // Arrange        commandBus.Setup(c => c.Submit(It.IsAny<CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>())).Returns(new CommandResult(true));     Mapper.CreateMap<CategoryFormModel, CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>();          var httpConfiguration = new HttpConfiguration();     WebApiConfig.Register(httpConfiguration);     var httpRouteData = new HttpRouteData(httpConfiguration.Routes["DefaultApi"],         new HttpRouteValueDictionary { { "controller", "category" } });     var controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage(HttpMethod.Post, "http://localhost/api/category/")         {             Properties =             {                 { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, httpConfiguration },                 { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpRouteDataKey, httpRouteData }             }         }     };     // Act     CategoryModel category = new CategoryModel();     category.CategoryId = 1;     category.CategoryName = "Mock Category";     var response = controller.Post(category);               // Assert     Assert.AreEqual(HttpStatusCode.Created, response.StatusCode);     var newCategory = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<CategoryModel>(response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result);     Assert.AreEqual(string.Format("http://localhost/api/category/{0}", newCategory.CategoryId), response.Headers.Location.ToString()); } [Test] public void Post_EmptyCategory_Returns_BadRequestStatusCode() {     // Arrange        commandBus.Setup(c => c.Submit(It.IsAny<CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>())).Returns(new CommandResult(true));     Mapper.CreateMap<CategoryFormModel, CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>();     var httpConfiguration = new HttpConfiguration();     WebApiConfig.Register(httpConfiguration);     var httpRouteData = new HttpRouteData(httpConfiguration.Routes["DefaultApi"],         new HttpRouteValueDictionary { { "controller", "category" } });     var controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage(HttpMethod.Post, "http://localhost/api/category/")         {             Properties =             {                 { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, httpConfiguration },                 { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpRouteDataKey, httpRouteData }             }         }     };     // Act     CategoryModel category = new CategoryModel();     category.CategoryId = 0;     category.CategoryName = "";     // The ASP.NET pipeline doesn't run, so validation don't run.     controller.ModelState.AddModelError("", "mock error message");     var response = controller.Post(category);     // Assert     Assert.AreEqual(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, response.StatusCode);   } In the above code block, we have written two unit methods, Post_Category_Returns_CreatedStatusCode and Post_EmptyCategory_Returns_BadRequestStatusCode. The unit test method Post_Category_Returns_CreatedStatusCode  verifies the behaviour 1 and 3, that we have defined in the beginning of the section “Unit Test for HTTP Post”. The unit test method Post_EmptyCategory_Returns_BadRequestStatusCode verifies the behaviour 2. For extracting the data from response, we call Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result of HttpResponseMessage object and deserializeit it with Json Convertor. The implementation of HTTP Post in the CategoryController is provided below: // POST /api/category public HttpResponseMessage Post(CategoryModel category) {       if (ModelState.IsValid)     {         var command = new CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand(category.CategoryId, category.CategoryName, category.Description);         var result = commandBus.Submit(command);         if (result.Success)         {                               var response = Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.Created, category);             string uri = Url.Link("DefaultApi", new { id = category.CategoryId });             response.Headers.Location = new Uri(uri);             return response;         }     }     else     {         return Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, ModelState);     }     throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest); } The unit test implementation for HTTP Put and HTTP Delete are very similar to the unit test we have written for  HTTP Get. The complete unit tests for the CategoryController is given below: [TestFixture] public class CategoryApiControllerTest { private Mock<ICategoryRepository> categoryRepository; private Mock<ICommandBus> commandBus; [SetUp] public void SetUp() {     categoryRepository = new Mock<ICategoryRepository>();     commandBus = new Mock<ICommandBus>(); } [Test] public void Get_All_Returns_AllCategory() {     // Arrange        IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> fakeCategories = GetCategories();     categoryRepository.Setup(x => x.GetCategoryWithExpenses()).Returns(fakeCategories);     CategoryController controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage()                 {                     Properties = { { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, new HttpConfiguration() } }                 }     };     // Act     var categories = controller.Get();     // Assert     Assert.IsNotNull(categories, "Result is null");     Assert.IsInstanceOf(typeof(IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense>),categories, "Wrong Model");             Assert.AreEqual(3, categories.Count(), "Got wrong number of Categories"); }        [Test] public void Get_CorrectCategoryId_Returns_Category() {     // Arrange        IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> fakeCategories = GetCategories();     categoryRepository.Setup(x => x.GetCategoryWithExpenses()).Returns(fakeCategories);     CategoryController controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage()         {             Properties = { { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, new HttpConfiguration() } }         }     };     // Act     var response = controller.Get(1);     // Assert     Assert.AreEqual(HttpStatusCode.OK, response.StatusCode);     var category = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<CategoryWithExpense>(response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result);     Assert.AreEqual(1, category.CategoryId, "Got wrong number of Categories"); } [Test] public void Get_InValidCategoryId_Returns_NotFound() {     // Arrange        IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> fakeCategories = GetCategories();     categoryRepository.Setup(x => x.GetCategoryWithExpenses()).Returns(fakeCategories);     CategoryController controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage()         {             Properties = { { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, new HttpConfiguration() } }         }     };     // Act     var response = controller.Get(5);     // Assert     Assert.AreEqual(HttpStatusCode.NotFound, response.StatusCode);            } [Test] public void Post_Category_Returns_CreatedStatusCode() {     // Arrange        commandBus.Setup(c => c.Submit(It.IsAny<CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>())).Returns(new CommandResult(true));     Mapper.CreateMap<CategoryFormModel, CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>();          var httpConfiguration = new HttpConfiguration();     WebApiConfig.Register(httpConfiguration);     var httpRouteData = new HttpRouteData(httpConfiguration.Routes["DefaultApi"],         new HttpRouteValueDictionary { { "controller", "category" } });     var controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage(HttpMethod.Post, "http://localhost/api/category/")         {             Properties =             {                 { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, httpConfiguration },                 { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpRouteDataKey, httpRouteData }             }         }     };     // Act     CategoryModel category = new CategoryModel();     category.CategoryId = 1;     category.CategoryName = "Mock Category";     var response = controller.Post(category);               // Assert     Assert.AreEqual(HttpStatusCode.Created, response.StatusCode);     var newCategory = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<CategoryModel>(response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result);     Assert.AreEqual(string.Format("http://localhost/api/category/{0}", newCategory.CategoryId), response.Headers.Location.ToString()); } [Test] public void Post_EmptyCategory_Returns_BadRequestStatusCode() {     // Arrange        commandBus.Setup(c => c.Submit(It.IsAny<CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>())).Returns(new CommandResult(true));     Mapper.CreateMap<CategoryFormModel, CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>();     var httpConfiguration = new HttpConfiguration();     WebApiConfig.Register(httpConfiguration);     var httpRouteData = new HttpRouteData(httpConfiguration.Routes["DefaultApi"],         new HttpRouteValueDictionary { { "controller", "category" } });     var controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage(HttpMethod.Post, "http://localhost/api/category/")         {             Properties =             {                 { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, httpConfiguration },                 { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpRouteDataKey, httpRouteData }             }         }     };     // Act     CategoryModel category = new CategoryModel();     category.CategoryId = 0;     category.CategoryName = "";     // The ASP.NET pipeline doesn't run, so validation don't run.     controller.ModelState.AddModelError("", "mock error message");     var response = controller.Post(category);     // Assert     Assert.AreEqual(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, response.StatusCode);   } [Test] public void Put_Category_Returns_OKStatusCode() {     // Arrange        commandBus.Setup(c => c.Submit(It.IsAny<CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>())).Returns(new CommandResult(true));     Mapper.CreateMap<CategoryFormModel, CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>();     CategoryController controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage()         {             Properties = { { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, new HttpConfiguration() } }         }     };     // Act     CategoryModel category = new CategoryModel();     category.CategoryId = 1;     category.CategoryName = "Mock Category";     var response = controller.Put(category.CategoryId,category);     // Assert     Assert.AreEqual(HttpStatusCode.OK, response.StatusCode);    } [Test] public void Delete_Category_Returns_NoContentStatusCode() {     // Arrange              commandBus.Setup(c => c.Submit(It.IsAny<DeleteCategoryCommand >())).Returns(new CommandResult(true));     CategoryController controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage()         {             Properties = { { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, new HttpConfiguration() } }         }     };     // Act               var response = controller.Delete(1);     // Assert     Assert.AreEqual(HttpStatusCode.NoContent, response.StatusCode);   } private static IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> GetCategories() {     IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> fakeCategories = new List<CategoryWithExpense> {     new CategoryWithExpense {CategoryId=1, CategoryName = "Test1", Description="Test1Desc", TotalExpenses=1000},     new CategoryWithExpense {CategoryId=2, CategoryName = "Test2", Description="Test2Desc",TotalExpenses=2000},     new CategoryWithExpense { CategoryId=3, CategoryName = "Test3", Description="Test3Desc",TotalExpenses=3000}       }.AsEnumerable();     return fakeCategories; } }  The complete implementation for the Api Controller, CategoryController is given below: public class CategoryController : ApiController {       private readonly ICommandBus commandBus;     private readonly ICategoryRepository categoryRepository;     public CategoryController(ICommandBus commandBus, ICategoryRepository categoryRepository)     {         this.commandBus = commandBus;         this.categoryRepository = categoryRepository;     } public IQueryable<CategoryWithExpense> Get() {     var categories = categoryRepository.GetCategoryWithExpenses().AsQueryable();     return categories; }   // GET /api/category/5 public HttpResponseMessage Get(int id) {     var category = categoryRepository.GetCategoryWithExpenses().Where(c => c.CategoryId == id).SingleOrDefault();     if (category == null)     {         return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.NotFound);     }     return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK, category); }   // POST /api/category public HttpResponseMessage Post(CategoryModel category) {       if (ModelState.IsValid)     {         var command = new CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand(category.CategoryId, category.CategoryName, category.Description);         var result = commandBus.Submit(command);         if (result.Success)         {                               var response = Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.Created, category);             string uri = Url.Link("DefaultApi", new { id = category.CategoryId });             response.Headers.Location = new Uri(uri);             return response;         }     }     else     {         return Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, ModelState);     }     throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest); }   // PUT /api/category/5 public HttpResponseMessage Put(int id, CategoryModel category) {     if (ModelState.IsValid)     {         var command = new CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand(category.CategoryId, category.CategoryName, category.Description);         var result = commandBus.Submit(command);         return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK, category);     }     else     {         return Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, ModelState);     }     throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest); }       // DELETE /api/category/5     public HttpResponseMessage Delete(int id)     {         var command = new DeleteCategoryCommand { CategoryId = id };         var result = commandBus.Submit(command);         if (result.Success)         {             return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.NoContent);         }             throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest);     } } Source Code The EFMVC app can download from http://efmvc.codeplex.com/ . The unit test project can be found from the project EFMVC.Tests and Web API project can be found from EFMVC.Web.API.

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  • EFMVC Migrated to .NET 4.5, Visual Studio 2012, ASP.NET MVC 4 and EF 5 Code First

    - by shiju
    I have just migrated my EFMVC app from .NET 4.0 and ASP.NET MVC 4 RC to .NET 4.5, ASP.NET MVC 4 RTM and Entity Framework 5 Code First. In this release, the EFMVC solution is built with Visual Studio 2012 RTM. The migration process was very smooth and did not made any major changes other than adding simple unit tests with NUnit and Moq. I will add more unit tests on later and will also modify the existing solution. Source Code You can download the source code from http://efmvc.codeplex.com/

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  • June 26th Links: ASP.NET, ASP.NET MVC, .NET and NuGet

    - by ScottGu
    Here is the latest in my link-listing series.  Also check out my Best of 2010 Summary for links to 100+ other posts I’ve done in the last year. [I am also now using Twitter for quick updates and to share links. Follow me at: twitter.com/scottgu] ASP.NET Introducing new ASP.NET Universal Providers: Great post from Scott Hanselman on the new System.Web.Providers we are working on.  This release delivers new ASP.NET Membership, Role Management, Session, Profile providers that work with SQL Server, SQL CE and SQL Azure. CSS Sprites and the ASP.NET Sprite and Image Optimization Library: Great post from Scott Mitchell that talks about a free library for ASP.NET that you can use to optimize your CSS and images to reduce HTTP requests and speed up your site. Better HTML5 Support for the VS 2010 Editor: Another great post from Scott Hanselman on an update several people on my team did that enables richer HTML5 editing support within Visual Studio 2010. Install the Ajax Control Toolkit from NuGet: Nice post by Stephen Walther on how you can now use NuGet to install the Ajax Control Toolkit within your applications.  This makes it much easier to reference and use. May 2011 Release of the Ajax Control Toolkit: Another great post from Stephen Walther that talks about the May release of the Ajax Control Toolkit. It includes a bunch of nice enhancements and fixes. SassAndCoffee 0.9 Released: Paul Betts blogs about the latest release of his SassAndCoffee extension (available via NuGet). It enables you to easily use Sass and Coffeescript within your ASP.NET applications (both MVC and Webforms). ASP.NET MVC ASP.NET MVC Mini-Profiler: The folks at StackOverflow.com (a great site built with ASP.NET MVC) have released a nice (free) profiler they’ve built that enables you to easily profile your ASP.NET MVC 3 sites and tune them for performance.  Globalization, Internationalization and Localization in ASP.NET MVC 3: Great post from Scott Hanselman on how to enable internationalization, globalization and localization support within your ASP.NET MVC 3 and jQuery solutions. Precompile your MVC Razor Views: Great post from David Ebbo that discusses a new Razor Generator tool that enables you to pre-compile your razor view templates as assemblies – which enables a bunch of cool scenarios. Unit Testing Razor Views: Nice post from David Ebbo that shows how to use his new Razor Generator to enable unit testing of razor view templates with ASP.NET MVC. Bin Deploying ASP.NET MVC 3: Nice post by Phil Haack that covers a cool feature added to VS 2010 SP1 that makes it really easy to \bin deploy ASP.NET MVC and Razor within your application. This enables you to easily deploy the app to servers that don’t have ASP.NET MVC 3 installed. .NET Table Splitting with EF 4.1 Code First: Great post from Morteza Manavi that discusses how to split up a single database table across multiple EF entity classes.  This shows off some of the power behind EF 4.1 and is very useful when working with legacy database schemas. Choosing the Right Collection Class: Nice post from James Michael Hare that talks about the different collection class options available within .NET.  A nice overview for people who haven’t looked at all of the support now built into the framework. Little Wonders: Empty(), DefaultIfEmpty() and Count() helper methods: Another in James Michael Hare’s excellent series on .NET/C# “Little Wonders”.  This post covers some of the great helper methods now built-into .NET that make coding even easier. NuGet NuGet 1.4 Released: Learn all about the latest release of NuGet – which includes a bunch of cool new capabilities.  It takes only seconds to update to it – go for it! NuGet in Depth: Nice presentation from Scott Hanselman all about NuGet and some of the investments we are making to enable a better open source ecosystem within .NET. NuGet for the Enterprise – NuGet in a Continuous Integration Automated Build System: Great post from Scott Hanselman on how to integrate NuGet within enterprise build environments and enable it with CI solutions. Hope this helps, Scott

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  • Multi-tenant ASP.NET MVC – Introduction

    - by zowens
    I’ve read a few different blogs that talk about multi-tenancy and how to resolve some of the issues surrounding multi-tenancy. What I’ve come to realize is that these implementations overcomplicate the issues and give only a muddy implementation! I’ve seen some really illogical code out there. I have recently been building a multi-tenancy framework for internal use at eagleenvision.net. Through this process, I’ve realized a few different techniques to make building multi-tenant applications actually quite easy. I will be posting a few different entries over the issue and my personal implementation. In this first post, I will discuss what multi-tenancy means and how my implementation will be structured.   So what’s the problem? Here’s the deal. Multi-tenancy is basically a technique of code-reuse of web application code. A multi-tenant application is an application that runs a single instance for multiple clients. Here the “client” is different URL bindings on IIS using ASP.NET MVC. The problem with different instances of the, essentially, same application is that you have to spin up different instances of ASP.NET. As the number of running instances of ASP.NET grows, so does the memory footprint of IIS. Stack Exchange shifted its architecture to multi-tenancy March. As the blog post explains, multi-tenancy saves cost in terms of memory utilization and physical disc storage. If you use the same code base for many applications, multi-tenancy just makes sense. You’ll reduce the amount of work it takes to synchronize the site implementations and you’ll thank your lucky stars later for choosing to use one application for multiple sites. Multi-tenancy allows the freedom of extensibility while relying on some pre-built code.   You’d think this would be simple. I have actually seen a real lack of reference material on the subject in terms of ASP.NET MVC. This is somewhat surprising given the number of users of ASP.NET MVC. However, I will certainly fill the void ;). Implementing a multi-tenant application takes a little thinking. It’s not straight-forward because the possibilities of implementation are endless. I have yet to see a great implementation of a multi-tenant MVC application. The only one that comes close to what I have in mind is Rob Ashton’s implementation (all the entries are listed on this page). There’s some really nasty code in there… something I’d really like to avoid. He has also written a library (MvcEx) that attempts to aid multi-tenant development. This code is even worse, in my honest opinion. Once I start seeing Reflection.Emit, I have to assume the worst :) In all seriousness, if his implementation makes sense to you, use it! It’s a fine implementation that should be given a look. At least look at the code. I will reference MvcEx going forward as a comparison to my implementation. I will explain why my approach differs from MvcEx and how it is better or worse (hopefully better).   Core Goals of my Multi-Tenant Implementation The first, and foremost, goal is to use Inversion of Control containers to my advantage. As you will see throughout this series, I pass around containers quite frequently and rely on their use heavily. I will be using StructureMap in my implementation. However, you could probably use your favorite IoC tool instead. <RANT> However, please don’t be stupid and abstract your IoC tool. Each IoC is powerful and by abstracting the capabilities, you’re doing yourself a real disservice. Who in the world swaps out IoC tools…? No one!</RANT> (It had to be said.) I will outline some of the goodness of StructureMap as we go along. This is really an invaluable tool in my tool belt and simple to use in my multi-tenant implementation. The second core goal is to represent a tenant as easily as possible. Just as a dependency container will be a first-class citizen, so will a tenant. This allows us to easily extend and use tenants. This will also allow different ways of “plugging in” tenants into your application. In my implementation, there will be a single dependency container for a single tenant. This will enable isolation of the dependencies of the tenant. The third goal is to use composition as a means to delegate “core” functions out to the tenant. More on this later.   Features In MvcExt, “Modules” are a code element of the infrastructure. I have simplified this concept and have named this “Features”. A feature is a simple element of an application. Controllers can be specified to have a feature and actions can have “sub features”. Each tenant can select features it needs and the other features will be hidden to the tenant’s users. My implementation doesn’t require something to be a feature. A controller can be common to all tenants. For example, (as you will see) I have a “Content” controller that will return the CSS, Javascript and Images for a tenant. This is common logic to all tenants and shouldn’t be hidden or considered a “feature”; Content is a core component.   Up next My next post will be all about the code. I will reveal some of the foundation to the way I do multi-tenancy. I will have posts dedicated to Foundation, Controllers, Views, Caching, Content and how to setup the tenants. Each post will be in-depth about the issues and implementation details, while adhering to my core goals outlined in this post. As always, comment with questions of DM me on twitter or send me an email.

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