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  • [ASP.NET 4.0] Persisting Row Selection in Data Controls

    - by HosamKamel
    Data Control Selection Feature In ASP.NET 2.0: ASP.NET Data Controls row selection feature was based on row index (in the current page), this of course produce an issue if you try to select an item in the first page then navigate to the second page without select any record you will find the same row (with the same index) selected in the second page! In the sample application attached: Select the second row in the books GridView. Navigate to second page without doing any selection You will find the second row in the second page selected. Persisting Row Selection: Is a new feature which replace the old selection mechanism which based on row index to be based on the row data key instead. This means that if you select the third row on page 1 and move to page 2, nothing is selected on page 2. When you move back to page 1, the third row is still selected. Data Control Selection Feature In ASP.NET 3.5 SP1: The Persisting Row Selection was initially supported only in Dynamic Data projects Data Control Selection Feature In ASP.NET 4.0: Persisted selection is now supported for the GridView and ListView controls in all projects. You can enable this feature by setting the EnablePersistedSelection property, as shown below: Important thing to note, once you enable this feature you have to set the DataKeyNames property too because as discussed the full approach is based on the Row Data Key Simple feature but  is a much more natural behavior than the behavior in earlier versions of ASP.NET. Download Demo Project

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  • What is New in ASP.NET 4.0 Code Access Security

    - by HosamKamel
    ASP.NET Code Access Security (CAS) is a feature that helps protect server applications on hosting multiple Web sites, ASP.NET lets you assign a configurable trust level that corresponds to a predefined set of permissions. ASP.NET has predefined ASP.NET Trust Levels and Policy Files that you can assign to applications, you also can assign custom trust level and policy files. Most web hosting companies run ASP.NET applications in Medium Trust to prevent that one website affect or harm another site etc. As .NET Framework's Code Access Security model has evolved, ASP.NET 4.0 Code Access Security also has introduced several changes and improvements.   A Full post addresses the new changes in ASP.NET 4.0 is published at Asp.Net QA Team Here http://weblogs.asp.net/asptest/archive/2010/04/23/what-is-new-in-asp-net-4-0-code-access-security.aspx

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  • Entity Framework Code-First to Provide Replacement for ASP.NET Profile Provider

    - by Ken Cox [MVP]
    A while back, I coordinated a project to add support for the SQL Table Profile Provider in ASP.NET 4 Web Applications.  We urged Microsoft to improve ASP.NET’s built-in Profile support so our workaround wouldn’t be necessary. Instead, Microsoft plans to provide a replacement for ASP.NET Profile in a forthcoming release. In response to my feature suggestion on Connect, Microsoft says we should look for something even better using Entity Framework: “When code-first is officially released the final piece of a full replacement of the ASP.NET Profile will have arrived. Once code-first for EF4 is released, developers will have a really easy and very approachable way to create any arbitrary class, and automatically have the .NET Framework create a table to provide storage for that class. Furthermore developer will also have full LINQ-query capabilities against code-first classes. “ The downside is that there won’t be a way to retrofit this Profile replacement to pre- ASP.NET 4 Web applications. At least there’ll still be the MVP workaround code. It looks like it’s time for me to dig into a CTP of EF Code-First to see what’s available.   Scott Guthrie has been blogging about Code-First Development with Entity Framework 4. It’s not clear when the EF Code-First is coming, but my guess is that it’ll be part of the VS 2010/.NET 4 service pack.

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  • VB.NET IF() Coalesce and “Expression Expected” Error

    - by Jeff Widmer
    I am trying to use the equivalent of the C# “??” operator in some VB.NET code that I am working in. This StackOverflow article for “Is there a VB.NET equivalent for C#'s ?? operator?” explains the VB.NET IF() statement syntax which is exactly what I am looking for... and I thought I was going to be done pretty quickly and could move on. But after implementing the IF() statement in my code I started to receive this error: Compiler Error Message: BC30201: Expression expected. And no matter how I tried using the “IF()” statement, whenever I tried to visit the aspx page that I was working on I received the same error. This other StackOverflow article Using VB.NET If vs. IIf in binding/rendering expression indicated that the VB.NET IF() operator was not available until VS2008 or .NET Framework 3.5.  So I checked the Web Application project properties but it was targeting the .NET Framework 3.5: So I was still not understanding what was going on, but then I noticed the version information in the detailed compiler output of the error page: This happened to be a C# project, but with an ASPX page with inline VB.NET code (yes, it is strange to have that but that is the project I am working on).  So even though the project file was targeting the .NET Framework 3.5, the ASPX page was being compiled using the .NET Framework 2.0.  But why?  Where does this get set?  How does ASP.NET know which version of the compiler to use for the inline code? For this I turned to the web.config.  Here is the system.codedom/compilers section that was in the web.config for this project: <system.codedom>     <compilers>         <compiler language="c#;cs;csharp" extension=".cs" warningLevel="4" type="Microsoft.CSharp.CSharpCodeProvider, System, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">             <providerOption name="CompilerVersion" value="v3.5" />             <providerOption name="WarnAsError" value="false" />         </compiler>     </compilers> </system.codedom> Keep in mind that this is a C# web application project file but my aspx file has inline VB.NET code.  The web.config does not have any information for how to compile for VB.NET so it defaults to .NET 2.0 (instead of 3.5 which is what I need). So the web.config needed to include the VB.NET compiler option.  Here it is with both the C# and VB.NET options (I copied the VB.NET config from a new VB.NET Web Application project file).     <system.codedom>         <compilers>             <compiler language="c#;cs;csharp" extension=".cs" warningLevel="4" type="Microsoft.CSharp.CSharpCodeProvider, System, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">                 <providerOption name="CompilerVersion" value="v3.5" />                 <providerOption name="WarnAsError" value="false" />             </compiler>       <compiler language="vb;vbs;visualbasic;vbscript" extension=".vb" warningLevel="4" type="Microsoft.VisualBasic.VBCodeProvider, System, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089">         <providerOption name="CompilerVersion" value="v3.5"/>         <providerOption name="OptionInfer" value="true"/>         <providerOption name="WarnAsError" value="false"/>       </compiler>     </compilers>     </system.codedom>   So the inline VB.NET code on my aspx page was being compiled using the .NET Framework 2.0 when it really needed to be compiled with the .NET Framework 3.5 compiler in order to take advantage of the VB.NET IF() coalesce statement.  Without the VB.NET web.config compiler option, the default is to compile using the .NET Framework 2.0 and the VB.NET IF() coalesce statement does not exist (at least in the form that I want it in).  FYI, there is an older IF statement in VB.NET 2.0 compiler which is why it is giving me the unusual “Expression Expected” error message – see this article for when VB.NET got the new updated version. EDIT (2011-06-20): I had made a wrong assumption in the first version of this blog post.  After a little more research and investigation I was able to figure out that the issue was in the web.config and not with the IIS App Pool.  Thanks to the comment from James which forced me to look into this again.

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  • How do i return integers from a string ?

    - by kannan.ambadi
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Suppose you are passing a string(for e.g.: “My name has 1 K, 2 A and 3 N”)  which may contain integers, letters or special characters. I want to retrieve only numbers from the input string. We can implement it in many ways such as splitting the string into an array or by using TryParse method. I would like to share another idea, that’s by using Regular expressions. All you have to do is, create an instance of Regular Expression with a specified pattern for integer. Regular expression class defines a method called Split, which splits the specified input string based on the pattern provided during object initialization.     We can write the code as given below:   public static int[] SplitIdSeqenceValues(object combinedArgs)         {             var _argsSeperator = new Regex(@"\D+", RegexOptions.Compiled);               string[] splitedIntegers = _argsSeperator.Split(combinedArgs.ToString());               var args = new int[splitedIntegers.Length];               for (int i = 0; i < splitedIntegers.Length; i++)                 args[i] = MakeSafe.ToSafeInt32(splitedIntegers[i]);                           return args;         }    It would be better, if we set to RegexOptions.Compiled so that the regular expression will have performance boost by faster compilation.   Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Happy Programming  :))   

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  • ASP.NET MVC 3 RTM Released

    - by shiju
     The ASP.NET team has released RTM version of ASP.NET MVC 3. You can download the ASP.NET MVC 3 RTM from here and source code of ASP.NET MVC 3 can download from here. Microsoft has released the following products along with ASP.NET MVC 3.NuGetIIS Express 7.5SQL Server Compact Edition 4Web Deploy and Web Farm Framework 2.0Orchard 1.0WebMatrix 1.0 You can read more details from ScottGu's blog post Announcing release of ASP.NET MVC 3, IIS Express, SQL CE 4, Web Farm Framework, Orchard, WebMatrix .You can upgrade your ASP.NET MVC 2 projects to ASP.NET MVC 3 using MVC 3 Project Upgrade Tool. You can read more details about the MVC 3 Upgrade Tool from here. Demo Web App using ASP.NET MVC 3 RTM  You can download a demo web app using ASP.NET MVC 3 RTM from here. The demo app is explained in the below blog postsDeveloping web apps using ASP.NET MVC 3, Razor and EF Code First - Part 1Developing web apps using ASP.NET MVC 3, Razor and EF Code First - Part 2

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  • Dividing web.config into multiple files in asp.net

    - by Jalpesh P. Vadgama
    When you are having different people working on one project remotely you will get some problem with web.config, as everybody was having different version of web.config. So at that time once you check in your web.config with your latest changes the other people have to get latest that web.config and made some specific changes as per their local environment. Most of people who have worked things from remotely has faced that problem. I think most common example would be connection string and app settings changes. For this kind of situation this will be a best solution. We can divide particular section of web.config into the multiple files. For example we could have separate ConnectionStrings.config file for connection strings and AppSettings.config file for app settings file. Most of people does not know that there is attribute called ‘configSource’ where we can  define the path of external config file and it will load that section from that external file. Just like below. <configuration> <appSettings configSource="AppSettings.config"/> <connectionStrings configSource="ConnectionStrings.config"/> </configuration> And you could have your ConnectionStrings.config file like following. <connectionStrings> <add name="DefaultConnection" connectionString="Data Source=(LocalDb)\v11.0;Initial Catalog=aspnet-WebApplication1-20120523114732;Integrated Security=True" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" /> </connectionStrings> Same way you have another AppSettings.Config file like following. <appSettings> <add key="aspnet:UseTaskFriendlySynchronizationContext" value="true" /> <add key="ValidationSettings:UnobtrusiveValidationMode" value="WebForms" /> </appSettings> That's it. Hope you like this post. Stay tuned for more..

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  • .NET Reflector 6, .NET Reflector Pro, TestDriven.NET, .NET 4.0 and Mono

    - by Bart Read
    By now you may well have noticed that .NET Reflector 6 and .NET Reflector Pro are out in the wild. The official launch happened today, although we actually put the software out last Thursday as part of a phased release plan to ensure that everything went smoothly today which, so far, it seems to have done. Clive and Alex have already talked extensively about what the new version and the Pro extension do, so I'm not going to go into any detail here, but I've linked to their blogs at the bottom. What...(read more)

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  • ASP.Net Web API in Visual Studio 2010

    - by sreejukg
    Recently for one of my project, it was necessary to create couple of services. In the past I was using WCF, since my Services are going to be utilized through HTTP, I was thinking of ASP.Net web API. So I decided to create a Web API project. Now the real issue is that ASP.Net Web API launched after Visual Studio 2010 and I had to use ASP.Net web API in VS 2010 itself. By default there is no template available for Web API in Visual Studio 2010. Microsoft has made available an update that installs ASP.Net MVC 4 with web API in Visual Studio 2010. You can find the update from the below url. http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=30683 Though the update denotes ASP.Net MVC 4, this also includes ASP.Net Web API. Download the installation media and start the installer. As usual for any update, you need to agree on terms and conditions. The installation starts straight away, once you clicked the Install button. If everything goes ok, you will see the success message. Now open Visual Studio 2010, you can see ASP.Net MVC 4 Project template is available for you. Now you can create ASP.Net Web API project using Visual Studio 2010. When you create a new ASP.Net MVC 4 project, you can choose the Web API template. Further reading http://www.asp.net/web-api/overview/getting-started-with-aspnet-web-api/tutorial-your-first-web-api http://www.asp.net/mvc/mvc4

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  • April 14th Links: ASP.NET, ASP.NET MVC, ASP.NET Web API and Visual Studio

    - by ScottGu
    Here is the latest in my link-listing blog series: ASP.NET Easily overlooked features in VS 11 Express for Web: Good post by Scott Hanselman that highlights a bunch of easily overlooked improvements that are coming to VS 11 (and specifically the free express editions) for web development: unit testing, browser chooser/launcher, IIS Express, CSS Color Picker, Image Preview in Solution Explorer and more. Get Started with ASP.NET 4.5 Web Forms: Good 5-part tutorial that walks-through building an application using ASP.NET Web Forms and highlights some of the nice improvements coming with ASP.NET 4.5. What is New in Razor V2 and What Else is New in Razor V2: Great posts by Andrew Nurse, a dev on the ASP.NET team, about some of the new improvements coming with ASP.NET Razor v2. ASP.NET MVC 4 AllowAnonymous Attribute: Nice post from David Hayden that talks about the new [AllowAnonymous] filter introduced with ASP.NET MVC 4. Introduction to the ASP.NET Web API: Great tutorial by Stephen Walher that covers how to use the new ASP.NET Web API support built-into ASP.NET 4.5 and ASP.NET MVC 4. Comprehensive List of ASP.NET Web API Tutorials and Articles: Tugberk Ugurlu links to a huge collection of articles, tutorials, and samples about the new ASP.NET Web API capability. Async Mashups using ASP.NET Web API: Nice post by Henrik on how you can use the new async language support coming with .NET 4.5 to easily and efficiently make asynchronous network requests that do not block threads within ASP.NET. ASP.NET and Front-End Web Development Visual Studio 11 and Front End Web Development - JavaScript/HTML5/CSS3: Nice post by Scott Hanselman that highlights some of the great improvements coming with VS 11 (including the free express edition) for front-end web development. HTML5 Drag/Drop and Async Multi-file Upload with ASP.NET Web API: Great post by Filip W. that demonstrates how to implement an async file drag/drop uploader using HTML5 and ASP.NET Web API. Device Emulator Guide for Mobile Development with ASP.NET: Good post from Rachel Appel that covers how to use various device emulators with ASP.NET and VS to develop cross platform mobile sites. Fixing these jQuery: A Guide to Debugging: Great presentation by Adam Sontag on debugging with JavaScript and jQuery.  Some really good tips, tricks and gotchas that can save a lot of time. ASP.NET and Open Source Getting Started with ASP.NET Web Stack Source on CodePlex: Fantastic post by Henrik (an architect on the ASP.NET team) that provides step by step instructions on how to work with the ASP.NET source code we recently open sourced. Contributing to ASP.NET Web Stack Source on CodePlex: Follow-on to the post above (also by Henrik) that walks-through how you can submit a code contribution to the ASP.NET MVC, Web API and Razor projects. Overview of the WebApiContrib project: Nice post by Pedro Reys on the new open source WebApiContrib project that has been started to deliver cool extensions and libraries for use with ASP.NET Web API. Entity Framework Entity Framework 5 Performance Improvements and Performance Considerations for EF5:  Good articles that describes some of the big performance wins coming with EF5 (which will ship with both .NET 4.5 and ASP.NET MVC 4). Automatic compilation of LINQ queries will yield some significant performance wins (up to 600% faster). ASP.NET MVC 4 and EF Database Migrations: Good post by David Hayden that covers the new database migrations support within EF 4.3 which allows you to easily update your database schema during development - without losing any of the data within it. Visual Studio What's New in Visual Studio 11 Unit Testing: Nice post by Peter Provost (from the VS team) that talks about some of the great improvements coming to VS11 for unit testing - including built-in VS tooling support for a broad set of unit test frameworks (including NUnit, XUnit, Jasmine, QUnit and more) Hope this helps, Scott

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  • Using TypeScript in ASP.NET MVC Projects

    - by shiju
    In the previous blog post Microsoft TypeScript : A Typed Superset of JavaScript, I have given a brief introduction on TypeScript. In this post, I will demonstrate how to use TypeScript with ASP.NET MVC projects and how we can compile TypeScript within the ASP.NET MVC projects. Using TypeScript with ASP.NET MVC 3 Projects The Visual Studio plug-in for TypeScript provides an ASP.NET MVC 3 project template for TypeScript that lets you to compile TypeScript from the Visual Studio. The following screen shot shows the TypeScript template for ASP.NET MVC 3 project The “TypeScript Internet Application” template is just a ASP.NET MVC 3 internet application project template which will allows to compile TypeScript programs to JavaScript when you are building your ASP.NET MVC projects. This project template will have the following section in the .csproject file <None Include="Scripts\jquery.d.ts" /> <TypeScriptCompile Include="Scripts\site.ts" /> <Content Include="Scripts\site.js"> <DependentUpon>site.ts</DependentUpon> </Content> .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } <Target Name="BeforeBuild"> <Exec Command="&amp;quot;$(PROGRAMFILES)\ Microsoft SDKs\TypeScript\0.8.0.0\tsc&amp;quot; @(TypeScriptCompile ->'&quot;%(fullpath)&quot;', ' ')" /> </Target> .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } The “BeforeBuild” target will allows you to compile TypeScript programs when you are building your ASP.NET MVC projects. The TypeScript project template will provide a typing reference file for the jQuery library named “jquery.d.ts”. The following default app.ts file referenced to jquery.d.ts 1: ///<reference path='jquery.d.ts' /> 2:   3: $(document).ready(function () { 4:   5: $(".btn-slide").click(function () { 6: $("#main").slideToggle("slow"); 7: $(this).toggleClass("active"); 8: }); 9:   10: }); .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } Using TypeScript with ASP.NET MVC 4 Projects The current preview version of TypeScript is not providing a project template for ASP.NET MVC 4 projects. But you can use TypeScript with ASP.NET MVC 4 projects by editing the project’s .csproject file. You can take the necessary settings from ASP.NET MVC 3 project file. I have just added the following section in the end of the .csproj file of a ASP.NET MVC 4 project, which will allows to compile all TypeScript when building ASP.NET MVC 4 project. <ItemGroup> <TypeScriptCompile Include="$(ProjectDir)\**\*.ts" /> </ItemGroup> <Target Name="BeforeBuild"> <Exec Command="&amp;quot;$(PROGRAMFILES)\ Microsoft SDKs\TypeScript\0.8.0.0\tsc&amp;quot; @(TypeScriptCompile ->'&quot;%(fullpath)&quot;', ' ')" /> </Target> .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; }

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  • May 20th Links: ASP.NET MVC, ASP.NET, .NET 4, VS 2010, Silverlight

    - by ScottGu
    Here is the latest in my link-listing series.  Also check out my VS 2010 and .NET 4 series and ASP.NET MVC 2 series for other on-going blog series I’m working on. [In addition to blogging, I am also now using Twitter for quick updates and to share links. Follow me at: twitter.com/scottgu] ASP.NET MVC How to Localize an ASP.NET MVC Application: Michael Ceranski has a good blog post that describes how to localize ASP.NET MVC 2 applications. ASP.NET MVC with jTemplates Part 1 and Part 2: Steve Gentile has a nice two-part set of blog posts that demonstrate how to use the jTemplate and DataTable jQuery libraries to implement client-side data binding with ASP.NET MVC. CascadingDropDown jQuery Plugin for ASP.NET MVC: Raj Kaimal has a nice blog post that demonstrates how to implement a dynamically constructed cascading dropdownlist on the client using jQuery and ASP.NET MVC. How to Configure VS 2010 Code Coverage for ASP.NET MVC Unit Tests: Visual Studio enables you to calculate the “code coverage” of your unit tests.  This measures the percentage of code within your application that is exercised by your tests – and can give you a sense of how much test coverage you have.  Gunnar Peipman demonstrates how to configure this for ASP.NET MVC projects. Shrinkr URL Shortening Service Sample: A nice open source application and code sample built by Kazi Manzur that demonstrates how to implement a URL Shortening Services (like bit.ly) using ASP.NET MVC 2 and EF4.  More details here. Creating RSS Feeds in ASP.NET MVC: Damien Guard has a nice post that describes a cool new “FeedResult” class he created that makes it easy to publish and expose RSS feeds from within ASP.NET MVC sites. NoSQL with MongoDB, NoRM and ASP.NET MVC Part 1 and Part 2: Nice two-part blog series by Shiju Varghese on how to use MongoDB (a document database) with ASP.NET MVC.  If you are interested in document databases also make sure to check out the Raven DB project from Ayende. Using the FCKEditor with ASP.NET MVC: Quick blog post that describes how to use FCKEditor – an open source HTML Text Editor – with ASP.NET MVC. ASP.NET Replace Html.Encode Calls with the New HTML Encoding Syntax: Phil Haack has a good blog post that describes a useful way to quickly update your ASP.NET pages and ASP.NET MVC views to use the new <%: %> encoding syntax in ASP.NET 4.  I blogged about the new <%: %> syntax – it provides an easy and concise way to HTML encode content. Integrating Twitter into an ASP.NET Website using OAuth: Scott Mitchell has a nice article that describes how to take advantage of Twiter within an ASP.NET Website using the OAuth protocol – which is a simple, secure protocol for granting API access. Creating an ASP.NET report using VS 2010 Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3: Raj Kaimal has a nice three part set of blog posts that detail how to use SQL Server Reporting Services, ASP.NET 4 and VS 2010 to create a dynamic reporting solution. Three Hidden Extensibility Gems in ASP.NET 4: Phil Haack blogs about three obscure but useful extensibility points enabled with ASP.NET 4. .NET 4 Entity Framework 4 Video Series: Julie Lerman has a nice, free, 7-part video series on MSDN that walks through how to use the new EF4 capabilities with VS 2010 and .NET 4.  I’ll be covering EF4 in a blog series that I’m going to start shortly as well. Getting Lazy with System.Lazy: System.Lazy and System.Lazy<T> are new features in .NET 4 that provide a way to create objects that may need to perform time consuming operations and defer the execution of the operation until it is needed.  Derik Whittaker has a nice write-up that describes how to use it. LINQ to Twitter: Nifty open source library on Codeplex that enables you to use LINQ syntax to query Twitter. Visual Studio 2010 Using Intellitrace in VS 2010: Chris Koenig has a nice 10 minute video that demonstrates how to use the new Intellitrace features of VS 2010 to enable DVR playback of your debug sessions. Make the VS 2010 IDE Colors look like VS 2008: Scott Hanselman has a nice blog post that covers the Visual Studio Color Theme Editor extension – which allows you to customize the VS 2010 IDE however you want. How to understand your code using Dependency Graphs, Sequence Diagrams, and the Architecture Explorer: Jennifer Marsman has a nice blog post describes how to take advantage of some of the new architecture features within VS 2010 to quickly analyze applications and legacy code-bases. How to maintain control of your code using Layer Diagrams: Another great blog post by Jennifer Marsman that demonstrates how to setup a “layer diagram” within VS 2010 to enforce clean layering within your applications.  This enables you to enforce a compiler error if someone inadvertently violates a layer design rule. Collapse Selection in Solution Explorer Extension: Useful VS 2010 extension that enables you to quickly collapse “child nodes” within the Visual Studio Solution Explorer.  If you have deeply nested project structures this extension is useful. Silverlight and Windows Phone 7 Building a Simple Windows Phone 7 Application: A nice tutorial blog post that demonstrates how to take advantage of Expression Blend to create an animated Windows Phone 7 application. If you haven’t checked out my Windows Phone 7 Twitter Tutorial I also recommend reading that. Hope this helps, Scott P.S. If you haven’t already, check out this month’s "Find a Hoster” page on the www.asp.net website to learn about great (and very inexpensive) ASP.NET hosting offers.

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  • Why is VB so popular?

    - by aaaidan
    To me, Visual Basic seems clumsy, ugly, error-prone, and difficult to read. I'll let others explain why. While VB.net has clearly been a huge leap forward for the language in terms of features, I still don't understand why anyone would choose to code in VB over, say, C#. However, I still see (what seems to be) the vast majority of commercial web apps from "MS shops" are built in VB. I could stand corrected on this, but VB still seems more popular than it deserves. Can anyone help answer any (or all) of these questions: Am I missing something with VB? Is it easier to learn, or "friendlier" than C#? Are there features I don't know about? Why is VB/VB.net so frequently used today, especially in web projects?

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  • Should a c# dev switch to VB.net when the team language base is mixed?

    - by jjr2527
    I recently joined a new development team where the language preferences are mixed on the .net platform. Dev 1: Knows VB.net, does not know c# Dev 2: Knows VB.net, does not know c# Dev 3: Knows c# and VB.net, prefers c# Dev 4: Knows c# and VB6(VB.net should be pretty easy to pick up), prefers c# It seems to me that the thought leaders in the .net space are c# devs almost universally. I also thought that some 3rd party tools didn't support VB.net but when I started looking into it I didn't find any good examples. I would prefer to get the whole team on c# but if there isn't any good reason to force the issue aside from preference then I don't think that is the right choice. Are there any reasons I should lead folks away from VB.net?

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  • ASP.Net MVC 2 Auto Complete Textbox With Custom View Model Attribute & EditorTemplate

    - by SeanMcAlinden
    In this post I’m going to show how to create a generic, ajax driven Auto Complete text box using the new MVC 2 Templates and the jQuery UI library. The template will be automatically displayed when a property is decorated with a custom attribute within the view model. The AutoComplete text box in action will look like the following:   The first thing to do is to do is visit my previous blog post to put the custom model metadata provider in place, this is necessary when using custom attributes on the view model. http://weblogs.asp.net/seanmcalinden/archive/2010/06/11/custom-asp-net-mvc-2-modelmetadataprovider-for-using-custom-view-model-attributes.aspx Once this is in place, make sure you visit the jQuery UI and download the latest stable release – in this example I’m using version 1.8.2. You can download it here. Add the jQuery scripts and css theme to your project and add references to them in your master page. Should look something like the following: Site.Master <head runat="server">     <title><asp:ContentPlaceHolder ID="TitleContent" runat="server" /></title>     <link href="../../Content/Site.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />     <link href="../../css/ui-lightness/jquery-ui-1.8.2.custom.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />     <script src="../../Scripts/jquery-1.4.2.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>     <script src="../../Scripts/jquery-ui-1.8.2.custom.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script> </head> Once this is place we can get started. Creating the AutoComplete Custom Attribute The auto complete attribute will derive from the abstract MetadataAttribute created in my previous post. It will look like the following: AutoCompleteAttribute using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Web.Mvc; using System.Web.Routing; namespace Mvc2Templates.Attributes {     public class AutoCompleteAttribute : MetadataAttribute     {         public RouteValueDictionary RouteValueDictionary;         public AutoCompleteAttribute(string controller, string action, string parameterName)         {             this.RouteValueDictionary = new RouteValueDictionary();             this.RouteValueDictionary.Add("Controller", controller);             this.RouteValueDictionary.Add("Action", action);             this.RouteValueDictionary.Add(parameterName, string.Empty);         }         public override void Process(ModelMetadata modelMetaData)         {             modelMetaData.AdditionalValues.Add("AutoCompleteUrlData", this.RouteValueDictionary);             modelMetaData.TemplateHint = "AutoComplete";         }     } } As you can see, the constructor takes in strings for the controller, action and parameter name. The parameter name will be used for passing the search text within the auto complete text box. The constructor then creates a new RouteValueDictionary which we will use later to construct the url for getting the auto complete results via ajax. The main interesting method is the method override called Process. With the process method, the route value dictionary is added to the modelMetaData AdditionalValues collection. The TemplateHint is also set to AutoComplete, this means that when the view model is parsed for display, the MVC 2 framework will look for a view user control template called AutoComplete, if it finds one, it uses that template to display the property. The View Model To show you how the attribute will look, this is the view model I have used in my example which can be downloaded at the end of this post. View Model using System.ComponentModel; using Mvc2Templates.Attributes; namespace Mvc2Templates.Models {     public class TemplateDemoViewModel     {         [AutoComplete("Home", "AutoCompleteResult", "searchText")]         [DisplayName("European Country Search")]         public string SearchText { get; set; }     } } As you can see, the auto complete attribute is called with the controller name, action name and the name of the action parameter that the search text will be passed into. The AutoComplete Template Now all of this is in place, it’s time to create the AutoComplete template. Create a ViewUserControl called AutoComplete.ascx at the following location within your application – Views/Shared/EditorTemplates/AutoComplete.ascx Add the following code: AutoComplete.ascx <%@ Control Language="C#" Inherits="System.Web.Mvc.ViewUserControl" %> <%     var propertyName = ViewData.ModelMetadata.PropertyName;     var propertyValue = ViewData.ModelMetadata.Model;     var id = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();     RouteValueDictionary urlData =         (RouteValueDictionary)ViewData.ModelMetadata.AdditionalValues.Where(x => x.Key == "AutoCompleteUrlData").Single().Value;     var url = Mvc2Templates.Views.Shared.Helpers.RouteHelper.GetUrl(this.ViewContext.RequestContext, urlData); %> <input type="text" name="<%= propertyName %>" value="<%= propertyValue %>" id="<%= id %>" class="autoComplete" /> <script type="text/javascript">     $(function () {         $("#<%= id %>").autocomplete({             source: function (request, response) {                 $.ajax({                     url: "<%= url %>" + request.term,                     dataType: "json",                     success: function (data) {                         response(data);                     }                 });             },             minLength: 2         });     }); </script> There is a lot going on in here but when you break it down it’s quite simple. Firstly, the property name and property value are retrieved through the model meta data. These are required to ensure that the text box input has the correct name and data to allow for model binding. If you look at line 14 you can see them being used in the text box input creation. The interesting bit is on line 8 and 9, this is the code to retrieve the route value dictionary we added into the model metada via the custom attribute. Line 11 is used to create the url, in order to do this I created a quick helper class which looks like the code below titled RouteHelper. The last bit of script is the code to initialise the jQuery UI AutoComplete control with the correct url for calling back to our controller action. RouteHelper using System.Web.Mvc; using System.Web.Routing; namespace Mvc2Templates.Views.Shared.Helpers {     public static class RouteHelper     {         const string Controller = "Controller";         const string Action = "Action";         const string ReplaceFormatString = "REPLACE{0}";         public static string GetUrl(RequestContext requestContext, RouteValueDictionary routeValueDictionary)         {             RouteValueDictionary urlData = new RouteValueDictionary();             UrlHelper urlHelper = new UrlHelper(requestContext);                          int i = 0;             foreach(var item in routeValueDictionary)             {                 if (item.Value == string.Empty)                 {                     i++;                     urlData.Add(item.Key, string.Format(ReplaceFormatString, i.ToString()));                 }                 else                 {                     urlData.Add(item.Key, item.Value);                 }             }             var url = urlHelper.RouteUrl(urlData);             for (int index = 1; index <= i; index++)             {                 url = url.Replace(string.Format(ReplaceFormatString, index.ToString()), string.Empty);             }             return url;         }     } } See it in action All you need to do to see it in action is pass a view model from your controller with the new AutoComplete attribute attached and call the following within your view: <%= this.Html.EditorForModel() %> NOTE: The jQuery UI auto complete control expects a JSON string returned from your controller action method… as you can’t use the JsonResult to perform GET requests, use a normal action result, convert your data into json and return it as a string via a ContentResult. If you download the solution it will be very clear how to handle the controller and action for this demo. The full source code for this post can be downloaded here. It has been developed using MVC 2 and Visual Studio 2010. As always, I hope this has been interesting/useful. Kind Regards, Sean McAlinden.

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  • June 26th Links: ASP.NET, ASP.NET MVC, .NET and NuGet

    - by ScottGu
    Here is the latest in my link-listing series.  Also check out my Best of 2010 Summary for links to 100+ other posts I’ve done in the last year. [I am also now using Twitter for quick updates and to share links. Follow me at: twitter.com/scottgu] ASP.NET Introducing new ASP.NET Universal Providers: Great post from Scott Hanselman on the new System.Web.Providers we are working on.  This release delivers new ASP.NET Membership, Role Management, Session, Profile providers that work with SQL Server, SQL CE and SQL Azure. CSS Sprites and the ASP.NET Sprite and Image Optimization Library: Great post from Scott Mitchell that talks about a free library for ASP.NET that you can use to optimize your CSS and images to reduce HTTP requests and speed up your site. Better HTML5 Support for the VS 2010 Editor: Another great post from Scott Hanselman on an update several people on my team did that enables richer HTML5 editing support within Visual Studio 2010. Install the Ajax Control Toolkit from NuGet: Nice post by Stephen Walther on how you can now use NuGet to install the Ajax Control Toolkit within your applications.  This makes it much easier to reference and use. May 2011 Release of the Ajax Control Toolkit: Another great post from Stephen Walther that talks about the May release of the Ajax Control Toolkit. It includes a bunch of nice enhancements and fixes. SassAndCoffee 0.9 Released: Paul Betts blogs about the latest release of his SassAndCoffee extension (available via NuGet). It enables you to easily use Sass and Coffeescript within your ASP.NET applications (both MVC and Webforms). ASP.NET MVC ASP.NET MVC Mini-Profiler: The folks at StackOverflow.com (a great site built with ASP.NET MVC) have released a nice (free) profiler they’ve built that enables you to easily profile your ASP.NET MVC 3 sites and tune them for performance.  Globalization, Internationalization and Localization in ASP.NET MVC 3: Great post from Scott Hanselman on how to enable internationalization, globalization and localization support within your ASP.NET MVC 3 and jQuery solutions. Precompile your MVC Razor Views: Great post from David Ebbo that discusses a new Razor Generator tool that enables you to pre-compile your razor view templates as assemblies – which enables a bunch of cool scenarios. Unit Testing Razor Views: Nice post from David Ebbo that shows how to use his new Razor Generator to enable unit testing of razor view templates with ASP.NET MVC. Bin Deploying ASP.NET MVC 3: Nice post by Phil Haack that covers a cool feature added to VS 2010 SP1 that makes it really easy to \bin deploy ASP.NET MVC and Razor within your application. This enables you to easily deploy the app to servers that don’t have ASP.NET MVC 3 installed. .NET Table Splitting with EF 4.1 Code First: Great post from Morteza Manavi that discusses how to split up a single database table across multiple EF entity classes.  This shows off some of the power behind EF 4.1 and is very useful when working with legacy database schemas. Choosing the Right Collection Class: Nice post from James Michael Hare that talks about the different collection class options available within .NET.  A nice overview for people who haven’t looked at all of the support now built into the framework. Little Wonders: Empty(), DefaultIfEmpty() and Count() helper methods: Another in James Michael Hare’s excellent series on .NET/C# “Little Wonders”.  This post covers some of the great helper methods now built-into .NET that make coding even easier. NuGet NuGet 1.4 Released: Learn all about the latest release of NuGet – which includes a bunch of cool new capabilities.  It takes only seconds to update to it – go for it! NuGet in Depth: Nice presentation from Scott Hanselman all about NuGet and some of the investments we are making to enable a better open source ecosystem within .NET. NuGet for the Enterprise – NuGet in a Continuous Integration Automated Build System: Great post from Scott Hanselman on how to integrate NuGet within enterprise build environments and enable it with CI solutions. Hope this helps, Scott

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  • Ternary operator in VB.NET

    - by Jalpesh P. Vadgama
    We all know about Ternary operator in C#.NET. I am a big fan of ternary operator and I like to use it instead of using IF..Else. Those who don’t know about ternary operator please go through below link. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ty67wk28(v=vs.80).aspx Here you can see ternary operator returns one of the two values based on the condition. See following example. bool value = false;string output=string.Empty;//using If conditionif (value==true) output ="True";else output="False";//using tenary operatoroutput = value == true ? "True" : "False"; In the above example you can see how we produce same output with the ternary operator without using If..Else statement. Recently in one of the project I was working with VB.NET language and I was eager to know if there is a ternary operator equivalent there or not. After searching on internet I have found two ways to do it. IF operator which works for VB.NET 2008 and higher version and IIF operator which is there since VB 6.0. So let’s check same above example with both of this operators. So let’s create a console application which has following code. Module Module1 Sub Main() Dim value As Boolean = False Dim output As String = String.Empty ''Output using if else statement If value = True Then output = "True" Else output = "False" Console.WriteLine("Output Using If Loop") Console.WriteLine(output) output = If(value = True, "True", "False") Console.WriteLine("Output using If operator") Console.WriteLine(output) output = IIf(value = True, "True", "False") Console.WriteLine("Output using IIF Operator") Console.WriteLine(output) Console.ReadKey() End If End SubEnd Module As you can see in the above code I have written all three-way to condition check using If.Else statement and If operator and IIf operator. You can see that both IIF and If operator has three parameter first parameter is the condition which you need to check and then another parameter is true part of you need to put thing which you need as output when condition is ‘true’. Same way third parameter is for the false part where you need to put things which you need as output when condition as ‘false’. Now let’s run that application and following is the output as expected. That’s it. You can see all three ways are producing same output. Hope you like it. Stay tuned for more..Till then Happy Programming.

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  • Would a programmer knowing C# and VB.Net ever choose VB.Net?

    - by Earlz
    Now before someone tells me VB.Net isn't bad like VB was, I know it isn't. But, I've yet to speak to a programmer who is completely content that some project they work on is written in VB.Net. Basically, my question is would a programmer knowing both C# and VB.Net (and all of their team knowing both), would they ever choose VB.Net? And why? All of the VB.Net projects I've seen were written that way only because the programmer that started it(that usually isn't working there anymore) knew VB6(or earlier) and wrote it in VB.Net because of the similar syntax. Is there any advantage to writing a program in VB.Net compared to C#? (hopefully this is appropriate here, SO rejected it within a few minutes)

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  • A Visual Studio tool eliminating the need to rewrite for web and mobile

    - by Visual WebGui
    We have already covered the BYOD requirements that an application developer is faced with, in an earlier blog entry ( How to Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) to a .NET application ). In that entry we emphasized the fact that application developers will need to prepare their applications for serving multiple types of devices on multiple platforms, ranging from the smallest mobile devices up to and beyond the largest desktop devices. The experts prediction is that in the near future we will see that the...(read more)

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  • Fixing the Model Binding issue of ASP.NET MVC 4 and ASP.NET Web API

    - by imran_ku07
            Introduction:                     Yesterday when I was checking ASP.NET forums, I found an important issue/bug in ASP.NET MVC 4 and ASP.NET Web API. The issue is present in System.Web.PrefixContainer class which is used by both ASP.NET MVC and ASP.NET Web API assembly. The details of this issue is available in this thread. This bug can be a breaking change for you if you upgraded your application to ASP.NET MVC 4 and your application model properties using the convention available in the above thread. So, I have created a package which will fix this issue both in ASP.NET MVC and ASP.NET Web API. In this article, I will show you how to use this package.           Description:                     Create or open an ASP.NET MVC 4 project and install ImranB.ModelBindingFix NuGet package. Then, add this using statement on your global.asax.cs file, using ImranB.ModelBindingFix;                     Then, just add this line in Application_Start method,   Fixer.FixModelBindingIssue(); // For fixing only in MVC call this //Fixer.FixMvcModelBindingIssue(); // For fixing only in Web API call this //Fixer.FixWebApiModelBindingIssue(); .                     This line will fix the model binding issue. If you are using Html.Action or Html.RenderAction then you should use Html.FixedAction or Html.FixedRenderAction instead to avoid this bug(make sure to reference ImranB.ModelBindingFix.SystemWebMvc namespace). If you are using FormDataCollection.ReadAs extension method then you should use FormDataCollection.FixedReadAs instead to avoid this bug(make sure to reference ImranB.ModelBindingFix.SystemWebHttp namespace). The source code of this package is available at github.          Summary:                     There is a small but important issue/bug in ASP.NET MVC 4. In this article, I showed you how to fix this issue/bug by using a package. Hopefully you will enjoy this article too.

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  • Microsoft 2010 Product Tour

    - by dmccollough
    Randy Walker, Co-Founder of the Northwest Arkansas .Net User Group and Microsoft MVP has arranged for a couple of Microsoft experts, Sarika Calla Team Lead on the IDE Team and Kevin Halverson to give presentations on newly released Visual Studio 2010.   June 1 – Bentonville, Arkansas Wal-Mart .Net User Group June 1 – Rogers, Arkansas Northwest Arkansas SQL Server User Group (lunch meeting) June 1 – Springdale, Arkansas Tyson devLoop June 1 – Fayetteville, Arkansas Northwest Arkansas .Net User Group June 2 – Fort Smith, Arkansas Datatronics June 2 – Little Rock, Arkansas Little Rock .Net User Group June 3 – Fort Worth, Texas Fort Worth .Net User Group   Please contact Randy Walker with questions at [email protected]

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  • EFMVC Migrated to .NET 4.5, Visual Studio 2012, ASP.NET MVC 4 and EF 5 Code First

    - by shiju
    I have just migrated my EFMVC app from .NET 4.0 and ASP.NET MVC 4 RC to .NET 4.5, ASP.NET MVC 4 RTM and Entity Framework 5 Code First. In this release, the EFMVC solution is built with Visual Studio 2012 RTM. The migration process was very smooth and did not made any major changes other than adding simple unit tests with NUnit and Moq. I will add more unit tests on later and will also modify the existing solution. Source Code You can download the source code from http://efmvc.codeplex.com/

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  • Mobile enabled web apps with ASP.NET MVC 3 and jQuery Mobile

    - by shiju
    In my previous blog posts, I have demonstrated a simple web app using ASP.NET MVC 3 and EF Code First. In this post, I will be focus on making this application for mobile devices. A single web site will be used for both mobile browsers and desktop browsers. If users are accessing the web app from mobile browsers, users will be redirect to mobile specific pages and will get normal pages if users are accessing from desktop browsers. In this demo app, the mobile specific pages are maintained in an ASP.NET MVC Area named Mobile and mobile users will be redirect to MVC Area Mobile. Let’s add a new area named Mobile to the ASP.NET MVC app. For adding Area, right click the ASP.NET MVC project and  select Area from Add option. Our mobile specific pages using jQuery Mobile will be maintained in the Mobile Area. ASP.NET MVC Global filter for redirecting mobile visitors to Mobile area Let’s add an ASP.NET MVC Global filter for redirecting mobile visitors to Mobile area. The below Global filter is taken from the sample app http://aspnetmobilesamples.codeplex.com/ created by the ASP.NET team. The below filer will redirect the Mobile visitors to an ASP.NET MVC Area Mobile. public class RedirectMobileDevicesToMobileAreaAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute     {         protected override bool AuthorizeCore(System.Web.HttpContextBase httpContext)         {             // Only redirect on the first request in a session             if (!httpContext.Session.IsNewSession)                 return true;               // Don't redirect non-mobile browsers             if (!httpContext.Request.Browser.IsMobileDevice)                 return true;               // Don't redirect requests for the Mobile area             if (Regex.IsMatch(httpContext.Request.Url.PathAndQuery, "/Mobile($|/)"))                 return true;               return false;         }           protected override void HandleUnauthorizedRequest(AuthorizationContext filterContext)         {             var redirectionRouteValues = GetRedirectionRouteValues(filterContext.RequestContext);             filterContext.Result = new RedirectToRouteResult(redirectionRouteValues);         }           // Override this method if you want to customize the controller/action/parameters to which         // mobile users would be redirected. This lets you redirect users to the mobile equivalent         // of whatever resource they originally requested.         protected virtual RouteValueDictionary GetRedirectionRouteValues(RequestContext requestContext)         {             return new RouteValueDictionary(new { area = "Mobile", controller = "Home", action = "Index" });         }     } Let’s add the global filer RedirectMobileDevicesToMobileAreaAttribute to the global filter collection in the Application_Start() of Global.asax.cs file   GlobalFilters.Filters.Add(new RedirectMobileDevicesToMobileAreaAttribute(), 1); Now your mobile visitors will be redirect to the Mobile area. But the browser detection logic in the RedirectMobileDevicesToMobileAreaAttribute filter will not be working in some modern browsers and some conditions. But the good news is that ASP.NET’s browser detection feature is extensible and will be greatly working with the open source framework 51Degrees.mobi. 51Degrees.mobi is a Browser Capabilities Provider that will be working with ASP.NET’s Request.Browser and will provide more accurate and detailed information. For more details visit the documentation page at http://51degrees.codeplex.com/documentation. Let’s add a reference to 51Degrees.mobi library using NuGet We can easily add the 51Degrees.mobi from NuGet and this will update the web.config for necessary configuartions. Mobile Web App using jQuery Mobile Framework jQuery Mobile Framework is built on top of jQuery that provides top-of-the-line JavaScript in a unified User Interface that works across the most-used smartphone web browsers and tablet form factors. It provides an easy way to develop user interfaces for mobile web apps. The current version of the framework is jQuery Mobile Alpha 3. We need to include the following files to use jQuery Mobile. The jQuery Mobile CSS file (jquery.mobile-1.0a3.min.css) The jQuery library (jquery-1.5.min.js) The jQuery Mobile library (jquery.mobile-1.0a3.min.js) Let’s add the required jQuery files directly from jQuery CDN . You can download the files and host them on your own server. jQuery Mobile page structure The basic jQuery Mobile page structure is given below <!DOCTYPE html> <html>   <head>   <title>Page Title</title>   <link rel="stylesheet" href="http://code.jquery.com/mobile/1.0a3/jquery.mobile-1.0a1.min.css" />   <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.5.min.js"></script>   <script src="http://code.jquery.com/mobile/1.0a3/jquery.mobile-1.0a3.min.js"></script> </head> <body> <div data-role="page">   <div data-role="header">     <h1>Page Title</h1>   </div>   <div data-role="content">     <p>Page content goes here.</p>      </div>   <div data-role="footer">     <h4>Page Footer</h4>   </div> </div> </body> </html> The data- attributes are the new feature of HTML5 so that jQuery Mobile will be working on browsers that supporting HTML 5. You can get a detailed browser support details from http://jquerymobile.com/gbs/ . In the Head section we have included the Core jQuery javascript file and jQuery Mobile Library and the core CSS Library for the UI Element Styling. These jQuery files are minified versions and will improve the performance of page load on Mobile Devices. The jQuery Mobile pages are identified with an element with the data-role="page" attribute inside the <body> tag. <div data-role="page"> </div> Within the "page" container, any valid HTML markup can be used, but for typical pages in jQuery Mobile, the immediate children of a "page" are div element with data-roles of "header", "content", and "footer". <div data-role="page">     <div data-role="header">...</div>     <div data-role="content">...</div>     <div data-role="footer">...</div> </div> The div data-role="content" holds the main content of the HTML page and will be used for making user interaction elements. The div data-role="header" is header part of the page and div data-role="footer" is the footer part of the page. Creating Mobile specific pages in the Mobile Area Let’s create Layout page for our Mobile area <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head>     <title>@ViewBag.Title</title>     <link rel="stylesheet" href="http://code.jquery.com/mobile/1.0a3/jquery.mobile-1.0a3.min.css" />     <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.5.min.js"></script>     <script src="http://code.jquery.com/mobile/1.0a3/jquery.mobile-1.0a3.min.js"></script>     </head>      <body> @RenderBody()    </body> </html> In the Layout page, I have given reference to jQuery Mobile JavaScript files and the CSS file. Let’s add an Index view page Index.chtml @{     ViewBag.Title = "Index"; } <div data-role="page"> <div data-role="header">      <h1>Expense Tracker Mobile</h1> </div> <div data-role="content">   <ul data-role="listview">     <li>@Html.Partial("_LogOnPartial")</li>      <li>@Html.ActionLink("Home", "Index", "Home")</li>      <li>@Html.ActionLink("Category", "Index", "Category")</li>                          <li>@Html.ActionLink("Expense", "Index", "Expense")</li> </ul> </div> <div data-role="footer">           Shiju Varghese | <a href="http://weblogs.asp.net/shijuvarghese">Blog     </a> | <a href="http://twitter.com/shijucv">Twitter</a>   </div> </div>   In the Index page, we have used data-role “listview” for showing our content as List View Let’s create a data entry screen create.cshtml @model MyFinance.Domain.Category @{     ViewBag.Title = "Create Category"; }   <div data-role="page"> <div data-role="header">      <h1>Create Category</h1>     [email protected]("Home", "Index","Home",null, new { @class = "ui-btn-right" })      </div>       <div data-role="content"> [email protected] (Html.BeginForm("Create","Category",FormMethod.Post))     {       <div data-role="fieldcontain"> [email protected](model => model.Name) [email protected](model => model.Name)        <div> [email protected](m => m.Name)        </div>         </div>         <div data-role="fieldcontain"> [email protected](model => model.Description) [email protected](model => model.Description)                   </div>                    <div class="ui-body ui-body-b">         <button type="submit" data-role="button" data-theme="b">Save</button>       </div>     }        </div> </div>   In jQuery Mobile, the form elements should be placed inside the data-role="fieldcontain" The below screen shots show the pages rendered in mobile browser Index Page Create Page Source Code You can download the source code from http://efmvc.codeplex.com   Summary We have created a single  web app for desktop browsers and mobile browsers. If a user access the site from desktop browsers, users will get normal web pages and get mobile specific pages if users access from mobile browsers. If users are accessing the website from mobile devices, we will redirect to a ASP.NET MVC area Mobile. For redirecting to the Mobile area, we have used a Global filer for the redirection logic and used open source framework 51Degrees.mobi for the better support for mobile browser detection. In the Mobile area, we have created the pages using jQuery Mobile and users will get mobile friendly web pages. We can create great mobile web apps using ASP.NET MVC  and jQuery Mobile Framework.

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