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  • What is the Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) Act?

    In 2002 after the wake of the Enron and World Com Financial scandals Senator Paul Sarbanes and Representative Michael Oxley lead the creation of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. This act administered by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) dramatically altered corporate financial practices and data governance. In addition, it also set specific deadlines for compliance. The Sarbanes-Oxley is not a set of standard business rules and does not specify how a company should retain its records; In fact, this act outlines which pieces of data are to be stored as well as the storage duration. The SOX act targets the financial side of companies, but its impacts can be seen within the technology arena as well because it is their responsibility to store all of a company’s electronic records regardless of file type. This act specifies that all records and electronic messages must be saved for no less than five years according to SearchCIO. In addition, consequences for non-compliance are fines, imprisonment, or both. Sarbanes-Oxley Act: Rules that affect the management of Electronic records according to SearchCIO. Allowed practices regarding destruction, alteration, or falsification of records. Retention period for records storage. Best practices indicate that corporations securely store all business records using the same guidelines set for public accountants. Types of business records that need to be stored Business Records  Business Communications Including Electronic Communications References: SOXLaw: The Sarbanes-Oxley Act 2002 Retrieved May 2011 from http://www.soxlaw.com/ SearchCIO: What is Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX)? Retrieved May 2011 from http://searchcio.techtarget.com/definition/Sarbanes-Oxley-Act

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  • Jquery and live act wired but act ok after force refresh in IE

    - by Y.G.J
    hi guys - somthing is wrong with my code and i can't get what it is... i have a div id = "personaltab" i have a form in side it to login the user with username and password. if success the jquery empty the div and puts in the form of the bidding. if the user try to bid the other ajax that assign to the button is working but for some reason skips the empty and just adding the responded ajax to the div i have checked that in IE and chrome and it is working fine in chrome here are my codes $("#login").click(function() { var id = $("input#pid").val(); var user = $("input#puser").val(); var pass = $("input#ppass").val(); var dataString = 'id='+ id + '&user='+ user + '&pass=' + pass; if (user == "") { alert("error"); $("input#puser").focus(); return false; } if (pass == "") { alert("error"); $("input#ppass").focus(); return false; } $.ajax({ type: "POST", url: "loginpersonal.asp", data: dataString, success: function(msg) { if (msg=="False") { alert("error"); $("#personaltab").show(); } else { $("#personaltab").fadeOut("normal",function(){ $("#personaltab").empty(); $("#personaltab").append(msg); $("#personaltab").slideDown(); }); } }, error: function (XMLHttpRequest, textStatus, errorThrown) { alert('error'); } }); return false; }); $("#sendbid").live("click", function(){ var startat = $("input[name=startat]").val(); var sprice = $("input[name=sprice]").val(); if (parseInt(sprice)<=parseInt(startat)) { alert("error"); $("input[name=sprice]").focus(); return false; } else { var payment = $("select[name=payment]").val(); if ($('input[name=credit]').is(':checked') ){ var credit = true; } var prodid = $("input[name=id]").val(); var dataString = 'id='+ prodid + '&price='+ sprice + '&payment=' + payment + '&credit=' + credit; $.ajax({ type: "POST", url: "loginpersonal.asp", data: dataString, success: function(msg) { $("#personaltab").empty(); $("#personaltab").append(msg); $("#personaltab").show(); }, error: function (XMLHttpRequest, textStatus, errorThrown) { alert('error'); } }); } return false; });

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  • How can I connect to my ACT database to export data?

    - by Adam Gessel
    I am trying to export data from an MSSQL server that ACT uses. It is ACT 2005. I have tried tons of different things, from trying to starting the MSSQL server in single user mode (still can't login), I have tried copying the mdf files from it and putting it on another server (it complains about having the same name as another database for master.mdf and almost every other file), I have tried putting Administrator in the group that the MSSQL instance runs under, and nothing seems to work! Can anybody with experience with this help me out? Thanks!

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  • How can I connect to my ACT database to export data?

    - by Adam Gessel
    I am trying to export data from an MSSQL server that ACT uses. It is ACT 2005. I have tried tons of different things, from trying to starting the MSSQL server in single user mode (still can't login), I have tried copying the mdf files from it and putting it on another server (it complains about having the same name as another database for master.mdf and almost every other file), I have tried putting Administrator in the group that the MSSQL instance runs under, and nothing seems to work! Can anybody with experience with this help me out? Thanks!

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  • The PATRIOT Act and how it relates to the Internet

    The subject of the Internet and anonymity is a very sticky situation for me because I primarily develop web applications for a living.  As a part of my job I have to track users as they enter, navigate and leave specific applications. The level of tracking depends on where the user goes within a website.  The basic information that I capture includes the user’s IP address, browser type, operating system, the date/time they entered the site and the URL from which the user was referred to the website. In addition to the custom logging that is placed on the website, web servers also have methods of logging built-in as well. Web server logging allows companies to have a central repository to store all user activity across the entire server. Not to mention that they can also create a central repository that allows multiple servers to store log files in one location. This allows users to be tracked across multiple servers as they browse website located on a specific collection of servers that host multiple websites. All this being said there are methods to attempt to protect your privacy by using proxy servers and increasing your browser security levels, but that will only limit the amount of logging not eliminate it. I have to agree with Traynor when he states that the PATRIOT Act eviscerates the constitutional protections of anonymous communication on the Internet. Therefore, given the recent passage and implementation of the PATRIOT Act, the constitutional guarantees of the right to anonymity have been severely compromised. I think that the PATRIOT Act is a direct violation of our first amendment rights because it allows for the government to directly monitor any and all activity on the internet including communications, usage, and transactions that can occur.  This opens the door to scrutiny and persecution of individuals who are not in line with the government’s beliefs and actions. If England had this type of monitoring capabilities during the revolutionary war, I believe it would have been almost impossible to succeed from England.

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  • May 2011 Release of the Ajax Control Toolkit

    - by Stephen Walther
    I’m happy to announce that the Superexpert team has published the May 2011 release of the Ajax Control Toolkit at CodePlex. You can download the new release at the following URL: http://ajaxcontroltoolkit.codeplex.com/releases/view/65800 This release focused on improving the ModalPopup and AsyncFileUpload controls. Our team closed a total of 34 bugs related to the ModalPopup and AsyncFileUpload controls. Enhanced ModalPopup Control You can take advantage of the Ajax Control Toolkit ModalPopup control to easily create popup dialogs in your ASP.NET Web Forms applications. When the dialog appears, you cannot interact with any page content which appears behind the modal dialog. For example, the following page contains a standard ASP.NET Button and Panel. When you click the Button, the Panel appears as a popup dialog: <%@ Page Language="vb" AutoEventWireup="false" CodeBehind="Simple.aspx.vb" Inherits="ACTSamples.Simple" %> <%@ Register TagPrefix="act" Namespace="AjaxControlToolkit" Assembly="AjaxControlToolkit" %> <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> <head runat="server"> <title>Simple Modal Popup Sample</title> <style type="text/css"> html { background-color: blue; } #dialog { border: 2px solid black; width: 500px; background-color: White; } #dialogContents { padding: 10px; } .modalBackground { background-color:Gray; filter:alpha(opacity=70); opacity:0.7; } </style> </head> <body> <form id="form1" runat="server"> <div> <act:ToolkitScriptManager ID="tsm" runat="server" /> <asp:Panel ID="dialog" runat="server"> <div id="dialogContents"> Here are the contents of the dialog. <br /> <asp:Button ID="btnOK" Text="OK" runat="server" /> </div> </asp:Panel> <asp:Button ID="btnShow" Text="Open Dialog" runat="server" /> <act:ModalPopupExtender TargetControlID="btnShow" PopupControlID="dialog" OkControlID="btnOK" DropShadow="true" BackgroundCssClass="modalBackground" runat="server" /> </div> </form> </body> </html>     Notice that the page includes two controls from the Ajax Control Toolkit: the ToolkitScriptManager and the ModalPopupExtender control. Any page which uses any of the controls from the Ajax Control Toolkit must include a ToolkitScriptManager. The ModalPopupExtender is used to create the popup. The following properties are set: · TargetControlID – This is the ID of the Button or LinkButton control which causes the modal popup to be displayed. · PopupControlID – This is the ID of the Panel control which contains the content displayed in the modal popup. · OKControlID – This is the ID of a Button or LinkButton which causes the modal popup to close. · DropShadow – Displays a drop shadow behind the modal popup. · BackgroundCSSClass – The name of a Cascading Style Sheet class which is used to gray out the background of the page when the modal popup is displayed. The ModalPopup is completely cross-browser compatible. For example, the following screenshots show the same page displayed in Firefox 4, Internet Explorer 9, and Chrome 11: The ModalPopup control has lots of nice properties. For example, you can make the ModalPopup draggable. You also can programmatically hide and show a modal popup from either server-side or client-side code. To learn more about the properties of the ModalPopup control, see the following website: http://www.asp.net/ajax/ajaxcontroltoolkit/Samples/ModalPopup/ModalPopup.aspx Animated ModalPopup Control In the May 2011 release of the Ajax Control Toolkit, we enhanced the Modal Popup control so that it supports animations. We made this modification in response to a feature request posted at CodePlex which got 65 votes (plenty of people wanted this feature): http://ajaxcontroltoolkit.codeplex.com/workitem/6944 I want to thank Dani Kenan for posting a patch to this issue which we used as the basis for adding animation support for the modal popup. Thanks Dani! The enhanced ModalPopup in the May 2011 release of the Ajax Control Toolkit supports the following animations: OnShowing – Called before the modal popup is shown. OnShown – Called after the modal popup is shown. OnHiding – Called before the modal popup is hidden. OnHidden – Called after the modal popup is hidden. You can use these animations, for example, to fade-in a modal popup when it is displayed and fade-out the popup when it is hidden. Here’s the code: <act:ModalPopupExtender ID="ModalPopupExtender1" TargetControlID="btnShow" PopupControlID="dialog" OkControlID="btnOK" DropShadow="true" BackgroundCssClass="modalBackground" runat="server"> <Animations> <OnShown> <Fadein /> </OnShown> <OnHiding> <Fadeout /> </OnHiding> </Animations> </act:ModalPopupExtender>     So that you can experience the full joy of this animated modal popup, I recorded the following video: Of course, you can use any of the animations supported by the Ajax Control Toolkit with the modal popup. The animation reference is located here: http://www.asp.net/ajax/ajaxcontroltoolkit/Samples/Walkthrough/AnimationReference.aspx Fixes to the AsyncFileUpload In the May 2011 release, we also focused our energies on performing bug fixes for the AsyncFileUpload control. We fixed several major issues with the AsyncFileUpload including: It did not work in master pages It did not work when ClientIDMode=”Static” It did not work with Firefox 4 It did not work when multiple AsyncFileUploads were included in the same page It generated markup which was not HTML5 compatible The AsyncFileUpload control is a super useful control. It enables you to upload files in a form without performing a postback. Here’s some sample code which demonstrates how you can use the AsyncFileUpload: <%@ Page Language="vb" AutoEventWireup="false" CodeBehind="Simple.aspx.vb" Inherits="ACTSamples.Simple1" %> <%@ Register TagPrefix="act" Namespace="AjaxControlToolkit" Assembly="AjaxControlToolkit" %> <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> <head id="Head1" runat="server"> <title>Simple AsyncFileUpload</title> </head> <body> <form id="form1" runat="server"> <div> <act:ToolkitScriptManager ID="tsm" runat="server" /> User Name: <br /> <asp:TextBox ID="txtUserName" runat="server" /> <asp:RequiredFieldValidator EnableClientScript="false" ErrorMessage="Required" ControlToValidate="txtUserName" runat="server" /> <br /><br /> Avatar: <act:AsyncFileUpload ID="async1" ThrobberID="throbber" UploadingBackColor="yellow" ErrorBackColor="red" CompleteBackColor="green" UploaderStyle="Modern" PersistFile="true" runat="server" /> <asp:Image ID="throbber" ImageUrl="uploading.gif" style="display:none" runat="server" /> <br /><br /> <asp:Button ID="btnSubmit" Text="Submit" runat="server" /> </div> </form> </body> </html> And here’s the code-behind for the page above: Public Class Simple1 Inherits System.Web.UI.Page Private Sub btnSubmit_Click(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles btnSubmit.Click If Page.IsValid Then ' Get Form Fields Dim userName As String Dim file As Byte() userName = txtUserName.Text If async1.HasFile Then file = async1.FileBytes End If ' Save userName, file to database ' Redirect to success page Response.Redirect("SimpleDone.aspx") End If End Sub End Class   The form above contains an AsyncFileUpload which has values for the following properties: ThrobberID – The ID of an element in the page to display while a file is being uploaded. UploadingBackColor – The color to display in the upload field while a file is being uploaded. ErrorBackColor – The color to display in the upload field when there is an error uploading a file. CompleteBackColor – The color to display in the upload field when the upload is complete. UploaderStyle – The user interface style: Traditional or Modern. PersistFile – When true, the uploaded file is persisted in Session state. The last property PersistFile, causes the uploaded file to be stored in Session state. That way, if completing a form requires multiple postbacks, then the user needs to upload the file only once. For example, if there is a server validation error, then the user is not required to re-upload the file after fixing the validation issue. In the sample code above, this condition is simulated by disabling client-side validation for the RequiredFieldValidator control. The RequiredFieldValidator EnableClientScript property has the value false. The following video demonstrates how the AsyncFileUpload control works: You can learn more about the properties and methods of the AsyncFileUpload control by visiting the following page: http://www.asp.net/ajax/ajaxcontroltoolkit/Samples/AsyncFileUpload/AsyncFileUpload.aspx Conclusion In the May 2011 release of the Ajax Control Toolkit, we addressed over 30 bugs related to the ModalPopup and AsyncFileUpload controls. Furthermore, by building on code submitted by the community, we enhanced the ModalPopup control so that it supports animation (Thanks Dani). In our next sprint for the June release of the Ajax Control Toolkit, we plan to focus on the HTML Editor control. Subscribe to this blog to keep updated.

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  • Creating Custom Ajax Control Toolkit Controls

    - by Stephen Walther
    The goal of this blog entry is to explain how you can extend the Ajax Control Toolkit with custom Ajax Control Toolkit controls. I describe how you can create the two halves of an Ajax Control Toolkit control: the server-side control extender and the client-side control behavior. Finally, I explain how you can use the new Ajax Control Toolkit control in a Web Forms page. At the end of this blog entry, there is a link to download a Visual Studio 2010 solution which contains the code for two Ajax Control Toolkit controls: SampleExtender and PopupHelpExtender. The SampleExtender contains the minimum skeleton for creating a new Ajax Control Toolkit control. You can use the SampleExtender as a starting point for your custom Ajax Control Toolkit controls. The PopupHelpExtender control is a super simple custom Ajax Control Toolkit control. This control extender displays a help message when you start typing into a TextBox control. The animated GIF below demonstrates what happens when you click into a TextBox which has been extended with the PopupHelp extender. Here’s a sample of a Web Forms page which uses the control: <%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeBehind="ShowPopupHelp.aspx.cs" Inherits="MyACTControls.Web.Default" %> <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> <html > <head runat="server"> <title>Show Popup Help</title> </head> <body> <form id="form1" runat="server"> <div> <act:ToolkitScriptManager ID="tsm" runat="server" /> <%-- Social Security Number --%> <asp:Label ID="lblSSN" Text="SSN:" AssociatedControlID="txtSSN" runat="server" /> <asp:TextBox ID="txtSSN" runat="server" /> <act:PopupHelpExtender id="ph1" TargetControlID="txtSSN" HelpText="Please enter your social security number." runat="server" /> <%-- Social Security Number --%> <asp:Label ID="lblPhone" Text="Phone Number:" AssociatedControlID="txtPhone" runat="server" /> <asp:TextBox ID="txtPhone" runat="server" /> <act:PopupHelpExtender id="ph2" TargetControlID="txtPhone" HelpText="Please enter your phone number." runat="server" /> </div> </form> </body> </html> In the page above, the PopupHelp extender is used to extend the functionality of the two TextBox controls. When focus is given to a TextBox control, the popup help message is displayed. An Ajax Control Toolkit control extender consists of two parts: a server-side control extender and a client-side behavior. For example, the PopupHelp extender consists of a server-side PopupHelpExtender control (PopupHelpExtender.cs) and a client-side PopupHelp behavior JavaScript script (PopupHelpBehavior.js). Over the course of this blog entry, I describe how you can create both the server-side extender and the client-side behavior. Writing the Server-Side Code Creating a Control Extender You create a control extender by creating a class that inherits from the abstract ExtenderControlBase class. For example, the PopupHelpExtender control is declared like this: public class PopupHelpExtender: ExtenderControlBase { } The ExtenderControlBase class is part of the Ajax Control Toolkit. This base class contains all of the common server properties and methods of every Ajax Control Toolkit extender control. The ExtenderControlBase class inherits from the ExtenderControl class. The ExtenderControl class is a standard class in the ASP.NET framework located in the System.Web.UI namespace. This class is responsible for generating a client-side behavior. The class generates a call to the Microsoft Ajax Library $create() method which looks like this: <script type="text/javascript"> $create(MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior, {"HelpText":"Please enter your social security number.","id":"ph1"}, null, null, $get("txtSSN")); }); </script> The JavaScript $create() method is part of the Microsoft Ajax Library. The reference for this method can be found here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb397487.aspx This method accepts the following parameters: type – The type of client behavior to create. The $create() method above creates a client PopupHelpBehavior. Properties – Enables you to pass initial values for the properties of the client behavior. For example, the initial value of the HelpText property. This is how server property values are passed to the client. Events – Enables you to pass client-side event handlers to the client behavior. References – Enables you to pass references to other client components. Element – The DOM element associated with the client behavior. This will be the DOM element associated with the control being extended such as the txtSSN TextBox. The $create() method is generated for you automatically. You just need to focus on writing the server-side control extender class. Specifying the Target Control All Ajax Control Toolkit extenders inherit a TargetControlID property from the ExtenderControlBase class. This property, the TargetControlID property, points at the control that the extender control extends. For example, the Ajax Control Toolkit TextBoxWatermark control extends a TextBox, the ConfirmButton control extends a Button, and the Calendar control extends a TextBox. You must indicate the type of control which your extender is extending. You indicate the type of control by adding a [TargetControlType] attribute to your control. For example, the PopupHelp extender is declared like this: [TargetControlType(typeof(TextBox))] public class PopupHelpExtender: ExtenderControlBase { } The PopupHelp extender can be used to extend a TextBox control. If you try to use the PopupHelp extender with another type of control then an exception is thrown. If you want to create an extender control which can be used with any type of ASP.NET control (Button, DataView, TextBox or whatever) then use the following attribute: [TargetControlType(typeof(Control))] Decorating Properties with Attributes If you decorate a server-side property with the [ExtenderControlProperty] attribute then the value of the property gets passed to the control’s client-side behavior. The value of the property gets passed to the client through the $create() method discussed above. The PopupHelp control contains the following HelpText property: [ExtenderControlProperty] [RequiredProperty] public string HelpText { get { return GetPropertyValue("HelpText", "Help Text"); } set { SetPropertyValue("HelpText", value); } } The HelpText property determines the help text which pops up when you start typing into a TextBox control. Because the HelpText property is decorated with the [ExtenderControlProperty] attribute, any value assigned to this property on the server is passed to the client automatically. For example, if you declare the PopupHelp extender in a Web Form page like this: <asp:TextBox ID="txtSSN" runat="server" /> <act:PopupHelpExtender id="ph1" TargetControlID="txtSSN" HelpText="Please enter your social security number." runat="server" />   Then the PopupHelpExtender renders the call to the the following Microsoft Ajax Library $create() method: $create(MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior, {"HelpText":"Please enter your social security number.","id":"ph1"}, null, null, $get("txtSSN")); You can see this call to the JavaScript $create() method by selecting View Source in your browser. This call to the $create() method calls a method named set_HelpText() automatically and passes the value “Please enter your social security number”. There are several attributes which you can use to decorate server-side properties including: ExtenderControlProperty – When a property is marked with this attribute, the value of the property is passed to the client automatically. ExtenderControlEvent – When a property is marked with this attribute, the property represents a client event handler. Required – When a value is not assigned to this property on the server, an error is displayed. DefaultValue – The default value of the property passed to the client. ClientPropertyName – The name of the corresponding property in the JavaScript behavior. For example, the server-side property is named ID (uppercase) and the client-side property is named id (lower-case). IDReferenceProperty – Applied to properties which refer to the IDs of other controls. URLProperty – Calls ResolveClientURL() to convert from a server-side URL to a URL which can be used on the client. ElementReference – Returns a reference to a DOM element by performing a client $get(). The WebResource, ClientResource, and the RequiredScript Attributes The PopupHelp extender uses three embedded resources named PopupHelpBehavior.js, PopupHelpBehavior.debug.js, and PopupHelpBehavior.css. The first two files are JavaScript files and the final file is a Cascading Style sheet file. These files are compiled as embedded resources. You don’t need to mark them as embedded resources in your Visual Studio solution because they get added to the assembly when the assembly is compiled by a build task. You can see that these files get embedded into the MyACTControls assembly by using Red Gate’s .NET Reflector tool: In order to use these files with the PopupHelp extender, you need to work with both the WebResource and the ClientScriptResource attributes. The PopupHelp extender includes the following three WebResource attributes. [assembly: WebResource("PopupHelp.PopupHelpBehavior.js", "text/javascript")] [assembly: WebResource("PopupHelp.PopupHelpBehavior.debug.js", "text/javascript")] [assembly: WebResource("PopupHelp.PopupHelpBehavior.css", "text/css", PerformSubstitution = true)] These WebResource attributes expose the embedded resource from the assembly so that they can be accessed by using the ScriptResource.axd or WebResource.axd handlers. The first parameter passed to the WebResource attribute is the name of the embedded resource and the second parameter is the content type of the embedded resource. The PopupHelp extender also includes the following ClientScriptResource and ClientCssResource attributes: [ClientScriptResource("MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior", "PopupHelp.PopupHelpBehavior.js")] [ClientCssResource("PopupHelp.PopupHelpBehavior.css")] Including these attributes causes the PopupHelp extender to request these resources when you add the PopupHelp extender to a page. If you open View Source in a browser which uses the PopupHelp extender then you will see the following link for the Cascading Style Sheet file: <link href="/WebResource.axd?d=0uONMsWXUuEDG-pbJHAC1kuKiIMteQFkYLmZdkgv7X54TObqYoqVzU4mxvaa4zpn5H9ch0RDwRYKwtO8zM5mKgO6C4WbrbkWWidKR07LD1d4n4i_uNB1mHEvXdZu2Ae5mDdVNDV53znnBojzCzwvSw2&amp;t=634417392021676003" type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" /> You also will see the following script include for the JavaScript file: <script src="/ScriptResource.axd?d=pIS7xcGaqvNLFBvExMBQSp_0xR3mpDfS0QVmmyu1aqDUjF06TrW1jVDyXNDMtBHxpRggLYDvgFTWOsrszflZEDqAcQCg-hDXjun7ON0Ol7EXPQIdOe1GLMceIDv3OeX658-tTq2LGdwXhC1-dE7_6g2&amp;t=ffffffff88a33b59" type="text/javascript"></script> The JavaScrpt file returned by this request to ScriptResource.axd contains the combined scripts for any and all Ajax Control Toolkit controls in a page. By default, the Ajax Control Toolkit combines all of the JavaScript files required by a page into a single JavaScript file. Combining files in this way really speeds up how quickly all of the JavaScript files get delivered from the web server to the browser. So, by default, there will be only one ScriptResource.axd include for all of the JavaScript files required by a page. If you want to disable Script Combining, and create separate links, then disable Script Combining like this: <act:ToolkitScriptManager ID="tsm" runat="server" CombineScripts="false" /> There is one more important attribute used by Ajax Control Toolkit extenders. The PopupHelp behavior uses the following two RequirdScript attributes to load the JavaScript files which are required by the PopupHelp behavior: [RequiredScript(typeof(CommonToolkitScripts), 0)] [RequiredScript(typeof(PopupExtender), 1)] The first parameter of the RequiredScript attribute represents either the string name of a JavaScript file or the type of an Ajax Control Toolkit control. The second parameter represents the order in which the JavaScript files are loaded (This second parameter is needed because .NET attributes are intrinsically unordered). In this case, the RequiredScript attribute will load the JavaScript files associated with the CommonToolkitScripts type and the JavaScript files associated with the PopupExtender in that order. The PopupHelp behavior depends on these JavaScript files. Writing the Client-Side Code The PopupHelp extender uses a client-side behavior written with the Microsoft Ajax Library. Here is the complete code for the client-side behavior: (function () { // The unique name of the script registered with the // client script loader var scriptName = "PopupHelpBehavior"; function execute() { Type.registerNamespace('MyACTControls'); MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior = function (element) { /// <summary> /// A behavior which displays popup help for a textbox /// </summmary> /// <param name="element" type="Sys.UI.DomElement">The element to attach to</param> MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior.initializeBase(this, [element]); this._textbox = Sys.Extended.UI.TextBoxWrapper.get_Wrapper(element); this._cssClass = "ajax__popupHelp"; this._popupBehavior = null; this._popupPosition = Sys.Extended.UI.PositioningMode.BottomLeft; this._popupDiv = null; this._helpText = "Help Text"; this._element$delegates = { focus: Function.createDelegate(this, this._element_onfocus), blur: Function.createDelegate(this, this._element_onblur) }; } MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior.prototype = { initialize: function () { MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior.callBaseMethod(this, 'initialize'); // Add event handlers for focus and blur var element = this.get_element(); $addHandlers(element, this._element$delegates); }, _ensurePopup: function () { if (!this._popupDiv) { var element = this.get_element(); var id = this.get_id(); this._popupDiv = $common.createElementFromTemplate({ nodeName: "div", properties: { id: id + "_popupDiv" }, cssClasses: ["ajax__popupHelp"] }, element.parentNode); this._popupBehavior = new $create(Sys.Extended.UI.PopupBehavior, { parentElement: element }, {}, {}, this._popupDiv); this._popupBehavior.set_positioningMode(this._popupPosition); } }, get_HelpText: function () { return this._helpText; }, set_HelpText: function (value) { if (this._HelpText != value) { this._helpText = value; this._ensurePopup(); this._popupDiv.innerHTML = value; this.raisePropertyChanged("Text") } }, _element_onfocus: function (e) { this.show(); }, _element_onblur: function (e) { this.hide(); }, show: function () { this._popupBehavior.show(); }, hide: function () { if (this._popupBehavior) { this._popupBehavior.hide(); } }, dispose: function() { var element = this.get_element(); $clearHandlers(element); if (this._popupBehavior) { this._popupBehavior.dispose(); this._popupBehavior = null; } } }; MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior.registerClass('MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior', Sys.Extended.UI.BehaviorBase); Sys.registerComponent(MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior, { name: "popupHelp" }); } // execute if (window.Sys && Sys.loader) { Sys.loader.registerScript(scriptName, ["ExtendedBase", "ExtendedCommon"], execute); } else { execute(); } })();   In the following sections, we’ll discuss how this client-side behavior works. Wrapping the Behavior for the Script Loader The behavior is wrapped with the following script: (function () { // The unique name of the script registered with the // client script loader var scriptName = "PopupHelpBehavior"; function execute() { // Behavior Content } // execute if (window.Sys && Sys.loader) { Sys.loader.registerScript(scriptName, ["ExtendedBase", "ExtendedCommon"], execute); } else { execute(); } })(); This code is required by the Microsoft Ajax Library Script Loader. You need this code if you plan to use a behavior directly from client-side code and you want to use the Script Loader. If you plan to only use your code in the context of the Ajax Control Toolkit then you can leave out this code. Registering a JavaScript Namespace The PopupHelp behavior is declared within a namespace named MyACTControls. In the code above, this namespace is created with the following registerNamespace() method: Type.registerNamespace('MyACTControls'); JavaScript does not have any built-in way of creating namespaces to prevent naming conflicts. The Microsoft Ajax Library extends JavaScript with support for namespaces. You can learn more about the registerNamespace() method here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb397723.aspx Creating the Behavior The actual Popup behavior is created with the following code. MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior = function (element) { /// <summary> /// A behavior which displays popup help for a textbox /// </summmary> /// <param name="element" type="Sys.UI.DomElement">The element to attach to</param> MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior.initializeBase(this, [element]); this._textbox = Sys.Extended.UI.TextBoxWrapper.get_Wrapper(element); this._cssClass = "ajax__popupHelp"; this._popupBehavior = null; this._popupPosition = Sys.Extended.UI.PositioningMode.BottomLeft; this._popupDiv = null; this._helpText = "Help Text"; this._element$delegates = { focus: Function.createDelegate(this, this._element_onfocus), blur: Function.createDelegate(this, this._element_onblur) }; } MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior.prototype = { initialize: function () { MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior.callBaseMethod(this, 'initialize'); // Add event handlers for focus and blur var element = this.get_element(); $addHandlers(element, this._element$delegates); }, _ensurePopup: function () { if (!this._popupDiv) { var element = this.get_element(); var id = this.get_id(); this._popupDiv = $common.createElementFromTemplate({ nodeName: "div", properties: { id: id + "_popupDiv" }, cssClasses: ["ajax__popupHelp"] }, element.parentNode); this._popupBehavior = new $create(Sys.Extended.UI.PopupBehavior, { parentElement: element }, {}, {}, this._popupDiv); this._popupBehavior.set_positioningMode(this._popupPosition); } }, get_HelpText: function () { return this._helpText; }, set_HelpText: function (value) { if (this._HelpText != value) { this._helpText = value; this._ensurePopup(); this._popupDiv.innerHTML = value; this.raisePropertyChanged("Text") } }, _element_onfocus: function (e) { this.show(); }, _element_onblur: function (e) { this.hide(); }, show: function () { this._popupBehavior.show(); }, hide: function () { if (this._popupBehavior) { this._popupBehavior.hide(); } }, dispose: function() { var element = this.get_element(); $clearHandlers(element); if (this._popupBehavior) { this._popupBehavior.dispose(); this._popupBehavior = null; } } }; The code above has two parts. The first part of the code is used to define the constructor function for the PopupHelp behavior. This is a factory method which returns an instance of a PopupHelp behavior: MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior = function (element) { } The second part of the code modified the prototype for the PopupHelp behavior: MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior.prototype = { } Any code which is particular to a single instance of the PopupHelp behavior should be placed in the constructor function. For example, the default value of the _helpText field is assigned in the constructor function: this._helpText = "Help Text"; Any code which is shared among all instances of the PopupHelp behavior should be added to the PopupHelp behavior’s prototype. For example, the public HelpText property is added to the prototype: get_HelpText: function () { return this._helpText; }, set_HelpText: function (value) { if (this._HelpText != value) { this._helpText = value; this._ensurePopup(); this._popupDiv.innerHTML = value; this.raisePropertyChanged("Text") } }, Registering a JavaScript Class After you create the PopupHelp behavior, you must register the behavior as a class by using the Microsoft Ajax registerClass() method like this: MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior.registerClass('MyACTControls.PopupHelpBehavior', Sys.Extended.UI.BehaviorBase); This call to registerClass() registers PopupHelp behavior as a class which derives from the base Sys.Extended.UI.BehaviorBase class. Like the ExtenderControlBase class on the server side, the BehaviorBase class on the client side contains method used by every behavior. The documentation for the BehaviorBase class can be found here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb311020.aspx The most important methods and properties of the BehaviorBase class are the following: dispose() – Use this method to clean up all resources used by your behavior. In the case of the PopupHelp behavior, the dispose() method is used to remote the event handlers created by the behavior and disposed the Popup behavior. get_element() -- Use this property to get the DOM element associated with the behavior. In other words, the DOM element which the behavior extends. get_id() – Use this property to the ID of the current behavior. initialize() – Use this method to initialize the behavior. This method is called after all of the properties are set by the $create() method. Creating Debug and Release Scripts You might have noticed that the PopupHelp behavior uses two scripts named PopupHelpBehavior.js and PopupHelpBehavior.debug.js. However, you never create these two scripts. Instead, you only create a single script named PopupHelpBehavior.pre.js. The pre in PopupHelpBehavior.pre.js stands for preprocessor. When you build the Ajax Control Toolkit (or the sample Visual Studio Solution at the end of this blog entry), a build task named JSBuild generates the PopupHelpBehavior.js release script and PopupHelpBehavior.debug.js debug script automatically. The JSBuild preprocessor supports the following directives: #IF #ELSE #ENDIF #INCLUDE #LOCALIZE #DEFINE #UNDEFINE The preprocessor directives are used to mark code which should only appear in the debug version of the script. The directives are used extensively in the Microsoft Ajax Library. For example, the Microsoft Ajax Library Array.contains() method is created like this: $type.contains = function Array$contains(array, item) { //#if DEBUG var e = Function._validateParams(arguments, [ {name: "array", type: Array, elementMayBeNull: true}, {name: "item", mayBeNull: true} ]); if (e) throw e; //#endif return (indexOf(array, item) >= 0); } Notice that you add each of the preprocessor directives inside a JavaScript comment. The comment prevents Visual Studio from getting confused with its Intellisense. The release version, but not the debug version, of the PopupHelpBehavior script is also minified automatically by the Microsoft Ajax Minifier. The minifier is invoked by a build step in the project file. Conclusion The goal of this blog entry was to explain how you can create custom AJAX Control Toolkit controls. In the first part of this blog entry, you learned how to create the server-side portion of an Ajax Control Toolkit control. You learned how to derive a new control from the ExtenderControlBase class and decorate its properties with the necessary attributes. Next, in the second part of this blog entry, you learned how to create the client-side portion of an Ajax Control Toolkit control by creating a client-side behavior with JavaScript. You learned how to use the methods of the Microsoft Ajax Library to extend your client behavior from the BehaviorBase class. Download the Custom ACT Starter Solution

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  • Seriously, It’s Time to Get Your Content Act Together

    - by Mike Stiles
    Branded content, content marketing, social content, brand journalism, we’re seeing those terms more and more. Why? The technology tools are coming together. We should know. We can gather big data, crunch it, listen to the public, moderate, respond, get to know the customer intimately, know what they like, know what they want, we can target, distribute, amplify, measure engagement and reaction, modify strategy and even automate a great deal of all that. An amazing machine, a sleek, smooth-running engine has been built such that all the parts can interact and work together to deliver peak performance and maximum output. But that engine isn’t going anywhere without any gas. Content is the gas. Yes, we curate other people’s content. We can siphon their gas. There’s tech to help with that too. But as for the creation of original, worthwhile content made for a specific audience, our audience, machines can’t do that…at least not yet. Curated content is great. But somebody has to originate the content for it to be curated and shared. And since the need for good, curated content is obviously large and the desire to share is there, it’s a winning proposition for a brand to be a consistent producer of original content. And yet, it feels like content is an issue we’re avoiding. There’s a reluctance to build a massive pipeline if you have no idea what you’re going to run through it. The C-suite often doesn’t know what content is, that it’s different from ads, where to get it, who makes it, how long it should be, what the point of it is if there’s no hard sell of the product, what it costs, how to use it, how to measure it, how to make sure it’s good, or how to make sure it will keep flowing. It could be the reason many brands aren’t pulling the trigger on socially enabling the enterprise. And that’s a shame, because there are a lot of creative, daring, experimental, uniquely talented entertainers and journalists chomping at the bit to execute content for brands. But for many corporate executives, content is “weird,” and the people who make it are even weirder. The content side of the equation is human. It’s art, but art that can be informed by data. The natural inclination is for brands to turn to their agencies for such creative endeavors. But agencies are falling into one of two categories. They’re failing to transition from ads to content. In “Content Era, What’s the Role of Agencies?” Alexander Jutkowitz says agencies were made for one-hit campaigns, not ongoing content. Or, they’re ready and capable but can’t get clients to do the right things. Agencies have to make money, even if it means continuing to do the wrong things because that’s all the client will agree to. So what we wind up with in the pipeline is advertising, marketing-heavy content, content that was obviously created or spearheaded by non-creative executives, random & inconsistent content, copy written for SEO bots, and other completely uninteresting nightmares. Frank Rose, author of “The Art of Immersion,” writes, “Content without story and excitement is noise pollution.” In the old days, you made an ad and inserted it into shows made by people who knew what they were doing. You could bask in that show’s success and leverage their audience. Now, you are tasked with attracting, amassing and holding your own audience. You may just want to make, advertise and sell your widgets. But now there’s a war on for a precious commodity, attention. People are busy. They have filters to keep uninteresting and irrelevant things out. They value their time and expect value back when they give it up. Joe Pulizzi, founder of the Content Marketing Institute, says, "Your customers don't care about you, your products, your services…they care about themselves, their wants and their needs." Is it worth getting serious about content and doing it right? 61% of consumers feel better about a company that delivers custom content (Custom Content Council). Interesting content is one of the top 3 reasons people follow brands on social (Content+). 78% of consumers think organizations that provide custom content want to build good relationships with them (TMG Custom Media). On the B2B side, 80% of business decision makers prefer to get company info in a series of articles vs. an ad. So what’s the hang-up? Cited barriers to content marketing are lack of human resources (42%) and lack of budget (35%). 54% of brands don’t have a single on-site, dedicated content creator. And only 38% of brands have a content marketing strategy. Tech has built the biggest, most incredible stage for brands that’s ever been built. Putting something on that stage is your responsibility. Do a bad show, or no show at all, and you’ll be the beautiful, talented actress that never got discovered. @mikestilesPhoto: Gabriella Fabbri, stock.xchng

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  • Building Web Applications with ACT and jQuery

    - by dwahlin
    My second talk at TechEd is focused on integrating ASP.NET AJAX and jQuery features into websites (if you’re interested in Silverlight you can download code/slides for that talk here). The content starts out by discussing ScriptManager features available in ASP.NET 3.5 and ASP.NET 4 and provides details on why you should consider using a Content Delivery Network (CDN).  If you’re running an external facing site then checking out the CDN features offered by Microsoft or Google is definitely recommended. The talk also goes into the process of contributing to the Ajax Control Toolkit as well as the new Ajax Minifier tool that’s available to crunch JavaScript and CSS files. The extra fun starts in the next part of the talk which details some of the work Microsoft is doing with the jQuery team to donate template, globalization and data linking code to the project. I go into jQuery templates, data linking and a new globalization option that are all being worked on. I want to thank Stephen Walther, Dave Reed and James Senior for their thoughts and contributions since some of the topics covered are pretty bleeding edge right now.The slides and sample code for the talk can be downloaded below.     Download Slides and Samples

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  • The Grenelle II Act In France: A Milestone Towards Integrated Reporting

    - by Evelyn Neumayr
    By Elena Avesani, Principal Product Strategy Manager, Oracle In July of 2010, France took a significant step towards mandating integrated sustainability and financial reporting for all large companies with a new law called Grenelle II. Article 225 of Grenelle II requires that many listed companies on the French stock exchanges incorporate information on the social and environmental consequences of their activities into their annual reports, as well as their societal commitments for sustainable development. The decree that implements Article 225 of Grenelle II was passed in April 2012. Grenelle II is the strongest governmental mandate yet in support of sustainability reporting. The law defines the phase-in process, with large listed companies expected to comply in their 2012 reports and smaller companies expected to comply with their 2014 annual reports. This extra-financial information will have to be embedded in the annual management report, approved by the Board of Directors, verified by a third-party body and given to the annual general meeting. The subjects that must be reported on are grouped into Environmental, Social, and Governance categories. Oracle solutions can help organizations integrate financial and sustainability reporting and provide a more accurate and auditable approach to collecting, consolidating, and reporting such environmental, social, and economic metrics. Through Oracle Environmental Accounting and Reporting and Oracle Hyperion Financial Management Sustainability Starter Kit organizations can collect environmental, social and governance data and collect and consolidate corporate sustainability reporting data from multiple systems and business units. For more information about these solutions please contact [email protected]

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  • Network Balancing Act

    - by listey
    Next up in our popular Oracle Solaris How To series is the Integrated Load Balancer, part of the suite of network facilities that are built in to Oracle Solaris 11. Providing Layer 3 and Layer 4 load balancing capabilities you can use this device to simulate or even replace your hardware based network infrastructure. Read more about the capabilities and how to get a basic configuration working in How to Set Up a Load-Balanced Application Across Two Oracle Solaris Zones

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  • Make one monitor act like two, split in half

    - by Nathan J. Brauer
    Context: Ubuntu 11.10, Unity Let's say I have a screen at resolution 1000x500. What I'd like to do is split the screen down the middle so [Unity or X or ?] acts as if there are two displays (each of 500x500). Examples: Unity will display a different toolbar (the top one) on each side of the display. If I maximize a window on the left side of the screen, it will fill the left side only. If I maximize on the right, it will fill the right. If I hit "fullscreen" in youtube (flash) or Chrome or Movie Player, it will only fill the side of the display that it's on. If it's really is impossible to do this with Unity, will it work with Gnome3 and how? A million thanks!

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  • How to create Checkboxes that act like Radio buttons with Jquery

    - by hmloo
    I have a post here to show code examples for check/uncheck all checkbox with Jquery. This time I will implement another request that the user should only be able to check at most one of the checkboxes, it's behave like radio buttons. There are 2 cases. Case 1 shows function that has little difference with radio button. It allows the user to deselect checkbox. Case 2 is same as radio button. Case 1 <head id="Head1" runat="server"> <title></title> <script src="Scripts/jquery-1.4.1.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <style type="text/css"> .cbRowItem {display:block;} </style> <script type="text/javascript"> $(document).ready(function() { var $chk = $('input:checkbox .cbRowItem'); $chk.click(function() { $chk.not(this).removeAttr('checked'); }); }); </script> </head> <body> <form id="form1" runat="server"> <div style="display:block;"> <asp:CheckBox id="CheckBox1" runat="server" class="cbRowItem" Text = "CheckBox 1"/> <asp:CheckBox id="CheckBox2" runat="server" class="cbRowItem" Text = "CheckBox 2"/> <asp:CheckBox id="CheckBox3" runat="server" class="cbRowItem" Text = "CheckBox 3"/> <asp:CheckBox id="CheckBox4" runat="server" class="cbRowItem" Text = "CheckBox 4"/> </div> </form> </body> </html> Case 2 <head id="Head1" runat="server"> <title></title> <script src="Scripts/jquery-1.4.1.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <style type="text/css"> .cbRowItem {display:block;} </style> <script type="text/javascript"> $(document).ready(function() { var $chk = $('input:checkbox .cbRowItem'); $chk.click(function() { $chk.removeAttr('checked'); $(this).attr('checked', 'checked'); }); }); </script> </head> <body> <form id="form1" runat="server"> <div style="display:block;"> <asp:CheckBox id="CheckBox1" runat="server" class="cbRowItem" Text = "CheckBox 1"/> <asp:CheckBox id="CheckBox2" runat="server" class="cbRowItem" Text = "CheckBox 2"/> <asp:CheckBox id="CheckBox3" runat="server" class="cbRowItem" Text = "CheckBox 3"/> <asp:CheckBox id="CheckBox4" runat="server" class="cbRowItem" Text = "CheckBox 4"/> </div> </form> </body> </html>

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  • Think Global, Act Regional with Identity Globe Trotters

    - by Tanu Sood
    This month we will be introducing a new section on our blog. Titled “Identity Globe Trotters”, this will be a monthly series that would feature a regional topic the last Friday of every month. We would invite guest contributors from different regions to highlight a region-specific business issue, solution, highlight a customer implementation or a regional discussion of interest. If you have an Identity management topic in mind that you’d like featured in this section, do let us know. We look forward to engaging in meaningful discussions with you on global perspectives, regional solutions.

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  • ACT On Marketing Campaign “Middleware Consolidation and Innovation Program”

    - by JuergenKress
     You want marketing budget to run joint Oracle Fusion Middleware 12 c events? Participate in the OFM ACTon Campaign. The opportunity for you as a partners is to : Create larger deals by reselling software and systems e.g. WebLogic on ODA, SOA on ODA, Exalogic for AppAdvantage Create more service revenue at our existing customer, by consolidation and migration of application servers platforms. Extend and innovate platforms e.g. mobile integration big data or business process automation Create service business at new customers, more than 120.000 customers use middleware today! The objective of the initiative is to run joint events for our middleware customers and Generate re-sell middleware license revenue in the broad market Generate Service revenue for partners Prepare partners to understand upgrade and upsell opportunities to Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c WebLogic Community Workspace (WebLogic Community membership required) you can learn details about the campaign: OFM ACTon event Brief & Middleware Consolidation and Innovation_Act-On Program_Salesplay & Campaign kit DRAFT. Interested and want to participate? Contact your local Value Added Distributer and he will work with you on a joint campaign plan! WebLogic Partner Community For regular information become a member in the WebLogic Partner Community please visit: http://www.oracle.com/partners/goto/wls-emea ( OPN account required). If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center. Blog Twitter LinkedIn Mix Forum Wiki Technorati Tags: marketing,ACton,Campaign,WebLogic,WebLogic Community,Oracle,OPN,Jürgen Kress

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  • Detect, Analyze, Act – Fast!

    - by Ajay Khanna
    In fast changing business environment, it becomes crucial to identify business opportunities and business issues as soon as possible. If identified at the right time, business managers can address issues before they escalate to serious problems and can take advantage of the new opportunities before the competition does. Moreover, they have to be efficient to do this at the right cost. Success depends on how responsive organization is to emerging events and changing environment. These events can be customer issues, competition moves, changes in regulations, or changes in company policies. In order to be responsive in such situations, organizations need to first identify and track these situations. They can do that via business activity monitoring (BAM) and complex event processing (CEP). A unified monitoring dashboard helps put together a comprehensive picture of the situation in hand and provides deep insight to take proper actions. With CEP, businesses can connect all the relevant events, detect event patterns and take immediate actions using Business Process Management system.   So to be responsive we need: Real-Time Visibility with Business Activity Monitoring You can use BAM technology to monitor progress, track performance, meet service-level agreements (SLAs), manage exceptions, and issue alerts to an employee or application when a process is not functioning properly—all in real time. A unified monitoring dashboard helps you maintain a complete picture of each situation so you can take action effectively. BAM works hand in hand with BPM software to discover the significant activities that drive business success.   Real-Time Sense and Respond An event-driven BPM solution enables each step in a business process to be informed not only by the previous step, but also by any other step, data, and pattern of behavior deemed relevant to that step. This gives the company the ability to “sense and respond.” You can describe interesting event patterns and event correlations and monitor the business in real-time. Whenever a pre-defined pattern emerges you can take actions like raising alerts, notifications, or kicking off another business process. This synergy possible by integrating activity monitoring, event processing, and BPM makes it possible for managers to keep a finger on the pulse of their business. Business managers can now respond to customers faster, respond to competition faster, reduce fraud and do more cross-selling. Read more about being responsive in the whitepaper “The Instantly Responsive Enterprise: Integrating BPM and Complex Event Processing” in BPM Resource Kit.

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  • Ajax Control Toolkit Now Supports jQuery

    - by Stephen.Walther
    I’m excited to announce the September 2013 release of the Ajax Control Toolkit, which now supports building new Ajax Control Toolkit controls with jQuery. You can download the latest release of the Ajax Control Toolkit from http://AjaxControlToolkit.CodePlex.com or you can install the Ajax Control Toolkit directly within Visual Studio by executing the following NuGet command: The New jQuery Extender Base Class This release of the Ajax Control Toolkit introduces a new jQueryExtender base class. This new base class enables you to create Ajax Control Toolkit controls with jQuery instead of the Microsoft Ajax Library. Currently, only one control in the Ajax Control Toolkit has been rewritten to use the new jQueryExtender base class (only one control has been jQueryized). The ToggleButton control is the first of the Ajax Control Toolkit controls to undergo this dramatic transformation. All of the other controls in the Ajax Control Toolkit are written using the Microsoft Ajax Library. We hope to gradually rewrite these controls as jQuery controls over time. You can view the new jQuery ToggleButton live at the Ajax Control Toolkit sample site: http://www.asp.net/ajaxLibrary/AjaxControlToolkitSampleSite/ToggleButton/ToggleButton.aspx Why are we rewriting Ajax Control Toolkits with jQuery? There are very few developers actively working with the Microsoft Ajax Library while there are thousands of developers actively working with jQuery. Because we want talented developers in the community to continue to contribute to the Ajax Control Toolkit, and because almost all JavaScript developers are familiar with jQuery, it makes sense to support jQuery with the Ajax Control Toolkit. Also, we believe that the Ajax Control Toolkit is a great framework for Web Forms developers who want to build new ASP.NET controls that use JavaScript. The Ajax Control Toolkit has great features such as automatic bundling, minification, caching, and compression. We want to make it easy for ASP.NET developers to build new controls that take advantage of these features. Instantiating Controls with data-* Attributes We took advantage of the new JQueryExtender base class to change the way that Ajax Control Toolkit controls are instantiated. In the past, adding an Ajax Control Toolkit to a page resulted in inline JavaScript being injected into the page. For example, adding the ToggleButton control to a page injected the following HTML and script: <input id="ctl00_SampleContent_CheckBox1" name="ctl00$SampleContent$CheckBox1" type="checkbox" checked="checked" /> <script type="text/javascript"> //<![CDATA[ Sys.Application.add_init(function() { $create(Sys.Extended.UI.ToggleButtonBehavior, {"CheckedImageAlternateText":"Check", "CheckedImageUrl":"ToggleButton_Checked.gif", "ImageHeight":19, "ImageWidth":19, "UncheckedImageAlternateText":"UnCheck", "UncheckedImageUrl":"ToggleButton_Unchecked.gif", "id":"ctl00_SampleContent_ToggleButtonExtender1"}, null, null, $get("ctl00_SampleContent_CheckBox1")); }); //]]> </script> Notice the call to the JavaScript $create() method at the bottom of the page. When using the Microsoft Ajax Library, this call to the $create() method is necessary to create the Ajax Control Toolkit control. This inline script looks pretty ugly to a modern JavaScript developer. Inline script! Horrible! The jQuery version of the ToggleButton injects the following HTML and script into the page: <input id="ctl00_SampleContent_CheckBox1" name="ctl00$SampleContent$CheckBox1" type="checkbox" checked="checked" data-act-togglebuttonextender="imageWidth:19, imageHeight:19, uncheckedImageUrl:'ToggleButton_Unchecked.gif', checkedImageUrl:'ToggleButton_Checked.gif', uncheckedImageAlternateText:'I don&#39;t understand why you don&#39;t like ASP.NET', checkedImageAlternateText:'It&#39;s really nice to hear from you that you like ASP.NET'" /> Notice that there is no script! There is no call to the $create() method. In fact, there is no inline JavaScript at all. The jQuery version of the ToggleButton uses an HTML5 data-* attribute instead of an inline script. The ToggleButton control is instantiated with a data-act-togglebuttonextender attribute. Using data-* attributes results in much cleaner markup (You don’t need to feel embarrassed when selecting View Source in your browser). Ajax Control Toolkit versus jQuery So in a jQuery world why is the Ajax Control Toolkit needed at all? Why not just use jQuery plugins instead of the Ajax Control Toolkit? For example, there are lots of jQuery ToggleButton plugins floating around the Internet. Why not just use one of these jQuery plugins instead of using the Ajax Control Toolkit ToggleButton control? There are three main reasons why the Ajax Control Toolkit continues to be valuable in a jQuery world: Ajax Control Toolkit controls run on both the server and client jQuery plugins are client only. A jQuery plugin does not include any server-side code. If you need to perform any work on the server – think of the AjaxFileUpload control – then you can’t use a pure jQuery solution. Ajax Control Toolkit controls provide a better Visual Studio experience You don’t get any design time experience when you use jQuery plugins within Visual Studio. Ajax Control Toolkit controls, on the other hand, are designed to work with Visual Studio. For example, you can use the Visual Studio Properties window to set Ajax Control Toolkit control properties. Ajax Control Toolkit controls shield you from working with JavaScript I like writing code in JavaScript. However, not all developers like JavaScript and some developers want to completely avoid writing any JavaScript code at all. The Ajax Control Toolkit enables you to take advantage of JavaScript (and the latest features of HTML5) in your ASP.NET Web Forms websites without writing a single line of JavaScript. Better ToolkitScriptManager Documentation With this release, we have added more detailed documentation for using the ToolkitScriptManager. In particular, we added documentation that describes how to take advantage of the new bundling, minification, compression, and caching features of the Ajax Control Toolkit. The ToolkitScriptManager documentation is part of the Ajax Control Toolkit sample site and it can be read here: http://www.asp.net/ajaxLibrary/AjaxControlToolkitSampleSite/ToolkitScriptManager/ToolkitScriptManager.aspx Other Fixes This release of the Ajax Control Toolkit includes several important bug fixes. For example, the Ajax Control Toolkit Twitter control was completely rewritten with this release. Twitter is in the process of retiring the first version of their API. You can read about their plans here: https://dev.twitter.com/blog/planning-for-api-v1-retirement We completely rewrote the Ajax Control Toolkit Twitter control to use the new Twitter API. To take advantage of the new Twitter API, you must get a key and access token from Twitter and add the key and token to your web.config file. Detailed instructions for using the new version of the Ajax Control Toolkit Twitter control can be found here: http://www.asp.net/ajaxLibrary/AjaxControlToolkitSampleSite/Twitter/Twitter.aspx   Summary We’ve made some really great changes to the Ajax Control Toolkit over the last two releases to modernize the toolkit. In the previous release, we updated the Ajax Control Toolkit to use a better bundling, minification, compression, and caching system. With this release, we updated the Ajax Control Toolkit to support jQuery. We also continue to update the Ajax Control Toolkit with important bug fixes. I hope you like these changes and I look forward to hearing your feedback.

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  • Top/left edges of screen, in Virtualbox, act like bottom/right edges

    - by Ken
    I have Virtualbox running on Windows Vista, and Debian running inside Virtualbox. Everything's running great, for the most part. Everything looks correct. But when I'm in full-screen mode, the top edge seems to act (to the mouse) like it's the bottom edge, and the left edge seems to act like the right edge. For example, if I click in the middle of the desktop and drag left, as if to select some icons, when I hit the very leftmost pixel of the screen, the selection (but not the mouse pointer) jumps to the far right edge of the screen). For the left edge, it's not such a big deal, but not having the top edge is kind of annoying: it means I can't select things from the menu in my top panel by slamming the mouse against the top of the screen. Anyone seen this before? Is there some way to make this work? Thanks!

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  • July 2013 Release of the Ajax Control Toolkit

    - by Stephen.Walther
    I’m super excited to announce the July 2013 release of the Ajax Control Toolkit. You can download the new version of the Ajax Control Toolkit from CodePlex (http://ajaxControlToolkit.CodePlex.com) or install the Ajax Control Toolkit from NuGet: With this release, we have completely rewritten the way the Ajax Control Toolkit combines, minifies, gzips, and caches JavaScript files. The goal of this release was to improve the performance of the Ajax Control Toolkit and make it easier to create custom Ajax Control Toolkit controls. Improving Ajax Control Toolkit Performance Previous releases of the Ajax Control Toolkit optimized performance for a single page but not multiple pages. When you visited each page in an app, the Ajax Control Toolkit would combine all of the JavaScript files required by the controls in the page into a new JavaScript file. So, even if every page in your app used the exact same controls, visitors would need to download a new combined Ajax Control Toolkit JavaScript file for each page visited. Downloading new scripts for each page that you visit does not lead to good performance. In general, you want to make as few requests for JavaScript files as possible and take maximum advantage of caching. For most apps, you would get much better performance if you could specify all of the Ajax Control Toolkit controls that you need for your entire app and create a single JavaScript file which could be used across your entire app. What a great idea! Introducing Control Bundles With this release of the Ajax Control Toolkit, we introduce the concept of Control Bundles. You define a Control Bundle to indicate the set of Ajax Control Toolkit controls that you want to use in your app. You define Control Bundles in a file located in the root of your application named AjaxControlToolkit.config. For example, the following AjaxControlToolkit.config file defines two Control Bundles: <ajaxControlToolkit> <controlBundles> <controlBundle> <control name="CalendarExtender" /> <control name="ComboBox" /> </controlBundle> <controlBundle name="CalendarBundle"> <control name="CalendarExtender"></control> </controlBundle> </controlBundles> </ajaxControlToolkit> The first Control Bundle in the file above does not have a name. When a Control Bundle does not have a name then it becomes the default Control Bundle for your entire application. The default Control Bundle is used by the ToolkitScriptManager by default. For example, the default Control Bundle is used when you declare the ToolkitScriptManager like this:  <ajaxToolkit:ToolkitScriptManager runat=”server” /> The default Control Bundle defined in the file above includes all of the scripts required for the CalendarExtender and ComboBox controls. All of the scripts required for both of these controls are combined, minified, gzipped, and cached automatically. The AjaxControlToolkit.config file above also defines a second Control Bundle with the name CalendarBundle. Here’s how you would use the CalendarBundle with the ToolkitScriptManager: <ajaxToolkit:ToolkitScriptManager runat="server"> <ControlBundles> <ajaxToolkit:ControlBundle Name="CalendarBundle" /> </ControlBundles> </ajaxToolkit:ToolkitScriptManager> In this case, only the JavaScript files required by the CalendarExtender control, and not the ComboBox, would be downloaded because the CalendarBundle lists only the CalendarExtender control. You can use multiple named control bundles with the ToolkitScriptManager and you will get all of the scripts from both bundles. Support for ControlBundles is a new feature of the ToolkitScriptManager that we introduced with this release. We extended the ToolkitScriptManager to support the Control Bundles that you can define in the AjaxControlToolkit.config file. Let me be explicit about the rules for Control Bundles: 1. If you do not create an AjaxControlToolkit.config file then the ToolkitScriptManager will download all of the JavaScript files required for all of the controls in the Ajax Control Toolkit. This is the easy but low performance option. 2. If you create an AjaxControlToolkit.config file and create a ControlBundle without a name then the ToolkitScriptManager uses that Control Bundle by default. For example, if you plan to use only the CalendarExtender and ComboBox controls in your application then you should create a default bundle that lists only these two controls. 3. If you create an AjaxControlToolkit.config file and create one or more named Control Bundles then you can use these named Control Bundles with the ToolkitScriptManager. For example, you might want to use different subsets of the Ajax Control Toolkit controls in different sections of your app. I should also mention that you can use the AjaxControlToolkit.config file with custom Ajax Control Toolkit controls – new controls that you write. For example, here is how you would register a set of custom controls from an assembly named MyAssembly: <ajaxControlToolkit> <controlBundles> <controlBundle name="CustomBundle"> <control name="MyAssembly.MyControl1" assembly="MyAssembly" /> <control name="MyAssembly.MyControl2" assembly="MyAssembly" /> </controlBundle> </ajaxControlToolkit> What about ASP.NET Bundling and Minification? The idea of Control Bundles is similar to the idea of Script Bundles used in ASP.NET Bundling and Minification. You might be wondering why we didn’t simply use Script Bundles with the Ajax Control Toolkit. There were several reasons. First, ASP.NET Bundling does not work with scripts embedded in an assembly. Because all of the scripts used by the Ajax Control Toolkit are embedded in the AjaxControlToolkit.dll assembly, ASP.NET Bundling was not an option. Second, Web Forms developers typically think at the level of controls and not at the level of individual scripts. We believe that it makes more sense for a Web Forms developer to specify the controls that they need in an app (CalendarExtender, ToggleButton) instead of the individual scripts that they need in an app (the 15 or so scripts required by the CalenderExtender). Finally, ASP.NET Bundling does not work with older versions of ASP.NET. The Ajax Control Toolkit needs to support ASP.NET 3.5, ASP.NET 4.0, and ASP.NET 4.5. Therefore, using ASP.NET Bundling was not an option. There is nothing wrong with using Control Bundles and Script Bundles side-by-side. The ASP.NET 4.0 and 4.5 ToolkitScriptManager supports both approaches to bundling scripts. Using the AjaxControlToolkit.CombineScriptsHandler Browsers cache JavaScript files by URL. For example, if you request the exact same JavaScript file from two different URLs then the exact same JavaScript file must be downloaded twice. However, if you request the same JavaScript file from the same URL more than once then it only needs to be downloaded once. With this release of the Ajax Control Toolkit, we have introduced a new HTTP Handler named the AjaxControlToolkit.CombineScriptsHandler. If you register this handler in your web.config file then the Ajax Control Toolkit can cache your JavaScript files for up to one year in the future automatically. You should register the handler in two places in your web.config file: in the <httpHandlers> section and the <system.webServer> section (don’t forget to register the handler for the AjaxFileUpload while you are there!). <httpHandlers> <add verb="*" path="AjaxFileUploadHandler.axd" type="AjaxControlToolkit.AjaxFileUploadHandler, AjaxControlToolkit" /> <add verb="*" path="CombineScriptsHandler.axd" type="AjaxControlToolkit.CombineScriptsHandler, AjaxControlToolkit" /> </httpHandlers> <system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false" /> <handlers> <add name="AjaxFileUploadHandler" verb="*" path="AjaxFileUploadHandler.axd" type="AjaxControlToolkit.AjaxFileUploadHandler, AjaxControlToolkit" /> <add name="CombineScriptsHandler" verb="*" path="CombineScriptsHandler.axd" type="AjaxControlToolkit.CombineScriptsHandler, AjaxControlToolkit" /> </handlers> <system.webServer> The handler is only used in release mode and not in debug mode. You can enable release mode in your web.config file like this: <compilation debug=”false”> You also can override the web.config setting with the ToolkitScriptManager like this: <act:ToolkitScriptManager ScriptMode=”Release” runat=”server”/> In release mode, scripts are combined, minified, gzipped, and cached with a far future cache header automatically. When the handler is not registered, scripts are requested from the page that contains the ToolkitScriptManager: When the handler is registered in the web.config file, scripts are requested from the handler: If you want the best performance, always register the handler. That way, the Ajax Control Toolkit can cache the bundled scripts across page requests with a far future cache header. If you don’t register the handler then a new JavaScript file must be downloaded whenever you travel to a new page. Dynamic Bundling and Minification Previous releases of the Ajax Control Toolkit used a Visual Studio build task to minify the JavaScript files used by the Ajax Control Toolkit controls. The disadvantage of this approach to minification is that it made it difficult to create custom Ajax Control Toolkit controls. Starting with this release of the Ajax Control Toolkit, we support dynamic minification. The JavaScript files in the Ajax Control Toolkit are minified at runtime instead of at build time. Scripts are minified only when in release mode. You can specify release mode with the web.config file or with the ToolkitScriptManager ScriptMode property. Because of this change, the Ajax Control Toolkit now depends on the Ajax Minifier. You must include a reference to AjaxMin.dll in your Visual Studio project or you cannot take advantage of runtime minification. If you install the Ajax Control Toolkit from NuGet then AjaxMin.dll is added to your project as a NuGet dependency automatically. If you download the Ajax Control Toolkit from CodePlex then the AjaxMin.dll is included in the download. This change means that you no longer need to do anything special to create a custom Ajax Control Toolkit. As an open source project, we hope more people will contribute to the Ajax Control Toolkit (Yes, I am looking at you.) We have been working hard on making it much easier to create new custom controls. More on this subject with the next release of the Ajax Control Toolkit. A Single Visual Studio Solution We also made substantial changes to the Visual Studio solution and projects used by the Ajax Control Toolkit with this release. This change will matter to you only if you need to work directly with the Ajax Control Toolkit source code. In previous releases of the Ajax Control Toolkit, we maintained separate solution and project files for ASP.NET 3.5, ASP.NET 4.0, and ASP.NET 4.5. Starting with this release, we now support a single Visual Studio 2012 solution that takes advantage of multi-targeting to build ASP.NET 3.5, ASP.NET 4.0, and ASP.NET 4.5 versions of the toolkit. This change means that you need Visual Studio 2012 to open the Ajax Control Toolkit project downloaded from CodePlex. For details on how we setup multi-targeting, please see Budi Adiono’s blog post: http://www.budiadiono.com/2013/07/25/visual-studio-2012-multi-targeting-framework-project/ Summary You can take advantage of this release of the Ajax Control Toolkit to significantly improve the performance of your website. You need to do two things: 1) You need to create an AjaxControlToolkit.config file which lists the controls used in your app and 2) You need to register the AjaxControlToolkit.CombineScriptsHandler in the web.config file. We made substantial changes to the Ajax Control Toolkit with this release. We think these changes will result in much better performance for multipage apps and make the process of building custom controls much easier. As always, we look forward to hearing your feedback.

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  • How do i convert hdb file? ... believed to be from act! source

    - by Wardy
    Any ideas ? I think the original source was a goldmine database, looking around it appears that the file was likely built using an application called ACT which I gather is a huge product I don't really want to be deploying for a one off file total size less than 5 meg. So ... Anyone know of a simple tool that I can run this file through to convert it to a standard CSV or something? It does appear to be (when looking at it in notepad and excel) in some sort of csv type format but it's like the data is encrypted somehow.

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  • Nginx to act as both a webserver and for file transfer

    - by Simon Naude
    I would like to use Nginx as a webserver on my Ubuntu 12.04 server, but i would also like to use it for file transfers. I have been able to set it up as a webserver (very simple), and I have been able to set it up for file transfers (using autoindex on line), but i have not been able to do them both at the same time. Is it possible to have Nginx act as a webserver, and then when you click a link it shows your file directories instead?

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  • I assume Row_Number doesn’t act only on rows of the window frame

    - by AspOnMyNet
    a) Quote is taken from http://www.postgresql.org/docs/current/static/tutorial-window.html for each row, there is a set of rows within its partition called its window frame. Many (but not all) window functions act only on the rows of the window frame, rather than of the whole partition. By default, if ORDER BY is supplied then the frame consists of all rows from the start of the partition up through the current row, plus any following rows that are equal to the current row according to the ORDER BY clause I assume Row_Number doesn’t act only on rows of the window frame, but instead always act on all rows of a partition? b) By default, if ORDER BY is supplied then the frame consists of all rows from the start of the partition up through the current row, plus any following rows that are equal to the current row according to the ORDER BY clause I assume that is only true for those window functions that act only on rows of the window frame ( thus above quote isn't true for ROW_NUMBER() function )? c) http://www.postgresql.org/docs/current/static/tutorial-window.html talks about PostgreSQL 8.4’s Windowing functions. Is everything in that article also true for Sql Server 2008’s Windowing functions thanx

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