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  • Generate DROP statements for all extended properties

    - by jamiet
    This evening I have been attempting to migrate an existing on-premise database to SQL Azure using the wizard that is built-in to SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS). When I did so I received the following error: The following objects are not supported = [MS_Description] = Extended Property Evidently databases containing extended properties can not be migrated using this particular wizard so I set about removing all of the extended properties – unfortunately there were over a thousand of them so I needed a better way than simply deleting each and every one of them manually. I found a couple of resources online that went some way toward this: Drop all extended properties in a MSSQL database by Angelo Hongens Modifying and deleting extended properties by Adam Aspin Unfortunately neither provided a script that exactly suited my needs. Angelo’s covered extended properties on tables and columns however I had other objects that had extended properties on them. Adam’s looked more complete but when I ran it I got an error: Msg 468, Level 16, State 9, Line 78 Cannot resolve the collation conflict between "Latin1_General_100_CS_AS" and "Latin1_General_CI_AS" in the equal to operation. So, both great resources but I wasn’t able to use either on their own to get rid of all of my extended properties. Hence, I combined the excellent work that Angelo and Adam had provided in order to manufacture my own script which did successfully manage to generate calls to sp_dropextendedproperty for all of my extended properties. If you think you might be able to make use of such a script then feel free to download it from https://skydrive.live.com/redir.aspx?cid=550f681dad532637&resid=550F681DAD532637!16707&parid=550F681DAD532637!16706&authkey=!APxPIQCatzC7BQ8. This script will remove extended properties on tables, columns, check constraints, default constraints, views, sprocs, foreign keys, primary keys, table triggers, UDF parameters, sproc parameters, databases, schemas, database files and filegroups. If you have any object types with extended properties on them that are not in that list then consult Adam’s aforementioned article – it should prove very useful. I repeat here the message that I have placed at the top of the script: /* This script will generate calls to sp_dropextendedproperty for every extended property that exists in your database. Actually, a caveat: I don't promise that it will catch each and every extended property that exists, but I'm confident it will catch most of them! It is based on this: http://blog.hongens.nl/2010/02/25/drop-all-extended-properties-in-a-mssql-database/ by Angelo Hongens. Also had lots of help from this: http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Metadata/72609/ by Adam Aspin Adam actually provides a script at that link to do something very similar but when I ran it I got an error: Msg 468, Level 16, State 9, Line 78 Cannot resolve the collation conflict between "Latin1_General_100_CS_AS" and "Latin1_General_CI_AS" in the equal to operation. So I put together this version instead. Use at your own risk. Jamie Thomson 2012-03-25 */ Hope this is useful to someone! @Jamiet

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  • bluetooth doesn't recognize mouse (and other devices)... sometimes

    - by Angelo
    I have a problem with bluetooth with Vista, running on my MacBook. It often doesn't recognize my wireless Magic Mouse. And I saw that it even doesn't seem to start as the pictogram in the task-bar isn't there most of the time I run Vista. But I'm only an Apple-nerd, so I don't know to much about this issue on Vista. When reinstalling Boothcamp or other updates, then once in a while bluetooth recognizes my own mouse (and other devices from some neighbours... so that implicates that the problem must be the bluetooth function in the first place, not my mouse.) Is there some update for the bluetooth application? Angelo

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  • Visual Studio App.config XML Transformation

    - by João Angelo
    Visual Studio 2010 introduced a much-anticipated feature, Web configuration transformations. This feature allows to configure a web application project to transform the web.config file during deployment based on the current build configuration (Debug, Release, etc). If you haven’t already tried it there is a nice step-by-step introduction post to XML transformations on the Visual Web Developer Team Blog and for a quick reference on the supported syntax you have this MSDN entry. Unfortunately there are some bad news, this new feature is specific to web application projects since it resides in the Web Publishing Pipeline (WPP) and therefore is not officially supported in other project types like such as a Windows applications. The keyword here is officially because Vishal Joshi has a nice blog post on how to extend it’s support to app.config transformations. However, the proposed workaround requires that the build action for the app.config file be changed to Content instead of the default None. Also from the comments to the said post it also seems that the workaround will not work for a ClickOnce deployment. Working around this I tried to remove the build action change requirement and at the same time add ClickOnce support. This effort resulted in a single MSBuild project file (AppConfig.Transformation.targets) available for download from GitHub. It integrates itself in the build process so in order to add app.config transformation support to an existing Windows Application Project you just need to import this targets file after all the other import directives that already exist in the *.csproj file. Before – Without App.config transformation support ... <Import Project="$(MSBuildToolsPath)\Microsoft.CSharp.targets" /> <Target Name="BeforeBuild"> </Target> <Target Name="AfterBuild"> </Target> </Project> After – With App.config transformation support ... <Import Project="$(MSBuildToolsPath)\Microsoft.CSharp.targets" /> <Import Project="C:\MyExtensions\AppConfig.Transformation.targets" /> <Target Name="BeforeBuild"> </Target> <Target Name="AfterBuild"> </Target> </Project> As a final disclaimer, the testing time was limited so any problem that you find let me know. The MSBuild project invokes the mage tool so the Framework SDK must be installed. Update: I finally had some spare time and was able to check the problem reported by Geoff Smith and believe the problem is solved. The Publish command inside Visual Studio triggers a build workflow different than through MSBuild command line and this was causing problems. I posted a new version in GitHub that should now support ClickOnce deployment with app.config tranformation from within Visual Studio and MSBuild command line. Also here is a link for the sample application used to test the new version using the Publish command with the install location set to be from a CD-ROM or DVD-ROM and selected that the application will not check for updates. Thanks to Geoff for spotting the problem.

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  • .NET Weak Event Handlers – Part II

    - by João Angelo
    On the first part of this article I showed two possible ways to create weak event handlers. One using reflection and the other using a delegate. For this performance analysis we will further differentiate between creating a delegate by providing the type of the listener at compile time (Explicit Delegate) vs creating the delegate with the type of the listener being only obtained at runtime (Implicit Delegate). As expected, the performance between reflection/delegate differ significantly. With the reflection based approach, creating a weak event handler is just storing a MethodInfo reference while with the delegate based approach there is the need to create the delegate which will be invoked later. So, at creating the weak event handler reflection clearly wins, but what about when the handler is invoked. No surprises there, performing a call through reflection every time a handler is invoked is costly. In conclusion, if you want good performance when creating handlers that only sporadically get triggered use reflection, otherwise use the delegate based approach. The explicit delegate approach always wins against the implicit delegate, but I find the syntax for the latter much more intuitive. // Implicit delegate - The listener type is inferred at runtime from the handler parameter public static EventHandler WrapInDelegateCall(EventHandler handler); public static EventHandler<TArgs> WrapInDelegateCall<TArgs>(EventHandler<TArgs> handler) where TArgs : EventArgs; // Explicite delegate - TListener is the type that defines the handler public static EventHandler WrapInDelegateCall<TListener>(EventHandler handler); public static EventHandler<TArgs> WrapInDelegateCall<TArgs, TListener>(EventHandler<TArgs> handler) where TArgs : EventArgs;

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  • One Exception to Aggregate Them All

    - by João Angelo
    .NET 4.0 introduced a new type of exception, the AggregateException which as the name implies allows to aggregate several exceptions inside a single throw-able exception instance. It is extensively used in the Task Parallel Library (TPL) and besides representing a simple collection of exceptions can also be used to represent a set of exceptions in a tree-like structure. Besides its InnerExceptions property which is a read-only collection of exceptions, the most relevant members of this new type are the methods Flatten and Handle. The former allows to flatten a tree hierarchy removing the need to recur while working with an aggregate exception. For example, if we would flatten the exception tree illustrated in the previous figure the result would be: The other method, Handle, accepts a predicate that is invoked for each aggregated exception and returns a boolean indicating if each exception is handled or not. If at least one exception goes unhandled then Handle throws a new AggregateException containing only the unhandled exceptions. The following code snippet illustrates this behavior and also another scenario where an aggregate exception proves useful – single threaded batch processing. static void Main() { try { ConvertAllToInt32("10", "x1x", "0", "II"); } catch (AggregateException errors) { // Contained exceptions are all FormatException // so Handle does not thrown any exception errors.Handle(e => e is FormatException); } try { ConvertAllToInt32("1", "1x", null, "-2", "#4"); } catch (AggregateException errors) { // Handle throws a new AggregateException containing // the exceptions for which the predicate failed. // In this case it will contain a single ArgumentNullException errors.Handle(e => e is FormatException); } } private static int[] ConvertAllToInt32(params string[] values) { var errors = new List<Exception>(); var integers = new List<int>(); foreach (var item in values) { try { integers.Add(Int32.Parse(item)); } catch (Exception e) { errors.Add(e); } } if (errors.Count > 0) throw new AggregateException(errors); return integers.ToArray(); }

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  • We Don’t Need No Regions

    - by João Angelo
    If your code reaches a level where you want to hide it behind regions then you have a problem that regions won’t solve. Regions are good to hide things that you don’t want to have knowledge about such as auto-generated code. Normally, when you’re developing you end up reading more code than you write it so why would you want to complicate the reading process. I, for one, would love to have that one discussion around regions where someone convinces me that they solve a problem that has no other alternative solution, but I’m still waiting. The most frequent argument I hear about regions is that they allow you to structure your code, but why don’t just structure it using classes, methods and all that other stuff that OOP is about because at the end of the day, you should be doing object oriented programming and not region oriented programming. Having said that, I do believe that sometimes is helpful to have a quick overview of a code file contents and Visual Studio allows you to do just that through the Collapse to Definitions command (CTRL + M, CTRL + O) which collapses the members of all types; if you like regions, you should try this, it is much more useful to read all the members of a type than all the regions inside a type.

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  • Webcenter book review

    - by angelo.santagata
    Hi all, just had the opportunity to read Peter Moskovits Webcenter Handbook and I must say even for someone who has been involved with webcenter for a couple of years now I was pleasantly pleased with this book and still came away with some nuggets.. checkout my review on amazon.com

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  • VSTO Troubleshooting Quick Tips

    - by João Angelo
    If you ever find yourself troubleshooting a VSTO addin that does not load then these steps will interest you. Do not skip the basics and check the registry at HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Office\<Application>\AddIns\<AddInName> or HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Office\<Product>\AddIns\<Application> because if the LoadBehavior key is not set to 3 the office application will not even try to load it on startup; Enable error alerts popups by configuring an environment variable SET VSTO_SUPPRESSDISPLAYALERTS=0 Enable logging errors to file by configuring an environment variable SET VSTO_LOGALERTS=1 Pray for an error alert popup or for an error in the log file so that you can fix its cause.  

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  • Razor – Hiding a Section in a Layout

    - by João Angelo
    Layouts in Razor allow you to define placeholders named sections where content pages may insert custom content much like the ContentPlaceHolder available in ASPX master pages. When you define a section in a Razor layout it’s possible to specify if the section must be defined in every content page using the layout or if its definition is optional allowing a page not to provide any content for that section. For the latter case, it’s also possible using the IsSectionDefined method to render default content when a page does not define the section. However if you ever require to hide a given section from all pages based on some runtime condition you might be tempted to conditionally define it in the layout much like in the following code snippet. if(condition) { @RenderSection("ConditionalSection", false) } With this code you’ll hit an error as soon as any content page provides content for the section which makes sense since if a page inherits a layout then it should only define sections that are also defined in it. To workaround this scenario you have a couple of options. Make the given section optional with and move the condition that enables or disables it to every content page. This leads to code duplication and future pages may forget to only define the section based on that same condition. The other option is to conditionally define the section in the layout page using the following hack: @{ if(condition) { @RenderSection("ConditionalSection", false) } else { RenderSection("ConditionalSection", false).WriteTo(TextWriter.Null); } } Hack inspired by a recent stackoverflow question.

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  • Code Trivia #5

    - by João Angelo
    A quick one inspired by real life broken code. What’s wrong in this piece of code? class Planet { public Planet() { this.Initialize(); } public Planet(string name) : this() { this.Name = name; } private string name = "Unspecified"; public string Name { get { return name; } set { name = value; } } private void Initialize() { Console.Write("Planet {0} initialized.", this.Name); } }

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  • Purging SOA Instances

    - by angelo.santagata
    All, If your running Oracle SOA suite in a high thoughput environment you'll probably discover that your dehydration store will get large, and larger if you dont manage it properly. There are many strategies in manging how to purge this, and this document recently released by Oracle details them quite nicely. The document is Oracle SOA Suite 10g based however a 11g version is in the works and should be out soon. Enjoy the read

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  • Code Trivia #4

    - by João Angelo
    Got the inspiration for this one in a recent stackoverflow question. What should the following code output and why? class Program { class Author { public string FirstName { get; set; } public string LastName { get; set; } public override string ToString() { return LastName + ", " + FirstName; } } static void Main() { Author[] authors = new[] { new Author { FirstName = "John", LastName = "Doe" }, new Author { FirstName = "Jane", LastName="Doe" } }; var line1 = String.Format("Authors: {0} and {1}", authors); Console.WriteLine(line1); string[] serial = new string[] { "AG27H", "6GHW9" }; var line2 = String.Format("Serial: {0}-{1}", serial); Console.WriteLine(line2); int[] version = new int[] { 1, 0 }; var line3 = String.Format("Version: {0}.{1}", version); Console.WriteLine(line3); } } Update: The code will print the first two lines // Authors: Doe, John and Doe, Jane // Serial: AG27H-6GHW9 and then throw an exception on the third call to String.Format because array covariance is not supported in value types. Given this the third call of String.Format will not resolve to String.Format(string, params object[]), like the previous two, but to String.Format(string, object) which fails to provide the second argument for the specified format and will then cause the exception.

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  • Code Trivia #7

    - by João Angelo
    Lets go for another code trivia, it’s business as usual, you just need to find what’s wrong with the following code: static void Main(string[] args) { using (var file = new FileStream("test", FileMode.Create) { WriteTimeout = 1 }) { file.WriteByte(0); } } TIP: There’s something very wrong with this specific code and there’s also another subtle problem that arises due to how the code is structured.

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  • Do Repeat Yourself in Unit Tests

    - by João Angelo
    Don’t get me wrong I’m a big supporter of the DRY (Don’t Repeat Yourself) Principle except however when it comes to unit tests. Why? Well, in my opinion a unit test should be a self-contained group of actions with the intent to test a very specific piece of code and should not depend on externals shared with other unit tests. In a typical unit test we can divide its code in two major groups: Preparation of preconditions for the code under test; Invocation of the code under test. It’s in the first group that you are tempted to refactor common code in several unit tests into helper methods that can then be called in each one of them. Another way to not duplicate code is to use the built-in infrastructure of some unit test frameworks such as SetUp/TearDown methods that automatically run before and after each unit test. I must admit that in the past I was guilty of both charges but what at first seemed a good idea since I was removing code duplication turnout to offer no added value and even complicate the process when a given test fails. We love unit tests because of their rapid feedback when something goes wrong. However, this feedback requires most of the times reading the code for the failed test. Given this, what do you prefer? To read a single method or wander through several methods like SetUp/TearDown and private common methods. I say it again, do repeat yourself in unit tests. It may feel wrong at first but I bet you won’t regret it later.

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  • Weblogic 10.3.4 (PS3) nodemanager wont start?

    - by angelo.santagata
    Hi all, well Im back from Australia and one of the things which happened was Oracle announced the PS3 release of oracles SOA & Webcenter products have been released. Now I normally use pre-installed images but I always like to install the products at least once that way I get to see its installation caveats.. Here’s one. Installation on Windows 7 64bit, 64bit JVM, generic weblogic Server installer. All worked fine, EXCEPT I cant start the node manager, I get the following error <08-Feb-2011 17:16:48> <INFO> <Loading domains file: D:\products\wls1034\WLSERV~1.3\common\NODEMA~1\nodemanager.domains> <08-Feb-2011 17:16:48> <SEVERE> <Fatal error in node manager server> weblogic.nodemanager.common.ConfigException: Native version is enabled but nodemanager native library could not be loaded     at weblogic.nodemanager.server.NMServerConfig.initProcessControl(NMServerConfig.java:249)     at weblogic.nodemanager.server.NMServerConfig.<init>(NMServerConfig.java:190)     at weblogic.nodemanager.server.NMServer.init(NMServer.java:182)     at weblogic.nodemanager.server.NMServer.<init>(NMServer.java:148)     at weblogic.nodemanager.server.NMServer.main(NMServer.java:390)     at weblogic.NodeManager.main(NodeManager.java:31) Caused by: java.lang.UnsatisfiedLinkError: D:\products\wls1034\wlserver_10.3\server\native\win\32\nodemanager.dll: Can't load IA 32-bit .dll on a AMD 64-bit platform     at java.lang.ClassLoader$NativeLibrary.load(Native Method)     at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadLibrary0(ClassLoader.java:1803)     at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadLibrary(ClassLoader.java:1728)     at java.lang.Runtime.loadLibrary0(Runtime.java:823)     at java.lang.System.loadLibrary(System.java:1028)     at weblogic.nodemanager.util.WindowsProcessControl.<init>(WindowsProcessControl.java:17)     at weblogic.nodemanager.util.ProcessControlFactory.getProcessControl(ProcessControlFactory.java:24)     at weblogic.nodemanager.server.NMServerConfig.initProcessControl(NMServerConfig.java:247)     ... 5 more Ok it appears that the node manager has gotten confused and thinks this is a 32bit install of Weblogic Server whereas it is the 64bit install.. Might have been something I did, or didnt do, on installation (e.g. –d64 on the jvm command line), however the workaround is pretty easy. 1. Create a file called nodemanager.properties in %WL_HOME%\common\nodemanager on my machine it was D:\products\wls1034\wlserver_10.3\common\nodemanager 2. Add the following line to it NativeVersionEnabled=false 3. And start it up!, this will force it not to use .DLL files and use emulation/non native methods instead..  

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  • VS 2010 SP1 BETA – App.config XML Transformation Fix

    - by João Angelo
    The current version for App.config XML tranformations as described in a previous post does not support the SP1 BETA version of Visual Studio. I did some quick tests and decided to provide a different version with a compatibility fix for those already experimenting with the beta release of the service pack. This is a quick workaround to the build errors I found when using the transformations in SP1 beta and is pretty much untested since I’ll wait for the final release of the service pack to take a closer look to any possible problems. But for now, those that already installed SP1 beta can use the following transformations: VS 2010 SP1 BETA – App.config XML Transformation And those with the RTM release of Visual Studio can continue to use the original version of the transformations available from: VS 2010 RTM – App.config XML Transformation

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  • Extended Logging with Caller Info Attributes

    - by João Angelo
    .NET 4.5 caller info attributes may be one of those features that do not get much airtime, but nonetheless are a great addition to the framework. These attributes will allow you to programmatically access information about the caller of a given method, more specifically, the code file full path, the member name of the caller and the line number at which the method was called. They are implemented by taking advantage of C# 4.0 optional parameters and are a compile time feature so as an added bonus the returned member name is not affected by obfuscation. The main usage scenario will be for tracing and debugging routines as will see right now. In this sample code I’ll be using NLog, but the example is also applicable to other logging frameworks like log4net. First an helper class, without any dependencies and that can be used anywhere to obtain caller information: using System; using System.IO; using System.Runtime.CompilerServices; public sealed class CallerInfo { private CallerInfo(string filePath, string memberName, int lineNumber) { this.FilePath = filePath; this.MemberName = memberName; this.LineNumber = lineNumber; } public static CallerInfo Create( [CallerFilePath] string filePath = "", [CallerMemberName] string memberName = "", [CallerLineNumber] int lineNumber = 0) { return new CallerInfo(filePath, memberName, lineNumber); } public string FilePath { get; private set; } public string FileName { get { return this.fileName ?? (this.fileName = Path.GetFileName(this.FilePath)); } } public string MemberName { get; private set; } public int LineNumber { get; private set; } public override string ToString() { return string.Concat(this.FilePath, "|", this.MemberName, "|", this.LineNumber); } private string fileName; } Then an extension class specific for NLog Logger: using System; using System.Runtime.CompilerServices; using NLog; public static class LoggerExtensions { public static void TraceMemberEntry( this Logger logger, [CallerFilePath] string filePath = "", [CallerMemberName] string memberName = "", [CallerLineNumber] int lineNumber = 0) { LogMemberEntry(logger, LogLevel.Trace, filePath, memberName, lineNumber); } public static void TraceMemberExit( this Logger logger, [CallerFilePath] string filePath = "", [CallerMemberName] string memberName = "", [CallerLineNumber] int lineNumber = 0) { LogMemberExit(logger, LogLevel.Trace, filePath, memberName, lineNumber); } public static void DebugMemberEntry( this Logger logger, [CallerFilePath] string filePath = "", [CallerMemberName] string memberName = "", [CallerLineNumber] int lineNumber = 0) { LogMemberEntry(logger, LogLevel.Debug, filePath, memberName, lineNumber); } public static void DebugMemberExit( this Logger logger, [CallerFilePath] string filePath = "", [CallerMemberName] string memberName = "", [CallerLineNumber] int lineNumber = 0) { LogMemberExit(logger, LogLevel.Debug, filePath, memberName, lineNumber); } public static void LogMemberEntry( this Logger logger, LogLevel logLevel, [CallerFilePath] string filePath = "", [CallerMemberName] string memberName = "", [CallerLineNumber] int lineNumber = 0) { const string MsgFormat = "Entering member {1} at line {2}"; InternalLog(logger, logLevel, MsgFormat, filePath, memberName, lineNumber); } public static void LogMemberExit( this Logger logger, LogLevel logLevel, [CallerFilePath] string filePath = "", [CallerMemberName] string memberName = "", [CallerLineNumber] int lineNumber = 0) { const string MsgFormat = "Exiting member {1} at line {2}"; InternalLog(logger, logLevel, MsgFormat, filePath, memberName, lineNumber); } private static void InternalLog( Logger logger, LogLevel logLevel, string format, string filePath, string memberName, int lineNumber) { if (logger == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("logger"); if (logLevel == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("logLevel"); logger.Log(logLevel, format, filePath, memberName, lineNumber); } } Finally an usage example: using NLog; internal static class Program { private static readonly Logger Logger = LogManager.GetCurrentClassLogger(); private static void Main(string[] args) { Logger.TraceMemberEntry(); // Compile time feature // Next three lines output the same except for line number Logger.Trace(CallerInfo.Create().ToString()); Logger.Trace(() => CallerInfo.Create().ToString()); Logger.Trace(delegate() { return CallerInfo.Create().ToString(); }); Logger.TraceMemberExit(); } } NOTE: Code for helper class and Logger extension also available here.

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  • Code Trivia #6

    - by João Angelo
    It’s time for yet another code trivia and it’s business as usual. What will the following program output to the console? using System; using System.Drawing; using System.Threading; class Program { [ThreadStatic] static Point Mark = new Point(1, 1); static void Main() { Thread.CurrentThread.Name = "A"; MoveMarkUp(); var helperThread = new Thread(MoveMarkUp) { Name = "B" }; helperThread.Start(); helperThread.Join(); } static void MoveMarkUp() { Mark.Y++; Console.WriteLine("{0}:{1}", Thread.CurrentThread.Name, Mark); } }

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  • ASP.NET ViewState Tips and Tricks #2

    - by João Angelo
    If you need to store complex types in ViewState DO implement IStateManager to control view state persistence and reduce its size. By default a serializable object will be fully stored in view state using BinaryFormatter. A quick comparison for a complex type with two integers and one string property produces the following results measured using ASP.NET tracing: BinaryFormatter: 328 bytes in view state IStateManager: 28 bytes in view state BinaryFormatter sample code: // DO NOT [Serializable] public class Info { public int Id { get; set; } public string Name { get; set; } public int Age { get; set; } } public class ExampleControl : WebControl { protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e) { base.OnLoad(e); if (!this.Page.IsPostBack) { this.User = new Info { Id = 1, Name = "John Doe", Age = 27 }; } } public Info User { get { object o = this.ViewState["Example_User"]; if (o == null) return null; return (Info)o; } set { this.ViewState["Example_User"] = value; } } } IStateManager sample code: // DO public class Info : IStateManager { public int Id { get; set; } public string Name { get; set; } public int Age { get; set; } private bool isTrackingViewState; bool IStateManager.IsTrackingViewState { get { return this.isTrackingViewState; } } void IStateManager.LoadViewState(object state) { var triplet = (Triplet)state; this.Id = (int)triplet.First; this.Name = (string)triplet.Second; this.Age = (int)triplet.Third; } object IStateManager.SaveViewState() { return new Triplet(this.Id, this.Name, this.Age); } void IStateManager.TrackViewState() { this.isTrackingViewState = true; } } public class ExampleControl : WebControl { protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e) { base.OnLoad(e); if (!this.Page.IsPostBack) { this.User = new Info { Id = 1, Name = "John Doe", Age = 27 }; } } public Info User { get; set; } protected override object SaveViewState() { return new Pair( ((IStateManager)this.User).SaveViewState(), base.SaveViewState()); } protected override void LoadViewState(object savedState) { if (savedState != null) { var pair = (Pair)savedState; this.User = new Info(); ((IStateManager)this.User).LoadViewState(pair.First); base.LoadViewState(pair.Second); } } }

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  • What version of webcenter do I have?

    - by angelo.santagata
    Ive seen this come up a few times, someone has webcenter installed, but isnt sure *exactly* which version of webcenter 11g they have installed.. Well its quite easy... Connect to sqplus as SYSDBA to the WebCenter database Run the following query to get the WebCenter schema: select username from all_users where username like '%WEBCENTER%'; Take note of the WebCenter username so you can use in next query. Run the following query to get the WebCenter version: Replace: - With the username from previous query. select version from .WC_REPOSITORY_VERSION; Also worth noting this is all documented in support note Note 1053606.1 available at metalink

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  • Unit Testing DateTime – The Crazy Way

    - by João Angelo
    We all know that the process of unit testing code that depends on DateTime, particularly the current time provided through the static properties (Now, UtcNow and Today), it’s a PITA. If you go ask how to unit test DateTime.Now on stackoverflow I’ll bet that you’ll get two kind of answers: Encapsulate the current time in your own interface and use a standard mocking framework; Pull out the big guns like Typemock Isolator, JustMock or Microsoft Moles/Fakes and mock the static property directly. Now each alternative has is pros and cons and I would have to say that I glean more to the second approach because the first adds a layer of abstraction just for the sake of testability. However, the second approach depends on commercial tools that not every shop wants to buy or in the not so friendly Microsoft Moles. (Sidenote: Moles is now named Fakes and it will ship with VS 2012) This tends to leave people without an acceptable and simple solution so after reading another of these types of questions in SO I came up with yet another alternative, one based on the first alternative that I presented here but tries really hard to not get in your way with yet another layer of abstraction. So, without further dues, I present you, the Tardis. The Tardis is single section of conditionally compiled code that overrides the meaning of the DateTime expression inside a single class. You still get the normal coding experience of using DateTime all over the place, but in a DEBUG compilation your tests will be able to mock every static method or property of the DateTime class. An example follows, while the full Tardis code can be downloaded from GitHub: using System; using NSubstitute; using NUnit.Framework; using Tardis; public class Example { public Example() : this(string.Empty) { } public Example(string title) { #if DEBUG this.DateTime = DateTimeProvider.Default; this.Initialize(title); } internal IDateTimeProvider DateTime { get; set; } internal Example(string title, IDateTimeProvider provider) { this.DateTime = provider; #endif this.Initialize(title); } private void Initialize(string title) { this.Title = title; this.CreatedAt = DateTime.UtcNow; } private string title; public string Title { get { return this.title; } set { this.title = value; this.UpdatedAt = DateTime.UtcNow; } } public DateTime CreatedAt { get; private set; } public DateTime UpdatedAt { get; private set; } } public class TExample { public void T001() { // Arrange var tardis = Substitute.For<IDateTimeProvider>(); tardis.UtcNow.Returns(new DateTime(2000, 1, 1, 6, 6, 6)); // Act var sut = new Example("Title", tardis); // Assert Assert.That(sut.CreatedAt, Is.EqualTo(tardis.UtcNow)); } public void T002() { // Arrange var tardis = Substitute.For<IDateTimeProvider>(); var sut = new Example("Title", tardis); tardis.UtcNow.Returns(new DateTime(2000, 1, 1, 6, 6, 6)); // Act sut.Title = "Updated"; // Assert Assert.That(sut.UpdatedAt, Is.EqualTo(tardis.UtcNow)); } } This approach is also suitable for other similar classes with commonly used static methods or properties like the ConfigurationManager class.

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  • Webcenter and accessability

    - by angelo.santagata
    Got asked about webcenter accessability today, and the answer is obsolutely yes Oracle WebCenter 11gR1 has been tested against Oracle's Accessibility Guidelines (OGHAG), that combine guidelines of Section 508 and WCAG 1.0 'AA'. Here are the links to the product VPATs: VPAT for WebCenter Framework 11gR1: http://www.oracle.com/accessibility/templates/t1008.html VPAT for WebCenter Spaces 11gR1: http://www.oracle.com/accessibility/templates/t1684.html WebCenter 11gR1 PS1 has been tested against the current iteration of OGHAG, that factors in WCAG 2.0.

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  • Assembly Resources Expression Builder

    - by João Angelo
    In ASP.NET you can tackle the internationalization requirement by taking advantage of native support to local and global resources used with the ResourceExpressionBuilder. But with this approach you cannot access public resources defined in external assemblies referenced by your Web application. However, since you can extend the .NET resource provider mechanism and create new expression builders you can workaround this limitation and use external resources in your ASPX pages much like you use local or global resources. Finally, if you are thinking, okay this is all very nice but where’s the code I can use? Well, it was too much to publish directly here so download it from [email protected], where you also find a sample on how to configure and use it.

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  • Introducing NFakeMail

    - by João Angelo
    Ever had to resort to custom code to control emails sent by an application during integration and/or system testing? If you answered yes then you should definitely continue reading. NFakeMail makes it easier for developers to do integration/system testing on software that sends emails by providing a fake SMTP server. You’ll no longer have to manually validate the email sending process. It’s developed in C# and IronPython and targets the .NET 4.0 framework. With NFakeMail you can easily automate the testing of components that rely on sending mails while doing its job. Let’s take a look at some sample code, we start with a simple class containing a method that sends emails. class Notifier { public void Notify() { using (var smtpClient = new SmtpClient("localhost", 10025)) { smtpClient.Send("[email protected]", "[email protected]", "S1", "."); smtpClient.Send("[email protected]", "[email protected]", "S2", ".."); } } } Then to automate the tests for this method we only need to the following: [Test] public void Notify_T001() { using (var server = new FakeSmtpServer(10025)) { new Notifier().Notify(); // Verifies two messages are received in the next five seconds var messages = server.WaitForMessages(count: 2, timeout: 5000); // Verifies the message sender Debug.Assert(messages.All(m => m.From.Address == "[email protected]")); } } The created FakeSmtpServer instance will act as a simple SMTP server and intercept the messages sent by the Notifier class. It’s even possible to verify some fields of each intercepted message and by default all intercepted messages are saved to the file system in MIME format.

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  • Default Parameters vs Method Overloading

    - by João Angelo
    With default parameters introduced in C# 4.0 one might be tempted to abandon the old approach of providing method overloads to simulate default parameters. However, you must take in consideration that both techniques are not interchangeable since they show different behaviors in certain scenarios. For me the most relevant difference is that default parameters are a compile time feature while method overloading is a runtime feature. To illustrate these concepts let’s take a look at a complete, although a bit long, example. What you need to retain from the example is that static method Foo uses method overloading while static method Bar uses C# 4.0 default parameters. static void CreateCallerAssembly(string name) { // Caller class - Invokes Example.Foo() and Example.Bar() string callerCode = String.Concat( "using System;", "public class Caller", "{", " public void Print()", " {", " Console.WriteLine(Example.Foo());", " Console.WriteLine(Example.Bar());", " }", "}"); var parameters = new CompilerParameters(new[] { "system.dll", "Common.dll" }, name); new CSharpCodeProvider().CompileAssemblyFromSource(parameters, callerCode); } static void Main() { // Example class - Foo uses overloading while Bar uses C# 4.0 default parameters string exampleCode = String.Concat( "using System;", "public class Example", "{{", " public static string Foo() {{ return Foo(\"{0}\"); }}", " public static string Foo(string key) {{ return \"FOO-\" + key; }}", " public static string Bar(string key = \"{0}\") {{ return \"BAR-\" + key; }}", "}}"); var compiler = new CSharpCodeProvider(); var parameters = new CompilerParameters(new[] { "system.dll" }, "Common.dll"); // Build Common.dll with default value of "V1" compiler.CompileAssemblyFromSource(parameters, String.Format(exampleCode, "V1")); // Caller1 built against Common.dll that uses a default of "V1" CreateCallerAssembly("Caller1.dll"); // Rebuild Common.dll with default value of "V2" compiler.CompileAssemblyFromSource(parameters, String.Format(exampleCode, "V2")); // Caller2 built against Common.dll that uses a default of "V2" CreateCallerAssembly("Caller2.dll"); dynamic caller1 = Assembly.LoadFrom("Caller1.dll").CreateInstance("Caller"); dynamic caller2 = Assembly.LoadFrom("Caller2.dll").CreateInstance("Caller"); Console.WriteLine("Caller1.dll:"); caller1.Print(); Console.WriteLine("Caller2.dll:"); caller2.Print(); } And if you run this code you will get the following output: // Caller1.dll: // FOO-V2 // BAR-V1 // Caller2.dll: // FOO-V2 // BAR-V2 You see that even though Caller1.dll runs against the current Common.dll assembly where method Bar defines a default value of “V2″ the output show us the default value defined at the time Caller1.dll compiled against the first version of Common.dll. This happens because the compiler will copy the current default value to each method call, much in the same way a constant value (const keyword) is copied to a calling assembly and changes to it’s value will only be reflected if you rebuild the calling assembly again. The use of default parameters is also discouraged by Microsoft in public API’s as stated in (CA1026: Default parameters should not be used) code analysis rule.

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