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  • Java Spotlight Episode 110: Arun Gupta on the Java EE 6 Pocket Guide @arungupta

    - by Roger Brinkley
    Interview with Arun Gupta on his new Java EE 6 Pocket Guide. Right-click or Control-click to download this MP3 file. You can also subscribe to the Java Spotlight Podcast Feed to get the latest podcast automatically. If you use iTunes you can open iTunes and subscribe with this link:  Java Spotlight Podcast in iTunes. Show Notes News Getting Started with JavaFX2 and Scene Builder Using the New CSS Analyzer in JavaFX Scene Builder JavaOne Latin America Keynotes NetBeans Podcast #62 - NetBeans Community News with Geertjan and Tinu Request for Project Nashorn (Open Source) JEP 170: JDBC 4.2 Open Sourcing: decora-compiler JPA 2.1 Schema Generation WebSocket, Java EE 7, and GlassFish Events Dec 3-5, jDays, Göteborg, Sweden Dec 4-6, JavaOne Latin America, Sao Paolo, Brazil Dec 14-15, IndicThreads, Pune, India Feature InterviewArun Gupta is a Java EE & GlassFish Evangelist working at Oracle. Arun has over 14 years of experience in the software industry working in various technologies, Java(TM) platform, and several web-related technologies. In his current role, he works very closely to create and foster the community around Java EE & GlassFish. He has participated in several standard bodies and worked amicably with members from other companies. He has been with the Java EE team since it’s inception. And since then he has contibuted to all Java EE releases.He is a prolific blogger at http://blogs.sun.com/arungupta with over 1000 blog entries and frequent visitors from all over the world reaching up to 25,000 hits/day. His new Java EE 6 Pocket Guide is now available on O’Reily What’s Cool Videos: Getting Started with Java Embedded JavaFX: Leverageing Multicore Performance JavaFX on BeagleBoard State of the Lambda: Libraries Edition FOSDEM 2013 CFP now open! The return of the Shark

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  • JMaghreb 2012 Trip Report

    - by arungupta
    JMaghreb is the inaugural Java conference organized by Morocco JUG. It is the biggest Java conference in Maghreb (5 countries in North West Africa). Oracle was the exclusive platinum sponsor with several others. The registrations had to be closed at 1412 for the free conference and several folks were already on the waiting list. Rabat with 531 registrations and Casablanca with 426 were the top cities. Some statistics ... 850+ attendees over 2 days, 500+ every day 30 sessions were delivered by 18 speakers from 10 different countries 10 sessions in French and 20 in English 6 of the speakers spoke at JavaOne 2012 8 will be at Devoxx Attendees from 5 different countries and 57 cities in Morocco 40.9% qualified them as professional and rest as students Topics ranged from HTML5, Java EE 7, ADF, JavaFX, MySQL, JCP, Vaadin, Android, Community, JCP Java EE 6 hands-on lab was sold out within 7 minutes and JavaFX in 12 minutes I gave the keynote along with Simon Ritter which was basically a recap of the Strategy and Technical keynotes presented at JavaOne 2012. An informal survey during the keynote showed the following numbers: 25% using NetBeans, 90% on Eclipse, 3 on JDeveloper, 1 on IntelliJ About 10 subscribers to free online Java magazine. This digital magazine is a comprehensive source of information for everything Java - subscribe for free!! About 10-15% using Java SE 7. Download JDK 7 and get started today! Even JDK 8 builds have been available for a while now. My second talk explained the core concepts of WebSocket and how JSR 356 is providing a standard API to build WebSocket-driven applications in Java EE 7. TOTD #183 explains how you can easily get started with WebSocket in GlassFish 4. The complete slide deck is available: Next day started with a community keynote by Sonya Barry. Some of us live the life of JCP, JSR, EG, EC, RI, etc every day, but not every body is. To address that, Sonya prepared an excellent introductory presentation providing an explanation of these terms and how java.net infrastructure supports Java development. The registration for the lab showed there is a definite demand for these technologies in this part of the world. I delivered the Java EE 6 hands-on lab to a packed room of about 120 attendees. Most of the attendees were able to progress and follow the lab instructions. Some of the attendees did not have a laptop but were taking extensive notes on paper notepads. Several attendees were already using Java EE 6 in their projects and typically they are the ones asking deep dive questions. Also gave out three copies of my recently released Java EE 6 Pocket Guide and new GlassFish t-shirts. Definitely feels happy to coach ~120 more Java developers learn standards-based enterprise Java programming. I also participated in a JCP BoF along with Werner, Sonya, and Badr. Adotp-a-JSR, java.net infrastructure, how to file a JSR, what is an RI, and other similar topics were discussed in a candid manner. You can follow @JMaghrebConf or check out their facebook page. java.net published a timely conversation with Badr El Houari - the fearless leader of the Morocco JUG team. Did you know that Morocco JUG stood for JCP EC elections (ADD LINK) ? Even though they did not get elected but did fairly well. Now some sample tweets from #JMaghreb ... #JMaghreb is over. Impressive for a first edition! Thanks @badrelhouari and all the @MoroccoJUG team ! Since you @speakjava : System.out.println("Thank you so much dear Tech Evangelist ! The JavaFX was pretty amazing !!! "); #JMaghreb @YounesVendetta @arungupta @JMaghrebConf Right ! hope he will be back to morocco again and again .. :) @Alji_ @arungupta @JMaghrebConf That dude is a genius ;) Put it on your wall :p @arungupta rocking Java EE 6 at @JMaghrebConf #Java #JavaEE #JMaghreb http://t.co/isl0Iq5p @sonyabarry you are an awesome speaker ;-) #JMaghreb rich more than 550 attendees in day one. Expecting more tomorrow! ongratulations @badrelhouari the organisation was great! The talks were pretty interesting, and the turnout was surprising at #JMaghreb! #JMaghreb is truly awesome... The speakers are unbelievable ! #JavaFX... Just amazing #JMaghreb Charmed by the talk about #javaFX ( nodes architecture, MVC, Lazy loading, binding... ) gotta start using it intead of SWT. #JMaghreb JavaFX is killing JFreeChart. It supports Charts a lot of kind of them ... #JMaghreb The british man is back #JMaghreb I do like him!! #JMaghreb @arungupta rocking @JMaghrebConf. pic.twitter.com/CNohA3PE @arungupta Great talk about the future of Java EE (JEE 7 & JEE 8) Thank you. #JMaghreb JEE7 more mooore power , leeess less code !! #JMaghreb They are simplifying the existing API for Java Message Service 2.0 #JMaghreb good to know , the more the code is simplified the better ! The Glassdoor guy #arungupta is doing it RIGHT ! #JMaghreb Great presentation of The Future of the Java Platform: Java EE 7, Java SE 8 & Beyond #jMaghreb @arungupta is a great Guy apparently #JMaghreb On a personal front, the hotel (Soiftel Jardin des Roses) was pretty nice and the location was perfect. There was a 1.8 mile loop dirt trail right next to it so I managed to squeeze some runs before my upcoming marathon. Also enjoyed some great Moroccan cuisine - Couscous, Tajine, mint tea, and moroccan salad. Visit to Kasbah of the Udayas, Hassan II (one of the tallest mosque in the world), and eating in a restaurant in a kasbah are some of the exciting local experiences. Now some pictures from the event (and around the city) ... And the complete album: Many thanks to Badr, Faisal, and rest of the team for organizing a great conference. They are already thinking about how to improve the content, logisitics, and flow for the next year. I'm certainly looking forward to JMaghreb 2.0 :-)

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  • So long Oracle ...

    - by arungupta
    ... and thanks for all the fish! This Friday (October 18, 2013) is my last day at Oracle. After Publishing almost 1400 blog entries with 5500+ comments on them Working in the Java EE team since inception Visiting 35+ countries and several cities around the world Speaking at all major Java conferences and lots of Java User Groups 15-year alumni of JavaOne as staff Meeting and working with best of the best in the Java community Most importantly having lots of fun Its time for me to move on! No new blog entries will be posted on this blog. Feel free to subscribe to The Aquarium for latest updates on Java EE and GlassFish. I'll continue to publish all the excellent content that you've been used to at blog.arungupta.me now onwards. Read my new blog to learn about my new adventures! Here are some of the conference badges collected over the past years ... And the cities visited ... View Cities Visited by "Miles To Go..." in a larger map The comments on this blog are disabled as I'll not be able to respond to them. Feel free to leave comments on the new blog and I'd love to follow up with you there. Thank you very much for all the support that has been shown on this blog. I'd like to conclude with a Hindi song that I've been humming for the past few days now ... Abhi alvida mat kaho doston ... Na jaane kahan phir mulaqaat ho ... Kyonki ... Beete huye lamhon ki kasak saath to hogi ... Khawabon mein hi ho chahe mulaqaat to hogi ... For my non-Hindi readers, here is my paraphrased meaning ... Don't say goodbye yet my friends ... We'll likely meet somewhere else ... Because ... We'll always have the memories of the wonderful time spent together ... May be in dreams but we will meet again ... With that, over and out, and see you at blog.arungupta.me!

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  • JavaOne Latin America 2012 is a wrap!

    - by arungupta
    Third JavaOne in Latin America (2010, 2011) is now a wrap! Like last year, the event started with a Geek Bike Ride. I could not attend the bike ride because of pre-planned activities but heard lots of good comments about it afterwards. This is a great way to engage with JavaOne attendees in an informal setting. I highly recommend you joining next time! JavaOne Blog provides a a great coverage for the opening keynotes. I talked about all the great set of functionality that is coming in the Java EE 7 Platform. Also shared the details on how Java EE 7 JSRs are willing to take help from the Adopt-a-JSR program. glassfish.org/adoptajsr bridges the gap between JUGs willing to participate and looking for areas on where to help. The different specification leads have identified areas on where they are looking for feedback. So if you are JUG is interested in picking a JSR, I recommend to take a look at glassfish.org/adoptajsr and jump on the bandwagon. The main attraction for the Tuesday evening was the GlassFish Party. The party was packed with Latin American JUG leaders, execs from Oracle, and local community members. Free flowing food and beer/caipirinhas acted as great lubricant for great conversations. Some of them were considering the migration from Spring -> Java EE 6 and replacing their primary app server with GlassFish. Locaweb, a local hosting provider sponsored a round of beer at the party as well. They are planning to come with Java EE hosting next year and GlassFish would be a logical choice for them ;) I heard lots of positive feedback about the party afterwards. Many thanks to Bruno Borges for organizing a great party! Check out some more fun pictures of the party! Next day, I gave a presentation on "The Java EE 7 Platform: Productivity and HTML 5" and the slides are now available: With so much new content coming in the plaform: Java Caching API (JSR 107) Concurrency Utilities for Java EE (JSR 236) Batch Applications for the Java Platform (JSR 352) Java API for JSON (JSR 353) Java API for WebSocket (JSR 356) And JAX-RS 2.0 (JSR 339) and JMS 2.0 (JSR 343) getting major updates, there is definitely lot of excitement that was evident amongst the attendees. The talk was delivered in the biggest hall and had about 200 attendees. Also spent a lot of time talking to folks at the OTN Lounge. The JUG leaders appreciation dinner in the evening had its usual share of fun. Day 3 started with a session on "Building HTML5 WebSocket Apps in Java". The slides are now available: The room was packed with about 150 attendees and there was good interaction in the room as well. A collaborative whiteboard built using WebSocket was very well received. The following tweets made it more worthwhile: A WebSocket speek, by @ArunGupta, was worth every hour lost in transit. #JavaOneBrasil2012, #JavaOneBr @arungupta awesome presentation about WebSockets :) The session was immediately followed by the hands-on lab "Developing JAX-RS Web Applications Utilizing Server-Sent Events and WebSocket". The lab covers JAX-RS 2.0, Jersey-specific features such as Server-Sent Events, and a WebSocket endpoint using JSR 356. The complete self-paced lab guide can be downloaded from here. The lab was planned for 2 hours but several folks finished the entire exercise in about 75 mins. The wonderfully written lab material and an added incentive of Java EE 6 Pocket Guide did the trick ;-) I also spoke at "The Java Community Process: How You Can Make a Positive Difference". It was really great to see several JUG leaders talking about Adopt-a-JSR program and other activities that attendees can do to participate in the JCP. I shared details about Adopt a Java EE 7 JSR as well. The community keynote in the evening was looking fun but I had to leave in between to go through the peak Sao Paulo traffic time :) Enjoy the complete set of pictures in the album:

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  • Twitte API for Java - Hello Twitter Servlet (TOTD #178)

    - by arungupta
    There are a few Twitter APIs for Java that allow you to integrate Twitter functionality in a Java application. This is yet another API, built using JAX-RS and Jersey stack. I started this effort earlier this year and kept delaying to share because wanted to provide a more comprehensive API. But I've delayed enough and releasing it as a work-in-progress. I'm happy to take contributions in order to evolve this API and make it complete, useful, and robust. Drop a comment on the blog if you are interested or ping me at @arungupta. How do you get started ? Just add the following to your "pom.xml": <dependency> <groupId>org.glassfish.samples</groupId> <artifactId>twitter-api</artifactId> <version>1.0-SNAPSHOT</version></dependency> The implementation of this API uses Jersey OAuth Filters for authentication with Twitter and so the following dependencies are required if any API that requires authentication, which is pretty much all the APIs ;-) <dependency> <groupId>com.sun.jersey.contribs.jersey-oauth</groupId>     <artifactId>oauth-client</artifactId>     <version>${jersey.version}</version> </dependency> <dependency>     <groupId>com.sun.jersey.contribs.jersey-oauth</groupId>     <artifactId>oauth-signature</artifactId>     <version>${jersey.version}</version> </dependency> Once the dependencies are added to your project, inject Twitter  API in your Servlet (or any other Java EE component) as: @Inject Twitter twitter; Here is a simple non-secure invocation of the API to get you started: SearchResults result = twitter.search("glassfish", SearchResults.class);for (SearchResultsTweet t : result.getResults()) { out.println(t.getText() + "<br/>");} This code returns the tweets that matches the query "glassfish". The source code for the complete project can be downloaded here. Download it, unzip, and mvn package will build the .war file. And then deploy it on GlassFish or any other Java EE 6 compliant application server! The source code for the API also acts as the javadocs and can be checked out from here. A more detailed sample using security and several other API from this library is coming soon!

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  • Why is Java EE 6 better than Spring ?

    - by arungupta
    Java EE 6 was released over 2 years ago and now there are 14 compliant application servers. In all my talks around the world, a question that is frequently asked is Why should I use Java EE 6 instead of Spring ? There are already several blogs covering that topic: Java EE wins over Spring by Bill Burke Why will I use Java EE instead of Spring in new Enterprise Java projects in 2012 ? by Kai Waehner (more discussion on TSS) Spring to Java EE migration (Part 1 and 2, 3 and 4 coming as well) by David Heffelfinger Spring to Java EE - A Migration Experience by Lincoln Baxter Migrating Spring to Java EE 6 by Bert Ertman and Paul Bakker at NLJUG Moving from Spring to Java EE 6 - The Age of Frameworks is Over at TSS Java EE vs Spring Shootout by Rohit Kelapure and Reza Rehman at JavaOne 2011 Java EE 6 and the Ewoks by Murat Yener Definite excuse to avoid Spring forever - Bert Ertman and Arun Gupta I will try to share my perspective in this blog. First of all, I'd like to start with a note: Thank you Spring framework for filling the interim gap and providing functionality that is now included in the mainstream Java EE 6 application servers. The Java EE platform has evolved over the years learning from frameworks like Spring and provides all the functionality to build an enterprise application. Thank you very much Spring framework! While Spring was revolutionary in its time and is still very popular and quite main stream in the same way Struts was circa 2003, it really is last generation's framework - some people are even calling it legacy. However my theory is "code is king". So my approach is to build/take a simple Hello World CRUD application in Java EE 6 and Spring and compare the deployable artifacts. I started looking at the official tutorial Developing a Spring Framework MVC Application Step-by-Step but it is using the older version 2.5. I wasn't able to find any updated version in the current 3.1 release. Next, I downloaded Spring Tool Suite and thought that would provide some template samples to get started. A least a quick search did not show any handy tutorials - either video or text-based. So I searched and found a link to their SVN repository at src.springframework.org/svn/spring-samples/. I tried the "mvc-basic" sample and the generated WAR file was 4.43 MB. While it was named a "basic" sample it seemed to come with 19 different libraries bundled but it was what I could find: ./WEB-INF/lib/aopalliance-1.0.jar./WEB-INF/lib/hibernate-validator-4.1.0.Final.jar./WEB-INF/lib/jcl-over-slf4j-1.6.1.jar./WEB-INF/lib/joda-time-1.6.2.jar./WEB-INF/lib/joda-time-jsptags-1.0.2.jar./WEB-INF/lib/jstl-1.2.jar./WEB-INF/lib/log4j-1.2.16.jar./WEB-INF/lib/slf4j-api-1.6.1.jar./WEB-INF/lib/slf4j-log4j12-1.6.1.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-aop-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-asm-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-beans-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-context-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-context-support-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-core-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-expression-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-web-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-webmvc-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/validation-api-1.0.0.GA.jar And it is not even using any database! The app deployed fine on GlassFish 3.1.2 but the "@Controller Example" link did not work as it was missing the context root. With a bit of tweaking I could deploy the application and assume that the account got created because no error was displayed in the browser or server log. Next I generated the WAR for "mvc-ajax" and the 5.1 MB WAR had 20 JARs (1 removed, 2 added): ./WEB-INF/lib/aopalliance-1.0.jar./WEB-INF/lib/hibernate-validator-4.1.0.Final.jar./WEB-INF/lib/jackson-core-asl-1.6.4.jar./WEB-INF/lib/jackson-mapper-asl-1.6.4.jar./WEB-INF/lib/jcl-over-slf4j-1.6.1.jar./WEB-INF/lib/joda-time-1.6.2.jar./WEB-INF/lib/jstl-1.2.jar./WEB-INF/lib/log4j-1.2.16.jar./WEB-INF/lib/slf4j-api-1.6.1.jar./WEB-INF/lib/slf4j-log4j12-1.6.1.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-aop-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-asm-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-beans-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-context-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-context-support-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-core-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-expression-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-web-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-webmvc-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/validation-api-1.0.0.GA.jar 2 more JARs for just doing Ajax. Anyway, deploying this application gave the following error: Caused by: java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: org.codehaus.jackson.map.SerializationConfig.<init>(Lorg/codehaus/jackson/map/ClassIntrospector;Lorg/codehaus/jackson/map/AnnotationIntrospector;Lorg/codehaus/jackson/map/introspect/VisibilityChecker;Lorg/codehaus/jackson/map/jsontype/SubtypeResolver;)V    at org.springframework.samples.mvc.ajax.json.ConversionServiceAwareObjectMapper.<init>(ConversionServiceAwareObjectMapper.java:20)    at org.springframework.samples.mvc.ajax.json.JacksonConversionServiceConfigurer.postProcessAfterInitialization(JacksonConversionServiceConfigurer.java:40)    at org.springframework.beans.factory.support.AbstractAutowireCapableBeanFactory.applyBeanPostProcessorsAfterInitialization(AbstractAutowireCapableBeanFactory.java:407) Seems like some incorrect repos in the "pom.xml". Next one is "mvc-showcase" and the 6.49 MB WAR now has 28 JARs as shown below: ./WEB-INF/lib/aopalliance-1.0.jar./WEB-INF/lib/aspectjrt-1.6.10.jar./WEB-INF/lib/commons-fileupload-1.2.2.jar./WEB-INF/lib/commons-io-2.0.1.jar./WEB-INF/lib/el-api-2.2.jar./WEB-INF/lib/hibernate-validator-4.1.0.Final.jar./WEB-INF/lib/jackson-core-asl-1.8.1.jar./WEB-INF/lib/jackson-mapper-asl-1.8.1.jar./WEB-INF/lib/javax.inject-1.jar./WEB-INF/lib/jcl-over-slf4j-1.6.1.jar./WEB-INF/lib/jdom-1.0.jar./WEB-INF/lib/joda-time-1.6.2.jar./WEB-INF/lib/jstl-api-1.2.jar./WEB-INF/lib/jstl-impl-1.2.jar./WEB-INF/lib/log4j-1.2.16.jar./WEB-INF/lib/rome-1.0.0.jar./WEB-INF/lib/slf4j-api-1.6.1.jar./WEB-INF/lib/slf4j-log4j12-1.6.1.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-aop-3.1.0.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-asm-3.1.0.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-beans-3.1.0.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-context-3.1.0.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-context-support-3.1.0.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-core-3.1.0.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-expression-3.1.0.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-web-3.1.0.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/spring-webmvc-3.1.0.RELEASE.jar./WEB-INF/lib/validation-api-1.0.0.GA.jar The app at least deployed and showed results this time. But still no database! Next I tried building "jpetstore" and got the error: [ERROR] Failed to execute goal on project org.springframework.samples.jpetstore:Could not resolve dependencies for project org.springframework.samples:org.springframework.samples.jpetstore:war:1.0.0-SNAPSHOT: Failed to collect dependencies for [commons-fileupload:commons-fileupload:jar:1.2.1 (compile), org.apache.struts:com.springsource.org.apache.struts:jar:1.2.9 (compile), javax.xml.rpc:com.springsource.javax.xml.rpc:jar:1.1.0 (compile), org.apache.commons:com.springsource.org.apache.commons.dbcp:jar:1.2.2.osgi (compile), commons-io:commons-io:jar:1.3.2 (compile), hsqldb:hsqldb:jar:1.8.0.7 (compile), org.apache.tiles:tiles-core:jar:2.2.0 (compile), org.apache.tiles:tiles-jsp:jar:2.2.0 (compile), org.tuckey:urlrewritefilter:jar:3.1.0 (compile), org.springframework:spring-webmvc:jar:3.0.0.BUILD-SNAPSHOT (compile), org.springframework:spring-orm:jar:3.0.0.BUILD-SNAPSHOT (compile), org.springframework:spring-context-support:jar:3.0.0.BUILD-SNAPSHOT (compile), org.springframework.webflow:spring-js:jar:2.0.7.RELEASE (compile), org.apache.ibatis:com.springsource.com.ibatis:jar:2.3.4.726 (runtime), com.caucho:com.springsource.com.caucho:jar:3.2.1 (compile), org.apache.axis:com.springsource.org.apache.axis:jar:1.4.0 (compile), javax.wsdl:com.springsource.javax.wsdl:jar:1.6.1 (compile), javax.servlet:jstl:jar:1.2 (runtime), org.aspectj:aspectjweaver:jar:1.6.5 (compile), javax.servlet:servlet-api:jar:2.5 (provided), javax.servlet.jsp:jsp-api:jar:2.1 (provided), junit:junit:jar:4.6 (test)]: Failed to read artifact descriptor for org.springframework:spring-webmvc:jar:3.0.0.BUILD-SNAPSHOT: Could not transfer artifact org.springframework:spring-webmvc:pom:3.0.0.BUILD-SNAPSHOT from/to JBoss repository (http://repository.jboss.com/maven2): Access denied to: http://repository.jboss.com/maven2/org/springframework/spring-webmvc/3.0.0.BUILD-SNAPSHOT/spring-webmvc-3.0.0.BUILD-SNAPSHOT.pom It appears the sample is broken - maybe I was pulling from the wrong repository - would be great if someone were to point me at a good target to use here. With a 50% hit on samples in this repository, I started searching through numerous blogs, most of which have either outdated information (using XML-heavy Spring 2.5), some piece of configuration (which is a typical "feature" of Spring) is missing, or too much complexity in the sample. I finally found this blog that worked like a charm. This blog creates a trivial Spring MVC 3 application using Hibernate and MySQL. This application performs CRUD operations on a single table in a database using typical Spring technologies.  I downloaded the sample code from the blog, deployed it on GlassFish 3.1.2 and could CRUD the "person" entity. The source code for this application can be downloaded here. More details on the application statistics below. And then I built a similar CRUD application in Java EE 6 using NetBeans wizards in a couple of minutes. The source code for the application can be downloaded here and the WAR here. The Spring Source Tool Suite may also offer similar wizard-driven capabilities but this blog focus primarily on comparing the runtimes. The lack of STS tutorials was slightly disappointing as well. NetBeans however has tons of text-based and video tutorials and tons of material even by the community. One more bit on the download size of tools bundle ... NetBeans 7.1.1 "All" is 211 MB (which includes GlassFish and Tomcat) Spring Tool Suite  2.9.0 is 347 MB (~ 65% bigger) This blog is not about the tooling comparison so back to the Java EE 6 version of the application .... In order to run the Java EE version on GlassFish, copy the MySQL Connector/J to glassfish3/glassfish/domains/domain1/lib/ext directory and create a JDBC connection pool and JDBC resource as: ./bin/asadmin create-jdbc-connection-pool --datasourceclassname \\ com.mysql.jdbc.jdbc2.optional.MysqlDataSource --restype \\ javax.sql.DataSource --property \\ portNumber=3306:user=mysql:password=mysql:databaseName=mydatabase \\ myConnectionPool ./bin/asadmin create-jdbc-resource --connectionpoolid myConnectionPool jdbc/myDataSource I generated WARs for the two projects and the table below highlights some differences between them: Java EE 6 Spring WAR File Size 0.021030 MB 10.87 MB (~516x) Number of files 20 53 (> 2.5x) Bundled libraries 0 36 Total size of libraries 0 12.1 MB XML files 3 5 LoC in XML files 50 (11 + 15 + 24) 129 (27 + 46 + 16 + 11 + 19) (~ 2.5x) Total .properties files 1 Bundle.properties 2 spring.properties, log4j.properties Cold Deploy 5,339 ms 11,724 ms Second Deploy 481 ms 6,261 ms Third Deploy 528 ms 5,484 ms Fourth Deploy 484 ms 5,576 ms Runtime memory ~73 MB ~101 MB Some points worth highlighting from the table ... 516x WAR file, 10x deployment time - With 12.1 MB of libraries (for a very basic application) bundled in your application, the WAR file size and the deployment time will naturally go higher. The WAR file for Spring-based application is 516x bigger and the deployment time is double during the first deployment and ~ 10x during subsequent deployments. The Java EE 6 application is fully portable and will run on any Java EE 6 compliant application server. 36 libraries in the WAR - There are 14 Java EE 6 compliant application servers today. Each of those servers provide all the functionality like transactions, dependency injection, security, persistence, etc typically required of an enterprise or web application. There is no need to bundle 36 libraries worth 12.1 MB for a trivial CRUD application. These 14 compliant application servers provide all the functionality baked in. Now you can also deploy these libraries in the container but then you don't get the "portability" offered by Spring in that case. Does your typical Spring deployment actually do that ? 3x LoC in XML - The number of XML files is about 1.6x and the LoC is ~ 2.5x. So much XML seems circa 2003 when the Java language had no annotations. The XML files can be further reduced, e.g. faces-config.xml can be replaced without providing i18n, but I just want to compare stock applications. Memory usage - Both the applications were deployed on default GlassFish 3.1.2 installation and any additional memory consumed as part of deployment/access was attributed to the application. This is by no means scientific but at least provides an initial ballpark. This area definitely needs more investigation. Another table that compares typical Java EE 6 compliant application servers and the custom-stack created for a Spring application ... Java EE 6 Spring Web Container ? 53 MB (tcServer 2.6.3 Developer Edition) Security ? 12 MB (Spring Security 3.1.0) Persistence ? 6.3 MB (Hibernate 4.1.0, required) Dependency Injection ? 5.3 MB (Framework) Web Services ? 796 KB (Spring WS 2.0.4) Messaging ? 3.4 MB (RabbitMQ Server 2.7.1) 936 KB (Java client 936) OSGi ? 1.3 MB (Spring OSGi 1.2.1) GlassFish and WebLogic (starting at 33 MB) 83.3 MB There are differentiating factors on both the stacks. But most of the functionality like security, persistence, and dependency injection is baked in a Java EE 6 compliant application server but needs to be individually managed and patched for a Spring application. This very quickly leads to a "stack explosion". The Java EE 6 servers are tested extensively on a variety of platforms in different combinations whereas a Spring application developer is responsible for testing with different JDKs, Operating Systems, Versions, Patches, etc. Oracle has both the leading OSS lightweight server with GlassFish and the leading enterprise Java server with WebLogic Server, both Java EE 6 and both with lightweight deployment options. The Web Container offered as part of a Java EE 6 application server not only deploys your enterprise Java applications but also provide operational management, diagnostics, and mission-critical capabilities required by your applications. The Java EE 6 platform also introduced the Web Profile which is a subset of the specifications from the entire platform. It is targeted at developers of modern web applications offering a reasonably complete stack, composed of standard APIs, and is capable out-of-the-box of addressing the needs of a large class of Web applications. As your applications grow, the stack can grow to the full Java EE 6 platform. The GlassFish Server Web Profile starting at 33MB (smaller than just the non-standard tcServer) provides most of the functionality typically required by a web application. WebLogic provides battle-tested functionality for a high throughput, low latency, and enterprise grade web application. No individual managing or patching, all tested and commercially supported for you! Note that VMWare does have a server, tcServer, but it is non-standard and not even certified to the level of the standard Web Profile most customers expect these days. Customers who choose this risk proprietary lock-in since VMWare does not seem to want to formally certify with either Java EE 6 Enterprise Platform or with Java EE 6 Web Profile but of course it would be great if they were to join the community and help their customers reduce the risk of deploying on VMWare software. Some more points to help you decide choose between Java EE 6 and Spring ... Freedom to choose container - There are 14 Java EE 6 compliant application servers today, with a variety of open source and commercial offerings. A Java EE 6 application can be deployed on any of those containers. So if you deployed your application on GlassFish today and would like to scale up with your demands then you can deploy the same application to WebLogic. And because of the portability of a Java EE 6 application, you can even take it a different vendor altogether. Spring requires a runtime which could be any of these app servers as well. But why use Spring when all the required functionality is already baked into the application server itself ? Spring also has a different definition of portability where they claim to bundle all the libraries in the WAR file and move to any application server. But we saw earlier how bloated that archive could be. The equivalent features in Spring runtime offerings (mainly tcServer) are not all open source, not as mature, and often require manual assembly.  Vendor choice - The Java EE 6 platform is created using the Java Community Process where all the big players like Oracle, IBM, RedHat, and Apache are conritbuting to make the platform successful. Each application server provides the basic Java EE 6 platform compliance and has its own competitive offerings. This allows you to choose an application server for deploying your Java EE 6 applications. If you are not happy with the support or feature of one vendor then you can move your application to a different vendor because of the portability promise offered by the platform. Spring is a set of products from a single company, one price book, one support organization, one sustaining organization, one sales organization, etc. If any of those cause a customer headache, where do you go ? Java EE, backed by multiple vendors, is a safer bet for those that are risk averse. Production support - With Spring, typically you need to get support from two vendors - VMWare and the container provider. With Java EE 6, all of this is typically provided by one vendor. For example, Oracle offers commercial support from systems, operating systems, JDK, application server, and applications on top of them. VMWare certainly offers complete production support but do you really want to put all your eggs in one basket ? Do you really use tcServer ? ;-) Maintainability - With Spring, you are likely building your own distribution with multiple JAR files, integrating, patching, versioning, etc of all those components. Spring's claim is that multiple JAR files allow you to go à la carte and pick the latest versions of different components. But who is responsible for testing whether all these versions work together ? Yep, you got it, its YOU! If something does not work, who patches and maintains the JARs ? Of course, you! Commercial support for such a configuration ? On your own! The Java EE application servers manage all of this for you and provide a well-tested and commercially supported bundle. While it is always good to realize that there is something new and improved that updates and replaces older frameworks like Spring, the good news is not only does a Java EE 6 container offer what is described here, most also will let you deploy and run your Spring applications on them while you go through an upgrade to a more modern architecture. End result, you get the best of both worlds - keeping your legacy investment but moving to a more agile, lightweight world of Java EE 6. A message to the Spring lovers ... The complexity in J2EE 1.2, 1.3, and 1.4 led to the genesis of Spring but that was in 2004. This is 2012 and the name has changed to "Java EE 6" :-) There are tons of improvements in the Java EE platform to make it easy-to-use and powerful. Some examples: Adding @Stateless on a POJO makes it an EJB EJBs can be packaged in a WAR with no special packaging or deployment descriptors "web.xml" and "faces-config.xml" are optional in most of the common cases Typesafe dependency injection is now part of the Java EE platform Add @Path on a POJO allows you to publish it as a RESTful resource EJBs can be used as backing beans for Facelets-driven JSF pages providing full MVC Java EE 6 WARs are known to be kilobytes in size and deployed in milliseconds Tons of other simplifications in the platform and application servers So if you moved away from J2EE to Spring many years ago and have not looked at Java EE 6 (which has been out since Dec 2009) then you should definitely try it out. Just be at least aware of what other alternatives are available instead of restricting yourself to one stack. Here are some workshops and screencasts worth trying: screencast #37 shows how to build an end-to-end application using NetBeans screencast #36 builds the same application using Eclipse javaee-lab-feb2012.pdf is a 3-4 hours self-paced hands-on workshop that guides you to build a comprehensive Java EE 6 application using NetBeans Each city generally has a "spring cleanup" program every year. It allows you to clean up the mess from your house. For your software projects, you don't need to wait for an annual event, just get started and reduce the technical debt now! Move away from your legacy Spring-based applications to a lighter and more modern approach of building enterprise Java applications using Java EE 6. Watch this beautiful presentation that explains how to migrate from Spring -> Java EE 6: List of files in the Java EE 6 project: ./index.xhtml./META-INF./person./person/Create.xhtml./person/Edit.xhtml./person/List.xhtml./person/View.xhtml./resources./resources/css./resources/css/jsfcrud.css./template.xhtml./WEB-INF./WEB-INF/classes./WEB-INF/classes/Bundle.properties./WEB-INF/classes/META-INF./WEB-INF/classes/META-INF/persistence.xml./WEB-INF/classes/org./WEB-INF/classes/org/javaee./WEB-INF/classes/org/javaee/javaeemysql./WEB-INF/classes/org/javaee/javaeemysql/AbstractFacade.class./WEB-INF/classes/org/javaee/javaeemysql/Person.class./WEB-INF/classes/org/javaee/javaeemysql/Person_.class./WEB-INF/classes/org/javaee/javaeemysql/PersonController$1.class./WEB-INF/classes/org/javaee/javaeemysql/PersonController$PersonControllerConverter.class./WEB-INF/classes/org/javaee/javaeemysql/PersonController.class./WEB-INF/classes/org/javaee/javaeemysql/PersonFacade.class./WEB-INF/classes/org/javaee/javaeemysql/util./WEB-INF/classes/org/javaee/javaeemysql/util/JsfUtil.class./WEB-INF/classes/org/javaee/javaeemysql/util/PaginationHelper.class./WEB-INF/faces-config.xml./WEB-INF/web.xml List of files in the Spring 3.x project: ./META-INF ./META-INF/MANIFEST.MF./WEB-INF./WEB-INF/applicationContext.xml./WEB-INF/classes./WEB-INF/classes/log4j.properties./WEB-INF/classes/org./WEB-INF/classes/org/krams ./WEB-INF/classes/org/krams/tutorial ./WEB-INF/classes/org/krams/tutorial/controller ./WEB-INF/classes/org/krams/tutorial/controller/MainController.class ./WEB-INF/classes/org/krams/tutorial/domain ./WEB-INF/classes/org/krams/tutorial/domain/Person.class ./WEB-INF/classes/org/krams/tutorial/service ./WEB-INF/classes/org/krams/tutorial/service/PersonService.class ./WEB-INF/hibernate-context.xml ./WEB-INF/hibernate.cfg.xml ./WEB-INF/jsp ./WEB-INF/jsp/addedpage.jsp ./WEB-INF/jsp/addpage.jsp ./WEB-INF/jsp/deletedpage.jsp ./WEB-INF/jsp/editedpage.jsp ./WEB-INF/jsp/editpage.jsp ./WEB-INF/jsp/personspage.jsp ./WEB-INF/lib ./WEB-INF/lib/antlr-2.7.6.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/aopalliance-1.0.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/c3p0-0.9.1.2.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/cglib-nodep-2.2.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/commons-beanutils-1.8.3.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/commons-collections-3.2.1.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/commons-digester-2.1.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/commons-logging-1.1.1.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/dom4j-1.6.1.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/ejb3-persistence-1.0.2.GA.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/hibernate-annotations-3.4.0.GA.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/hibernate-commons-annotations-3.1.0.GA.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/hibernate-core-3.3.2.GA.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/javassist-3.7.ga.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/jstl-1.1.2.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/jta-1.1.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/junit-4.8.1.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/log4j-1.2.14.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/mysql-connector-java-5.1.14.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/persistence-api-1.0.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/slf4j-api-1.6.1.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/slf4j-log4j12-1.6.1.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/spring-aop-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/spring-asm-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/spring-beans-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/spring-context-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/spring-context-support-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/spring-core-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/spring-expression-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/spring-jdbc-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/spring-orm-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/spring-tx-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/spring-web-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/spring-webmvc-3.0.5.RELEASE.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/standard-1.1.2.jar ./WEB-INF/lib/xml-apis-1.0.b2.jar ./WEB-INF/spring-servlet.xml ./WEB-INF/spring.properties ./WEB-INF/web.xml So, are you excited about Java EE 6 ? Want to get started now ? Here are some resources: Java EE 6 SDK (including runtime, samples, tutorials etc) GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 3.1.2 (Community) Oracle GlassFish Server 3.1.2 (Commercial) Java EE 6 using WebLogic 12c and NetBeans (Video) Java EE 6 with NetBeans and GlassFish (Video) Java EE with Eclipse and GlassFish (Video)

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  • WebSocket and Java EE 7 - Getting Ready for JSR 356 (TOTD #181)

    - by arungupta
    WebSocket is developed as part of HTML 5 specification and provides a bi-directional, full-duplex communication channel over a single TCP socket. It provides dramatic improvement over the traditional approaches of Polling, Long-Polling, and Streaming for two-way communication. There is no latency from establishing new TCP connections for each HTTP message. There is a WebSocket API and the WebSocket Protocol. The Protocol defines "handshake" and "framing". The handshake defines how a normal HTTP connection can be upgraded to a WebSocket connection. The framing defines wire format of the message. The design philosophy is to keep the framing minimum to avoid the overhead. Both text and binary data can be sent using the API. WebSocket may look like a competing technology to Server-Sent Events (SSE), but they are not. Here are the key differences: WebSocket can send and receive data from a client. A typical example of WebSocket is a two-player game or a chat application. Server-Sent Events can only push data data to the client. A typical example of SSE is stock ticker or news feed. With SSE, XMLHttpRequest can be used to send data to the server. For server-only updates, WebSockets has an extra overhead and programming can be unecessarily complex. SSE provides a simple and easy-to-use model that is much better suited. SSEs are sent over traditional HTTP and so no modification is required on the server-side. WebSocket require servers that understand the protocol. SSE have several features that are missing from WebSocket such as automatic reconnection, event IDs, and the ability to send arbitrary events. The client automatically tries to reconnect if the connection is closed. The default wait before trying to reconnect is 3 seconds and can be configured by including "retry: XXXX\n" header where XXXX is the milliseconds to wait before trying to reconnect. Event stream can include a unique event identifier. This allows the server to determine which events need to be fired to each client in case the connection is dropped in between. The data can span multiple lines and can be of any text format as long as EventSource message handler can process it. WebSockets provide true real-time updates, SSE can be configured to provide close to real-time by setting appropriate timeouts. OK, so all excited about WebSocket ? Want to convert your POJOs into WebSockets endpoint ? websocket-sdk and GlassFish 4.0 is here to help! The complete source code shown in this project can be downloaded here. On the server-side, the WebSocket SDK converts a POJO into a WebSocket endpoint using simple annotations. Here is how a WebSocket endpoint will look like: @WebSocket(path="/echo")public class EchoBean { @WebSocketMessage public String echo(String message) { return message + " (from your server)"; }} In this code "@WebSocket" is a class-level annotation that declares a POJO to accept WebSocket messages. The path at which the messages are accepted is specified in this annotation. "@WebSocketMessage" indicates the Java method that is invoked when the endpoint receives a message. This method implementation echoes the received message concatenated with an additional string. The client-side HTML page looks like <div style="text-align: center;"> <form action=""> <input onclick="send_echo()" value="Press me" type="button"> <input id="textID" name="message" value="Hello WebSocket!" type="text"><br> </form></div><div id="output"></div> WebSocket allows a full-duplex communication. So the client, a browser in this case, can send a message to a server, a WebSocket endpoint in this case. And the server can send a message to the client at the same time. This is unlike HTTP which follows a "request" followed by a "response". In this code, the "send_echo" method in the JavaScript is invoked on the button click. There is also a <div> placeholder to display the response from the WebSocket endpoint. The JavaScript looks like: <script language="javascript" type="text/javascript"> var wsUri = "ws://localhost:8080/websockets/echo"; var websocket = new WebSocket(wsUri); websocket.onopen = function(evt) { onOpen(evt) }; websocket.onmessage = function(evt) { onMessage(evt) }; websocket.onerror = function(evt) { onError(evt) }; function init() { output = document.getElementById("output"); } function send_echo() { websocket.send(textID.value); writeToScreen("SENT: " + textID.value); } function onOpen(evt) { writeToScreen("CONNECTED"); } function onMessage(evt) { writeToScreen("RECEIVED: " + evt.data); } function onError(evt) { writeToScreen('<span style="color: red;">ERROR:</span> ' + evt.data); } function writeToScreen(message) { var pre = document.createElement("p"); pre.style.wordWrap = "break-word"; pre.innerHTML = message; output.appendChild(pre); } window.addEventListener("load", init, false);</script> In this code The URI to connect to on the server side is of the format ws://<HOST>:<PORT>/websockets/<PATH> "ws" is a new URI scheme introduced by the WebSocket protocol. <PATH> is the path on the endpoint where the WebSocket messages are accepted. In our case, it is ws://localhost:8080/websockets/echo WEBSOCKET_SDK-1 will ensure that context root is included in the URI as well. WebSocket is created as a global object so that the connection is created only once. This object establishes a connection with the given host, port and the path at which the endpoint is listening. The WebSocket API defines several callbacks that can be registered on specific events. The "onopen", "onmessage", and "onerror" callbacks are registered in this case. The callbacks print a message on the browser indicating which one is called and additionally also prints the data sent/received. On the button click, the WebSocket object is used to transmit text data to the endpoint. Binary data can be sent as one blob or using buffering. The HTTP request headers sent for the WebSocket call are: GET ws://localhost:8080/websockets/echo HTTP/1.1Origin: http://localhost:8080Connection: UpgradeSec-WebSocket-Extensions: x-webkit-deflate-frameHost: localhost:8080Sec-WebSocket-Key: mDbnYkAUi0b5Rnal9/cMvQ==Upgrade: websocketSec-WebSocket-Version: 13 And the response headers received are Connection:UpgradeSec-WebSocket-Accept:q4nmgFl/lEtU2ocyKZ64dtQvx10=Upgrade:websocket(Challenge Response):00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00 The headers are shown in Chrome as shown below: The complete source code shown in this project can be downloaded here. The builds from websocket-sdk are integrated in GlassFish 4.0 builds. Would you like to live on the bleeding edge ? Then follow the instructions below to check out the workspace and install the latest SDK: Check out the source code svn checkout https://svn.java.net/svn/websocket-sdk~source-code-repository Build and install the trunk in your local repository as: mvn install Copy "./bundles/websocket-osgi/target/websocket-osgi-0.3-SNAPSHOT.jar" to "glassfish3/glassfish/modules/websocket-osgi.jar" in your GlassFish 4 latest promoted build. Notice, you need to overwrite the JAR file. Anybody interested in building a cool application using WebSocket and get it running on GlassFish ? :-) This work will also feed into JSR 356 - Java API for WebSocket. On a lighter side, there seems to be less agreement on the name. Here are some of the options that are prevalent: WebSocket (W3C API, the URL is www.w3.org/TR/websockets though) Web Socket (HTML5 Demos - html5demos.com/web-socket) Websocket (Jenkins Plugin - wiki.jenkins-ci.org/display/JENKINS/Websocket%2BPlugin) WebSockets (Used by Mozilla - developer.mozilla.org/en/WebSockets, but use WebSocket as well) Web sockets (HTML5 Working Group - www.whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/multipage/network.html) Web Sockets (Chrome Blog - blog.chromium.org/2009/12/web-sockets-now-available-in-google.html) I prefer "WebSocket" as that seems to be most common usage and used by the W3C API as well. What do you use ?

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  • TOTD #166: Using NoSQL database in your Java EE 6 Applications on GlassFish - MongoDB for now!

    - by arungupta
    The Java EE 6 platform includes Java Persistence API to work with RDBMS. The JPA specification defines a comprehensive API that includes, but not restricted to, how a database table can be mapped to a POJO and vice versa, provides mechanisms how a PersistenceContext can be injected in a @Stateless bean and then be used for performing different operations on the database table and write typesafe queries. There are several well known advantages of RDBMS but the NoSQL movement has gained traction over past couple of years. The NoSQL databases are not intended to be a replacement for the mainstream RDBMS. As Philosophy of NoSQL explains, NoSQL database was designed for casual use where all the features typically provided by an RDBMS are not required. The name "NoSQL" is more of a category of databases that is more known for what it is not rather than what it is. The basic principles of NoSQL database are: No need to have a pre-defined schema and that makes them a schema-less database. Addition of new properties to existing objects is easy and does not require ALTER TABLE. The unstructured data gives flexibility to change the format of data any time without downtime or reduced service levels. Also there are no joins happening on the server because there is no structure and thus no relation between them. Scalability and performance is more important than the entire set of functionality typically provided by an RDBMS. This set of databases provide eventual consistency and/or transactions restricted to single items but more focus on CRUD. Not be restricted to SQL to access the information stored in the backing database. Designed to scale-out (horizontal) instead of scale-up (vertical). This is important knowing that databases, and everything else as well, is moving into the cloud. RBDMS can scale-out using sharding but requires complex management and not for the faint of heart. Unlike RBDMS which require a separate caching tier, most of the NoSQL databases comes with integrated caching. Designed for less management and simpler data models lead to lower administration as well. There are primarily three types of NoSQL databases: Key-Value stores (e.g. Cassandra and Riak) Document databases (MongoDB or CouchDB) Graph databases (Neo4J) You may think NoSQL is panacea but as I mentioned above they are not meant to replace the mainstream databases and here is why: RDBMS have been around for many years, very stable, and functionally rich. This is something CIOs and CTOs can bet their money on without much worry. There is a reason 98% of Fortune 100 companies run Oracle :-) NoSQL is cutting edge, brings excitement to developers, but enterprises are cautious about them. Commercial databases like Oracle are well supported by the backing enterprises in terms of providing support resources on a global scale. There is a full ecosystem built around these commercial databases providing training, performance tuning, architecture guidance, and everything else. NoSQL is fairly new and typically backed by a single company not able to meet the scale of these big enterprises. NoSQL databases are good for CRUDing operations but business intelligence is extremely important for enterprises to stay competitive. RDBMS provide extensive tooling to generate this data but that was not the original intention of NoSQL databases and is lacking in that area. Generating any meaningful information other than CRUDing require extensive programming. Not suited for complex transactions such as banking systems or other highly transactional applications requiring 2-phase commit. SQL cannot be used with NoSQL databases and writing simple queries can be involving. Enough talking, lets take a look at some code. This blog has published multiple blogs on how to access a RDBMS using JPA in a Java EE 6 application. This Tip Of The Day (TOTD) will show you can use MongoDB (a document-oriented database) with a typical 3-tier Java EE 6 application. Lets get started! The complete source code of this project can be downloaded here. Download MongoDB for your platform from here (1.8.2 as of this writing) and start the server as: [email protected]:~/tools/mongodb-linux-x86_64-1.8.2/bin$./mongod./mongod --help for help and startup optionsSun Jun 26 20:41:11 [initandlisten] MongoDB starting : pid=11210port=27017 dbpath=/data/db/ 64-bit Sun Jun 26 20:41:11 [initandlisten] db version v1.8.2, pdfile version4.5Sun Jun 26 20:41:11 [initandlisten] git version:433bbaa14aaba6860da15bd4de8edf600f56501bSun Jun 26 20:41:11 [initandlisten] build sys info: Linuxbs-linux64.10gen.cc 2.6.21.7-2.ec2.v1.2.fc8xen #1 SMP Fri Nov 2017:48:28 EST 2009 x86_64 BOOST_LIB_VERSION=1_41Sun Jun 26 20:41:11 [initandlisten] waiting for connections on port 27017Sun Jun 26 20:41:11 [websvr] web admin interface listening on port 28017 The default directory for the database is /data/db and needs to be created as: sudo mkdir -p /data/db/sudo chown `id -u` /data/db You can specify a different directory using "--dbpath" option. Refer to Quickstart for your specific platform. Using NetBeans, create a Java EE 6 project and make sure to enable CDI and add JavaServer Faces framework. Download MongoDB Java Driver (2.6.3 of this writing) and add it to the project library by selecting "Properties", "LIbraries", "Add Library...", creating a new library by specifying the location of the JAR file, and adding the library to the created project. Edit the generated "index.xhtml" such that it looks like: <h1>Add a new movie</h1><h:form> Name: <h:inputText value="#{movie.name}" size="20"/><br/> Year: <h:inputText value="#{movie.year}" size="6"/><br/> Language: <h:inputText value="#{movie.language}" size="20"/><br/> <h:commandButton actionListener="#{movieSessionBean.createMovie}" action="show" title="Add" value="submit"/></h:form> This page has a simple HTML form with three text boxes and a submit button. The text boxes take name, year, and language of a movie and the submit button invokes the "createMovie" method of "movieSessionBean" and then render "show.xhtml". Create "show.xhtml" ("New" -> "Other..." -> "Other" -> "XHTML File") such that it looks like: <head> <title><h1>List of movies</h1></title> </head> <body> <h:form> <h:dataTable value="#{movieSessionBean.movies}" var="m" > <h:column><f:facet name="header">Name</f:facet>#{m.name}</h:column> <h:column><f:facet name="header">Year</f:facet>#{m.year}</h:column> <h:column><f:facet name="header">Language</f:facet>#{m.language}</h:column> </h:dataTable> </h:form> This page shows the name, year, and language of all movies stored in the database so far. The list of movies is returned by "movieSessionBean.movies" property. Now create the "Movie" class such that it looks like: import com.mongodb.BasicDBObject;import com.mongodb.BasicDBObject;import com.mongodb.DBObject;import javax.enterprise.inject.Model;import javax.validation.constraints.Size;/** * @author arun */@Modelpublic class Movie { @Size(min=1, max=20) private String name; @Size(min=1, max=20) private String language; private int year; // getters and setters for "name", "year", "language" public BasicDBObject toDBObject() { BasicDBObject doc = new BasicDBObject(); doc.put("name", name); doc.put("year", year); doc.put("language", language); return doc; } public static Movie fromDBObject(DBObject doc) { Movie m = new Movie(); m.name = (String)doc.get("name"); m.year = (int)doc.get("year"); m.language = (String)doc.get("language"); return m; } @Override public String toString() { return name + ", " + year + ", " + language; }} Other than the usual boilerplate code, the key methods here are "toDBObject" and "fromDBObject". These methods provide a conversion from "Movie" -> "DBObject" and vice versa. The "DBObject" is a MongoDB class that comes as part of the mongo-2.6.3.jar file and which we added to our project earlier.  The complete javadoc for 2.6.3 can be seen here. Notice, this class also uses Bean Validation constraints and will be honored by the JSF layer. Finally, create "MovieSessionBean" stateless EJB with all the business logic such that it looks like: package org.glassfish.samples;import com.mongodb.BasicDBObject;import com.mongodb.DB;import com.mongodb.DBCollection;import com.mongodb.DBCursor;import com.mongodb.DBObject;import com.mongodb.Mongo;import java.net.UnknownHostException;import java.util.ArrayList;import java.util.List;import javax.annotation.PostConstruct;import javax.ejb.Stateless;import javax.inject.Inject;import javax.inject.Named;/** * @author arun */@[email protected] class MovieSessionBean { @Inject Movie movie; DBCollection movieColl; @PostConstruct private void initDB() throws UnknownHostException { Mongo m = new Mongo(); DB db = m.getDB("movieDB"); movieColl = db.getCollection("movies"); if (movieColl == null) { movieColl = db.createCollection("movies", null); } } public void createMovie() { BasicDBObject doc = movie.toDBObject(); movieColl.insert(doc); } public List<Movie> getMovies() { List<Movie> movies = new ArrayList(); DBCursor cur = movieColl.find(); System.out.println("getMovies: Found " + cur.size() + " movie(s)"); for (DBObject dbo : cur.toArray()) { movies.add(Movie.fromDBObject(dbo)); } return movies; }} The database is initialized in @PostConstruct. Instead of a working with a database table, NoSQL databases work with a schema-less document. The "Movie" class is the document in our case and stored in the collection "movies". The collection allows us to perform query functions on all movies. The "getMovies" method invokes "find" method on the collection which is equivalent to the SQL query "select * from movies" and then returns a List<Movie>. Also notice that there is no "persistence.xml" in the project. Right-click and run the project to see the output as: Enter some values in the text box and click on enter to see the result as: If you reached here then you've successfully used MongoDB in your Java EE 6 application, congratulations! Some food for thought and further play ... SQL to MongoDB mapping shows mapping between traditional SQL -> Mongo query language. Tutorial shows fun things you can do with MongoDB. Try the interactive online shell  The cookbook provides common ways of using MongoDB In terms of this project, here are some tasks that can be tried: Encapsulate database management in a JPA persistence provider. Is it even worth it because the capabilities are going to be very different ? MongoDB uses "BSonObject" class for JSON representation, add @XmlRootElement on a POJO and how a compatible JSON representation can be generated. This will make the fromXXX and toXXX methods redundant.

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  • TOTD #166: Using NoSQL database in your Java EE 6 Applications on GlassFish - MongoDB for now!

    - by arungupta
    The Java EE 6 platform includes Java Persistence API to work with RDBMS. The JPA specification defines a comprehensive API that includes, but not restricted to, how a database table can be mapped to a POJO and vice versa, provides mechanisms how a PersistenceContext can be injected in a @Stateless bean and then be used for performing different operations on the database table and write typesafe queries. There are several well known advantages of RDBMS but the NoSQL movement has gained traction over past couple of years. The NoSQL databases are not intended to be a replacement for the mainstream RDBMS. As Philosophy of NoSQL explains, NoSQL database was designed for casual use where all the features typically provided by an RDBMS are not required. The name "NoSQL" is more of a category of databases that is more known for what it is not rather than what it is. The basic principles of NoSQL database are: No need to have a pre-defined schema and that makes them a schema-less database. Addition of new properties to existing objects is easy and does not require ALTER TABLE. The unstructured data gives flexibility to change the format of data any time without downtime or reduced service levels. Also there are no joins happening on the server because there is no structure and thus no relation between them. Scalability and performance is more important than the entire set of functionality typically provided by an RDBMS. This set of databases provide eventual consistency and/or transactions restricted to single items but more focus on CRUD. Not be restricted to SQL to access the information stored in the backing database. Designed to scale-out (horizontal) instead of scale-up (vertical). This is important knowing that databases, and everything else as well, is moving into the cloud. RBDMS can scale-out using sharding but requires complex management and not for the faint of heart. Unlike RBDMS which require a separate caching tier, most of the NoSQL databases comes with integrated caching. Designed for less management and simpler data models lead to lower administration as well. There are primarily three types of NoSQL databases: Key-Value stores (e.g. Cassandra and Riak) Document databases (MongoDB or CouchDB) Graph databases (Neo4J) You may think NoSQL is panacea but as I mentioned above they are not meant to replace the mainstream databases and here is why: RDBMS have been around for many years, very stable, and functionally rich. This is something CIOs and CTOs can bet their money on without much worry. There is a reason 98% of Fortune 100 companies run Oracle :-) NoSQL is cutting edge, brings excitement to developers, but enterprises are cautious about them. Commercial databases like Oracle are well supported by the backing enterprises in terms of providing support resources on a global scale. There is a full ecosystem built around these commercial databases providing training, performance tuning, architecture guidance, and everything else. NoSQL is fairly new and typically backed by a single company not able to meet the scale of these big enterprises. NoSQL databases are good for CRUDing operations but business intelligence is extremely important for enterprises to stay competitive. RDBMS provide extensive tooling to generate this data but that was not the original intention of NoSQL databases and is lacking in that area. Generating any meaningful information other than CRUDing require extensive programming. Not suited for complex transactions such as banking systems or other highly transactional applications requiring 2-phase commit. SQL cannot be used with NoSQL databases and writing simple queries can be involving. Enough talking, lets take a look at some code. This blog has published multiple blogs on how to access a RDBMS using JPA in a Java EE 6 application. This Tip Of The Day (TOTD) will show you can use MongoDB (a document-oriented database) with a typical 3-tier Java EE 6 application. Lets get started! The complete source code of this project can be downloaded here. Download MongoDB for your platform from here (1.8.2 as of this writing) and start the server as: [email protected]:~/tools/mongodb-linux-x86_64-1.8.2/bin$./mongod./mongod --help for help and startup optionsSun Jun 26 20:41:11 [initandlisten] MongoDB starting : pid=11210port=27017 dbpath=/data/db/ 64-bit Sun Jun 26 20:41:11 [initandlisten] db version v1.8.2, pdfile version4.5Sun Jun 26 20:41:11 [initandlisten] git version:433bbaa14aaba6860da15bd4de8edf600f56501bSun Jun 26 20:41:11 [initandlisten] build sys info: Linuxbs-linux64.10gen.cc 2.6.21.7-2.ec2.v1.2.fc8xen #1 SMP Fri Nov 2017:48:28 EST 2009 x86_64 BOOST_LIB_VERSION=1_41Sun Jun 26 20:41:11 [initandlisten] waiting for connections on port 27017Sun Jun 26 20:41:11 [websvr] web admin interface listening on port 28017 The default directory for the database is /data/db and needs to be created as: sudo mkdir -p /data/db/sudo chown `id -u` /data/db You can specify a different directory using "--dbpath" option. Refer to Quickstart for your specific platform. Using NetBeans, create a Java EE 6 project and make sure to enable CDI and add JavaServer Faces framework. Download MongoDB Java Driver (2.6.3 of this writing) and add it to the project library by selecting "Properties", "LIbraries", "Add Library...", creating a new library by specifying the location of the JAR file, and adding the library to the created project. Edit the generated "index.xhtml" such that it looks like: <h1>Add a new movie</h1><h:form> Name: <h:inputText value="#{movie.name}" size="20"/><br/> Year: <h:inputText value="#{movie.year}" size="6"/><br/> Language: <h:inputText value="#{movie.language}" size="20"/><br/> <h:commandButton actionListener="#{movieSessionBean.createMovie}" action="show" title="Add" value="submit"/></h:form> This page has a simple HTML form with three text boxes and a submit button. The text boxes take name, year, and language of a movie and the submit button invokes the "createMovie" method of "movieSessionBean" and then render "show.xhtml". Create "show.xhtml" ("New" -> "Other..." -> "Other" -> "XHTML File") such that it looks like: <head> <title><h1>List of movies</h1></title> </head> <body> <h:form> <h:dataTable value="#{movieSessionBean.movies}" var="m" > <h:column><f:facet name="header">Name</f:facet>#{m.name}</h:column> <h:column><f:facet name="header">Year</f:facet>#{m.year}</h:column> <h:column><f:facet name="header">Language</f:facet>#{m.language}</h:column> </h:dataTable> </h:form> This page shows the name, year, and language of all movies stored in the database so far. The list of movies is returned by "movieSessionBean.movies" property. Now create the "Movie" class such that it looks like: import com.mongodb.BasicDBObject;import com.mongodb.BasicDBObject;import com.mongodb.DBObject;import javax.enterprise.inject.Model;import javax.validation.constraints.Size;/** * @author arun */@Modelpublic class Movie { @Size(min=1, max=20) private String name; @Size(min=1, max=20) private String language; private int year; // getters and setters for "name", "year", "language" public BasicDBObject toDBObject() { BasicDBObject doc = new BasicDBObject(); doc.put("name", name); doc.put("year", year); doc.put("language", language); return doc; } public static Movie fromDBObject(DBObject doc) { Movie m = new Movie(); m.name = (String)doc.get("name"); m.year = (int)doc.get("year"); m.language = (String)doc.get("language"); return m; } @Override public String toString() { return name + ", " + year + ", " + language; }} Other than the usual boilerplate code, the key methods here are "toDBObject" and "fromDBObject". These methods provide a conversion from "Movie" -> "DBObject" and vice versa. The "DBObject" is a MongoDB class that comes as part of the mongo-2.6.3.jar file and which we added to our project earlier.  The complete javadoc for 2.6.3 can be seen here. Notice, this class also uses Bean Validation constraints and will be honored by the JSF layer. Finally, create "MovieSessionBean" stateless EJB with all the business logic such that it looks like: package org.glassfish.samples;import com.mongodb.BasicDBObject;import com.mongodb.DB;import com.mongodb.DBCollection;import com.mongodb.DBCursor;import com.mongodb.DBObject;import com.mongodb.Mongo;import java.net.UnknownHostException;import java.util.ArrayList;import java.util.List;import javax.annotation.PostConstruct;import javax.ejb.Stateless;import javax.inject.Inject;import javax.inject.Named;/** * @author arun */@[email protected] class MovieSessionBean { @Inject Movie movie; DBCollection movieColl; @PostConstruct private void initDB() throws UnknownHostException { Mongo m = new Mongo(); DB db = m.getDB("movieDB"); movieColl = db.getCollection("movies"); if (movieColl == null) { movieColl = db.createCollection("movies", null); } } public void createMovie() { BasicDBObject doc = movie.toDBObject(); movieColl.insert(doc); } public List<Movie> getMovies() { List<Movie> movies = new ArrayList(); DBCursor cur = movieColl.find(); System.out.println("getMovies: Found " + cur.size() + " movie(s)"); for (DBObject dbo : cur.toArray()) { movies.add(Movie.fromDBObject(dbo)); } return movies; }} The database is initialized in @PostConstruct. Instead of a working with a database table, NoSQL databases work with a schema-less document. The "Movie" class is the document in our case and stored in the collection "movies". The collection allows us to perform query functions on all movies. The "getMovies" method invokes "find" method on the collection which is equivalent to the SQL query "select * from movies" and then returns a List<Movie>. Also notice that there is no "persistence.xml" in the project. Right-click and run the project to see the output as: Enter some values in the text box and click on enter to see the result as: If you reached here then you've successfully used MongoDB in your Java EE 6 application, congratulations! Some food for thought and further play ... SQL to MongoDB mapping shows mapping between traditional SQL -> Mongo query language. Tutorial shows fun things you can do with MongoDB. Try the interactive online shell  The cookbook provides common ways of using MongoDB In terms of this project, here are some tasks that can be tried: Encapsulate database management in a JPA persistence provider. Is it even worth it because the capabilities are going to be very different ? MongoDB uses "BSonObject" class for JSON representation, add @XmlRootElement on a POJO and how a compatible JSON representation can be generated. This will make the fromXXX and toXXX methods redundant.

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  • Welcome Stephen Chin and James Weaver to Oracle!

    - by arungupta
    Stephen Chin and James Weaver - the two JavaFX "rockstar" speakers from the community are joining Oracle's Java Evangelist Team. Both of them have co-authored a recently released book - Pro Java FX 2 and are well known for their passion to promote JavaFX. This shows Oracle's continued commitment to Java and JavaFX. Jim blogs at javafxpert.com and can be reached on @JavaFXpert. Steve blogs at and can be reached at steveonjava.com and can be reached at @steveonjava. You'll have an opportunity to meet and engage with them at different community facing activities. Welcome Stephen and James to Oracle!

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  • Java EE talks at JAX Conf

    - by arungupta
    JAX Conf is starting in San Jose today and there are several talks on Java EE there. Java EE Wednesday and Thursday Java Persistence API 2.0 with Eclipse Link RESTful Services with Java EE Cast Study: Functional programming in Scala with CDI GlassFish 3.1: Deploying your Java EE 6 Applications The future of Java Enterprise Testing Forge new ground in Rapid Enterprise Development The Java EE 7 Platform: Developing for the Cloud (Keynote) Exploring Java EE 6 for the Enterprise Developer JBoss Day JSF Summit CDI Tutorial And many more ... Check out the complete schedule and see ya there!

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  • Java EE talks at JAX Conf

    - by arungupta
    JAX Conf is starting in San Jose today and there are several talks on Java EE there. Java EE Wednesday and Thursday Java Persistence API 2.0 with Eclipse Link RESTful Services with Java EE Cast Study: Functional programming in Scala with CDI GlassFish 3.1: Deploying your Java EE 6 Applications The future of Java Enterprise Testing Forge new ground in Rapid Enterprise Development The Java EE 7 Platform: Developing for the Cloud (Keynote) Exploring Java EE 6 for the Enterprise Developer JBoss Day JSF Summit CDI Tutorial And many more ... Check out the complete schedule and see ya there!

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  • Build Open JDK 7 on Mac OSX (TOTD #172)

    - by arungupta
    The complete requirements, pre-requisites, and steps to build OpenJDK 7 port on Mac OSX are described here. The steps are very clearly explained and here are the exact ones I followed on my MacBook Pro 10.7.2: Confirm the version of pre-installed Java as: > java -versionjava version "1.6.0_26"Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_26-b03-383-11A511c)Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 20.1-b02-383, mixed mode) Download and install Mercurial from mercurial.berkwood.com (zip bundle for 10.7 is here). It gets installed in the /usr/local/bin directory. Get the source code as (commands highlighted in bold): hg clone http://hg.openjdk.java.net/macosx-port/macosx-port destination directory: macosx-port requesting all changes adding changesets adding manifests adding file changes added 437 changesets with 364 changes to 33 files updating to branch default 31 files updated, 0 files merged, 0 files removed, 0 files unresolved cd macosx-port chmod 7555 get_source.sh ./get_source.sh # Repos:  corba jaxp jaxws langtools jdk hotspot Starting on corba Starting on jaxp Starting on jaxws Starting on langtools Starting on jdk Starting on hotspot # hg clone http://hg.openjdk.java.net/macosx-port/macosx-port/corba corba requesting all changes adding changesets adding manifests adding file changes added 396 changesets with 3275 changes to 1379 files . . . # exit code 0 # cd ./corba && hg pull -u pulling from http://hg.openjdk.java.net/macosx-port/macosx-port/corba searching for changes no changes found # exit code 0 # cd ./jaxp && hg pull -u pulling from http://hg.openjdk.java.net/macosx-port/macosx-port/jaxp searching for changes no changes found # exit code 0 Install Xcode from the App Store. Include /Developer/usr/bin in PATH. Note: JDK 1.6.0_26 ame pre-installed on my laptop and I installed Xode after that. The compilation went fine and there was no need to re-install the Java for Mac OS X as mentioned in the original steps. Build the code as: make ALLOW_DOWNLOADS=true SA_APPLE_BOOT_JAVA=true ALWAYS_PASS_TEST_GAMMA=true ALT_BOOTDIR=`/usr/libexec/java_home -v 1.6` HOTSPOT_BUILD_JOBS=`sysctl -n hw.ncpu` The final output is shown as: >>>Finished making images @ Sat Nov 19 00:59:04 WET 2011 ... >>>Finished making images @ Sat Nov 19 00:59:04 WET 2011 ...############################################################################# Leaving jdk for target(s) sanity all docs images ################################################################################## Build time 00:17:42 jdk for target(s) sanity all docs images ############################################################################### Build times ##########Target all_product_buildStart 2011-11-19 00:32:40End 2011-11-19 00:59:0400:01:46 corba00:04:07 hotspot00:00:51 jaxp00:01:21 jaxws00:17:42 jdk00:00:37 langtools00:26:24 TOTAL######################### Change the directory and verify the version: >cd build/macosx-universal/j2sdk-image/1.7.0.jdk/Contents/Home/bin >./java -version openjdk version "1.7.0-internal" OpenJDK Runtime Environment (build 1.7.0-internal-arungup_2011_11_19_00_32-b00) OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM (build 21.0-b17, mixed mode) Now go fix some bugs, file new bugs, or discuss at the macosx-port-dev mailing list.

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  • Devoxx 2011 Trip Report + Pictures

    - by arungupta
    3350 attendees from 40 countries lived in "paradise" for 5 days last week. This paradise had 170+ rock star speakers delivering 200+ hours of technical content in about 150 sessions. And it truly was a paradise with a clear differentiation from other Java conferences. There were several Oracle speakers at the paradise covering the entire gamut of Java platform. I delivered a Java EE 6 hands-on lab (new content), showcased Java EE 7 and GlassFish 4.0 early work at the keynote, and participated in a panel to talk about Contexts and Dependency Injection. The demo in the keynote showed how to deploy a Java EE application in a managed environment. The demo showed a Conference Planner application that can be used by conference organizers to display sessions, tracks, and speaker information. This same application can be deployed and display data from JavaOne 2011 or Devoxx 2011 based upon the SQL chosen for database initialization. If javaone-sf-2011.sql is chosen for datbase initialization then the application looks like as shown: If devoxx-2011.sql is chosen then the application looks like as shown: And of course, clicking on Tracks, Speakers, Sessions shows you information from the respective conference. The complete source code for the application and detailed instructions are availaable at glassfish.org/javaone2011. In short: Download the sample app and unzip Download GlassFish build b05. Download platform-specific Load Balancer template Run "bin/install.sh" to configure GlassFish Pick javaone-sf-2011.sql or devoxx-2011.sql for database initialization You can also watch the application in action in this video: A breaking news shared at the conference was that Devoxx France is coming from April 18- 20 and 75% of the talks will be in French. Stay tuned for more details on that. I'm sure Antonio and gang will put up a great show out there! Just a tip for the first timers to Devoxx ... A bus leaves from Brussels airport to Antwerp city center between 4am - 11pm at the top of every hour, takes about 45 minutes, and costs 10 euros (only cash). Take a tram #6 (going towards Luchtbal) from Astrid station (next to the city center) and get off at the last station for Metropolis. It takes about 15 minutes. Purchase a day pass at the station using kiosks (much cheaper) or you can buy in the bus as well (about double the price). Either way, cash only. Here are a few pictures captured from the event: And the complete album here: Thank you Stephan for giving me an opportunity to speak at my first Devoxx. I hope to be back next year, just in time for Java EE 7 going final!

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  • Bert Ertman and Paul Bakker on Spring to Java EE 6 Migration Podcast

    - by arungupta
    NLJUG leader and Java Champion Bert Ertman and Paul Bakker talk about migrating Spring applications to Java EE 6 in the latest issue of Java Spotlight Podcast, episode #85. Bert and Paul talk about how to migrate your legacy Spring applications to use modern and lightweight Java EE 6 in five steps. The complete podcast is always fun but feel free to jump to 3:49 minutes into the show if you're in a hurry. They authored a series of article on the exact same topic starting here. There is an extensive set of articles available that help you migrate from Spring to Java EE 6. Subscribe to the podcast for future content.

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  • TOTD #165: Eclipse Indigo, Java EE 6 and GlassFish

    - by arungupta
    46 millions lines of code committed by 408 developers from 49 organizations is the recipe for Indigo, the sixth release as part of the Eclipse annual release train. The key features of this release are: EGit 1.0 enabling Git support WindowBuilder, a GUI Builder Jubula for automated functional testing for Java and HTML EclipseLink 2.3 with support for multi-tenant JPA entities Equinox 3.7 with OSGi 4.3 specs Read the complete list of improvements here and download now! An updated version of the GlassFish plugin is also pushed to the update center and can be downloaded by clicking on "Additional Server Adapters" and selecting GlassFish as shown below: Couple of much needed improvements in the plugin are: Configurable "Preserve Sessions across Re-deploys" by double-clicking on the server properties: This property could only be configured during server registeration in earlier versions. Richer management of GlassFish from within the IDE such as viewing all the resources (JDBC, Connectors, and JavaMail) as shown below: The screencast #36 shows complete Java EE 6 development using GlassFish and the video is  embedded here for convenience: This blog has published multiple entries on Eclipse and here are some of them: Eclipse Con 2011 Hands-on Lab delivered: OSGi, JavaEE, GlassFish, Eclipse a powerful foursome Screencast #38: "Developing OSGi-enabled Java EE Applications using GlassFish" Tutorial at EclipseCon 2011 Screencast #36: Web App Development using Java EE 6, GlassFish, and Eclipse - Webinar Recording Screencast #31: Java EE 6 using GlassFish and Eclipse 3.6 - Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse 11.1.1.6 is now available - 5 new screencasts TOTD #127: Embedding GlassFish in an existing OSGi runtime - Eclipse Equinox TOTD #126: Creating an OSGi bundles using Eclipse and deploying in GlassFish

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  • TOTD #165: Eclipse Indigo, Java EE 6 and GlassFish

    - by arungupta
    46 millions lines of code committed by 408 developers from 49 organizations is the recipe for Indigo, the sixth release as part of the Eclipse annual release train. The key features of this release are: EGit 1.0 enabling Git support WindowBuilder, a GUI Builder Jubula for automated functional testing for Java and HTML EclipseLink 2.3 with support for multi-tenant JPA entities Equinox 3.7 with OSGi 4.3 specs Read the complete list of improvements here and download now! An updated version of the GlassFish plugin is also pushed to the update center and can be downloaded by clicking on "Additional Server Adapters" and selecting GlassFish as shown below: Couple of much needed improvements in the plugin are: Configurable "Preserve Sessions across Re-deploys" by double-clicking on the server properties: This property could only be configured during server registeration in earlier versions. Richer management of GlassFish from within the IDE such as viewing all the resources (JDBC, Connectors, and JavaMail) as shown below: The screencast #36 shows complete Java EE 6 development using GlassFish and the video is  embedded here for convenience: This blog has published multiple entries on Eclipse and here are some of them: Eclipse Con 2011 Hands-on Lab delivered: OSGi, JavaEE, GlassFish, Eclipse a powerful foursome Screencast #38: "Developing OSGi-enabled Java EE Applications using GlassFish" Tutorial at EclipseCon 2011 Screencast #36: Web App Development using Java EE 6, GlassFish, and Eclipse - Webinar Recording Screencast #31: Java EE 6 using GlassFish and Eclipse 3.6 - Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse 11.1.1.6 is now available - 5 new screencasts TOTD #127: Embedding GlassFish in an existing OSGi runtime - Eclipse Equinox TOTD #126: Creating an OSGi bundles using Eclipse and deploying in GlassFish

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  • Geek Bike Ride at JavaOne 2012 - Pictures

    - by arungupta
    Following the tradition of JavaOne Latin America 2011, a gorgeous day in San Francisco marked the beginning of JavaOne 2012 with another Geek Bike Ride. About 50 Java developers got together this morning at Fisherman's Wharf and rode a bike along Marina, Crissy Field, Fort Mason, Golden Gate Bridge, and ultimately finishing in Sausalito downtown. This is a beautiful biking trail, mostly flat with a couple of good hills. Some folks even continued to Tiburon for an extra challenge. Check out map by Blazing Saddles for the exact course. They provide excellent bike rentals and a good service too! Here are some pictures from the day: Credits: Yoshio Terada And check out a video of bikers rolling down the hill: Credits: Yoshio Terada Thank you OTN for sponsoring the t-shirts! And Kevin Nilson, fearless leader of Silicon Valley JUG, for hosting the event! And now to main the conference starting tomorrow! Here is the evolving album for JavaOne 2012 so far ... And don't forget, I'm still recruiting runners for the Community Run on Oct 1 at 6:17am PT :-)

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  • Java EE 6 and NoSQL/MongoDB on GlassFish using JPA and EclipseLink 2.4 (TOTD #175)

    - by arungupta
    TOTD #166 explained how to use MongoDB in your Java EE 6 applications. The code in that tip used the APIs exposed by the MongoDB Java driver and so requires you to learn a new API. However if you are building Java EE 6 applications then you are already familiar with Java Persistence API (JPA). Eclipse Link 2.4, scheduled to release as part of Eclipse Juno, provides support for NoSQL databases by mapping a JPA entity to a document. Their wiki provides complete explanation of how the mapping is done. This Tip Of The Day (TOTD) will show how you can leverage that support in your Java EE 6 applications deployed on GlassFish 3.1.2. Before we dig into the code, here are the key concepts ... A POJO is mapped to a NoSQL data source using @NoSQL or <no-sql> element in "persistence.xml". A subset of JPQL and Criteria query are supported, based upon the underlying data store Connection properties are defined in "persistence.xml" Now, lets lets take a look at the code ... Download the latest EclipseLink 2.4 Nightly Bundle. There is a Installer, Source, and Bundle - make sure to download the Bundle link (20120410) and unzip. Download GlassFish 3.1.2 zip and unzip. Install the Eclipse Link 2.4 JARs in GlassFish Remove the following JARs from "glassfish/modules": org.eclipse.persistence.antlr.jar org.eclipse.persistence.asm.jar org.eclipse.persistence.core.jar org.eclipse.persistence.jpa.jar org.eclipse.persistence.jpa.modelgen.jar org.eclipse.persistence.moxy.jar org.eclipse.persistence.oracle.jar Add the following JARs from Eclipse Link 2.4 nightly build to "glassfish/modules": org.eclipse.persistence.antlr_3.2.0.v201107111232.jar org.eclipse.persistence.asm_3.3.1.v201107111215.jar org.eclipse.persistence.core.jpql_2.4.0.v20120407-r11132.jar org.eclipse.persistence.core_2.4.0.v20120407-r11132.jar org.eclipse.persistence.jpa.jpql_2.0.0.v20120407-r11132.jar org.eclipse.persistence.jpa.modelgen_2.4.0.v20120407-r11132.jar org.eclipse.persistence.jpa_2.4.0.v20120407-r11132.jar org.eclipse.persistence.moxy_2.4.0.v20120407-r11132.jar org.eclipse.persistence.nosql_2.4.0.v20120407-r11132.jar org.eclipse.persistence.oracle_2.4.0.v20120407-r11132.jar Start MongoDB Download latest MongoDB from here (2.0.4 as of this writing). Create the default data directory for MongoDB as: sudo mkdir -p /data/db/sudo chown `id -u` /data/db Refer to Quickstart for more details. Start MongoDB as: arungup-mac:mongodb-osx-x86_64-2.0.4 <arungup> ->./bin/mongod./bin/mongod --help for help and startup optionsMon Apr  9 12:56:02 [initandlisten] MongoDB starting : pid=3124 port=27017 dbpath=/data/db/ 64-bit host=arungup-mac.localMon Apr  9 12:56:02 [initandlisten] db version v2.0.4, pdfile version 4.5Mon Apr  9 12:56:02 [initandlisten] git version: 329f3c47fe8136c03392c8f0e548506cb21f8ebfMon Apr  9 12:56:02 [initandlisten] build info: Darwin erh2.10gen.cc 9.8.0 Darwin Kernel Version 9.8.0: Wed Jul 15 16:55:01 PDT 2009; root:xnu-1228.15.4~1/RELEASE_I386 i386 BOOST_LIB_VERSION=1_40Mon Apr  9 12:56:02 [initandlisten] options: {}Mon Apr  9 12:56:02 [initandlisten] journal dir=/data/db/journalMon Apr  9 12:56:02 [initandlisten] recover : no journal files present, no recovery neededMon Apr  9 12:56:02 [websvr] admin web console waiting for connections on port 28017Mon Apr  9 12:56:02 [initandlisten] waiting for connections on port 27017 Check out the JPA/NoSQL sample from SVN repository. The complete source code built in this TOTD can be downloaded here. Create Java EE 6 web app Create a Java EE 6 Maven web app as: mvn archetype:generate -DarchetypeGroupId=org.codehaus.mojo.archetypes -DarchetypeArtifactId=webapp-javaee6 -DgroupId=model -DartifactId=javaee-nosql -DarchetypeVersion=1.5 -DinteractiveMode=false Copy the model files from the checked out workspace to the generated project as: cd javaee-nosqlcp -r ~/code/workspaces/org.eclipse.persistence.example.jpa.nosql.mongo/src/model src/main/java Copy "persistence.xml" mkdir src/main/resources cp -r ~/code/workspaces/org.eclipse.persistence.example.jpa.nosql.mongo/src/META-INF ./src/main/resources Add the following dependencies: <dependency> <groupId>org.eclipse.persistence</groupId> <artifactId>org.eclipse.persistence.jpa</artifactId> <version>2.4.0-SNAPSHOT</version> <scope>provided</scope></dependency><dependency> <groupId>org.eclipse.persistence</groupId> <artifactId>org.eclipse.persistence.nosql</artifactId> <version>2.4.0-SNAPSHOT</version></dependency><dependency> <groupId>org.mongodb</groupId> <artifactId>mongo-java-driver</artifactId> <version>2.7.3</version></dependency> The first one is for the EclipseLink latest APIs, the second one is for EclipseLink/NoSQL support, and the last one is the MongoDB Java driver. And the following repository: <repositories> <repository> <id>EclipseLink Repo</id> <url>http://www.eclipse.org/downloads/download.php?r=1&amp;nf=1&amp;file=/rt/eclipselink/maven.repo</url> <snapshots> <enabled>true</enabled> </snapshots> </repository>  </repositories> Copy the "Test.java" to the generated project: mkdir src/main/java/examplecp -r ~/code/workspaces/org.eclipse.persistence.example.jpa.nosql.mongo/src/example/Test.java ./src/main/java/example/ This file contains the source code to CRUD the JPA entity to MongoDB. This sample is explained in detail on EclipseLink wiki. Create a new Servlet in "example" directory as: package example;import java.io.IOException;import java.io.PrintWriter;import javax.servlet.ServletException;import javax.servlet.annotation.WebServlet;import javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet;import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletResponse;/** * @author Arun Gupta */@WebServlet(name = "TestServlet", urlPatterns = {"/TestServlet"})public class TestServlet extends HttpServlet { protected void processRequest(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws ServletException, IOException { response.setContentType("text/html;charset=UTF-8"); PrintWriter out = response.getWriter(); try { out.println("<html>"); out.println("<head>"); out.println("<title>Servlet TestServlet</title>"); out.println("</head>"); out.println("<body>"); out.println("<h1>Servlet TestServlet at " + request.getContextPath() + "</h1>"); try { Test.main(null); } catch (Exception ex) { ex.printStackTrace(); } out.println("</body>"); out.println("</html>"); } finally { out.close(); } } @Override protected void doGet(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws ServletException, IOException { processRequest(request, response); } @Override protected void doPost(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws ServletException, IOException { processRequest(request, response); }} Build the project and deploy it as: mvn clean packageglassfish3/bin/asadmin deploy --force=true target/javaee-nosql-1.0-SNAPSHOT.war Accessing http://localhost:8080/javaee-nosql/TestServlet shows the following messages in the server.log: connecting(EISLogin( platform=> MongoPlatform user name=> "" MongoConnectionSpec())) . . .Connected: User: Database: 2.7  Version: 2.7 . . .Executing MappedInteraction() spec => null properties => {mongo.collection=CUSTOMER, mongo.operation=INSERT} input => [DatabaseRecord( CUSTOMER._id => 4F848E2BDA0670307E2A8FA4 CUSTOMER.NAME => AMCE)]. . .Data access result: [{TOTALCOST=757.0, ORDERLINES=[{DESCRIPTION=table, LINENUMBER=1, COST=300.0}, {DESCRIPTION=balls, LINENUMBER=2, COST=5.0}, {DESCRIPTION=rackets, LINENUMBER=3, COST=15.0}, {DESCRIPTION=net, LINENUMBER=4, COST=2.0}, {DESCRIPTION=shipping, LINENUMBER=5, COST=80.0}, {DESCRIPTION=handling, LINENUMBER=6, COST=55.0},{DESCRIPTION=tax, LINENUMBER=7, COST=300.0}], SHIPPINGADDRESS=[{POSTALCODE=L5J1H7, PROVINCE=ON, COUNTRY=Canada, CITY=Ottawa,STREET=17 Jane St.}], VERSION=2, _id=4F848E2BDA0670307E2A8FA8,DESCRIPTION=Pingpong table, CUSTOMER__id=4F848E2BDA0670307E2A8FA7, BILLINGADDRESS=[{POSTALCODE=L5J1H8, PROVINCE=ON, COUNTRY=Canada, CITY=Ottawa, STREET=7 Bank St.}]}] You'll not see any output in the browser, just the output in the console. But the code can be easily modified to do so. Once again, the complete Maven project can be downloaded here. Do you want to try accessing relational and non-relational (aka NoSQL) databases in the same PU ?

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  • Oracle WebLogic Server 12c Launch Event - Dec 1, 2011, 10am PT

    - by arungupta
    Calling all IT managers, architects, and developers, to find out how the new release of Oracle WebLogic Server 12c is: Designed to help you seamlessly move into the public or private cloud with an open, standards-based platform Built to drive higher value for your current infrastructure and significantly reduce development time and cost Optimized to run your solutions for Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE); Oracle Fusion Middleware; and Oracle Fusion Enhanced with transformational platforms and technologies such as Java EE 6, Oracle’s Active GridLink for RAC, Oracle Traffic Director, and Oracle Virtual Assembly Builder When ? Dec 1, 2011, 10am - 12pm PT Where ? Register online! Here are some other links for you to follow: blogs.oracle.com/weblogicserver @OracleWebLogic youtube.com/OracleWebLogic facebook.com/OracleWebLogic Steve Button's Blog Jeff West's Blog WebLogic Forums WebLogic @ OTN Almost ready to unwrap the ribbons, pop open the cork, at the start line ... or whatever fits your analogy :-) And in case you are wondering ... here is a snapshot of WebLogic 12c administration console snapshot:

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  • Larry Ellison and Mark Hurd on Oracle Cloud

    - by arungupta
    Oracle Cloud provides Java and Database as Platform Services and Customer Relationship Management, Human Capital Management, and Social Network as Application Services. Watch a live webcast with Larry Ellison and Mark Hurd on announcements about Oracle Cloud. Date ? Wednesday, June 06, 2012 Time ? 1:00 p.m. PT – 2:30 p.m. PT Register here for the webinar. You can also attend the live event by registering here. Oracle Cloud is by invitation only at this time and you can register for access here.

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  • GlassFish Community Event and Party at JavaOne 2011 - Oct 2, 2011

    - by arungupta
    As in the previous years (2010, 2009, 2008 (more), and 2007), the GlassFish community event and party are getting planned along with JavaOne 2011 as well. Here are the coordinates for the community event: Date: Sunday, October 2nd, 2011 Time: 12:30pm - 4:30pm Venue: Moscone West The party will be held at the regular venue of The Thirsty Bear. This is your chance to meet the core members of engineering, product management, executive management, and rest of the team. This is your (yet another) chance to voice your opinion and be heard. There will be community updates, customer testimonials, unconference, and fun activities too. Stay tuned for more details. Here are some pictures from the yesteryears: A conference badge will be required to attend the community event but the party will be open to all friends of GlassFish. So if you are in town, plan to stop by at the community event and/or the party. Stay tuned for RSVP details. Its going to be lot of fun!

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  • GlassFish Community Event and Party at JavaOne 2011 - Oct 2, 2011

    - by arungupta
    As in the previous years (2010, 2009, 2008 (more), and 2007), the GlassFish community event and party are getting planned along with JavaOne 2011 as well. Here are the coordinates for the community event: Date: Sunday, October 2nd, 2011 Time: 12:30pm - 4:30pm Venue: Moscone West The party will be held at the regular venue of The Thirsty Bear. This is your chance to meet the core members of engineering, product management, executive management, and rest of the team. This is your (yet another) chance to voice your opinion and be heard. There will be community updates, customer testimonials, unconference, and fun activities too. Stay tuned for more details. Here are some pictures from the yesteryears: A conference badge will be required to attend the community event but the party will be open to all friends of GlassFish. So if you are in town, plan to stop by at the community event and/or the party. Stay tuned for RSVP details. Its going to be lot of fun!

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  • Tuning GlassFish for Production

    - by arungupta
    The GlassFish distribution is optimized for developers and need simple deployment and server configuration changes to provide the performance typically required for production usage. The formal Performance Tuning Guide provides an explanation of capacity planning and tuning tips for application, GlassFish, JVM, and the operating system. The GlassFish Server Control (only with the commercial edition) also comes with Performance Tuner that optimizes the runtime for optimal throughput and scalability. And then there are multiple blogs that provide more insights as well: • Optimizing GlassFish for Production (Diego Silva, Mar 2012) • GlassFish Production Tuning (Vegard Skjefstad, Nov 2011) • GlassFish in Production (Sunny Saxena, Jul 2011) • Putting GlassFish v3 in Production: Essential Surviving Guide (JeanFrancois, Nov 2009) • A GlassFish Tuning Primer (Scott Oaks, Dec 2007) What is your favorite source for GlassFish Performance Tuning ?

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  • Tab Sweep: Arquillian, Power Mac, PowerPC, JSP Performance, JMX Connection, ...

    - by arungupta
    Recent Tips and News on Java, Java EE 6, GlassFish & more : • Extreme Portability: OpenJDK 7 and GlassFish 3.1.1 on Power Mac G5! (Mark Heckler) • Using GlassFish domain templates to easily create several customized domains (Masoud Kalali) • OpenJDK 7 on Apple G5 PowerPC on Mac OS X 10.5.8 (John Yeary) • ENABLING REMOTE ADMINISTRATION FOR GLASSFISH (Adam Bien) • The Java EE 7 Feature List: Cloud Focused Upgrades (devx) • Improve JavaServer Pages Performance with Caching (distributedcaching) • Interactive Glassfish configuration and application deployment (mpashworth) • Allow JMX connection on JVM 1.6.x (Martin Muller) • Arquillian 1.0.0.Final released! Ready for GlassFish and WebLogic! Death to all bugs! (Markus Eisele) • Using GlassFish and APEXListener as backend for Apache so server APEX (Ronald Rod) • Installing and running Eclipse, Glassfish and Ubuntu 12.04 Precise for Web Applications (Connected Web) • Java EE 6 and modular JAX-RS services (Parijat) • ARQUILLIAN CONFIGURATION FOR EMBEDDED GLASSFISH 3.1.2 AND MAVEN 3 (Adam Bien) • Atmosphere .9 released (JeanFrancois Arcand) • Make JSF your friend again (Daniel Pfeifer)

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