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  • Time to ignore IE?

    - by Delan Azabani
    In this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2781013/does-anyone-have-a-easy-to-use-png-fix-for-ie/2781041#2781041 which got voted down considerably, I point out the need to ignore Internet Explorer, or at least its old version 6, for the following reasons: It is hard to hack for, and some features don't exist at all The more you hack for IE, the longer people blindly use it (vicious cycle) My website, azabani.com, doesn't hack for IE at all. The layout looks somewhat broken in the browser, and most of my projects require features not present in IE's codebase. I would like to know if you support my view, or if you share views with those who downvoted my answer.

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  • Using the <h2> as the title after sent?

    - by Delan Azabani
    Currently, I have a semi-dynamic system for my website's pages. head.php has all the tags before the content body, foot.php the tags after. Any page using the main theme will include head.php, then write the content, then output foot.php. Currently, to be able to set the title, I quickly set a variable $title before inclusion: <?php $title = 'Untitled document'; include_once '../head.php'; ?> <h2>Untitled document</h2> Content here... <?php include_once '../foot.php'; ?> So that in head.php... <title><?php echo $title; ?> | Delan Azabani</title> However, this seems kludgy as the title is most of the time, the same as the content of the h2 tag. Is there a way I can get PHP to read the content of h2, track back and insert it, then send the whole thing at the end?

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  • Can't reboot netbook with any of the reboot parameters

    - by Delan Azabani
    I have a Sony VPCW218AG netbook that I've dual-booted with Ubuntu 10.10. Unlike the preinstalled Windows 7, Ubuntu will not reboot on this computer. Rebooting from Gnome, using the reboot command and SysRq+REISUB all don't work; they end hanging with a blank screen. I have read that Atom netbooks don't have a keyboard controller and therefore the default reboot method, kbd, won't work. I have actually tried all ten reboot= parameters listed here; none of them work. I have also tried disabling ACPI with noacpi acpi=off for each one; that didn't help either. Are there any other things I can try to fix the rebooting problem?

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  • Multiple interfaces to one IP address?

    - by Delan Azabani
    At present, I have: a Netgear router with DHCP off at 192.168.0.1 my computer eth0 at 192.168.0.2 wlan0 at 192.168.0.2 The wlan0 interface always connects to the router, while the eth0 interface connects to other computers with crossover and acts as a dnsmasq DHCP server for network boot and installation. If I use the Gnome NetworkManager to enable both connections, that is, with wlan0 connected to the router/internet and eth0 to another computer, both as 192.168.0.2, I cannot access the internet while eth0 is connected. Why is this? How can I configure my computer to follow wlan0 for Internet usage, but use eth0 for itself (the latter is working but blocking wlan0).

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  • Command to find the source package of a binary?

    - by Delan Azabani
    I know there's a which command, that echoes the full name of a binary (e.g. which sh). However, I'm fairly sure there's a command that echoes the package that provides a particular binary. Is there such a command? If so, what is it? I'd like to be able to run this: commandName ls and get coreutils for example.

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  • convert full-disk RAID5 array to partition-based array?

    - by Delan Azabani
    I have a RAID 5 array, md0, with three full-disk (non-partitioned) members, sdb, sdc, and sdd. My computer will hang during the AHCI BIOS if AHCI is enabled instead of IDE, if these drives are plugged in. I believe it may be because I'm using the whole disk, and the AHCI BIOS expects an MBR to be on the drive (I don't know why it would care). Is there a way to convert the array to use members sdb1, sdc1 and sdd1, partitioned MBR with 0xFD RAID partitions?

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  • Control of File Types in Ubuntu

    <b>Packt:</b> "In this article by Delan Azabani, you'll learn how Ubuntu identifies file types, how to use Assogiate to control these processes, using Ubuntu Tweak to associate types with applications and use Bless to inspect binary files."

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  • What useful things could a javaScript library provide?

    - by Delan Azabani
    In many of my answers I repeatedly urge users not to use JavaScript libraries like jQuery. I even wrote a blog post about the problems that using a library create. Some of these problems include holding back native standards development, keeping users comfortably using IE, and abstracting the developer from real JavaScript. If a site doesn't require IE as part of its audience, then how are libraries useful? The other popular browsers share extremely similar implementations and work well with things like JavaScript 1.6 arrays and AJAX. This is not a troll question, I'm truly wondering what they're useful for.

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  • How to repackage NVIDIA .run drivers into .deb with DKMS

    - by Delan Azabani
    At present, Ubuntu offers the 195.36.24 drivers as nvidia-current in their repository. This packaged driver is pretty cool as it uses DKMS so you don't have to keep reinstalling the driver after a new kernel version. The NVIDIA .run package drivers are at version 257 (beta) but they don't use DKMS so the graphics screws up every time a new kernel is installed and you don't reinstall the driver. How can I modify the .run to use DKMS and even better, package it as a deb package?

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  • Memory not being freed, causing giant memory leak

    - by Delan Azabani
    In my Unicode library for C++, the ustring class has operator= functions set for char* values and other ustring values. When doing the simple memory leak test: #include <cstdio> #include "ucpp" main() { ustring a; for(;;)a="MEMORY"; } the memory used by the program grows uncontrollably (characteristic of a program with a big memory leak) even though I've added free() calls to both of the functions. I am unsure why this is ineffective (am I missing free() calls in other places?) This is the current library code: #include <cstdlib> #include <cstring> class ustring { int * values; long len; public: long length() { return len; } ustring() { len = 0; values = (int *) malloc(0); } ustring(const ustring &input) { len = input.len; values = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int) * len); for (long i = 0; i < len; i++) values[i] = input.values[i]; } ustring operator=(ustring input) { ustring result(input); free(values); len = input.len; values = input.values; return * this; } ustring(const char * input) { values = (int *) malloc(0); long s = 0; // s = number of parsed chars int a, b, c, d, contNeed = 0, cont = 0; for (long i = 0; input[i]; i++) if (input[i] < 0x80) { // ASCII, direct copy (00-7f) values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = input[i]; } else if (input[i] < 0xc0) { // this is a continuation (80-bf) if (cont == contNeed) { // no need for continuation, use U+fffd values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = 0xfffd; } cont = cont + 1; values[s - 1] = values[s - 1] | ((input[i] & 0x3f) << ((contNeed - cont) * 6)); if (cont == contNeed) cont = contNeed = 0; } else if (input[i] < 0xc2) { // invalid byte, use U+fffd (c0-c1) values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = 0xfffd; } else if (input[i] < 0xe0) { // start of 2-byte sequence (c2-df) contNeed = 1; values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = (input[i] & 0x1f) << 6; } else if (input[i] < 0xf0) { // start of 3-byte sequence (e0-ef) contNeed = 2; values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = (input[i] & 0x0f) << 12; } else if (input[i] < 0xf5) { // start of 4-byte sequence (f0-f4) contNeed = 3; values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = (input[i] & 0x07) << 18; } else { // restricted or invalid (f5-ff) values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = 0xfffd; } len = s; } ustring operator=(const char * input) { ustring result(input); free(values); len = result.len; values = result.values; return * this; } ustring operator+(ustring input) { ustring result; result.len = len + input.len; result.values = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int) * result.len); for (long i = 0; i < len; i++) result.values[i] = values[i]; for (long i = 0; i < input.len; i++) result.values[i + len] = input.values[i]; return result; } ustring operator[](long index) { ustring result; result.len = 1; result.values = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int)); result.values[0] = values[index]; return result; } operator char * () { return this -> encode(); } char * encode() { char * r = (char *) malloc(0); long s = 0; for (long i = 0; i < len; i++) { if (values[i] < 0x80) r = (char *) realloc(r, s + 1), r[s + 0] = char(values[i]), s += 1; else if (values[i] < 0x800) r = (char *) realloc(r, s + 2), r[s + 0] = char(values[i] >> 6 | 0x60), r[s + 1] = char(values[i] & 0x3f | 0x80), s += 2; else if (values[i] < 0x10000) r = (char *) realloc(r, s + 3), r[s + 0] = char(values[i] >> 12 | 0xe0), r[s + 1] = char(values[i] >> 6 & 0x3f | 0x80), r[s + 2] = char(values[i] & 0x3f | 0x80), s += 3; else r = (char *) realloc(r, s + 4), r[s + 0] = char(values[i] >> 18 | 0xf0), r[s + 1] = char(values[i] >> 12 & 0x3f | 0x80), r[s + 2] = char(values[i] >> 6 & 0x3f | 0x80), r[s + 3] = char(values[i] & 0x3f | 0x80), s += 4; } return r; } };

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  • Why can't I assign a scalar value to a class using shorthand, but instead declare it first, then set

    - by ~delan-azabani
    I am writing a UTF-8 library for C++ as an exercise as this is my first real-world C++ code. So far, I've implemented concatenation, character indexing, parsing and encoding UTF-8 in a class called "ustring". It looks like it's working, but two (seemingly equivalent) ways of declaring a new ustring behave differently. The first way: ustring a; a = "test"; works, and the overloaded "=" operator parses the string into the class (which stores the Unicode strings as an dynamically allocated int pointer). However, the following does not work: ustring a = "test"; because I get the following error: test.cpp:4: error: conversion from ‘const char [5]’ to non-scalar type ‘ustring’ requested Is there a way to workaround this error? It probably is a problem with my code, though. The following is what I've written so far for the library: #include <cstdlib> #include <cstring> class ustring { int * values; long len; public: long length() { return len; } ustring * operator=(ustring input) { len = input.len; values = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int) * len); for (long i = 0; i < len; i++) values[i] = input.values[i]; return this; } ustring * operator=(char input[]) { len = sizeof(input); values = (int *) malloc(0); long s = 0; // s = number of parsed chars int a, b, c, d, contNeed = 0, cont = 0; for (long i = 0; i < sizeof(input); i++) if (input[i] < 0x80) { // ASCII, direct copy (00-7f) values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = input[i]; } else if (input[i] < 0xc0) { // this is a continuation (80-bf) if (cont == contNeed) { // no need for continuation, use U+fffd values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = 0xfffd; } cont = cont + 1; values[s - 1] = values[s - 1] | ((input[i] & 0x3f) << ((contNeed - cont) * 6)); if (cont == contNeed) cont = contNeed = 0; } else if (input[i] < 0xc2) { // invalid byte, use U+fffd (c0-c1) values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = 0xfffd; } else if (input[i] < 0xe0) { // start of 2-byte sequence (c2-df) contNeed = 1; values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = (input[i] & 0x1f) << 6; } else if (input[i] < 0xf0) { // start of 3-byte sequence (e0-ef) contNeed = 2; values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = (input[i] & 0x0f) << 12; } else if (input[i] < 0xf5) { // start of 4-byte sequence (f0-f4) contNeed = 3; values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = (input[i] & 0x07) << 18; } else { // restricted or invalid (f5-ff) values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = 0xfffd; } return this; } ustring operator+(ustring input) { ustring result; result.len = len + input.len; result.values = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int) * result.len); for (long i = 0; i < len; i++) result.values[i] = values[i]; for (long i = 0; i < input.len; i++) result.values[i + len] = input.values[i]; return result; } ustring operator[](long index) { ustring result; result.len = 1; result.values = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int)); result.values[0] = values[index]; return result; } char * encode() { char * r = (char *) malloc(0); long s = 0; for (long i = 0; i < len; i++) { if (values[i] < 0x80) r = (char *) realloc(r, s + 1), r[s + 0] = char(values[i]), s += 1; else if (values[i] < 0x800) r = (char *) realloc(r, s + 2), r[s + 0] = char(values[i] >> 6 | 0x60), r[s + 1] = char(values[i] & 0x3f | 0x80), s += 2; else if (values[i] < 0x10000) r = (char *) realloc(r, s + 3), r[s + 0] = char(values[i] >> 12 | 0xe0), r[s + 1] = char(values[i] >> 6 & 0x3f | 0x80), r[s + 2] = char(values[i] & 0x3f | 0x80), s += 3; else r = (char *) realloc(r, s + 4), r[s + 0] = char(values[i] >> 18 | 0xf0), r[s + 1] = char(values[i] >> 12 & 0x3f | 0x80), r[s + 2] = char(values[i] >> 6 & 0x3f | 0x80), r[s + 3] = char(values[i] & 0x3f | 0x80), s += 4; } return r; } };

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  • Other HTML serialisations?

    - by Delan Azabani
    After keeping in mind that HTML has both an SGML and XML serialisations, which are just encodings for a parser to "explode" into a DOM, I'm wondering whether there are other serialisations for HTML. A JSON serialisation? If so, are there any parsers for these alternative serialisations?

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  • testing if constructor in constructor chain

    - by Delan Azabani
    I'm attempting to implement a GTK+ inspired widget toolkit for the web in JavaScript. One of the constructor chains goes gtk.widget => gtk.container => gtk.bin => gtk.window Every gtk.widget has a showAll method, which, if and only if the widget is a gtk.container or derivative (such as gtk.bin or gtk.window), will recursively show the children of that widget. Obviously, if it isn't a gtk.container or derivative, we shouldn't do anything because the widget in question can't contain anything. For reference, here is my inheritance function; it's probably not the best, but it's a start: function inherit(target, parent) { target.prototype = new parent; target.prototype.constructor = target; } I know that I can check for the direct constructor like this: if (this.constructor === gtk.container) ... However, this only tests for direct construction and not, say, if the object is a gtk.bin or gtk.window. How can I test whether gtk.container is somewhere up in the constructor chain?

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  • What makes the availability of both primitive and object-wrapped values in JavaScript useful?

    - by Delan Azabani
    I wrote a blog post a while ago detailing how the availability of both primitive and object-wrapped value types in JavaScript (for things such as Number, String and Boolean) causes trouble, including but not limited to type-casting to a boolean (e.g. object-wrapped NaN, "" and false actually type-cast to true). My question is, with all this confusion and problems, is there any benefit to JavaScript having both types of values for the built-in classes?

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  • Library for parsing arguments GNU-style?

    - by Delan Azabani
    I've noticed the basic 'style' of most GNU core applications whereby arguments are: --longoption --longoption=value or --longoption value -abcdefg (multiple options) -iuwww-data (option i, u = www-data) They follow the above style. I want to avoid writing an argument parser if there's a library that does this using the above style. Is there one you know of?

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  • how to write mute logic when mute state is unknown

    - by Delan Azabani
    I'm writing an indicator-sound clone for OSS4. Setting the volume works fine now, but I'm having trouble with the muting aspect of my program. A couple of facts about muting in OSS4: vmix doesn't have a mute (and we use vmix for volume control) also, the 'media keys' way of controlling volume doesn't set a mute control, but rather, volume = 0 The problem with this is, when reading the vmix volume and encountering zero, we don't know if the user has actually set it to zero, or has it set to some other value, but has mute on. How should I write my muting logic? git code, if that helps

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  • Assignment operator that calls a constructor is broken

    - by Delan Azabani
    I've implemented some of the changes suggested in this question, and (thanks very much) it works quite well, however... in the process I've seemed to break the post-declaration assignment operator. With the following code: #include <cstdio> #include "ucpp" main() { ustring a = "test"; ustring b = "ing"; ustring c = "- -"; ustring d = "cafe\xcc\x81"; printf("%s\n", (a + b + c[1] + d).encode()); } I get a nice "testing cafe´" message. However, if I modify the code slightly so that the const char * conversion is done separately, post-declaration: #include <cstdio> #include "ucpp" main() { ustring a = "test"; ustring b = "ing"; ustring c = "- -"; ustring d; d = "cafe\xcc\x81"; printf("%s\n", (a + b + c[1] + d).encode()); } the ustring named d becomes blank, and all that is output is "testing ". My new code has three constructors, one void (which is probably the one being incorrectly used, and is used in the operator+ function), one that takes a const ustring &, and one that takes a const char *. The following is my new library code: #include <cstdlib> #include <cstring> class ustring { int * values; long len; public: long length() { return len; } ustring() { len = 0; values = (int *) malloc(0); } ustring(const ustring &input) { len = input.len; values = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int) * len); for (long i = 0; i < len; i++) values[i] = input.values[i]; } ustring operator=(ustring input) { ustring result(input); return result; } ustring(const char * input) { values = (int *) malloc(0); long s = 0; // s = number of parsed chars int a, b, c, d, contNeed = 0, cont = 0; for (long i = 0; input[i]; i++) if (input[i] < 0x80) { // ASCII, direct copy (00-7f) values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = input[i]; } else if (input[i] < 0xc0) { // this is a continuation (80-bf) if (cont == contNeed) { // no need for continuation, use U+fffd values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = 0xfffd; } cont = cont + 1; values[s - 1] = values[s - 1] | ((input[i] & 0x3f) << ((contNeed - cont) * 6)); if (cont == contNeed) cont = contNeed = 0; } else if (input[i] < 0xc2) { // invalid byte, use U+fffd (c0-c1) values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = 0xfffd; } else if (input[i] < 0xe0) { // start of 2-byte sequence (c2-df) contNeed = 1; values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = (input[i] & 0x1f) << 6; } else if (input[i] < 0xf0) { // start of 3-byte sequence (e0-ef) contNeed = 2; values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = (input[i] & 0x0f) << 12; } else if (input[i] < 0xf5) { // start of 4-byte sequence (f0-f4) contNeed = 3; values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = (input[i] & 0x07) << 18; } else { // restricted or invalid (f5-ff) values = (int *) realloc(values, sizeof(int) * ++s); values[s - 1] = 0xfffd; } len = s; } ustring operator=(const char * input) { ustring result(input); return result; } ustring operator+(ustring input) { ustring result; result.len = len + input.len; result.values = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int) * result.len); for (long i = 0; i < len; i++) result.values[i] = values[i]; for (long i = 0; i < input.len; i++) result.values[i + len] = input.values[i]; return result; } ustring operator[](long index) { ustring result; result.len = 1; result.values = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int)); result.values[0] = values[index]; return result; } char * encode() { char * r = (char *) malloc(0); long s = 0; for (long i = 0; i < len; i++) { if (values[i] < 0x80) r = (char *) realloc(r, s + 1), r[s + 0] = char(values[i]), s += 1; else if (values[i] < 0x800) r = (char *) realloc(r, s + 2), r[s + 0] = char(values[i] >> 6 | 0x60), r[s + 1] = char(values[i] & 0x3f | 0x80), s += 2; else if (values[i] < 0x10000) r = (char *) realloc(r, s + 3), r[s + 0] = char(values[i] >> 12 | 0xe0), r[s + 1] = char(values[i] >> 6 & 0x3f | 0x80), r[s + 2] = char(values[i] & 0x3f | 0x80), s += 3; else r = (char *) realloc(r, s + 4), r[s + 0] = char(values[i] >> 18 | 0xf0), r[s + 1] = char(values[i] >> 12 & 0x3f | 0x80), r[s + 2] = char(values[i] >> 6 & 0x3f | 0x80), r[s + 3] = char(values[i] & 0x3f | 0x80), s += 4; } return r; } };

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  • How do I define an implicit typecast from my class to a scalar?

    - by Delan Azabani
    I have the following code, which uses a Unicode string class from a library that I'm writing: #include <cstdio> #include "ucpp" main() { ustring a = "test"; ustring b = "ing"; ustring c = "- -"; ustring d; d = "cafe\xcc\x81"; printf("%s\n", (a + b + c[1] + d).encode()); } The encode method of the ustring class instances converts the internal Unicode into a UTF-8 char *. However, because I don't have access to the char class definition, I am unsure on how I can define an implicit typecast (so that I don't have to manually call encode when using with printf, etc).

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