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  • Collaborative Filtering Program: What to do for a Pearson Score When There Isn't Enough Data

    - by Mike
    I'm building a recommendation engine using collaborative filtering. For similarity scores, I use a Pearson correlation. This is great most of the time, but sometimes I have users that only share a 1 or 2 fields. For example: User 1{ a: 4 b: 2 } User 2{ a: 4 b: 3 } Since this is only 2 data points, a Pearson correlation would always be 1 (a straight line or perfect correlation). This obviously isn't what I want, so what value should I use instead? I could just throw away all instances like this (give a correlation of 0), but my data is really sparse right now and I don't want to lose anything. Is there any similarity score I could use that would fit in with the rest of my similarity scores (all Pearson)?

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  • Java Certification Exams and Their Move to Pearson VUE

    - by Harold Green
    You may be aware that Oracle recently migrated all Sun-branded certification exams from Prometric to Pearson VUE. Below are answers to some frequently-asked questions that we've been getting recently: What changes to the exams should I be aware of?Only minor changes were made to the exams during the transition to Pearson VUE: Renumbering of all exams to the Oracle exam numbering structure (i.e. 1Z0...). Most exam score reports were enhanced to provide more detailed feedback. Score reports now list every exam objective for which a question (or questions) were answered incorrectly. The previous format provided only section-level performance feedback. For three Java exams, some lengthy (time-consuming) questions were removed & replaced with shorter (less time-consuming) questions. This was done in order to shorten the required exam time (to 150 minutes). Some interactive question types were removed from several Java and Solaris exams (including "matching" and "drag-and-drop" questions). The passing scores (for the exams that were revised) were statistically adjusted to make them equal to their prior passing scores, thus ensuring that the exams maintained the same level of difficulty as before. The exam objectives and the exam questions themselves did not change. Candidates should study the same material and objectives. Are there also new testing practices I should be aware of?Oracle follows a common industry practice of placing occasional un-scored questions on our certification exams. Candidates will not know which questions are unscored. At the time of this blog post, only one of the migrated exams (1Z0-898) contains unscored questions.I started the Master certification path through Prometric, and now I need to complete the requirements through Pearson VUE. Where can I get guidance on this process?Visit our Vendor Transition FAQs to find comprehensive instructions. Oracle has created several specific paths to accommodate candidates who were at at varying stages of completion of their master path when the transition occurred. Make sure to follow the specific path designed for your case, as you will need to know which exam number to select in order to submit/re-submit your requirements. QUICK LINKS Oracle Certification Blog Post: Java, Oracle Solaris, MySQL and Other Former Sun Certification Exams Now Being Delivered At Pearson VUE Oracle Certification Website: Vendor Transition Announcement

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  • Installing pgAdmin III for postgreSQL 9.2

    - by Mikey
    I have a windows server that runs postgresql 9.2. I want to hit it using pgAdmin III from my Ubuntu Linux 12.10 workstation box. I installed pgAdmin III from synaptic and also tried direct download from postgreSQL site using software installer. Regardlesss, I can get only get pgAdmin III for postgresql 9.1. When I run pgAdmin III and point to my server I get an error message telling me that the database is 9.2 and my pgAdmin III is for 9.1, isn't compatible with 9.2. I can access the server itself fine OK from the Ubuntu box - I have Python programs that hit the database with no problems - but I need pgAdmin III for 9.2 running under Ununtu Linux 12.10. Is it available? Where do I get it?

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  • The Virtues and Challenges of Implementing Basel III: What Every CFO and CRO Needs To Know

    - by Jenna Danko
    The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) is a group tasked with providing thought-leadership to the global banking industry.  Over the years, the BCBS has released volumes of guidance in an effort to promote stability within the financial sector.  By effectively communicating best-practices, the Basel Committee has influenced financial regulations worldwide.  Basel regulations are intended to help banks: More easily absorb shocks due to various forms of financial-economic stress Improve risk management and governance Enhance regulatory reporting and transparency In June 2011, the BCBS released Basel III: A global regulatory framework for more resilient banks and banking systems.  This new set of regulations included many enhancements to previous rules and will have both short and long term impacts on the banking industry.  Some of the key features of Basel III include: A stronger capital base More stringent capital standards and higher capital requirements Introduction of capital buffers  Additional risk coverage Enhanced quantification of counterparty credit risk Credit valuation adjustments  Wrong  way risk  Asset Value Correlation Multiplier for large financial institutions Liquidity management and monitoring Introduction of leverage ratio Even more rigorous data requirements To implement these features banks need to embark on a journey replete with challenges. These can be categorized into three key areas: Data, Models and Compliance. Data Challenges Data quality - All standard dimensions of Data Quality (DQ) have to be demonstrated.  Manual approaches are now considered too cumbersome and automation has become the norm. Data lineage - Data lineage has to be documented and demonstrated.  The PPT / Excel approach to documentation is being replaced by metadata tools.  Data lineage has become dynamic due to a variety of factors, making static documentation out-dated quickly.  Data dictionaries - A strong and clean business glossary is needed with proper identification of business owners for the data.  Data integrity - A strong, scalable architecture with work flow tools helps demonstrate data integrity.  Manual touch points have to be minimized.   Data relevance/coverage - Data must be relevant to all portfolios and storage devices must allow for sufficient data retention.  Coverage of both on and off balance sheet exposures is critical.   Model Challenges Model development - Requires highly trained resources with both quantitative and subject matter expertise. Model validation - All Basel models need to be validated. This requires additional resources with skills that may not be readily available in the marketplace.  Model documentation - All models need to be adequately documented.  Creation of document templates and model development processes/procedures is key. Risk and finance integration - This integration is necessary for Basel as the Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses (ALLL) is calculated by Finance, yet Expected Loss (EL) is calculated by Risk Management – and they need to somehow be equal.  This is tricky at best from an implementation perspective.  Compliance Challenges Rules interpretation - Some Basel III requirements leave room for interpretation.  A misinterpretation of regulations can lead to delays in Basel compliance and undesired reprimands from supervisory authorities. Gap identification and remediation - Internal identification and remediation of gaps ensures smoother Basel compliance and audit processes.  However business lines are challenged by the competing priorities which arise from regulatory compliance and business as usual work.  Qualification readiness - Providing internal and external auditors with robust evidence of a thorough examination of the readiness to proceed to parallel run and Basel qualification  In light of new regulations like Basel III and local variations such as the Dodd Frank Act (DFA) and Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review (CCAR) in the US, banks are now forced to ask themselves many difficult questions.  For example, executives must consider: How will Basel III play into their Risk Appetite? How will they create project plans for Basel III when they haven’t yet finished implementing Basel II? How will new regulations impact capital structure including profitability and capital distributions to shareholders? After all, new regulations often lead to diminished profitability as well as an assortment of implementation problems as we discussed earlier in this note.  However, by requiring banks to focus on premium growth, regulators increase the potential for long-term profitability and sustainability.  And a more stable banking system: Increases consumer confidence which in turn supports banking activity  Ensures that adequate funding is available for individuals and companies Puts regulators at ease, allowing bankers to focus on banking Stability is intended to bring long-term profitability to banks.  Therefore, it is important that every banking institution takes the steps necessary to properly manage, monitor and disclose its risks.  This can be done with the assistance and oversight of an independent regulatory authority.  A spectrum of banks exist today wherein some continue to debate and negotiate with regulators over the implementation of new requirements, while others are simply choosing to embrace them for the benefits I highlighted above. Do share with me how your institution is coping with and embracing these new regulations within your bank. Dr. Varun Agarwal is a Principal in the Banking Practice for Capgemini Financial Services.  He has over 19 years experience in areas that span from enterprise risk management, credit, market, and to country risk management; financial modeling and valuation; and international financial markets research and analyses.

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  • About Solaris 11 and UltraSPARC II/III/IV/IV+

    - by nospam(at)example.com (Joerg Moellenkamp)
    I know that I will get the usual amount of comments like "Oh, Jörg ? you can't be negative about Oracle" for this article. However as usual I want to explain the logic behind my reasoning. Yes ? I know that there is a lot of UltraSPARC III, IV and IV+ gear out there. But there are some very basic questions: Does your application you are currently running on this gear stops running just because you can't run Solaris 11 on it? What is the need to upgrade a system already in production to Solaris 11? I have the impression, that some people think that the systems get useless in the moment Oracle releases Solaris 11. I know that Sun sold UltraSPARC IV+ systems until 2009. The Sun SF490 introduced 2004 for example, that was a Sun SF480 with UltraSPARC IV and later with UltraSPARC IV+. And yes, Sun made some speedbumps. At that time the systems of the UltraSPARC III to IV+ generations were supported on Solaris 8, on Solaris 9 and on Solaris 10. However from my perspective we sold them to customers, which weren't able to migrate to Solaris 10 because they used applications not supported on Solaris 9 or who just didn't wanted to migrate to Solaris 10. Believe it or not ? I personally know two customers that migrated core systems to Solaris 10 in ? well 2008/9. This was especially true when the M3000 was announced in 2008 when it closed the darned single socket gap. It may be different at you site, however that's what I remember about that time when talking with customers. At first: Just because there is no Solaris 11 for UltraSPARC III, IV and IV+, it doesn't mean that Solaris 10 will go away anytime soon. I just want to point you to "Expect Lifetime Support - Hardware and Operating Systems". It states about Premier Support:Maintenance and software upgrades are included for Oracle operating systems and Oracle VM for a minimum of eight years from the general availability date.GA for Solaris 10 was in 2005. Plus 8 years ? 2013 ? at minimum. Then you can still opt for 3 years of "Extended Support" ? 2016 ? at minimum. 2016 your systems purchased in 2009 are 7 years old. Even on systems purchased at the very end of the lifetime of that system generation. That are the rules as written in the linked document. I said minimum The actual dates are even further in the future: Premier Support for Solaris 10 ends in 2015, Extended support ends 2018. Sustaining support ? indefinite. You will find this in the document "Oracle Lifetime Support Policy: Oracle Hardware and Operating Systems".So I don't understand when some people write, that Oracle is less protective about hardware investments than Sun. And for hardware it's the same as with Sun: Service 5 years after EOL as part of Premier Support. I would like to write about a different perspective as well: I have to be a little cautious here, because this is going in the roadmap area, so I will mention the public sources here: John Fowler told last year that we have to expect at at least 3x the single thread performance of T3 for T4. We have 8 cores in T4, as stated by Rick Hetherington. Let's assume for a moment that a T4 core will have the performance of a UltraSPARC core (just to simplify math and not to disclosing anything about the performance, all existing SPARC cores are considered equal). So given this pieces of information, you could consolidate 8 V215, 4 or 8 V245, 2 full blown V445,2 full blown 490, 2 full blown M3000 on a single T4 SPARC processor. The Fowler roadmap prezo talked about 4-socket systems with T4. So 32 V215, 16 to 8 V245, 8 fullblown V445, 8 full blown V490, 8 full blown M3000 in a system image. I think you get the idea. That said, most of the systems we are talking about have already amortized and perhaps it's just time to invest in new systems to yield other advantages like reduced space consumptions, like reduced power consumption, like some of the neat features sun4v gives you, and yes ? reduced number of processor licenses for Oracle and less money for Oracle HW/SW support. As much as I dislike it myself that my own UltraSPARC III and UltraSPARC II based systems won't run on Solaris 11 (and I have quite a few of them in my personal lab), I really think that the impact on production environments will be much less than most people think now. By the way: The reason for this move is a quite significant new feature. I will tell you that it was this feature, when it's out. I assume, telling just a word more could lead to much more time to blog.

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  • PostgreSQL 9.1, pgadmin III, Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, support functions

    - by Chaz SLiger
    When pgAdmin III is used to open a PostgreSQL database the following message appears. There does not seem to be any obvious package listed in the Ubuntu Software Center for this. The server lacks instrumentation functions. pgadmin III uses some support functions that are not available by default in all PostgreSQL versions. These enable some tasks that make life easier when dealing with log files and configuration files. The adminpack is installed and activated by default if you are running the one-click installer of PostgreSQL. On Unix, you may have to install the contrib package, either with your package installer tool or by compilation.

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  • Finally, upgrade from Nokia X3 to Samsung Galaxy S III

    This time, something slightly different but nonetheless not less interesting, hopefully. Living on a remote island like Mauritius, ill-praised 'Cyber Island' in the Indian Ocean, has its advantages in life style and relaxed environment to life in but in terms of technological aspects it can be quite a nightmare. Well, I guess this might be different story to report about... one day. Cyber Island Mauritius Despite it's shiny advertisement as Cyber Island and business in ICT hub to Africa, Mauritius is not on the latest track of available models in computer hardware or, in the context of this article, cellulars or smart-phone, or communication technology in general. Okay, I have to admit that this statement is only partly true. Money can buy, even here in Mauritius. Luckily, there are ways and ways to deal with this outcry of modern, read: technological, civilisation issues. Online shopping you might think? Yes, for sure, until you discover in your checkout procedure that a small island in the Indian Ocean isn't a preferred destination for delivery and the precious time you spent on putting your items into your cart and feeding your personal level of anticipation gets ruined on the last stint. Ordering from abroad saves you money Anyway, I got in touch with my personal courier and luckily there were some extra-kilos left in the luggage. First obstacle sorted, we have a Transporter! Okay, on the next occasion off to Amazon online and using their Prime service for fast delivery. Actually, the order was placed on Saturday evening and everything got delivered on Tuesday morning - nice job in less than 72 hours. Okay, among the items of that shopping rush I ordered a shiny Samsung Galaxy S III 16GB in oceanic blue - did I mention, that you hardly get a blue model in Mauritius? - for my BWE. Interesting side-notes: First, Amazon Germany dropped the prices for roughly 30% on the S3, and we got the 16GB model for less than 500 Euro (or approx. Rs. 19.500,-) compared to the usual Rs. 27.000,- on the local market. It even varies whether the local price is inclusive or exclusive VAT (15%). Second, since a while she was bothering me to get an iPhone and an iPad for her, fair enough I thought, decent hardware, posh design and reliable services. Until we watched the 'magical' introduction of Samsung's new models at the IFA exhibition, she read the bashing comments on Google+ on the iPhone 5 and I gave her a brief summary on the law suit between Apple and Samsung in the USA. So, yes, Samsung USA is right, the next big thing is already here - literally. My BWE loves the look and touch of the Galaxy S3. And for me it was more cost-effective in terms of purchases done at the App Store, ups, Play Store. Transfer of contacts, text messages and media files Okay, now that the hardware is in place, how to transfer all those contacts, text messages, media files, etc. between those two devices? In the past, I used to use the Nokia Communication Suite between various models but now for Android? Well, as usual Google and Bing are reliable friends and among the first hits I came across an article about How to Transfer Contacts from Nokia to Android. Couldn't be easier, right? Well, sort of... my main Windows systems are already running on Windows 8, and this actually caused problems with the mobile/smart-phone device drivers. The article provides the download for an older version 1.10 which upgrades to 2.11 (as time of writing this entry) but both couldn't get the Galaxy S3 and the Nokia connected. Shame on me... the product page clearly doesn't mention Windows 8 (for now) and Windows 8 isn't available for the general audience at all... After I took a spare machine running on Windows Vista everything went smooth. Software installed, upgrade done, device drivers for Android automatically downloaded and installed, and the same painless routine for the Nokia part. I think, I rebooted the system twice during the whole setup procedure but hey, it was more or less a distraction while coding some stuff in ASP.NET MVC and Telerik Kendo UI. The transfer of contacts and text messages was done via Wondershare MobileGo for Android, and all media files by moving the additional microSD card from one device to the other. But even without an external SD card, it would have been very easy to copy the files via Windows Explorer directly. Little catch and excellent service Fine, we are almost done and the only step left is to shift the SIM card... Ouch, gotcha! The X3 uses a standard size SIM card while the S III only accepts microSIM form factor. What an irony, bigger smartphone needs smaller SIM card. Luckily, the next showroom of Emtel is just 5 mins away up the road, and the service staff over there know their job. Finally, after roughly 10 mins of paper work, activation and small chit-chat, the S3 came to life on the mobile network. Owning a smart-phone now and knowing that my BWE would like to interact more on social networks away from home, especially to upload pictures and provide local 'check-ins', I activated a data package for her in advance, too. Even that it is Saturday, everything was already done and ready to be used. Nice bonus: The Emtel clerk directly offered me to set up the configuration for the Emtel data services, yes sure, go ahead, this saves me to search for that in the settings. Okay, spoiler-alert here, setting a static APN to access the Emtel network and the internet wouldn't be a challenge. But hey, she already had the phone in her hands and I could keep my eyes on the children. Well done, Emtel! Resume Thanks to the useful software package by Wondershare is was a hands-free experience to transfer all the data from a Nokia mobile on Symbian S60 to a Samsung Galaxy S III on Android Ice Cream Sandwich (ICS). In the future, this wont be a serious issue at all anymore thanks to synchronisation services and cloud storage. And for now, I'm only waiting for the official upgrades for Jelly Bean.

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  • Finally, upgrade from Nokia X3 to Samsung Galaxy S III

    This time, something slightly different but nonetheless not less interesting, hopefully. Living on a remote island like Mauritius, ill-praised 'Cyber Island' in the Indian Ocean, has its advantages in life style and relaxed environment to life in but in terms of technological aspects it can be quite a nightmare. Well, I guess this might be different story to report about... one day. Cyber Island Mauritius Despite it's shiny advertisement as Cyber Island and business in ICT hub to Africa, Mauritius is not on the latest track of available models in computer hardware or, in the context of this article, cellulars or smart-phone, or communication technology in general. Okay, I have to admit that this statement is only partly true. Money can buy, even here in Mauritius. Luckily, there are ways and ways to deal with this outcry of modern, read: technological, civilisation issues. Online shopping you might think? Yes, for sure, until you discover in your checkout procedure that a small island in the Indian Ocean isn't a preferred destination for delivery and the precious time you spent on putting your items into your cart and feeding your personal level of anticipation gets ruined on the last stint. Ordering from abroad saves you money Anyway, I got in touch with my personal courier and luckily there were some extra-kilos left in the luggage. First obstacle sorted, we have a Transporter! Okay, on the next occasion off to Amazon online and using their Prime service for fast delivery. Actually, the order was placed on Saturday evening and everything got delivered on Tuesday morning - nice job in less than 72 hours. Okay, among the items of that shopping rush I ordered a shiny Samsung Galaxy S III 16GB in oceanic blue - did I mention, that you hardly get a blue model in Mauritius? - for my BWE. Interesting side-notes: First, Amazon Germany dropped the prices for roughly 30% on the S3, and we got the 16GB model for less than 500 Euro (or approx. Rs. 19.500,-) compared to the usual Rs. 27.000,- on the local market. It even varies whether the local price is inclusive or exclusive VAT (15%). Second, since a while she was bothering me to get an iPhone and an iPad for her, fair enough I thought, decent hardware, posh design and reliable services. Until we watched the 'magical' introduction of Samsung's new models at the IFA exhibition, she read the bashing comments on Google+ on the iPhone 5 and I gave her a brief summary on the law suit between Apple and Samsung in the USA. So, yes, Samsung USA is right, the next big thing is already here - literally. My BWE loves the look and touch of the Galaxy S3. And for me it was more cost-effective in terms of purchases done at the App Store, ups, Play Store. Transfer of contacts, text messages and media files Okay, now that the hardware is in place, how to transfer all those contacts, text messages, media files, etc. between those two devices? In the past, I used to use the Nokia Communication Suite between various models but now for Android? Well, as usual Google and Bing are reliable friends and among the first hits I came across an article about How to Transfer Contacts from Nokia to Android. Couldn't be easier, right? Well, sort of... my main Windows systems are already running on Windows 8, and this actually caused problems with the mobile/smart-phone device drivers. The article provides the download for an older version 1.10 which upgrades to 2.11 (as time of writing this entry) but both couldn't get the Galaxy S3 and the Nokia connected. Shame on me... the product page clearly doesn't mention Windows 8 (for now) and Windows 8 isn't available for the general audience at all... After I took a spare machine running on Windows Vista everything went smooth. Software installed, upgrade done, device drivers for Android automatically downloaded and installed, and the same painless routine for the Nokia part. I think, I rebooted the system twice during the whole setup procedure but hey, it was more or less a distraction while coding some stuff in ASP.NET MVC and Telerik Kendo UI. The transfer of contacts and text messages was done via Wondershare MobileGo for Android, and all media files by moving the additional microSD card from one device to the other. But even without an external SD card, it would have been very easy to copy the files via Windows Explorer directly. Little catch and excellent service Fine, we are almost done and the only step left is to shift the SIM card... Ouch, gotcha! The X3 uses a standard size SIM card while the S III only accepts microSIM form factor. What an irony, bigger smartphone needs smaller SIM card. Luckily, the next showroom of Emtel is just 5 mins away up the road, and the service staff over there know their job. Finally, after roughly 10 mins of paper work, activation and small chit-chat, the S3 came to life on the mobile network. Owning a smart-phone now and knowing that my BWE would like to interact more on social networks away from home, especially to upload pictures and provide local 'check-ins', I activated a data package for her in advance, too. Even that it is Saturday, everything was already done and ready to be used. Nice bonus: The Emtel clerk directly offered me to set up the configuration for the Emtel data services, yes sure, go ahead, this saves me to search for that in the settings. Okay, spoiler-alert here, setting a static APN to access the Emtel network and the internet wouldn't be a challenge. But hey, she already had the phone in her hands and I could keep my eyes on the children. Well done, Emtel! Resume Thanks to the useful software package by Wondershare is was a hands-free experience to transfer all the data from a Nokia mobile on Symbian S60 to a Samsung Galaxy S III on Android Ice Cream Sandwich (ICS). In the future, this wont be a serious issue at all anymore thanks to synchronisation services and cloud storage. And for now, I'm only waiting for the official upgrades for Jelly Bean.

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  • GDL Presents: Make Web Magic | Part III

    GDL Presents: Make Web Magic | Part III Make Web Magic: The Minds Behind the Most Popular Chrome Experiments Using the latest open web technologies, the developers creating some of the most inspired Chrome Experiments showcase their latest web experiments and discuss how they are making the web faster, more fun, and open in this 3-episode hangout. Host: Paul Irish, Developer Advocate, Chrome Guest: Hakim El Hattab From: GoogleDevelopers Views: 133 16 ratings Time: 30:35 More in Science & Technology

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  • How do I install pgAdmin III for postgreSQL 9.2?

    - by Vector
    I have a Windows server that runs postgresql 9.2. I want to hit it using pgAdmin III from my Ubuntu 12.10 workstation box. I installed pgAdmin III from synaptic and also tried direct download from postgreSQL site using software installer. Regardless, I can get only get pgAdmin III for postgresql 9.1. When I run pgAdmin III and point to my server I get an error message telling me that the database is 9.2 and my pgAdmin III is for 9.1, isn't compatible with 9.2. I can access the server itself fine OK from the Ubuntu box - I have Python programs that hit the database with no problems - but I need pgAdmin III for 9.2 running under Ubuntu 12.10. Is it available? Where do I get it?

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  • Obtaining In game Warcraft III data to program standalone AI

    - by Slav
    I am implementing common purpose behavioral algorithm and would like to test it under my lovely Warcraft III game and watch how it will fight against real players. The problem is how to obtain information about in game state (units, structures, environment, etc. ). Algorithm needs access to hard drive and possibly distributed computing, that's why JASS (WC3 Editor language) usage doesn't solve the issue. Direct 3D hooking is an approach, but it wasn't done for WC3 yet and significant drawback is inability to watch online at how AI performs since it uses the viewport to issue commands. How in game data can be obtained to a different process in a fastest and easiest way? Thank you.

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  • Installing Ubuntu 12 on SATA III drive

    - by Jared
    I am trying to install Ubuntu 12.04 on a SATA III drive however the installer will not recognize my drive in the guided (dual-boot) install. I have changed the controller from IDE to AHCI to no avail, the install still will only recognize my very small second drive that is plugged into a SATA II port. The thing is, the unguided install sees this drive just fine, I just am not sure enough of what I'm doing to feel safe installing via this method. Is there a fix for this beyond plugging my drive into a SATA II port? I really would like to avoid this because of my terrible cable management skills it would be a huge pain to switch it over.

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  • Making The EBS Upgrade From 11.5.10 Easier - Part III

    - by Annemarie Provisero
    ADVISOR WEBCAST: Making The EBS Upgrade From 11.5.10 Easier - Part III PRODUCT FAMILY: E-Business Suite July 19, 2011 at 8 am PT, 9 am MT, 11 am ET This one-hour session is recommended for technical users who are responsible for upgrading their E-Business Suite applications from Release 11.5.10 to Release 12.1.x. As you begin your upgrade process, there are a number of tools available to assist you in a successful upgrade. A successful upgrade requires careful planning, correct upgrade processing, detailed testing, and user (re)training prior to upgrade. Over three sessions we will discuss the tools that you can use to assist in your upgrade tasks. These tools are available to you via My Oracle Support and as part of the E-Business Suite product offerings. In this third session, we’ll cover the Best Practices for Using The Upgrade Tools. Additionally, this session includes an extended question and answer period. In the first part of the three-session series, we covered the following topics: Overview of Tools Available for Upgrading Upgrade versus Re-implementing Upgrade Community Upgrade Product Information Center Page Detailed Look at Upgrade Advisor In the second session, we covered the following topics: Recap of Part I Detailed Look at Maintenance Wizard Detailed Look at Patch Wizard A replay of those sessions is available via Note 740964.1, Advisor Webcast Archive. A short, live demonstration (only if applicable) and question and answer period will be included. Oracle Advisor Webcasts are dedicated to building your awareness around our products and services. This session does not replace offerings from Oracle Global Support Services. Click here to register for this session ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The above webcast is a service of the E-Business Suite Communities in My Oracle Support. For more information on other webcasts, please reference the Oracle Advisor Webcast Schedule.Click here to visit the E-Business Communities in My Oracle Support Note that all links require access to My Oracle Support.

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  • Developing custom MBeans to manage J2EE Applications (Part III)

    - by philippe Le Mouel
    This is the third and final part in a series of blogs, that demonstrate how to add management capability to your own application using JMX MBeans. In Part I we saw: How to implement a custom MBean to manage configuration associated with an application. How to package the resulting code and configuration as part of the application's ear file. How to register MBeans upon application startup, and unregistered them upon application stop (or undeployment). How to use generic JMX clients such as JConsole to browse and edit our application's MBean. In Part II we saw: How to add localized descriptions to our MBean, MBean attributes, MBean operations and MBean operation parameters. How to specify meaningful name to our MBean operation parameters. We also touched on future enhancements that will simplify how we can implement localized MBeans. In this third and last part, we will re-write our MBean to simplify how we added localized descriptions. To do so we will take advantage of the functionality we already described in part II and that is now part of WebLogic 10.3.3.0. We will show how to take advantage of WebLogic's localization support to localize our MBeans based on the client's Locale independently of the server's Locale. Each client will see MBean descriptions localized based on his/her own Locale. We will show how to achieve this using JConsole, and also using a sample programmatic JMX Java client. The complete code sample and associated build files for part III are available as a zip file. The code has been tested against WebLogic Server 10.3.3.0 and JDK6. To build and deploy our sample application, please follow the instruction provided in Part I, as they also apply to part III's code and associated zip file. Providing custom descriptions take II In part II we localized our MBean descriptions by extending the StandardMBean class and overriding its many getDescription methods. WebLogic 10.3.3.0 similarly to JDK 7 can automatically localize MBean descriptions as long as those are specified according to the following conventions: Descriptions resource bundle keys are named according to: MBean description: <MBeanInterfaceClass>.mbean MBean attribute description: <MBeanInterfaceClass>.attribute.<AttributeName> MBean operation description: <MBeanInterfaceClass>.operation.<OperationName> MBean operation parameter description: <MBeanInterfaceClass>.operation.<OperationName>.<ParameterName> MBean constructor description: <MBeanInterfaceClass>.constructor.<ConstructorName> MBean constructor parameter description: <MBeanInterfaceClass>.constructor.<ConstructorName>.<ParameterName> We also purposely named our resource bundle class MBeanDescriptions and included it as part of the same package as our MBean. We already followed the above conventions when creating our resource bundle in part II, and our default resource bundle class with English descriptions looks like: package blog.wls.jmx.appmbean; import java.util.ListResourceBundle; public class MBeanDescriptions extends ListResourceBundle { protected Object[][] getContents() { return new Object[][] { {"PropertyConfigMXBean.mbean", "MBean used to manage persistent application properties"}, {"PropertyConfigMXBean.attribute.Properties", "Properties associated with the running application"}, {"PropertyConfigMXBean.operation.setProperty", "Create a new property, or change the value of an existing property"}, {"PropertyConfigMXBean.operation.setProperty.key", "Name that identify the property to set."}, {"PropertyConfigMXBean.operation.setProperty.value", "Value for the property being set"}, {"PropertyConfigMXBean.operation.getProperty", "Get the value for an existing property"}, {"PropertyConfigMXBean.operation.getProperty.key", "Name that identify the property to be retrieved"} }; } } We have now also added a resource bundle with French localized descriptions: package blog.wls.jmx.appmbean; import java.util.ListResourceBundle; public class MBeanDescriptions_fr extends ListResourceBundle { protected Object[][] getContents() { return new Object[][] { {"PropertyConfigMXBean.mbean", "Manage proprietes sauvegarde dans un fichier disque."}, {"PropertyConfigMXBean.attribute.Properties", "Proprietes associee avec l'application en cour d'execution"}, {"PropertyConfigMXBean.operation.setProperty", "Construit une nouvelle proprietee, ou change la valeur d'une proprietee existante."}, {"PropertyConfigMXBean.operation.setProperty.key", "Nom de la propriete dont la valeur est change."}, {"PropertyConfigMXBean.operation.setProperty.value", "Nouvelle valeur"}, {"PropertyConfigMXBean.operation.getProperty", "Retourne la valeur d'une propriete existante."}, {"PropertyConfigMXBean.operation.getProperty.key", "Nom de la propriete a retrouver."} }; } } So now we can just remove the many getDescriptions methods from our MBean code, and have a much cleaner: package blog.wls.jmx.appmbean; import java.io.IOException; import java.io.InputStream; import java.io.OutputStream; import java.io.FileInputStream; import java.io.FileOutputStream; import java.io.File; import java.net.URL; import java.util.Map; import java.util.HashMap; import java.util.Properties; import javax.management.MBeanServer; import javax.management.ObjectName; import javax.management.MBeanRegistration; import javax.management.StandardMBean; import javax.management.MBeanOperationInfo; import javax.management.MBeanParameterInfo; public class PropertyConfig extends StandardMBean implements PropertyConfigMXBean, MBeanRegistration { private String relativePath_ = null; private Properties props_ = null; private File resource_ = null; private static Map operationsParamNames_ = null; static { operationsParamNames_ = new HashMap(); operationsParamNames_.put("setProperty", new String[] {"key", "value"}); operationsParamNames_.put("getProperty", new String[] {"key"}); } public PropertyConfig(String relativePath) throws Exception { super(PropertyConfigMXBean.class , true); props_ = new Properties(); relativePath_ = relativePath; } public String setProperty(String key, String value) throws IOException { String oldValue = null; if (value == null) { oldValue = String.class.cast(props_.remove(key)); } else { oldValue = String.class.cast(props_.setProperty(key, value)); } save(); return oldValue; } public String getProperty(String key) { return props_.getProperty(key); } public Map getProperties() { return (Map) props_; } private void load() throws IOException { InputStream is = new FileInputStream(resource_); try { props_.load(is); } finally { is.close(); } } private void save() throws IOException { OutputStream os = new FileOutputStream(resource_); try { props_.store(os, null); } finally { os.close(); } } public ObjectName preRegister(MBeanServer server, ObjectName name) throws Exception { // MBean must be registered from an application thread // to have access to the application ClassLoader ClassLoader cl = Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader(); URL resourceUrl = cl.getResource(relativePath_); resource_ = new File(resourceUrl.toURI()); load(); return name; } public void postRegister(Boolean registrationDone) { } public void preDeregister() throws Exception {} public void postDeregister() {} protected String getParameterName(MBeanOperationInfo op, MBeanParameterInfo param, int sequence) { return operationsParamNames_.get(op.getName())[sequence]; } } The only reason we are still extending the StandardMBean class, is to override the default values for our operations parameters name. If this isn't a concern, then one could just write the following code: package blog.wls.jmx.appmbean; import java.io.IOException; import java.io.InputStream; import java.io.OutputStream; import java.io.FileInputStream; import java.io.FileOutputStream; import java.io.File; import java.net.URL; import java.util.Properties; import javax.management.MBeanServer; import javax.management.ObjectName; import javax.management.MBeanRegistration; import javax.management.StandardMBean; import javax.management.MBeanOperationInfo; import javax.management.MBeanParameterInfo; public class PropertyConfig implements PropertyConfigMXBean, MBeanRegistration { private String relativePath_ = null; private Properties props_ = null; private File resource_ = null; public PropertyConfig(String relativePath) throws Exception { props_ = new Properties(); relativePath_ = relativePath; } public String setProperty(String key, String value) throws IOException { String oldValue = null; if (value == null) { oldValue = String.class.cast(props_.remove(key)); } else { oldValue = String.class.cast(props_.setProperty(key, value)); } save(); return oldValue; } public String getProperty(String key) { return props_.getProperty(key); } public Map getProperties() { return (Map) props_; } private void load() throws IOException { InputStream is = new FileInputStream(resource_); try { props_.load(is); } finally { is.close(); } } private void save() throws IOException { OutputStream os = new FileOutputStream(resource_); try { props_.store(os, null); } finally { os.close(); } } public ObjectName preRegister(MBeanServer server, ObjectName name) throws Exception { // MBean must be registered from an application thread // to have access to the application ClassLoader ClassLoader cl = Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader(); URL resourceUrl = cl.getResource(relativePath_); resource_ = new File(resourceUrl.toURI()); load(); return name; } public void postRegister(Boolean registrationDone) { } public void preDeregister() throws Exception {} public void postDeregister() {} } Note: The above would also require changing the operations parameters name in the resource bundle classes. For instance: PropertyConfigMXBean.operation.setProperty.key would become: PropertyConfigMXBean.operation.setProperty.p0 Client based localization When accessing our MBean using JConsole started with the following command line: jconsole -J-Djava.class.path=$JAVA_HOME/lib/jconsole.jar:$JAVA_HOME/lib/tools.jar: $WL_HOME/server/lib/wljmxclient.jar -J-Djmx.remote.protocol.provider.pkgs=weblogic.management.remote -debug We see that our MBean descriptions are localized according to the WebLogic's server Locale. English in this case: Note: Consult Part I for information on how to use JConsole to browse/edit our MBean. Now if we specify the client's Locale as part of the JConsole command line as follow: jconsole -J-Djava.class.path=$JAVA_HOME/lib/jconsole.jar:$JAVA_HOME/lib/tools.jar: $WL_HOME/server/lib/wljmxclient.jar -J-Djmx.remote.protocol.provider.pkgs=weblogic.management.remote -J-Dweblogic.management.remote.locale=fr-FR -debug We see that our MBean descriptions are now localized according to the specified client's Locale. French in this case: We use the weblogic.management.remote.locale system property to specify the Locale that should be associated with the cient's JMX connections. The value is composed of the client's language code and its country code separated by the - character. The country code is not required, and can be omitted. For instance: -Dweblogic.management.remote.locale=fr We can also specify the client's Locale using a programmatic client as demonstrated below: package blog.wls.jmx.appmbean.client; import javax.management.MBeanServerConnection; import javax.management.ObjectName; import javax.management.MBeanInfo; import javax.management.remote.JMXConnector; import javax.management.remote.JMXServiceURL; import javax.management.remote.JMXConnectorFactory; import java.util.Hashtable; import java.util.Set; import java.util.Locale; public class JMXClient { public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception { JMXConnector jmxCon = null; try { JMXServiceURL serviceUrl = new JMXServiceURL( "service:jmx:iiop://127.0.0.1:7001/jndi/weblogic.management.mbeanservers.runtime"); System.out.println("Connecting to: " + serviceUrl); // properties associated with the connection Hashtable env = new Hashtable(); env.put(JMXConnectorFactory.PROTOCOL_PROVIDER_PACKAGES, "weblogic.management.remote"); String[] credentials = new String[2]; credentials[0] = "weblogic"; credentials[1] = "weblogic"; env.put(JMXConnector.CREDENTIALS, credentials); // specifies the client's Locale env.put("weblogic.management.remote.locale", Locale.FRENCH); jmxCon = JMXConnectorFactory.newJMXConnector(serviceUrl, env); jmxCon.connect(); MBeanServerConnection con = jmxCon.getMBeanServerConnection(); Set mbeans = con.queryNames( new ObjectName( "blog.wls.jmx.appmbean:name=myAppProperties,type=PropertyConfig,*"), null); for (ObjectName mbeanName : mbeans) { System.out.println("\n\nMBEAN: " + mbeanName); MBeanInfo minfo = con.getMBeanInfo(mbeanName); System.out.println("MBean Description: "+minfo.getDescription()); System.out.println("\n"); } } finally { // release the connection if (jmxCon != null) jmxCon.close(); } } } The above client code is part of the zip file associated with this blog, and can be run using the provided client.sh script. The resulting output is shown below: $ ./client.sh Connecting to: service:jmx:iiop://127.0.0.1:7001/jndi/weblogic.management.mbeanservers.runtime MBEAN: blog.wls.jmx.appmbean:type=PropertyConfig,name=myAppProperties MBean Description: Manage proprietes sauvegarde dans un fichier disque. $ Miscellaneous Using Description annotation to specify MBean descriptions Earlier we have seen how to name our MBean descriptions resource keys, so that WebLogic 10.3.3.0 automatically uses them to localize our MBean. In some cases we might want to implicitly specify the resource key, and resource bundle. For instance when operations are overloaded, and the operation name is no longer sufficient to uniquely identify a single operation. In this case we can use the Description annotation provided by WebLogic as follow: import weblogic.management.utils.Description; @Description(resourceKey="myapp.resources.TestMXBean.description", resourceBundleBaseName="myapp.resources.MBeanResources") public interface TestMXBean { @Description(resourceKey="myapp.resources.TestMXBean.threshold.description", resourceBundleBaseName="myapp.resources.MBeanResources" ) public int getthreshold(); @Description(resourceKey="myapp.resources.TestMXBean.reset.description", resourceBundleBaseName="myapp.resources.MBeanResources") public int reset( @Description(resourceKey="myapp.resources.TestMXBean.reset.id.description", resourceBundleBaseName="myapp.resources.MBeanResources", displayNameKey= "myapp.resources.TestMXBean.reset.id.displayName.description") int id); } The Description annotation should be applied to the MBean interface. It can be used to specify MBean, MBean attributes, MBean operations, and MBean operation parameters descriptions as demonstrated above. Retrieving the Locale associated with a JMX operation from the MBean code There are several cases where it is necessary to retrieve the Locale associated with a JMX call from the MBean implementation. For instance this can be useful when localizing exception messages. This can be done as follow: import weblogic.management.mbeanservers.JMXContextUtil; ...... // some MBean method implementation public String setProperty(String key, String value) throws IOException { Locale callersLocale = JMXContextUtil.getLocale(); // use callersLocale to localize Exception messages or // potentially some return values such a Date .... } Conclusion With this last part we conclude our three part series on how to write MBeans to manage J2EE applications. We are far from having exhausted this particular topic, but we have gone a long way and are now capable to take advantage of the latest functionality provided by WebLogic's application server to write user friendly MBeans.

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  • Ranking Part III

    - by PointsToShare
    © 2011 By: Dov Trietsch. All rights reserved   Ranking Part III In a previous blogs “Ranking an Introduction” and  “Ranking Part II” , you have already praised me in “Rank the Author” and learned how to create a new element on a page and how to place it where you need it. For this installment, I just added code to keep the number of votes (you vote by clicking one of the stars) and the total vote. Using these two, we can compute the average rating. It’s a small step, but its purpose is to show that we do not need a detailed history in order to compute the average. A running total is sufficient. Please note that once you close the game, you will lose your previous total. In real life, we persist the totals in the list itself. We also keep a list of actual votes, but its purpose is to prevent double votes. If a person has already voted, his user id is already on the list and our program will check for it and bar the person from voting again. This is coded in an event receiver, which is a SharePoint server piece of code. I will show you how to do this part in a subsequent blog. Again, go to the page and look at the code. The gist of it is here. avg, votes, and stars are global variables that I defined before. function sendRate(sel){//I hate long line so I created pieces of the message in their own vars            var s1 = "Your Rating Was: ";            var s2 = ".. ";            var s3 = "\nVotes = ";            var s4 = "\nTotal Stars = ";            var s5 = "\nAverage = ";            var s;            s = parseInt(sel.id.replace("_", '')); // Get the selected star number            votes = parseInt(votes) + 1;            stars = parseInt(stars) + s;            avg = parseFloat(stars) / parseFloat(votes);            alert(s1 + sel.id + s2 +sel.title + s3 + votes + s4 + stars + s5 + avg);} Click on the link to play and examine “Ranking with Stats” That’s all folks!

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  • Using a service registry that doesn’t suck Part III: Service testing is part of SOA governance

    - by gsusx
    This is the third post of this series intended to highlight some of the principles of modern SOA governance solution. You can read the first two parts here: Using a service registry that doesn’t suck part I: UDDI is dead Using a service registry that doesn’t suck part II: Dear registry, do you have to be a message broker? This time I’ve decided to focus on what of the aspects that drives me ABSOLUTELY INSANE about traditional SOA Governance solutions: service testing or I should I say the lack of...(read more)

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  • Value of SOA Specialization interview with Thomas Schaller IPT - part III

    - by Jürgen Kress
    Recognized by Oracle, Preferred by Customers. We had the great opportunity to interview Thomas Schaller – Partner from our SOA Specialized Partner IPT Innovation Process Technology from Switzerland Why did IPT decide to become SOA Specialized? " SOA Specialization is a great branding for IPT. We are the SOA Specialists in the Swiss market, as we focus all our services around SOA. With 65 Swiss consultants focused on SOA Security & SOA Testing & BPM – Business Process Management & BSM – Business Service Modeling the partnership with Oracle as the technology leader in SOA is key, therefore it was important to us to become the first SOA Specialized company in Switzerland. As a result IPT is mentioned by Gartner as one of eight European SOA Consulting Firms and included in „Guide to SOA Consulting and System Integration Service Providers“ Can you describe the marketing activities with Oracle? Once a year we organize the largest SOA Conference in Switzerland “SOA, BPM & Integration Forum 2011“ Oracle is much more than a sponsor for the conference. Jointly we invite our customer base to attend this key event. The sales teams address jointly their most important prospects and customers. Oracle supports us with key speakers who present future directions of the Oracle SOA portfolio like Clemens Utschig-Utschig who presented details about the Complex Event Processing (CEP) solution in 2009 and James Allerton-Austin who presented details about the social BPM solution (BPM) in 2010. Additional our key customers presented their Oracle SOA success stories. How did you team with Oracle around the sales activities? "Sales alignment is key for the successful partnership. When we achieved! SOA Specialization we celebrated jointly with the Oracle and IPT middleware sales team. At the Aperol may interesting discussions resulted in joint opportunities and business. A key section of our joint business planning are marketing and sales activities. Together we define campaign topics and target customers. Matthias Breitschmid our superb Oracle partner manager ensures that the defined sales teams align and start the joint business. Regular we review our joint business plan with the joint management teams and Jürgen Kress our EMEA Oracle Sponsor. It is great to see that both companies profit from each other and we receive leads from Oracle!” Did you get Oracle support to train your consultants in the Oracle SOA Suite? “Enablement is key for us to deliver successful SOA projects. Together with Ralph Bellinghausen from the Oracle Enablement team we defined an Oracle trainings plan for our consultants. The monthly SOA Partner Community newsletter is a great resource to get the latest product updates, webcasts and trainings. As a SOA Specialized partner we get also invited to the SOA Blackbelt trainings, this trainings are hosted by Oracle product management where we get not only first hand information we get also direct access to the developers who can support us in critical project phases. Driven by the customer success we have increased our Oracle SOA practice by more than 200% in the last years!” Why did the customer decide for the IPT SOA offering? “SOA Specialization becomes a brand for customers, it proofs that we have the certified SOA skills and that IPT has delivered successful Oracle SOA projects. Jointly with Oracle and all the support we get from marketing, sales, enablement, support and product management we can ensure our customers to deliver their SOA project successful!” What are the next steps for IPT? “SOA Specialization is a super beneficial for IPT. We are looking forward to our upcoming SOA, BPM & Integration Forum 2011 and prepare to become BPM Specialized. part I Torsten Winterberg, Opitz Consulting & part II Debra Lilley, Fujitsu For more information on SOA Specialization and the SOA Partner Community please feel free to register at www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) Blog Twitter LinkedIn Mix Forum Wiki Website

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  • Getting started with Oracle Database In-Memory Part III - Querying The IM Column Store

    - by Maria Colgan
    In my previous blog posts, I described how to install, enable, and populate the In-Memory column store (IM column store). This weeks post focuses on how data is accessed within the IM column store. Let’s take a simple query “What is the most expensive air-mail order we have received to date?” SELECT Max(lo_ordtotalprice) most_expensive_order FROM lineorderWHERE  lo_shipmode = 5; The LINEORDER table has been populated into the IM column store and since we have no alternative access paths (indexes or views) the execution plan for this query is a full table scan of the LINEORDER table. You will notice that the execution plan has a new set of keywords “IN MEMORY" in the access method description in the Operation column. These keywords indicate that the LINEORDER table has been marked for INMEMORY and we may use the IM column store in this query. What do I mean by “may use”? There are a small number of cases were we won’t use the IM column store even though the object has been marked INMEMORY. This is similar to how the keyword STORAGE is used on Exadata environments. You can confirm that the IM column store was actually used by examining the session level statistics, but more on that later. For now let's focus on how the data is accessed in the IM column store and why it’s faster to access the data in the new column format, for analytical queries, rather than the buffer cache. There are four main reasons why accessing the data in the IM column store is more efficient. 1. Access only the column data needed The IM column store only has to scan two columns – lo_shipmode and lo_ordtotalprice – to execute this query while the traditional row store or buffer cache has to scan all of the columns in each row of the LINEORDER table until it reaches both the lo_shipmode and the lo_ordtotalprice column. 2. Scan and filter data in it's compressed format When data is populated into the IM column it is automatically compressed using a new set of compression algorithms that allow WHERE clause predicates to be applied against the compressed formats. This means the volume of data scanned in the IM column store for our query will be far less than the same query in the buffer cache where it will scan the data in its uncompressed form, which could be 20X larger. 3. Prune out any unnecessary data within each column The fastest read you can execute is the read you don’t do. In the IM column store a further reduction in the amount of data accessed is possible due to the In-Memory Storage Indexes(IM storage indexes) that are automatically created and maintained on each of the columns in the IM column store. IM storage indexes allow data pruning to occur based on the filter predicates supplied in a SQL statement. An IM storage index keeps track of minimum and maximum values for each column in each of the In-Memory Compression Unit (IMCU). In our query the WHERE clause predicate is on the lo_shipmode column. The IM storage index on the lo_shipdate column is examined to determine if our specified column value 5 exist in any IMCU by comparing the value 5 to the minimum and maximum values maintained in the Storage Index. If the value 5 is outside the minimum and maximum range for an IMCU, the scan of that IMCU is avoided. For the IMCUs where the value 5 does fall within the min, max range, an additional level of data pruning is possible via the metadata dictionary created when dictionary-based compression is used on IMCU. The dictionary contains a list of the unique column values within the IMCU. Since we have an equality predicate we can easily determine if 5 is one of the distinct column values or not. The combination of the IM storage index and dictionary based pruning, enables us to only scan the necessary IMCUs. 4. Use SIMD to apply filter predicates For the IMCU that need to be scanned Oracle takes advantage of SIMD vector processing (Single Instruction processing Multiple Data values). Instead of evaluating each entry in the column one at a time, SIMD vector processing allows a set of column values to be evaluated together in a single CPU instruction. The column format used in the IM column store has been specifically designed to maximize the number of column entries that can be loaded into the vector registers on the CPU and evaluated in a single CPU instruction. SIMD vector processing enables the Oracle Database In-Memory to scan billion of rows per second per core versus the millions of rows per second per core scan rate that can be achieved in the buffer cache. I mentioned earlier in this post that in order to confirm the IM column store was used; we need to examine the session level statistics. You can monitor the session level statistics by querying the performance views v$mystat and v$statname. All of the statistics related to the In-Memory Column Store begin with IM. You can see the full list of these statistics by typing: display_name format a30 SELECT display_name FROM v$statname WHERE  display_name LIKE 'IM%'; If we check the session statistics after we execute our query the results would be as follow; SELECT Max(lo_ordtotalprice) most_expensive_order FROM lineorderWHERE lo_shipmode = 5; SELECT display_name FROM v$statname WHERE  display_name IN ('IM scan CUs columns accessed',                        'IM scan segments minmax eligible',                        'IM scan CUs pruned'); As you can see, only 2 IMCUs were accessed during the scan as the majority of the IMCUs (44) in the LINEORDER table were pruned out thanks to the storage index on the lo_shipmode column. In next weeks post I will describe how you can control which queries use the IM column store and which don't. +Maria Colgan

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  • Bitmap Effects In WPF - Part III

    In previous article we saw remaining three effects DropShadow, Bevel and Emboss. In this article we will see how to group effects, and we will see how we can achieve the effects with triggers.

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  • SCOM, 90 days in, III. Stuff to Add

    - by merrillaldrich
    This is the third installment of a series on our deployment of System Center at my workplace, emphasis on SQL Server MP. At this point we’ve got Operations Manager installed, and up and running, and we’ve been able to categorize all the monitored servers into production, preproduction, test and DR using groups that have dynamic membership rules. We’ve got the SQL management pack working with out-of-the-box settings, and used it to locate all the SQL Server stack services like the engine, reporting...(read more)

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  • PASS Summit 2011 &ndash; Part III

    - by Tara Kizer
    Well we’re about a month past PASS Summit 2011, and yet I haven’t finished blogging my notes! Between work and home life, I haven’t been able to come up for air in a bit.  Now on to my notes… On Thursday of the PASS Summit 2011, I attended Klaus Aschenbrenner’s (blog|twitter) “Advanced SQL Server 2008 Troubleshooting”, Joe Webb’s (blog|twitter) “SQL Server Locking & Blocking Made Simple”, Kalen Delaney’s (blog|twitter) “What Happened? Exploring the Plan Cache”, and Paul Randal’s (blog|twitter) “More DBA Mythbusters”.  I think my head grew two times in size from the Thursday sessions.  Just WOW! I took a ton of notes in Klaus' session.  He took a deep dive into how to troubleshoot performance problems.  Here is how he goes about solving a performance problem: Start by checking the wait stats DMV System health Memory issues I/O issues I normally start with blocking and then hit the wait stats.  Here’s the wait stat query (Paul Randal’s) that I use when working on a performance problem.  He highlighted a few waits to be aware of such as WRITELOG (indicates IO subsystem problem), SOS_SCHEDULER_YIELD (indicates CPU problem), and PAGEIOLATCH_XX (indicates an IO subsystem problem or a buffer pool problem).  Regarding memory issues, Klaus recommended that as a bare minimum, one should set the “max server memory (MB)” in sp_configure to 2GB or 10% reserved for the OS (whichever comes first).  This is just a starting point though! Regarding I/O issues, Klaus talked about disk partition alignment, which can improve SQL I/O performance by up to 100%.  You should use 64kb for NTFS cluster, and it’s automatic in Windows 2008 R2. Joe’s locking and blocking presentation was a good session to really clear up the fog in my mind about locking.  One takeaway that I had no idea could be done was that you can set a timeout in T-SQL code view LOCK_TIMEOUT.  If you do this via the application, you should trap error 1222. Kalen’s session went into execution plans.  The minimum size of a plan is 24k.  This adds up fast especially if you have a lot of plans that don’t get reused much.  You can use sys.dm_exec_cached_plans to check how often a plan is being reused by checking the usecounts column.  She said that we can use DBCC FLUSHPROCINDB to clear out the stored procedure cache for a specific database.  I didn’t know we had this available, so this was great to hear.  This will be less intrusive when an emergency comes up where I’ve needed to run DBCC FREEPROCCACHE. Kalen said one should enable “optimize for ad hoc workloads” if you have an adhoc loc.  This stores only a 300-byte stub of the first plan, and if it gets run again, it’ll store the whole thing.  This helps with plan cache bloat.  I have a lot of systems that use prepared statements, and Kalen says we simulate those calls by using sp_executesql.  Cool! Paul did a series of posts last year to debunk various myths and misconceptions around SQL Server.  He continues to debunk things via “DBA Mythbusters”.  You can get a PDF of a bunch of these here.  One of the myths he went over is the number of tempdb data files that you should have.  Back in 2000, the recommendation was to have as many tempdb data files as there are CPU cores on your server.  This no longer holds true due to the numerous cores we have on our servers.  Paul says you should start out with 1/4 to 1/2 the number of cores and work your way up from there.  BUT!  Paul likes what Bob Ward (twitter) says on this topic: 8 or less cores –> set number of files equal to the number of cores Greater than 8 cores –> start with 8 files and increase in blocks of 4 One common myth out there is to set your MAXDOP to 1 for an OLTP workload with high CXPACKET waits.  Instead of that, dig deeper first.  Look for missing indexes, out-of-date statistics, increase the “cost threshold for parallelism” setting, and perhaps set MAXDOP at the query level.  Paul stressed that you should not plan a backup strategy but instead plan a restore strategy.  What are your recoverability requirements?  Once you know that, now plan out your backups. As Paul always does, he talked about DBCC CHECKDB.  He said how fabulous it is.  I didn’t want to interrupt the presentation, so after his session had ended, I asked Paul about the need to run DBCC CHECKDB on your mirror systems.  You could have data corruption occur at the mirror and not at the principal server.  If you aren’t checking for data corruption on your mirror systems, you could be failing over to a corrupt database in the case of a disaster or even a planned failover.  You can’t run DBCC CHECKDB against the mirrored database, but you can run it against a snapshot off the mirrored database.

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