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  • Why does my domain not show up in Google anymore?

    - by Earlz
    So I have had a website since about 2006. It's http://earlz.biz.tm . Recently I've noticed that no results will show up for it in google. I do have a secondary domain(that I plan on getting rid of) pointing to it but I don't understand why google would suddenly not show my site. I believe it was showing up a few months ago and my website is hardly ever down, like one or two days I believe has been the most it's been down in a row in this time period. Is there something wrong with my DNS or other configuration that would make google not index me? For reference I've tried: earlz.biz.tm site:earlz.biz.tm and the heading from my site "Earlz.biz.tm -- The reasoning is bacon" A few show up with the therusticstone.com domain(the one I plan to point somewhere else) but none show up directly linking to earlz.biz.tm.

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  • TightVNC and Vista yields "VNC server closed connection"

    - by Earlz
    I have forwarded the port 5900 for TightVNC. I have TightVNC 2.0 Beta4 installed on my Windows Vista machine. I then try to connect from an Arch Linux box: [[email protected] ~]$ vncviewer somehost::5900 Connected to RFB server, using protocol version 3.8 Performing standard VNC authentication Password: Authentication successful vncviewer: VNC server closed connection [[email protected] ~]$ vncviewer --help TightVNC Viewer version 1.3.10 What is wrong here? I thought that TightVNC 2.0 fixed the Vista bug with VNC servers? Is there any additional configuration I needed?

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  • SQL Server Trouble with Rails

    - by Earlz
    Ok, I've been trying to get this to work like all day now and I'm barely any further from when I started. I'm trying to get Ruby On Rails to connect to SQL Server. I've installed unixODBC and configured it and FreeTDS and installed just about every Ruby gem relating to ODBC that exists. [[email protected] myproject]$ tsql -S AVP1 -U sa -P pass locale is "en_US.UTF-8" locale charset is "UTF-8" 1> quit [[email protected] myproject]$ isql AVP1 sa pass [ISQL]ERROR: Could not SQLConnect [[email protected] myproject]$ rake db:version (in /home/earlz/myproject) rake aborted! IM002 (0) [unixODBC][Driver Manager]Data source name not found, and no default driver specified (See full trace by running task with --trace) so, as you can see, tsql works, but not isql. What is the difference in the two that breaks it? /etc/odbc.ini [AVP1] Description = ODBC connection via FreeTDS Driver = TDS Servername = my.server UID = sa PWD = pass port = 1232 Database = mydatabase /etc/odbcinst.ini [TDS] Description = v0.6 with protocol v7.0 Driver = /usr/lib/libtdsodbc.so Setup = /usr/lib/libtdsS.so CPTimeout = CPReuse = FileUsage = 1 (and yes, I've made sure that the .so files exist) the relevant part in freetds.conf [AVP1] host = my.server port = 1232 tds version = 8.0 and finally, my database.yml development: adapter: sqlserver mode: odbc dsn: AVP1 username: sa password: pass Can anyone please help me before I pull all my hair out? I am using a 64 bit Arch Linux that is completely up to date.

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  • sqrt(int_value + 0.0) -- Does it have a purpose?

    - by Earlz
    Hello, while doing some homework in my very strange C++ book, which I've been told before to throw away, had a very peculiar code segment. I know homework stuff always throws in extra "mystery" to try to confuse you like indenting 2 lines after a single-statement for-loop. But this one I'm confused on because it seems to serve some real-purpose. basically it is like this: int counter=10; ... if(pow(floor(sqrt(counter+0.0)),2) == counter) ... I'm interested in this part especially: sqrt(counter+0.0) Is there some purpose to the +0.0? Is this the poormans way of doing a static cast to a double? Does this avoid some compiler warning on some compiler I do not use? The entire program printed the exact same thing and compiled without warnings on g++ whenever I left out the +0.0 part. Maybe I'm not using a weird enough compiler? Edit: Also, does gcc just break standard and not make an error for Ambiguous reference since sqrt can take 3 different types of parameters? [[email protected]~/projects/homework1] $ cat calc.cpp #include <cmath> int main(){ int counter=0; sqrt(counter); } [[email protected]~/projects/homework1] $ g++ calc.cpp /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.47.0: warning: strcpy() is almost always misused, please use strlcpy() /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.47.0: warning: strcat() is almost always misused, please use strlcat() [[email protected]~/projects/homework1] $

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  • Communicate with the local machine from a web page

    - by Earlz
    Hello. We have a web application. There are physical devices that we need to be able to communicate with, and we have access to all of our clients computers to install whatever software we need. Now, for the question: Is there a way to make this browser-agnostic? As in, not requiring ActiveX controls? One of my ideas was to install a custom made webserver on each client and then have javascript on our webpage that communicates with that webserver. This could be done by the same way that http://earlz.biz.tm javascript can access subdomains assigned to 127.0.0.1 such as http://loopback.earlz.biz.tm The problem with this of course is that the client's custom made webserver would be forced to run on port 80(which will have conflicts at least sometimes), or we would have to use a nonstandard port for our web application, which is quite undesirable. Does anyone else have ideas on how to do this?

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  • How to get a project's directory from within T4?

    - by Earlz
    I've been messing around with T4 support in Mono and noticed a very cumbersome thing. The current directory when running T4 templates is the home directory. I need to be able to read a few files from the current project's directory but I'm at a loss for how to. <#@ template language="C#v3.5" #> <#@ output extension="txt" #> <#=System.IO.Directory.GetCurrentDirectory() #> yields /home/earlz where I want it to yield something like /home/earlz/MyProject How do I overcome this problem? Also, I tried the hostspecific and Host.ResolvePath, but I got a NotImplementedException

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  • Ruby on Rails Foreigner plugin not working for SQL Server

    - by Earlz
    Well, now that I've finally got my stupid ODBC stuff configured, I took a schema.rb file that I dumped from a Postgres database and did a db:schema:load on it in a Rails project configured for SQL Server. Well, it sets up all the schema in the SQL Server database except for a minor detail: No foreign keys are created. The rake command doesn't show any errors and does say it is adding foreign keys. But they don't actually get added. This is the last bit from the command: -- add_foreign_key("workhistoryform", "form", {:name=>"workhistoryform_form_rid_fkey", :column=>"form_rid", :primary_key=>"form_rid"}) -> 0.0002s -- initialize_schema_migrations_table() -> 0.0092s -- assume_migrated_upto_version(0) -> 0.0942s [[email protected] avp_msql_migrations]$ So what is the problem? Does the Foreigner plugin not work in SQL Server? If it didn't I'd expect to see an error or something...

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  • Would a programmer knowing C# and VB.Net ever choose VB.Net?

    - by Earlz
    Now before someone tells me VB.Net isn't bad like VB was, I know it isn't. But, I've yet to speak to a programmer who is completely content that some project they work on is written in VB.Net. Basically, my question is would a programmer knowing both C# and VB.Net (and all of their team knowing both), would they ever choose VB.Net? And why? All of the VB.Net projects I've seen were written that way only because the programmer that started it(that usually isn't working there anymore) knew VB6(or earlier) and wrote it in VB.Net because of the similar syntax. Is there any advantage to writing a program in VB.Net compared to C#? (hopefully this is appropriate here, SO rejected it within a few minutes)

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  • Why did object-oriented paradigms take so long to go mainstream?

    - by Earlz
    I read this question and it got me thinking about another fairly recent thing. Object oriented languages. I'm not sure when the first one was created, but why did it take so long before they became mainstream? C became vastly popular, but didn't become the object-oriented C++ for years(decades?) later No mainstream language before the 90s was object oriented Object oriented really seemed to take off with Java and C++ around the same time Now, my question, why did this take so long? Why wasn't C originally conceived as an object-oriented language? Taking a very small subset of C++ wouldn't have affected the core language a whole lot, so why was this idea not popular until the 90s?

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  • What should be done with class names that conflict (common) framework names

    - by Earlz
    What should be done exactly when the most obvious class name for a component is taken by a framework? In my case, I need to make a class that describes an HTTP request. Of course, the most common name is "taken" as System.Web.HttpRequest. What should I do? This project will be used in a web context, so I'd really rather not force people to not import the System.Web namespace, or type out all of my class names manually. What is the usual way of dealing with this? I can come up with this: Prefix class name with a project shortname Try to come up with a different name that means the same thing(I've tried and can't come up with anything) Force users to choose between namespaces

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  • What are some small, but extendable game ideas to use for inspiration?

    - by Earlz
    I recently came across the game Dopewars(or more generically, Drugwars). Now this is an extremely simple game to implement. A trivial basic implementation could be done in a couple of days, at the most. And it's extremely extendable. Now, my question is what other games are out there that follow this same kind of "difficulty level" for implementation? A game that is actually entertaining, yet trivial to implement, and can easily be extended?

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  • What all items can I put on my resume without it looking tacky? [closed]

    - by Earlz
    I've been searching for work, and so far it's very hard for me to even get a call back. So, I'm looking at adding things to my resume. I know a resume doesn't need to be over 2 pages. I have the basics: Objective/personal info General skills (languages known, etc) Work experience Some things I'm considering adding to it: My college education (though I don't have a degree) Awards given for programming skills in high school (curriculum contests and AP test scores) Open source projects? Would any of these 3 items look tacky? And I only have about 1.5 years of work experience, but I've been programming since I was 13. Is there anything else I can add to my resume that would give me a better chance of getting my foot in the door?

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  • How can I prevent HTTPS on another domain from wrongly showing on my HTTP-only domain?

    - by Earlz
    So, I have a blog at domain.com. This blog is HTTP-only because I would gain almost nothing from adding SSL support. I have a web service now that I want to enable SSL support on that runs on the same server and IP address as my blog. I got it all working pretty easily, but not if I go to https://domain.com I will see a huge warning about an SSL certificate error and then if I click "ok" through the warning, I'll see the web service with SSL support, not my blog. My biggest fear with this scheme is Google indexing an HTTPS version of it and penalizing my blog because the content between the two doesn't match. How can I somehow for my blog's domain to either not serve anything on HTTPS, or to redirect back to my HTTP blog, or to serve my blog, but with an invalid SSL certificate? What can I do, preferably without buying another dedicated IP for my website?

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  • Static classes and/or singletons -- How many does it take to become a code smell?

    - by Earlz
    In my projects I use quite a lot of static classes. These are usually classes that naturally seem to fit into a single-instance type of thing. Many times I use static classes and recently I've started using some singletons. How many of these does it take to become a code smell? For instance, in my recent project which has a lot of static classes is an Authentication library for ASP.Net. I use a static class for a helper class that fixes ASP.Net error codes so it can be used like CustomErrorsFixer.Fix(Context); Or my authentication class itself is a static class //in global.asax's begin_application Authentication.SomeState="blah"; Authentication.SomeOption=true; //etc //in global.asax's begin_request Authentication.Authenticate(); When are static or singleton classes bad to use? Am I doing it wrong, or am I just in a project that by definition has very little per-instance state associated with it? The only per-instance state I have is stored in HttpContext.Current.Items like so: /// <summary> /// The current user logged in for the HTTP request. If there is not a user logged in, this will be null. /// </summary> public static UserData CurrentUser{ get{ return HttpContext.Current.Items["fscauth_currentuser"] as UserData; //use HttpContext.Current as a little place to persist static data for this request } private set{ HttpContext.Current.Items["fscauth_currentuser"]=value; } }

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  • Which algorithms/data structures should I "recognize" and know by name?

    - by Earlz
    I'd like to consider myself a fairly experienced programmer. I've been programming for over 5 years now. My weak point though is terminology. I'm self-taught, so while I know how to program, I don't know some of the more formal aspects of computer science. So, what are practical algorithms/data structures that I could recognize and know by name? Note, I'm not asking for a book recommendation about implementing algorithms. I don't care about implementing them, I just want to be able to recognize when an algorithm/data structure would be a good solution to a problem. I'm asking more for a list of algorithms/data structures that I should "recognize". For instance, I know the solution to a problem like this: You manage a set of lockers labeled 0-999. People come to you to rent the locker and then come back to return the locker key. How would you build a piece of software to manage knowing which lockers are free and which are in used? The solution, would be a queue or stack. What I'm looking for are things like "in what situation should a B-Tree be used -- What search algorithm should be used here" etc. And maybe a quick introduction of how the more complex(but commonly used) data structures/algorithms work. I tried looking at Wikipedia's list of data structures and algorithms but I think that's a bit overkill. So I'm looking more for what are the essential things I should recognize?

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  • Question about the no-endorsment clause on the BSD license

    - by Earlz
    I'm developing a non-free library and I want to use Bcrypt.Net in it. The clause in question: Neither the name of BCrypt.Net nor the names of its contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific prior written permission. To what extent does this mean I can't use the name of Bcrypt.Net? For instance, could I say "the only ASP.Net authentication library capable of using Bcrypt" or can I even include "supports Bcrypt for password hashing" in promotional materials? Note: I do not actually modify any of Bcrypt.Net's code

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  • How should I manage "reverting" a branch done with bookmarks in mercurial?

    - by Earlz
    I have an open source project on bitbucket. Recently, I've been working on an experimental branch which I (for whatever reason) didn't make an actual branch for. Instead what I did was use bookmarks. So I made two bookmarks at the same revision test --the new code I worked on that should now be abandoned(due to an experiment failure) main -- the stable old code that works I worked in test. I also pushed from test to my server, which ended up switching the tip tag to the new unstable code, when I really would've rather it stayed at main. I "switched" back to the main bookmark by doing a hg update main and then committing an insignificant change. So, I pushed this with hg push -f and now my source control is "correct" on the server. I know that there should be a cleaner way to "switch" branches. What should I do in the future for this kind of operation?

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  • A good interpreted language for a small embedded project

    - by Earlz
    I have an mbed which has a small ARM Cortex M3 on it. Basically, my effective resources for the project are ~25Kb of RAM and ~400Kb of Flash. For I/O I'll have a PS/2 keyboard, a VGA framebuffer(with character output), and an SD card for saving/loading programs(up to a couple of Mb maybe) The reason I ask this here is because I'm trying to figure out what programming language to implement on the thing. I'm looking for an interpreted language that's easy for me to implement, and won't break the bank on my resources. I also intend for this to be at least possible to write on th device itself, though the editor can be interpreted(yay bootstrapping) Anyway, I've looked at a few simple languages. Some nice candidates: Forth BASIC Scheme? Has anyone done something like this or know of any languages that can fit this bill or have comments about my three candidates so far?

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  • Where should I draw the line between unit tests and integration tests? Should they be separate?

    - by Earlz
    I have a small MVC framework I've been working on. It's code base definitely isn't big, but it's not longer just a couple of classes. I finally decided to take the plunge and start writing tests for it(yes, I know I should've been doing that all along, but it's API was super unstable up until now) Anyway, my plan is to make it extremely easy to test, including integration tests. An example integration test would go something along these lines: Fake HTTP request object - MVC framework - HTTP response object - check the response is correct Because this is all doable without any state or special tools(browser automation etc), I could actually do this with ease with regular unit test frameworks(I use NUnit). Now the big question. Where exactly should I draw the line between unit tests and integration tests? Should I only test one class at a time(as much as possible) with unit tests? Also, should integration tests be placed in the same testing project as my unit testing project?

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  • Does it ever make sense to license source code as a learning resource under GPL?

    - by Earlz
    I recently came across a series of articles walking through how to make a scheme interpreter. I was browsing through the code when I realized that it was AGPL. For the most part, the code itself is the teaching tool. Basically, the code as-is is what I need, however, I did want to understand how it all fits together as well. I realized though that if I copy and paste a single line of code, my project would become AGPL. Possibly by even more trivial actions? Anyway, is this a standard practice at all? Am I just being over-paranoid? Also, what benefits are there to this licensing scheme?

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  • What is the best way to go about testing that we handle failures appropriately?

    - by Earlz
    we're working on error handling in an application. We try to have fairly good automated test coverage. One big problem though is that we don't really know of a way to test some of our error handling. For instance, we need to test that whenever there is an uncaught exception, a message is sent to our server with exception information. The big problem with this is that we strive to never have an uncaught exception(and instead have descriptive error messages). So, how do we test something what we never want to actually happen?

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  • Is using something other than XML advisable for my configuration file?

    - by Earlz
    I have a small tool I'm designing which would require a configuration file of some sort. The configuration file in my case is really more of a database, but it needs to be lightweight, and if needed the end-user should find it easily editable. However, it also will contain a lot of things in it. (depending on certain factors, could be 1Mb or more) I've decided I'd rather use plain ol' text, rather than trying to use SQLite or some such. However, with using text, I also have to deal with the variety of formats. So far, my options are XML JSON Custom format The data in my file is quite simple consisting for the most part of key-value type things. So, a custom format wouldn't be that difficult... but I'd rather not have to worry about writing the support for it. I've never seen JSON used for configuration files. And XML would bloat the file size substantially I think. (I also just has a dislike of XML in general). What should I do in this case? Factors to consider: This configuration file can be uploaded to a web service(so size matters) Users must be able to edit it by hand if necessary(ease of editing and reading matters) Must be able to generate and process automatically (speed doesn't matter a lot, but not excessively slow) The "keys" and "values" are plain strings, but must be escaped because they can contain anything. (unicode and escaping has to work easily)

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  • What reasons are there for not using a third party version control service?

    - by Earlz
    I've recently noticed a bit of a trend for my projects as of late. I use to run my own SVN server on my VPS, but recently the nail went in the coffin for that when I got my last project migrated from my server to a Mercurial repo on Bitbucket. What are some of the ramifications to this? (disregarding the change in version control systems) It seems like there has been a huge explosion in version control hosting, and companies like Bitbucket even offer private repos for free, and Github and other such services are extremely cheap now. Also, by using them you get the benefit of their infrastructure's speed and stability. What reasons are there these days to host your own version control? The only real reason I can think of is if your source code is super top secret.

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  • Should I implement slugs with my already fairly long URLs?

    - by Earlz
    I'm considering implementing slugs in my blog. My blog uses MongoDB. One of the side-effects of using MongoDB is that it uses relatively long hex string IDs. Example before: http://lastyearswishes.com/blog/view/5070f025d1f1a5760fdfafac after: http://lastyearswishes.com/blog/view/5070f025d1f1a5760fdfafac/improvements-on-barelymvc Of course, that's a relatively short title.. I have some longer ones, but intend to limit the maximum character limit for slugs to something reasonable. At what point does a URL become so long that it hurts SEO instead of improves it? In this case, should I leave my URLs alone, or add slugs?

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  • Best thing to do about projects supporting multiple versions of Visual Studio?

    - by Earlz
    I have an open source project that works on .Net 2.0 and up. The thing is though that I prefer to use Visual Studio 2012, which forces the solution and project files to only work with VS2010/2012. What exactly should I do? I don't want for my users to have to create a solution from scratch if they don't have access to VS2010, but yet, I also don't want to attempt to keep 3 different project files in sync(VS2005, VS2008, and VS2010/2012) What is the usual solution for this?

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