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  • NDC 2010: Eric Evans -What I learned since the book

    This was one of the most rewarding sessions for me. Eric Evans explained what he picked up and learned since he wrote the book, what parts that he realized was more important that he initially thought and what parts had been missing. A missing building block: Domain Events [...]...Did you know that DotNetSlackers also publishes .net articles written by top known .net Authors? We already have over 80 articles in several categories including Silverlight. Take a look: here.

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  • [Livre]:Chaînes d'exploits: Scénarios de hacking avancé et prévention, de A.Whitaker, K.Evans, J.Vot

    Bonjour La rédaction de DVP a lu pour vous l'ouvrage suivant: Chaînes d'exploits: Scénarios de hacking avancé et prévention de Andrew Whitaker, Keatron Evans, Jack Voth paru aux Editions PEARSON [IMG]http://images-eu.amazon.com/images/P/274402371X.08.LZZZZZZZ.jpg[/IMG] Citation: Un pirate informatique s'appuie rarement sur une unique attaque, mais utilise plutôt des chaînes d'exploits, qui impliquent plusie...

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  • NDC 2010: Eric Evans Folding together DDD into Agile

    One of the most puzzling emails Eric have received was one claiming that his book really proved that up front design was important. In large this is a miss conception on how modeling happens. A tremendous amount of knowledge comes from actually implementing the software. You have the most insight at the end of the [...]...Did you know that DotNetSlackers also publishes .net articles written by top known .net Authors? We already have over 80 articles in several categories including Silverlight. Take a look: here.

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  • NDC 2010: Eric Evans Folding together DDD into Agile

    One of the most puzzling emails Eric have received was one claiming that his book really proved that up front design was important. In large this is a miss conception on how modeling happens. A tremendous amount of knowledge comes from actually implementing the software. You have the most insight at the end of the [...]...Did you know that DotNetSlackers also publishes .net articles written by top known .net Authors? We already have over 80 articles in several categories including Silverlight. Take a look: here.

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  • Java Spotlight Episode 57: Live From #Devoxx - Ben Evans and Martijn Verburg of the London JUG with Yara Senger of SouJava

    - by Roger Brinkley
    Tweet Live from Devoxx 11,  an interview with Ben Evans and Martijn Verburg from the London JUG along with  Yara Senger from the SouJava JUG on the JCP Executive Committee Elections, JSR 248, and Adopt-a-JSR program. Both the London JUG and SouJava JUG are JCP Standard Edition Executive Committee Members. Joining us this week on the Java All Star Developer Panel are Geertjan Wielenga, Principal Product Manger in Oracle Developer Tools; Stephen Chin, Java Champion and Java FX expert; and Antonio Goncalves, Paris JUG leader. Right-click or Control-click to download this MP3 file. You can also subscribe to the Java Spotlight Podcast Feed to get the latest podcast automatically. If you use iTunes you can open iTunes and subscribe with this link: Java Spotlight Podcast in iTunes. Show Notes News Netbeans 7.1 JDK 7 upgrade tools Netbeans First Patch Program OpenJFX approved as an OpenJDK project Devoxx France April 18-20, 2012 Events Nov 22-25, OTN Developer Days in the Nordics Nov 22-23, Goto Conference, Prague Dec 6-8, Java One Brazil, Sao Paulo Feature interview Ben Evans has lived in "Interesting Times" in technology - he was the lead performance testing engineer for the Google IPO, worked on the initial UK trials of 3G networks with BT, built award-winning websites for some of Hollywood's biggest hits of the 90s, rearchitected and reimagined technology helping some of the most vulnerable people in the UK and has worked on everything from some of the UKs very first ecommerce sites, through to multi-billion dollar currency trading systems. He helps to run the London Java Community, and represents the JUG on the Java SE/EE Executive Committee. His first book "The Well-Grounded Java Developer" (with Martijn Verburg) has just been published by Manning. Martijn Verburg (aka 'the Diabolical Developer') herds Cats in the Java/open source communities and is constantly humbled by the creative power to be found there. Currently he resides in London where he co-leads the London JUG (a JCP EC member), runs a couple of open source projects & drinks too much beer at his local pub. You can find him online moderating at the Javaranch or discussing (ranting?) subjects on the Prgorammers Stack Exchange site. Most recently he's become a regular speaker at conferences on Java, open source and software development and has recently wrapped up his first Manning title - "The Well-Grounded Java Developer" with his co-author Ben Evans. Yara Senger is the partner and director of teacher education and Globalcode, graduated from the University of Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos, has significant experience in Brazil and abroad in developing solutions to critical Java. She is the co-creator of Java programs Academy and Academy of Web Developer, accumulating over 1000 hours in the classroom teaching Java. She currently serves as the President of Sou Java. In this interview Ben, Martijn, and Yara talk about the JCP Executive Committee Elections, JSR 348, and the Adopt-a-JSR program. Mail Bag What's Cool Show Transcripts Transcript for this show is available here when available.

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  • Learn Domain-Driven Design

    - by Ben Griswold
    I just wrote about how I like to present on unfamiliar topics. With this said, Domain-Driven Design (DDD) is no exception. This is yet another area I knew enough about to be dangerous but I certainly was no expert.  As it turns out, researching this topic wasn’t easy. I could be wrong, but it is as if DDD is a secret to which few are privy. If you search the Interwebs, you will likely find little information about DDD until you start rolling over rocks to find that one great write-up, a handful of podcasts and videos and the Readers’ Digest version of the Blue Book which apparently you must read if you really want to get the complete, unabridged skinny on DDD.  Even Wikipedia’s write-up is skimpy which I didn’t know was possible…   Here’s a list of valuable resources.  If you, too, are interested in DDD, this is a good starting place.  Domain-Driven Design: Tackling Complexity in the Heart of Software by Eric Evans Domain-Driven Design Quickly, by Abel Avram & Floyd Marinescu An Introduction to Domain-Driven Design by David Laribee Talking Domain-Driven Design with David Laribee Part 1, Deep Fried Bytes Talking Domain-Driven Design with David Laribee Part 2, Deep Fried Bytes Eric Evans on Domain Driven Design, .NET Rocks Domain-Driven Design Community Eric Evans on Domain Driven Design Jimmy Nilsson on Domain Driven Design Domain-Driven Design Wikipedia What I’ve Learned About DDD Since the Book, Eric Evans Domain Driven Design, Alt.Net Podcast Applying Domain-Driven Design and Patterns: With Examples in C# and .NET, Jimmy Nilsson Domain-Driven Design Discussion Group DDD: Putting the Model to Work by Eric Evans The Official DDD Site

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  • What issues tend to arise when working with HL7 messages?

    - by Ethel Evans
    I'm testing a product for health care businesses, and we're working with HL7 messages. I saw people groaning on another question about the issues with HL7 but not mentioning specifics. Can someone give me some ideas of what issues or classes of problems we should specifically be looking for? We are using some well-used libraries for the parsing. If specifics about these or what we're doing would be helpful please let me know in the comments and I'll add to the question if I can.

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  • How to set up an informational interview?

    - by Ethel Evans
    I've heard a lot about informational interviews, but don't have the slightest idea how to actually set one up or run one effectively. I work as an SDET (SDE in Test) in an area with lots of great technical companies, and would like to have a better understanding of how different companies do testing. I have three sub-questions: Who would I get in contact with to set up informational interviews at a company that I'd like to learn about? How can I make sure the time is productive? And, how do I keep the interview from being a burden to the employee(s) whom I speak with?

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  • How to share code as open source?

    - by Ethel Evans
    I have a little program that I wrote for a local group to handle a somewhat complicated scheduling issue for scheduling multiple meetings in multiple locations that change weekly according to certain criteria. It's a niche need, but I wouldn't be surprised if there are other groups that could use software like this. In fact, we've had requests from others for directions on starting a group like this, and if their groups get as big, they might also want special software to help with scheduling. I plan to continue developing the program and eventually make it an online web app, but a very simple alpha version is completed as a console app. I'd like to make it available as open source, but I have no idea what kind of process I should go through first. Right now, all I have is Java code, not even unit-tested thoroughly. I haven't shown the code to anyone else. There is no documentation. I don't know where I would put the code so others could access it. I don't know anything about licensing it. I don't know what kind of support people will expect from me if I release it as open source. I have no idea what else I should worry about. Can someone outline for me (or post an article(s) that outlines) the process of taking open source software from "coded" to "completed / available"? I really don't want to embarrass myself by doing things weirdly.

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  • Java web UI framework like ASP.NET MVC?

    - by Ethel Evans
    I'm doing some web apps for personal projects that might be shared out with my friends. I'm trying to use skills that will help me at work, but don't have $$ to spend on Visual Studio right now and don't want to try to cobble something together with Express Editions. Since I've been sort of wanting to bring my Java skills up to date and the main skills I want to work on are design and architecture skills, this isn't a big deal - except that I have no idea how to track down the right UI framework. I know I want something based on MVC, to get more practice with frameworks for that design pattern (we're using ASP .NET MVC2 at work). The UIs that I'll be making will be pretty simple - data entry, buttons, text, images. They will need AJAX. Any thoughts about which frameworks to look at? I'll be watching the comments, if anyone wants additional clarification on what I'm looking for.

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  • What have you learned from the bugs you helped discover and fix?

    - by Ethel Evans
    I liked the core of this question, and wanted to re-ask it in a way that made it less about 'fun' and more about 'What do these past mistakes tell us about how we can write and test software better?' As an SDET, I'm always looking for anecdotes about new and interesting ways that programs can fail. I've learned a lot from these tales in the past, and would like to get that from the intelligent people in this community as well. I'd be interested in hearing what the issue was, how it was caught, if you think there was anything that could have reasonably done to catch it earlier or to avoid the same issue on later projects, and any other interesting lessons you took away from this bug. Please only write about bugs you personally were involved with, ideally on a project you worked on (e.g., no "10 years before I was born, this happened and it was FUNNY!" answers). Please vote up answers that are thought-provoking or could change how you develop or test in some way, so this isn't just 'social fun'. Try to avoid voting up something just because it was funny.

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  • Is there any research out there on geographic differences in work environments (e.g., respect) for programmers?

    - by Ethel Evans
    One thing I've learned from this website is that software developers are not treated the same as what I've seen in the companies I've worked at, and some of the differences seem to be related to the culture or other factors of the geographical location where the programmer works. In some areas, it seems like programmers can expect many perks and a great deal of professional respect, but in others it sounds like programmers are seen as laborers who are told what to do and then should go do it without question. Even in just the USA, there seem to be major differences in "the norm" between the various regions of this country. I'm wondering how much of this is just my perception, and how much is real differences about how programmers are perceived in their different locations. Is there any research out there discussing major differences in programmer work environments or attitudes about how to treat or respect programmers by geography? I'd be interested in multiple articles tackling different ways of looking at this. Edit: Research, specifically, doesn't seem to be available, so I'm making the question broader. Any good, thoughtful writing on the topic of any kind available?

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  • Can you recommend a good test plan template?

    - by Ethel Evans
    Can you recommend a good test plan template for an agile testing team? I know there are templates for testing on the web and have already looked at some found by search engines, but I could really use something lightweight and something that has already been tried by skilled testers and is known to work well. Many templates I've seen give me the feeling that writing test documents is expected to be a third of the work that those testers are doing, but my team really prefers to use less documentation and more actual test writing. We use a wiki for documentation, so an approach that lends itself to living documents would be great. My hope is that using a more structured approach to test planning will increase the usefulness of my test plan while reducing the effort to create it by allowing me to think about the tests, and not the format and structure of the plan. My workplace does not have something already on hand, so whatever I start doing might be adopted by the company.

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  • Refactoring in domain driven design

    - by Andrew Whitaker
    I've just started working on a project and we're using domain-driven design (as defined by Eric Evans in Domain-Driven Design: Tackling Complexity in the Heart of Software. I believe that our project is certainly a candidate for this design pattern as Evans describes it in his book. I'm struggling with the idea of constantly refactoring. I know refactoring is a necessity in any project and will happen inevitably as the software changes. However, in my experience, refactoring occurs when the needs of the development team change, not as understanding of the domain changes ("refactoring to greater insight" as Evans calls it). I'm most concerned with breakthroughs in understanding of the domain model. I understand making small changes, but what if a large change in the model is necessary? What's an effective way of convincing yourself (and others) you should refactor after you obtain a clearer domain model? After all, refactoring to improve code organization or performance could be completely separate from how expressive in terms of the ubiquitous language code is. Sometimes it just seems like there's not enough time to refactor. Luckily, SCRUM lends it self to refactoring. The iterative nature of SCRUM makes it easy to build a small piece and change and it. But over time that piece will get larger and what if you have a breakthrough after that piece is so large that it will be too difficult to change? Has anyone worked on a project employing domain-driven design? If so, it would be great to get some insight on this one. I'd especially like to hear some success stories, since DDD seems very difficult to get right. Thanks!

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  • DDD and Value Objects. Are mutable Value Objects a good candidate for Non Aggr. Root Entity?

    - by Tony
    Here is a little problem Have an entity, with a value object. Not a problem. I replace a value object for a new one, then nhibernate inserts the new value and orphan the old one, then deletes it. Ok, that's a problem. Insured is my entity in my domain. He has a collection of Addresses (value objects). One of the addresses is the MailingAddress. When we want to update the mailing address, let's say zipcode was wrong, following Mr. Evans doctrine, we must replace the old object for a new one since it's immutable (a value object right?). But we don't want to delete the row thou, because that address's PK is a FK in a MailingHistory table. So, following Mr. Evans doctrine, we are pretty much screwed here. Unless i make my addressses Entities, so i don't have to "replace" it, and simply update its zipcode member, like the old good days. What would you suggest me in this case? The way i see it, ValueObjects are only useful when you want to encapsulate a group of database table's columns (component in nhibernate). Everything that has a persistence id in the database, is better off to make it an Entity (not necessarily an aggregate root) so you can update its members without recreating the whole object graph, specially if that's a deep-nested object. Do you concur? Is it allowed by Mr. Evans to have a mutable value object? Or is a mutable value object a candidate for an Entity? Thanks

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  • JMS Step 6 - How to Set Up an AQ JMS (Advanced Queueing JMS) for SOA Purposes

    - by John-Brown.Evans
    JMS Step 6 - How to Set Up an AQ JMS (Advanced Queueing JMS) for SOA Purposes .jblist{list-style-type:disc;margin:0;padding:0;padding-left:0pt;margin-left:36pt} ol{margin:0;padding:0} .c17_6{vertical-align:top;width:468pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c5_6{vertical-align:top;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:0pt 5pt 0pt 5pt} .c6_6{vertical-align:top;width:156pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c15_6{background-color:#ffffff} .c10_6{color:#1155cc;text-decoration:underline} .c1_6{text-align:center;direction:ltr} .c0_6{line-height:1.0;direction:ltr} .c16_6{color:#666666;font-size:12pt} .c18_6{color:inherit;text-decoration:inherit} .c8_6{background-color:#f3f3f3} .c2_6{direction:ltr} .c14_6{font-size:8pt} .c11_6{font-size:10pt} .c7_6{font-weight:bold} .c12_6{height:0pt} .c3_6{height:11pt} .c13_6{border-collapse:collapse} .c4_6{font-family:"Courier New"} .c9_6{font-style:italic} .title{padding-top:24pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#000000;font-size:36pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:6pt} .subtitle{padding-top:18pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-style:italic;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Georgia";padding-bottom:4pt} li{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial"} p{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;margin:0;font-family:"Arial"} h1{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h2{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:18pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h3{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:14pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h4{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:12pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h5{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:11pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h6{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} This post continues the series of JMS articles which demonstrate how to use JMS queues in a SOA context. The previous posts were: JMS Step 1 - How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g JMS Step 2 - Using the QueueSend.java Sample Program to Send a Message to a JMS Queue JMS Step 3 - Using the QueueReceive.java Sample Program to Read a Message from a JMS Queue JMS Step 4 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Writes a Message Based on an XML Schema to a JMS Queue JMS Step 5 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Reads a Message Based on an XML Schema from a JMS Queue This example leads you through the creation of an Oracle database Advanced Queue and the related WebLogic server objects in order to use AQ JMS in connection with a SOA composite. If you have not already done so, I recommend you look at the previous posts in this series, as they include steps which this example builds upon. The following examples will demonstrate how to write and read from the queue from a SOA process. 1. Recap and Prerequisites In the previous examples, we created a JMS Queue, a Connection Factory and a Connection Pool in the WebLogic Server Console. Then we wrote and deployed BPEL composites, which enqueued and dequeued a simple XML payload. AQ JMS allows you to interoperate with database Advanced Queueing via JMS in WebLogic server and therefore take advantage of database features, while maintaining compliance with the JMS architecture. AQ JMS uses the WebLogic JMS Foreign Server framework. A full description of this functionality can be found in the following Oracle documentation Oracle® Fusion Middleware Configuring and Managing JMS for Oracle WebLogic Server 11g Release 1 (10.3.6) Part Number E13738-06 7. Interoperating with Oracle AQ JMS http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E23943_01/web.1111/e13738/aq_jms.htm#CJACBCEJ For easier reference, this sample will use the same names for the objects as in the above document, except for the name of the database user, as it is possible that this user already exists in your database. We will create the following objects Database Objects Name Type AQJMSUSER Database User MyQueueTable Advanced Queue (AQ) Table UserQueue Advanced Queue WebLogic Server Objects Object Name Type JNDI Name aqjmsuserDataSource Data Source jdbc/aqjmsuserDataSource AqJmsModule JMS System Module AqJmsForeignServer JMS Foreign Server AqJmsForeignServerConnectionFactory JMS Foreign Server Connection Factory AqJmsForeignServerConnectionFactory AqJmsForeignDestination AQ JMS Foreign Destination queue/USERQUEUE eis/aqjms/UserQueue Connection Pool eis/aqjms/UserQueue 2. Create a Database User and Advanced Queue The following steps can be executed in the database client of your choice, e.g. JDeveloper or SQL Developer. The examples below use SQL*Plus. Log in to the database as a DBA user, for example SYSTEM or SYS. Create the AQJMSUSER user and grant privileges to enable the user to create AQ objects. Create Database User and Grant AQ Privileges sqlplus system/password as SYSDBA GRANT connect, resource TO aqjmsuser IDENTIFIED BY aqjmsuser; GRANT aq_user_role TO aqjmsuser; GRANT execute ON sys.dbms_aqadm TO aqjmsuser; GRANT execute ON sys.dbms_aq TO aqjmsuser; GRANT execute ON sys.dbms_aqin TO aqjmsuser; GRANT execute ON sys.dbms_aqjms TO aqjmsuser; Create the Queue Table and Advanced Queue and Start the AQ The following commands are executed as the aqjmsuser database user. Create the Queue Table connect aqjmsuser/aqjmsuser; BEGIN dbms_aqadm.create_queue_table ( queue_table = 'myQueueTable', queue_payload_type = 'sys.aq$_jms_text_message', multiple_consumers = false ); END; / Create the AQ BEGIN dbms_aqadm.create_queue ( queue_name = 'userQueue', queue_table = 'myQueueTable' ); END; / Start the AQ BEGIN dbms_aqadm.start_queue ( queue_name = 'userQueue'); END; / The above commands can be executed in a single PL/SQL block, but are shown as separate blocks in this example for ease of reference. You can verify the queue by executing the SQL command SELECT object_name, object_type FROM user_objects; which should display the following objects: OBJECT_NAME OBJECT_TYPE ------------------------------ ------------------- SYS_C0056513 INDEX SYS_LOB0000170822C00041$$ LOB SYS_LOB0000170822C00040$$ LOB SYS_LOB0000170822C00037$$ LOB AQ$_MYQUEUETABLE_T INDEX AQ$_MYQUEUETABLE_I INDEX AQ$_MYQUEUETABLE_E QUEUE AQ$_MYQUEUETABLE_F VIEW AQ$MYQUEUETABLE VIEW MYQUEUETABLE TABLE USERQUEUE QUEUE Similarly, you can view the objects in JDeveloper via a Database Connection to the AQJMSUSER. 3. Configure WebLogic Server and Add JMS Objects All these steps are executed from the WebLogic Server Administration Console. Log in as the webLogic user. Configure a WebLogic Data Source The data source is required for the database connection to the AQ created above. Navigate to domain > Services > Data Sources and press New then Generic Data Source. Use the values:Name: aqjmsuserDataSource JNDI Name: jdbc/aqjmsuserDataSource Database type: Oracle Database Driver: *Oracle’ Driver (Thin XA) for Instance connections; Versions:9.0.1 and later Connection Properties: Enter the connection information to the database containing the AQ created above and enter aqjmsuser for the User Name and Password. Press Test Configuration to verify the connection details and press Next. Target the data source to the soa server. The data source will be displayed in the list. It is a good idea to test the data source at this stage. Click on aqjmsuserDataSource, select Monitoring > Testing > soa_server1 and press Test Data Source. The result is displayed at the top of the page. Configure a JMS System Module The JMS system module is required to host the JMS foreign server for AQ resources. Navigate to Services > Messaging > JMS Modules and select New. Use the values: Name: AqJmsModule (Leave Descriptor File Name and Location in Domain empty.) Target: soa_server1 Click Finish. The other resources will be created in separate steps. The module will be displayed in the list.   Configure a JMS Foreign Server A foreign server is required in order to reference a 3rd-party JMS provider, in this case the database AQ, within a local WebLogic server JNDI tree. Navigate to Services > Messaging > JMS Modules and select (click on) AqJmsModule to configure it. Under Summary of Resources, select New then Foreign Server. Name: AqJmsForeignServer Targets: The foreign server is targeted automatically to soa_server1, based on the JMS module’s target. Press Finish to create the foreign server. The foreign server resource will be listed in the Summary of Resources for the AqJmsModule, but needs additional configuration steps. Click on AqJmsForeignServer and select Configuration > General to complete the configuration: JNDI Initial Context Factory: oracle.jms.AQjmsInitialContextFactory JNDI Connection URL: <empty> JNDI Properties Credential:<empty> Confirm JNDI Properties Credential: <empty> JNDI Properties: datasource=jdbc/aqjmsuserDataSource This is an important property. It is the JNDI name of the data source created above, which points to the AQ schema in the database and must be entered as a name=value pair, as in this example, e.g. datasource=jdbc/aqjmsuserDataSource, including the “datasource=” property name. Default Targeting Enabled: Leave this value checked. Press Save to save the configuration. At this point it is a good idea to verify that the data source was written correctly to the config file. In a terminal window, navigate to $MIDDLEWARE_HOME/user_projects/domains/soa_domain/config/jms  and open the file aqjmsmodule-jms.xml . The foreign server configuration should contain the datasource name-value pair, as follows:   <foreign-server name="AqJmsForeignServer">         <default-targeting-enabled>true</default-targeting-enabled>         <initial-context-factory>oracle.jms.AQjmsInitialContextFactory</initial-context-factory>         <jndi-property>           <key> datasource </key>           <value> jdbc/aqjmsuserDataSource </value>         </jndi-property>   </foreign-server> </weblogic-jms> Configure a JMS Foreign Server Connection Factory When creating the foreign server connection factory, you enter local and remote JNDI names. The name of the connection factory itself and the local JNDI name are arbitrary, but the remote JNDI name must match a specific format, depending on the type of queue or topic to be accessed in the database. This is very important and if the incorrect value is used, the connection to the queue will not be established and the error messages you get will not immediately reflect the cause of the error. The formats required (Remote JNDI names for AQ JMS Connection Factories) are described in the section Configure AQ Destinations  of the Oracle® Fusion Middleware Configuring and Managing JMS for Oracle WebLogic Server document mentioned earlier. In this example, the remote JNDI name used is   XAQueueConnectionFactory  because it matches the AQ and data source created earlier, i.e. thin with AQ. Navigate to JMS Modules > AqJmsModule > AqJmsForeignServer > Connection Factories then New.Name: AqJmsForeignServerConnectionFactory Local JNDI Name: AqJmsForeignServerConnectionFactory Note: this local JNDI name is the JNDI name which your client application, e.g. a later BPEL process, will use to access this connection factory. Remote JNDI Name: XAQueueConnectionFactory Press OK to save the configuration. Configure an AQ JMS Foreign Server Destination A foreign server destination maps the JNDI name on the foreign JNDI provider to the respective local JNDI name, allowing the foreign JNDI name to be accessed via the local server. As with the foreign server connection factory, the local JNDI name is arbitrary (but must be unique), but the remote JNDI name must conform to a specific format defined in the section Configure AQ Destinations  of the Oracle® Fusion Middleware Configuring and Managing JMS for Oracle WebLogic Server document mentioned earlier. In our example, the remote JNDI name is Queues/USERQUEUE , because it references a queue (as opposed to a topic) with the name USERQUEUE. We will name the local JNDI name queue/USERQUEUE, which is a little confusing (note the missing “s” in “queue), but conforms better to the JNDI nomenclature in our SOA server and also allows us to differentiate between the local and remote names for demonstration purposes. Navigate to JMS Modules > AqJmsModule > AqJmsForeignServer > Destinations and select New.Name: AqJmsForeignDestination Local JNDI Name: queue/USERQUEUE Remote JNDI Name:Queues/USERQUEUE After saving the foreign destination configuration, this completes the JMS part of the configuration. We still need to configure the JMS adapter in order to be able to access the queue from a BPEL processt. 4. Create a JMS Adapter Connection Pool in Weblogic Server Create the Connection Pool Access to the AQ JMS queue from a BPEL or other SOA process in our example is done via a JMS adapter. To enable this, the JmsAdapter in WebLogic server needs to be configured to have a connection pool which points to the local connection factory JNDI name which was created earlier. Navigate to Deployments > Next and select (click on) the JmsAdapter. Select Configuration > Outbound Connection Pools and New. Check the radio button for oracle.tip.adapter.jms.IJmsConnectionFactory and press Next. JNDI Name: eis/aqjms/UserQueue Press Finish Expand oracle.tip.adapter.jms.IJmsConnectionFactory and click on eis/aqjms/UserQueue to configure it. The ConnectionFactoryLocation must point to the foreign server’s local connection factory name created earlier. In our example, this is AqJmsForeignServerConnectionFactory . As a reminder, this connection factory is located under JMS Modules > AqJmsModule > AqJmsForeignServer > Connection Factories and the value needed here is under Local JNDI Name. Enter AqJmsForeignServerConnectionFactory  into the Property Value field for ConnectionFactoryLocation. You must then press Return/Enter then Save for the value to be accepted. If your WebLogic server is running in Development mode, you should see the message that the changes have been activated and the deployment plan successfully updated. If not, then you will manually need to activate the changes in the WebLogic server console.Although the changes have been activated, the JmsAdapter needs to be redeployed in order for the changes to become effective. This should be confirmed by the message Remember to update your deployment to reflect the new plan when you are finished with your changes. Redeploy the JmsAdapter Navigate back to the Deployments screen, either by selecting it in the left-hand navigation tree or by selecting the “Summary of Deployments” link in the breadcrumbs list at the top of the screen. Then select the checkbox next to JmsAdapter and press the Update button. On the Update Application Assistant page, select “Redeploy this application using the following deployment files” and press Finish. After a few seconds you should get the message that the selected deployments were updated. The JMS adapter configuration is complete and it can now be used to access the AQ JMS queue. You can verify that the JNDI name was created correctly, by navigating to Environment > Servers > soa_server1 and View JNDI Tree. Then scroll down in the JNDI Tree Structure to eis and select aqjms. This concludes the sample. In the following post, I will show you how to create a BPEL process which sends a message to this advanced queue via JMS. Best regards John-Brown Evans Oracle Technology Proactive Support Delivery

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  • JMS Step 7 - How to Write to an AQ JMS (Advanced Queueing JMS) Queue from a BPEL Process

    - by John-Brown.Evans
    JMS Step 7 - How to Write to an AQ JMS (Advanced Queueing JMS) Queue from a BPEL Process ol{margin:0;padding:0} .jblist{list-style-type:disc;margin:0;padding:0;padding-left:0pt;margin-left:36pt} .c4_7{vertical-align:top;width:468pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c3_7{vertical-align:top;width:234pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:0pt 5pt 0pt 5pt} .c6_7{vertical-align:top;width:156pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c16_7{background-color:#ffffff;padding:0pt 0pt 0pt 0pt} .c0_7{height:11pt;direction:ltr} .c9_7{color:#1155cc;text-decoration:underline} .c17_7{color:inherit;text-decoration:inherit} .c5_7{direction:ltr} .c18_7{background-color:#ffff00} .c2_7{background-color:#f3f3f3} .c14_7{height:0pt} .c8_7{text-indent:36pt} .c11_7{text-align:center} .c7_7{font-style:italic} .c1_7{font-family:"Courier New"} .c13_7{line-height:1.0} .c15_7{border-collapse:collapse} .c12_7{font-weight:bold} .c10_7{font-size:8pt} .title{padding-top:24pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#000000;font-size:36pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:6pt} .subtitle{padding-top:18pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-style:italic;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Georgia";padding-bottom:4pt} li{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial"} p{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;margin:0;font-family:"Arial"} h1{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h2{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:18pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h3{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:14pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h4{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:12pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h5{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:11pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h6{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} This post continues the series of JMS articles which demonstrate how to use JMS queues in a SOA context. The previous posts were: JMS Step 1 - How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g JMS Step 2 - Using the QueueSend.java Sample Program to Send a Message to a JMS Queue JMS Step 3 - Using the QueueReceive.java Sample Program to Read a Message from a JMS Queue JMS Step 4 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Writes a Message Based on an XML Schema to a JMS Queue JMS Step 5 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Reads a Message Based on an XML Schema from a JMS Queue JMS Step 6 - How to Set Up an AQ JMS (Advanced Queueing JMS) for SOA Purposes This example demonstrates how to write a simple message to an Oracle AQ via the the WebLogic AQ JMS functionality from a BPEL process and a JMS adapter. If you have not yet reviewed the previous posts, please do so first, especially the JMS Step 6 post, as this one references objects created there. 1. Recap and Prerequisites In the previous example, we created an Oracle Advanced Queue (AQ) and some related JMS objects in WebLogic Server to be able to access it via JMS. Here are the objects which were created and their names and JNDI names: Database Objects Name Type AQJMSUSER Database User MyQueueTable Advanced Queue (AQ) Table UserQueue Advanced Queue WebLogic Server Objects Object Name Type JNDI Name aqjmsuserDataSource Data Source jdbc/aqjmsuserDataSource AqJmsModule JMS System Module AqJmsForeignServer JMS Foreign Server AqJmsForeignServerConnectionFactory JMS Foreign Server Connection Factory AqJmsForeignServerConnectionFactory AqJmsForeignDestination AQ JMS Foreign Destination queue/USERQUEUE eis/aqjms/UserQueue Connection Pool eis/aqjms/UserQueue 2 . Create a BPEL Composite with a JMS Adapter Partner Link This step requires that you have a valid Application Server Connection defined in JDeveloper, pointing to the application server on which you created the JMS Queue and Connection Factory. You can create this connection in JDeveloper under the Application Server Navigator. Give it any name and be sure to test the connection before completing it. This sample will write a simple XML message to the AQ JMS queue via the JMS adapter, based on the following XSD file, which consists of a single string element: stringPayload.xsd <?xml version="1.0" encoding="windows-1252" ?> <xsd:schema xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"                xmlns="http://www.example.org"                targetNamespace="http://www.example.org"                elementFormDefault="qualified">  <xsd:element name="exampleElement" type="xsd:string">  </xsd:element> </xsd:schema> The following steps are all executed in JDeveloper. The SOA project will be created inside a JDeveloper Application. If you do not already have an application to contain the project, you can create a new one via File > New > General > Generic Application. Give the application any name, for example JMSTests and, when prompted for a project name and type, call the project   JmsAdapterWriteAqJms  and select SOA as the project technology type. If you already have an application, continue below. Create a SOA Project Create a new project and select SOA Tier > SOA Project as its type. Name it JmsAdapterWriteAqJms . When prompted for the composite type, choose Composite With BPEL Process. When prompted for the BPEL Process, name it JmsAdapterWriteAqJms too and choose Synchronous BPEL Process as the template. This will create a composite with a BPEL process and an exposed SOAP service. Double-click the BPEL process to open and begin editing it. You should see a simple BPEL process with a Receive and Reply activity. As we created a default process without an XML schema, the input and output variables are simple strings. Create an XSD File An XSD file is required later to define the message format to be passed to the JMS adapter. In this step, we create a simple XSD file, containing a string variable and add it to the project. First select the xsd item in the left-hand navigation tree to ensure that the XSD file is created under that item. Select File > New > General > XML and choose XML Schema. Call it stringPayload.xsd  and when the editor opens, select the Source view. then replace the contents with the contents of the stringPayload.xsd example above and save the file. You should see it under the XSD item in the navigation tree. Create a JMS Adapter Partner Link We will create the JMS adapter as a service at the composite level. If it is not already open, double-click the composite.xml file in the navigator to open it. From the Component Palette, drag a JMS adapter over onto the right-hand swim lane, under External References. This will start the JMS Adapter Configuration Wizard. Use the following entries: Service Name: JmsAdapterWrite Oracle Enterprise Messaging Service (OEMS): Oracle Advanced Queueing AppServer Connection: Use an existing application server connection pointing to the WebLogic server on which the connection factory created earlier is located. You can use the “+” button to create a connection directly from the wizard, if you do not already have one. Adapter Interface > Interface: Define from operation and schema (specified later) Operation Type: Produce Message Operation Name: Produce_message Produce Operation Parameters Destination Name: Wait for the list to populate. (Only foreign servers are listed here, because Oracle Advanced Queuing was selected earlier, in step 3) .         Select the foreign server destination created earlier, AqJmsForeignDestination (queue) . This will automatically populate the Destination Name field with the name of the foreign destination, queue/USERQUEUE . JNDI Name: The JNDI name to use for the JMS connection. This is the JNDI name of the connection pool created in the WebLogic Server.JDeveloper does not verify the value entered here. If you enter a wrong value, the JMS adapter won’t find the queue and you will get an error message at runtime. In our example, this is the value eis/aqjms/UserQueue Messages URL: We will use the XSD file we created earlier, stringPayload.xsd to define the message format for the JMS adapter. Press the magnifying glass icon to search for schema files. Expand Project Schema Files > stringPayload.xsd and select exampleElement : string . Press Next and Finish, which will complete the JMS Adapter configuration. Wire the BPEL Component to the JMS Adapter In this step, we link the BPEL process/component to the JMS adapter. From the composite.xml editor, drag the right-arrow icon from the BPEL process to the JMS adapter’s in-arrow.   This completes the steps at the composite level. 3. Complete the BPEL Process Design Invoke the JMS Adapter Open the BPEL component by double-clicking it in the design view of the composite.xml. This will display the BPEL process in the design view. You should see the JmsAdapterWrite partner link under one of the two swim lanes. We want it in the right-hand swim lane. If JDeveloper displays it in the left-hand lane, right-click it and choose Display > Move To Opposite Swim Lane. An Invoke activity is required in order to invoke the JMS adapter. Drag an Invoke activity between the Receive and Reply activities. Drag the right-hand arrow from the Invoke activity to the JMS adapter partner link. This will open the Invoke editor. The correct default values are entered automatically and are fine for our purposes. We only need to define the input variable to use for the JMS adapter. By pressing the green “+” symbol, a variable of the correct type can be auto-generated, for example with the name Invoke1_Produce_Message_InputVariable. Press OK after creating the variable. Assign Variables Drag an Assign activity between the Receive and Invoke activities. We will simply copy the input variable to the JMS adapter and, for completion, so the process has an output to print, again to the process’s output variable. Double-click the Assign activity and create two Copy rules: for the first, drag Variables > inputVariable > payload > client:process > client:input_string to Invoke1_Produce_Message_InputVariable > body > ns2:exampleElement for the second, drag the same input variable to outputVariable > payload > client:processResponse > client:result This will create two copy rules, similar to the following: Press OK. This completes the BPEL and Composite design. 4. Compile and Deploy the Composite Compile the process by pressing the Make or Rebuild icons or by right-clicking the project name in the navigator and selecting Make... or Rebuild... If the compilation is successful, deploy it to the SOA server connection defined earlier. (Right-click the project name in the navigator, select Deploy to Application Server, choose the application server connection, choose the partition on the server (usually default) and press Finish. You should see the message ----  Deployment finished.  ---- in the Deployment frame, if the deployment was successful. 5. Test the Composite Execute a Test Instance In a browser, log in to the Enterprise Manager 11g Fusion Middleware Control (EM) for your SOA installation. Navigate to SOA > soa-infra (soa_server1) > default (or wherever you deployed your composite) and click on  JmsAdapterWriteAqJms [1.0] , then press the Test button. Enter any string into the text input field, for example “Test message from JmsAdapterWriteAqJms” then press Test Web Service. If the instance is successful, you should see the same text you entered in the Response payload frame. Monitor the Advanced Queue The test message will be written to the advanced queue created at the top of this sample. To confirm it, log in to the database as AQJMSUSER and query the MYQUEUETABLE database table. For example, from a shell window with SQL*Plus sqlplus aqjmsuser/aqjmsuser SQL> SELECT user_data FROM myqueuetable; which will display the message contents, for example Similarly, you can use the JDeveloper Database Navigator to view the contents. Use a database connection to the AQJMSUSER and in the navigator, expand Queues Tables and select MYQUEUETABLE. Select the Data tab and scroll to the USER_DATA column to view its contents. This concludes this example. The following post will be the last one in this series. In it, we will learn how to read the message we just wrote using a BPEL process and AQ JMS. Best regards John-Brown Evans Oracle Technology Proactive Support Delivery

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  • JMS Step 4 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Writes a Message Based on an XML Schema to a JMS Queue

    - by John-Brown.Evans
    JMS Step 4 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Writes a Message Based on an XML Schema to a JMS Queue ol{margin:0;padding:0} .c11_4{vertical-align:top;width:129.8pt;border-style:solid;background-color:#f3f3f3;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c9_4{vertical-align:top;width:207pt;border-style:solid;background-color:#f3f3f3;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt}.c14{vertical-align:top;width:207pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c17_4{vertical-align:top;width:129.8pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c7_4{vertical-align:top;width:130pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:0pt 5pt 0pt 5pt} .c19_4{vertical-align:top;width:468pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c22_4{background-color:#ffffff} .c20_4{list-style-type:disc;margin:0;padding:0} .c6_4{font-size:8pt;font-family:"Courier New"} .c24_4{color:inherit;text-decoration:inherit} .c23_4{color:#1155cc;text-decoration:underline} .c0_4{height:11pt;direction:ltr} .c10_4{font-size:10pt;font-family:"Courier New"} .c3_4{padding-left:0pt;margin-left:36pt} .c18_4{font-size:8pt} .c8_4{text-align:center} .c12_4{background-color:#ffff00} .c2_4{font-weight:bold} .c21_4{background-color:#00ff00} .c4_4{line-height:1.0} .c1_4{direction:ltr} .c15_4{background-color:#f3f3f3} .c13_4{font-family:"Courier New"} .c5_4{font-style:italic} .c16_4{border-collapse:collapse} .title{padding-top:24pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#000000;font-size:36pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:6pt} .subtitle{padding-top:18pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-style:italic;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Georgia";padding-bottom:4pt} li{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial"} p{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;margin:0;font-family:"Arial"} h1{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:18pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h2{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:18pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:0pt} h3{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:14pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h4{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-style:italic;font-size:11pt;font-family:"Arial";padding-bottom:0pt} h5{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h6{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-style:italic;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";padding-bottom:0pt} This post continues the series of JMS articles which demonstrate how to use JMS queues in a SOA context. The previous posts were: JMS Step 1 - How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g JMS Step 2 - Using the QueueSend.java Sample Program to Send a Message to a JMS Queue JMS Step 3 - Using the QueueReceive.java Sample Program to Read a Message from a JMS Queue In this example we will create a BPEL process which will write (enqueue) a message to a JMS queue using a JMS adapter. The JMS adapter will enqueue the full XML payload to the queue. This sample will use the following WebLogic Server objects. The first two, the Connection Factory and JMS Queue, were created as part of the first blog post in this series, JMS Step 1 - How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g. If you haven't created those objects yet, please see that post for details on how to do so. The Connection Pool will be created as part of this example. Object Name Type JNDI Name TestConnectionFactory Connection Factory jms/TestConnectionFactory TestJMSQueue JMS Queue jms/TestJMSQueue eis/wls/TestQueue Connection Pool eis/wls/TestQueue 1. Verify Connection Factory and JMS Queue As mentioned above, this example uses a WLS Connection Factory called TestConnectionFactory and a JMS queue TestJMSQueue. As these are prerequisites for this example, let us verify they exist. Log in to the WebLogic Server Administration Console. Select Services > JMS Modules > TestJMSModule You should see the following objects: If not, or if the TestJMSModule is missing, please see the abovementioned article and create these objects before continuing. 2. Create a JMS Adapter Connection Pool in WebLogic Server The BPEL process we are about to create uses a JMS adapter to write to the JMS queue. The JMS adapter is deployed to the WebLogic server and needs to be configured to include a connection pool which references the connection factory associated with the JMS queue. In the WebLogic Server Console Go to Deployments > Next and select (click on) the JmsAdapter Select Configuration > Outbound Connection Pools and expand oracle.tip.adapter.jms.IJmsConnectionFactory. This will display the list of connections configured for this adapter. For example, eis/aqjms/Queue, eis/aqjms/Topic etc. These JNDI names are actually quite confusing. We are expecting to configure a connection pool here, but the names refer to queues and topics. One would expect these to be called *ConnectionPool or *_CF or similar, but to conform to this nomenclature, we will call our entry eis/wls/TestQueue . This JNDI name is also the name we will use later, when creating a BPEL process to access this JMS queue! Select New, check the oracle.tip.adapter.jms.IJmsConnectionFactory check box and Next. Enter JNDI Name: eis/wls/TestQueue for the connection instance, then press Finish. Expand oracle.tip.adapter.jms.IJmsConnectionFactory again and select (click on) eis/wls/TestQueue The ConnectionFactoryLocation must point to the JNDI name of the connection factory associated with the JMS queue you will be writing to. In our example, this is the connection factory called TestConnectionFactory, with the JNDI name jms/TestConnectionFactory.( As a reminder, this connection factory is contained in the JMS Module called TestJMSModule, under Services > Messaging > JMS Modules > TestJMSModule which we verified at the beginning of this document. )Enter jms/TestConnectionFactory  into the Property Value field for Connection Factory Location. After entering it, you must press Return/Enter then Save for the value to be accepted. If your WebLogic server is running in Development mode, you should see the message that the changes have been activated and the deployment plan successfully updated. If not, then you will manually need to activate the changes in the WebLogic server console. Although the changes have been activated, the JmsAdapter needs to be redeployed in order for the changes to become effective. This should be confirmed by the message Remember to update your deployment to reflect the new plan when you are finished with your changes as can be seen in the following screen shot: The next step is to redeploy the JmsAdapter.Navigate back to the Deployments screen, either by selecting it in the left-hand navigation tree or by selecting the “Summary of Deployments” link in the breadcrumbs list at the top of the screen. Then select the checkbox next to JmsAdapter and press the Update button On the Update Application Assistant page, select “Redeploy this application using the following deployment files” and press Finish. After a few seconds you should get the message that the selected deployments were updated. The JMS adapter configuration is complete and it can now be used to access the JMS queue. To summarize: we have created a JMS adapter connection pool connector with the JNDI name jms/TestConnectionFactory. This is the JNDI name to be accessed by a process such as a BPEL process, when using the JMS adapter to access the previously created JMS queue with the JNDI name jms/TestJMSQueue. In the following step, we will set up a BPEL process to use this JMS adapter to write to the JMS queue. 3. Create a BPEL Composite with a JMS Adapter Partner Link This step requires that you have a valid Application Server Connection defined in JDeveloper, pointing to the application server on which you created the JMS Queue and Connection Factory. You can create this connection in JDeveloper under the Application Server Navigator. Give it any name and be sure to test the connection before completing it. This sample will use the connection name jbevans-lx-PS5, as that is the name of the connection pointing to my SOA PS5 installation. When using a JMS adapter from within a BPEL process, there are various configuration options, such as the operation type (consume message, produce message etc.), delivery mode and message type. One of these options is the choice of the format of the JMS message payload. This can be structured around an existing XSD, in which case the full XML element and tags are passed, or it can be opaque, meaning that the payload is sent as-is to the JMS adapter. In the case of an XSD-based message, the payload can simply be copied to the input variable of the JMS adapter. In the case of an opaque message, the JMS adapter’s input variable is of type base64binary. So the payload needs to be converted to base64 binary first. I will go into this in more detail in a later blog entry. This sample will pass a simple message to the adapter, based on the following simple XSD file, which consists of a single string element: stringPayload.xsd <?xml version="1.0" encoding="windows-1252" ?> <xsd:schema xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns="http://www.example.org" targetNamespace="http://www.example.org" elementFormDefault="qualified" <xsd:element name="exampleElement" type="xsd:string"> </xsd:element> </xsd:schema> The following steps are all executed in JDeveloper. The SOA project will be created inside a JDeveloper Application. If you do not already have an application to contain the project, you can create a new one via File > New > General > Generic Application. Give the application any name, for example JMSTests and, when prompted for a project name and type, call the project JmsAdapterWriteWithXsd and select SOA as the project technology type. If you already have an application, continue below. Create a SOA Project Create a new project and choose SOA Tier > SOA Project as its type. Name it JmsAdapterWriteSchema. When prompted for the composite type, choose Composite With BPEL Process. When prompted for the BPEL Process, name it JmsAdapterWriteSchema too and choose Synchronous BPEL Process as the template. This will create a composite with a BPEL process and an exposed SOAP service. Double-click the BPEL process to open and begin editing it. You should see a simple BPEL process with a Receive and Reply activity. As we created a default process without an XML schema, the input and output variables are simple strings. Create an XSD File An XSD file is required later to define the message format to be passed to the JMS adapter. In this step, we create a simple XSD file, containing a string variable and add it to the project. First select the xsd item in the left-hand navigation tree to ensure that the XSD file is created under that item. Select File > New > General > XML and choose XML Schema. Call it stringPayload.xsd and when the editor opens, select the Source view. then replace the contents with the contents of the stringPayload.xsd example above and save the file. You should see it under the xsd item in the navigation tree. Create a JMS Adapter Partner Link We will create the JMS adapter as a service at the composite level. If it is not already open, double-click the composite.xml file in the navigator to open it. From the Component Palette, drag a JMS adapter over onto the right-hand swim lane, under External References. This will start the JMS Adapter Configuration Wizard. Use the following entries: Service Name: JmsAdapterWrite Oracle Enterprise Messaging Service (OEMS): Oracle Weblogic JMS AppServer Connection: Use an existing application server connection pointing to the WebLogic server on which the above JMS queue and connection factory were created. You can use the “+” button to create a connection directly from the wizard, if you do not already have one. This example uses a connection called jbevans-lx-PS5. Adapter Interface > Interface: Define from operation and schema (specified later) Operation Type: Produce Message Operation Name: Produce_message Destination Name: Press the Browse button, select Destination Type: Queues, then press Search. Wait for the list to populate, then select the entry for TestJMSQueue , which is the queue created earlier. JNDI Name: The JNDI name to use for the JMS connection. This is probably the most important step in this exercise and the most common source of error. This is the JNDI name of the JMS adapter’s connection pool created in the WebLogic Server and which points to the connection factory. JDeveloper does not verify the value entered here. If you enter a wrong value, the JMS adapter won’t find the queue and you will get an error message at runtime, which is very difficult to trace. In our example, this is the value eis/wls/TestQueue . (See the earlier step on how to create a JMS Adapter Connection Pool in WebLogic Server for details.) MessagesURL: We will use the XSD file we created earlier, stringPayload.xsd to define the message format for the JMS adapter. Press the magnifying glass icon to search for schema files. Expand Project Schema Files > stringPayload.xsd and select exampleElement: string. Press Next and Finish, which will complete the JMS Adapter configuration. Wire the BPEL Component to the JMS Adapter In this step, we link the BPEL process/component to the JMS adapter. From the composite.xml editor, drag the right-arrow icon from the BPEL process to the JMS adapter’s in-arrow. This completes the steps at the composite level. 4. Complete the BPEL Process Design Invoke the JMS Adapter Open the BPEL component by double-clicking it in the design view of the composite.xml, or open it from the project navigator by selecting the JmsAdapterWriteSchema.bpel file. This will display the BPEL process in the design view. You should see the JmsAdapterWrite partner link under one of the two swim lanes. We want it in the right-hand swim lane. If JDeveloper displays it in the left-hand lane, right-click it and choose Display > Move To Opposite Swim Lane. An Invoke activity is required in order to invoke the JMS adapter. Drag an Invoke activity between the Receive and Reply activities. Drag the right-hand arrow from the Invoke activity to the JMS adapter partner link. This will open the Invoke editor. The correct default values are entered automatically and are fine for our purposes. We only need to define the input variable to use for the JMS adapter. By pressing the green “+” symbol, a variable of the correct type can be auto-generated, for example with the name Invoke1_Produce_Message_InputVariable. Press OK after creating the variable. ( For some reason, while I was testing this, the JMS Adapter moved back to the left-hand swim lane again after this step. There is no harm in leaving it there, but I find it easier to follow if it is in the right-hand lane, because I kind-of think of the message coming in on the left and being routed through the right. But you can follow your personal preference here.) Assign Variables Drag an Assign activity between the Receive and Invoke activities. We will simply copy the input variable to the JMS adapter and, for completion, so the process has an output to print, again to the process’s output variable. Double-click the Assign activity and create two Copy rules: for the first, drag Variables > inputVariable > payload > client:process > client:input_string to Invoke1_Produce_Message_InputVariable > body > ns2:exampleElement for the second, drag the same input variable to outputVariable > payload > client:processResponse > client:result This will create two copy rules, similar to the following: Press OK. This completes the BPEL and Composite design. 5. Compile and Deploy the Composite We won’t go into too much detail on how to compile and deploy. In JDeveloper, compile the process by pressing the Make or Rebuild icons or by right-clicking the project name in the navigator and selecting Make... or Rebuild... If the compilation is successful, deploy it to the SOA server connection defined earlier. (Right-click the project name in the navigator, select Deploy to Application Server, choose the application server connection, choose the partition on the server (usually default) and press Finish. You should see the message ---- Deployment finished. ---- in the Deployment frame, if the deployment was successful. 6. Test the Composite This is the exciting part. Open two tabs in your browser and log in to the WebLogic Administration Console in one tab and the Enterprise Manager 11g Fusion Middleware Control (EM) for your SOA installation in the other. We will use the Console to monitor the messages being written to the queue and the EM to execute the composite. In the Console, go to Services > Messaging > JMS Modules > TestJMSModule > TestJMSQueue > Monitoring. Note the number of messages under Messages Current. In the EM, go to SOA > soa-infra (soa_server1) > default (or wherever you deployed your composite to) and click on JmsAdapterWriteSchema [1.0], then press the Test button. Under Input Arguments, enter any string into the text input field for the payload, for example Test Message then press Test Web Service. If the instance is successful you should see the same text in the Response message, “Test Message”. In the Console, refresh the Monitoring screen to confirm a new message has been written to the queue. Check the checkbox and press Show Messages. Click on the newest message and view its contents. They should include the full XML of the entered payload. 7. Troubleshooting If you get an exception similar to the following at runtime ... BINDING.JCA-12510 JCA Resource Adapter location error. Unable to locate the JCA Resource Adapter via .jca binding file element The JCA Binding Component is unable to startup the Resource Adapter specified in the element: location='eis/wls/QueueTest'. The reason for this is most likely that either 1) the Resource Adapters RAR file has not been deployed successfully to the WebLogic Application server or 2) the '' element in weblogic-ra.xml has not been set to eis/wls/QueueTest. In the last case you will have to add a new WebLogic JCA connection factory (deploy a RAR). Please correct this and then restart the Application Server at oracle.integration.platform.blocks.adapter.fw.AdapterBindingException. createJndiLookupException(AdapterBindingException.java:130) at oracle.integration.platform.blocks.adapter.fw.jca.cci. JCAConnectionManager$JCAConnectionPool.createJCAConnectionFactory (JCAConnectionManager.java:1387) at oracle.integration.platform.blocks.adapter.fw.jca.cci. JCAConnectionManager$JCAConnectionPool.newPoolObject (JCAConnectionManager.java:1285) ... then this is very likely due to an incorrect JNDI name entered for the JMS Connection in the JMS Adapter Wizard. Recheck those steps. The error message prints the name of the JNDI name used. In this example, it was incorrectly entered as eis/wls/QueueTest instead of eis/wls/TestQueue. This concludes this example. Best regards John-Brown Evans Oracle Technology Proactive Support Delivery

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  • JMS Step 5 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Reads a Message Based on an XML Schema from a JMS Queue

    - by John-Brown.Evans
    JMS Step 5 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Reads a Message Based on an XML Schema from a JMS Queue .jblist{list-style-type:disc;margin:0;padding:0;padding-left:0pt;margin-left:36pt} ol{margin:0;padding:0} .c12_5{vertical-align:top;width:468pt;border-style:solid;background-color:#f3f3f3;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c8_5{vertical-align:top;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 0pt 5pt} .c10_5{vertical-align:top;width:207pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c14_5{vertical-align:top;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:0pt 5pt 0pt 5pt} .c21_5{background-color:#ffffff} .c18_5{color:#1155cc;text-decoration:underline} .c16_5{color:#666666;font-size:12pt} .c5_5{background-color:#f3f3f3;font-weight:bold} .c19_5{color:inherit;text-decoration:inherit} .c3_5{height:11pt;text-align:center} .c11_5{font-weight:bold} .c20_5{background-color:#00ff00} .c6_5{font-style:italic} .c4_5{height:11pt} .c17_5{background-color:#ffff00} .c0_5{direction:ltr} .c7_5{font-family:"Courier New"} .c2_5{border-collapse:collapse} .c1_5{line-height:1.0} .c13_5{background-color:#f3f3f3} .c15_5{height:0pt} .c9_5{text-align:center} .title{padding-top:24pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#000000;font-size:36pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:6pt} .subtitle{padding-top:18pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-style:italic;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Georgia";padding-bottom:4pt} li{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial"} p{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;margin:0;font-family:"Arial"} h1{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h2{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:18pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h3{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:14pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h4{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:12pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h5{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:11pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h6{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} Welcome to another post in the series of blogs which demonstrates how to use JMS queues in a SOA context. The previous posts were: JMS Step 1 - How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g JMS Step 2 - Using the QueueSend.java Sample Program to Send a Message to a JMS Queue JMS Step 3 - Using the QueueReceive.java Sample Program to Read a Message from a JMS Queue JMS Step 4 - How to Create an 11g BPEL Process Which Writes a Message Based on an XML Schema to a JMS Queue Today we will create a BPEL process which will read (dequeue) the message from the JMS queue, which we enqueued in the last example. The JMS adapter will dequeue the full XML payload from the queue. 1. Recap and Prerequisites In the previous examples, we created a JMS Queue, a Connection Factory and a Connection Pool in the WebLogic Server Console. Then we designed and deployed a BPEL composite, which took a simple XML payload and enqueued it to the JMS queue. In this example, we will read that same message from the queue, using a JMS adapter and a BPEL process. As many of the configuration steps required to read from that queue were done in the previous samples, this one will concentrate on the new steps. A summary of the required objects is listed below. To find out how to create them please see the previous samples. They also include instructions on how to verify the objects are set up correctly. WebLogic Server Objects Object Name Type JNDI Name TestConnectionFactory Connection Factory jms/TestConnectionFactory TestJMSQueue JMS Queue jms/TestJMSQueue eis/wls/TestQueue Connection Pool eis/wls/TestQueue Schema XSD File The following XSD file is used for the message format. It was created in the previous example and will be copied to the new process. stringPayload.xsd <?xml version="1.0" encoding="windows-1252" ?> <xsd:schema xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"                 xmlns="http://www.example.org"                 targetNamespace="http://www.example.org"                 elementFormDefault="qualified">   <xsd:element name="exampleElement" type="xsd:string">   </xsd:element> </xsd:schema> JMS Message After executing the previous samples, the following XML message should be in the JMS queue located at jms/TestJMSQueue: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?><exampleElement xmlns="http://www.example.org">Test Message</exampleElement> JDeveloper Connection You will need a valid Application Server Connection in JDeveloper pointing to the SOA server which the process will be deployed to. 2. Create a BPEL Composite with a JMS Adapter Partner Link In the previous example, we created a composite in JDeveloper called JmsAdapterWriteSchema. In this one, we will create a new composite called JmsAdapterReadSchema. There are probably many ways of incorporating a JMS adapter into a SOA composite for incoming messages. One way is design the process in such a way that the adapter polls for new messages and when it dequeues one, initiates a SOA or BPEL instance. This is possibly the most common use case. Other use cases include mid-flow adapters, which are activated from within the BPEL process. In this example we will use a polling adapter, because it is the most simple to set up and demonstrate. But it has one disadvantage as a demonstrative model. When a polling adapter is active, it will dequeue all messages as soon as they reach the queue. This makes it difficult to monitor messages we are writing to the queue, because they will disappear from the queue as soon as they have been enqueued. To work around this, we will shut down the composite after deploying it and restart it as required. (Another solution for this would be to pause the consumption for the queue and resume consumption again if needed. This can be done in the WLS console JMS-Modules -> queue -> Control -> Consumption -> Pause/Resume.) We will model the composite as a one-way incoming process. Usually, a BPEL process will do something useful with the message after receiving it, such as passing it to a database or file adapter, a human workflow or external web service. But we only want to demonstrate how to dequeue a JMS message using BPEL and a JMS adapter, so we won’t complicate the design with further activities. However, we do want to be able to verify that we have read the message correctly, so the BPEL process will include a small piece of embedded java code, which will print the message to standard output, so we can view it in the SOA server’s log file. Alternatively, you can view the instance in the Enterprise Manager and verify the message. The following steps are all executed in JDeveloper. Create the project in the same JDeveloper application used for the previous examples or create a new one. Create a SOA Project Create a new project and choose SOA Tier > SOA Project as its type. Name it JmsAdapterReadSchema. When prompted for the composite type, choose Empty Composite. Create a JMS Adapter Partner Link In the composite editor, drag a JMS adapter over from the Component Palette to the left-hand swim lane, under Exposed Services. This will start the JMS Adapter Configuration Wizard. Use the following entries: Service Name: JmsAdapterRead Oracle Enterprise Messaging Service (OEMS): Oracle WebLogic JMS AppServer Connection: Use an application server connection pointing to the WebLogic server on which the JMS queue and connection factory mentioned under Prerequisites above are located. Adapter Interface > Interface: Define from operation and schema (specified later) Operation Type: Consume Message Operation Name: Consume_message Consume Operation Parameters Destination Name: Press the Browse button, select Destination Type: Queues, then press Search. Wait for the list to populate, then select the entry for TestJMSQueue , which is the queue created in a previous example. JNDI Name: The JNDI name to use for the JMS connection. As in the previous example, this is probably the most common source of error. This is the JNDI name of the JMS adapter’s connection pool created in the WebLogic Server and which points to the connection factory. JDeveloper does not verify the value entered here. If you enter a wrong value, the JMS adapter won’t find the queue and you will get an error message at runtime, which is very difficult to trace. In our example, this is the value eis/wls/TestQueue . (See the earlier step on how to create a JMS Adapter Connection Pool in WebLogic Server for details.) Messages/Message SchemaURL: We will use the XSD file created during the previous example, in the JmsAdapterWriteSchema project to define the format for the incoming message payload and, at the same time, demonstrate how to import an existing XSD file into a JDeveloper project. Press the magnifying glass icon to search for schema files. In the Type Chooser, press the Import Schema File button. Select the magnifying glass next to URL to search for schema files. Navigate to the location of the JmsAdapterWriteSchema project > xsd and select the stringPayload.xsd file. Check the “Copy to Project” checkbox, press OK and confirm the following Localize Files popup. Now that the XSD file has been copied to the local project, it can be selected from the project’s schema files. Expand Project Schema Files > stringPayload.xsd and select exampleElement: string . Press Next and Finish, which will complete the JMS Adapter configuration.Save the project. Create a BPEL Component Drag a BPEL Process from the Component Palette (Service Components) to the Components section of the composite designer. Name it JmsAdapterReadSchema and select Template: Define Service Later and press OK. Wire the JMS Adapter to the BPEL Component Now wire the JMS adapter to the BPEL process, by dragging the arrow from the adapter to the BPEL process. A Transaction Properties popup will be displayed. Set the delivery mode to async.persist. This completes the steps at the composite level. 3 . Complete the BPEL Process Design Invoke the BPEL Flow via the JMS Adapter Open the BPEL component by double-clicking it in the design view of the composite.xml, or open it from the project navigator by selecting the JmsAdapterReadSchema.bpel file. This will display the BPEL process in the design view. You should see the JmsAdapterRead partner link in the left-hand swim lane. Drag a Receive activity onto the BPEL flow diagram, then drag a wire (left-hand yellow arrow) from it to the JMS adapter. This will open the Receive activity editor. Auto-generate the variable by pressing the green “+” button and check the “Create Instance” checkbox. This will result in a BPEL instance being created when a new JMS message is received. At this point it would actually be OK to compile and deploy the composite and it would pick up any messages from the JMS queue. In fact, you can do that to test it, if you like. But it is very rudimentary and would not be doing anything useful with the message. Also, you could only verify the actual message payload by looking at the instance’s flow in the Enterprise Manager. There are various other possibilities; we could pass the message to another web service, write it to a file using a file adapter or to a database via a database adapter etc. But these will all introduce unnecessary complications to our sample. So, to keep it simple, we will add a small piece of Java code to the BPEL process which will write the payload to standard output. This will be written to the server’s log file, which will be easy to monitor. Add a Java Embedding Activity First get the full name of the process’s input variable, as this will be needed for the Java code. Go to the Structure pane and expand Variables > Process > Variables. Then expand the input variable, for example, "Receive1_Consume_Message_InputVariable > body > ns2:exampleElement”, and note variable’s name and path, if they are different from this one. Drag a Java Embedding activity from the Component Palette (Oracle Extensions) to the BPEL flow, after the Receive activity, then open it to edit. Delete the example code and replace it with the following, replacing the variable parts with those in your sample, if necessary.: System.out.println("JmsAdapterReadSchema process picked up a message"); oracle.xml.parser.v2.XMLElement inputPayload =    (oracle.xml.parser.v2.XMLElement)getVariableData(                           "Receive1_Consume_Message_InputVariable",                           "body",                           "/ns2:exampleElement");   String inputString = inputPayload.getFirstChild().getNodeValue(); System.out.println("Input String is " + inputPayload.getFirstChild().getNodeValue()); Tip. If you are not sure of the exact syntax of the input variable, create an Assign activity in the BPEL process and copy the variable to another, temporary one. Then check the syntax created by the BPEL designer. This completes the BPEL process design in JDeveloper. Save, compile and deploy the process to the SOA server. 3. Test the Composite Shut Down the JmsAdapterReadSchema Composite After deploying the JmsAdapterReadSchema composite to the SOA server it is automatically activated. If there are already any messages in the queue, the adapter will begin polling them. To ease the testing process, we will deactivate the process first Log in to the Enterprise Manager (Fusion Middleware Control) and navigate to SOA > soa-infra (soa_server1) > default (or wherever you deployed your composite to) and click on JmsAdapterReadSchema [1.0] . Press the Shut Down button to disable the composite and confirm the following popup. Monitor Messages in the JMS Queue In a separate browser window, log in to the WebLogic Server Console and navigate to Services > Messaging > JMS Modules > TestJMSModule > TestJMSQueue > Monitoring. This is the location of the JMS queue we created in an earlier sample (see the prerequisites section of this sample). Check whether there are any messages already in the queue. If so, you can dequeue them using the QueueReceive Java program created in an earlier sample. This will ensure that the queue is empty and doesn’t contain any messages in the wrong format, which would cause the JmsAdapterReadSchema to fail. Send a Test Message In the Enterprise Manager, navigate to the JmsAdapterWriteSchema created earlier, press Test and send a test message, for example “Message from JmsAdapterWriteSchema”. Confirm that the message was written correctly to the queue by verifying it via the queue monitor in the WLS Console. Monitor the SOA Server’s Output A program deployed on the SOA server will write its standard output to the terminal window in which the server was started, unless this has been redirected to somewhere else, for example to a file. If it has not been redirected, go to the terminal session in which the server was started, otherwise open and monitor the file to which it was redirected. Re-Enable the JmsAdapterReadSchema Composite In the Enterprise Manager, navigate to the JmsAdapterReadSchema composite again and press Start Up to re-enable it. This should cause the JMS adapter to dequeue the test message and the following output should be written to the server’s standard output: JmsAdapterReadSchema process picked up a message. Input String is Message from JmsAdapterWriteSchema Note that you can also monitor the payload received by the process, by navigating to the the JmsAdapterReadSchema’s Instances tab in the Enterprise Manager. Then select the latest instance and view the flow of the BPEL component. The Receive activity will contain and display the dequeued message too. 4 . Troubleshooting This sample demonstrates how to dequeue an XML JMS message using a BPEL process and no additional functionality. For example, it doesn’t contain any error handling. Therefore, any errors in the payload will result in exceptions being written to the log file or standard output. If you get any errors related to the payload, such as Message handle error ... ORABPEL-09500 ... XPath expression failed to execute. An error occurs while processing the XPath expression; the expression is /ns2:exampleElement. ... etc. check that the variable used in the Java embedding part of the process was entered correctly. Possibly follow the tip mentioned in previous section. If this doesn’t help, you can delete the Java embedding part and simply verify the message via the flow diagram in the Enterprise Manager. Or use a different method, such as writing it to a file via a file adapter. This concludes this example. In the next post, we will begin with an AQ JMS example, which uses JMS to write to an Advanced Queue stored in the database. Best regards John-Brown Evans Oracle Technology Proactive Support Delivery

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  • Tricky SQL query involving consecutive values

    - by Gabriel
    I need to perform a relatively easy to explain but (given my somewhat limited skills) hard to write SQL query. Assume we have a table similar to this one: exam_no | name | surname | result | date ---------+------+---------+--------+------------ 1 | John | Doe | PASS | 2012-01-01 1 | Ryan | Smith | FAIL | 2012-01-02 <-- 1 | Ann | Evans | PASS | 2012-01-03 1 | Mary | Lee | FAIL | 2012-01-04 ... | ... | ... | ... | ... 2 | John | Doe | FAIL | 2012-02-01 <-- 2 | Ryan | Smith | FAIL | 2012-02-02 2 | Ann | Evans | FAIL | 2012-02-03 2 | Mary | Lee | PASS | 2012-02-04 ... | ... | ... | ... | ... 3 | John | Doe | FAIL | 2012-03-01 3 | Ryan | Smith | FAIL | 2012-03-02 3 | Ann | Evans | PASS | 2012-03-03 3 | Mary | Lee | FAIL | 2012-03-04 <-- Note that exam_no and date aren't necessarily related as one might expect from the kind of example I chose. Now, the query that I need to do is as follows: From the latest exam (exam_no = 3) find all the students that have failed (John Doe, Ryan Smith and Mary Lee). For each of these students find the date of the first of the batch of consecutively failing exams. Another way to put it would be: for each of these students find the date of the first failing exam that comes after their last passing exam. (Look at the arrows in the table). The resulting table should be something like this: name | surname | date_since_failing ------+---------+-------------------- John | Doe | 2012-02-01 Ryan | Smith | 2012-01-02 Mary | Lee | 2012-01-04 Ann | Evans | 2012-02-03 How can I perform such a query? Thank you for your time.

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  • Block All Keyboard Input in a Linux Application (Using Qt or Mono)

    - by Evans
    Hi, I'm working on a online quiz client where we use a dedicated custom-made linux distro which contains only the quiz client software along with text editors and other utility software. When the user has started the quiz, I want to prevent him/her from minimizing the window/closing it/switching to the desktop or other windows. The quizzes can be attempted using only the mouse, so I need the keyboard to be completed disabled for the period of the quiz. How could I do this, using Qt or Mono? I'm ready to use any low-level libraries/drivers, if required. Thanks Evans

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  • No internet via wifi/ethernet after 14.04 upgrade

    - by Rhys Evans
    I have just updated to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS on my laptop, and I seem to be having some internet problems. I have no internet connection through wifi or Ethernet, after both working in the previous version. I am not at all knowledgeable of Ubuntu and its workings, so if you could just tell me what to do, what to show you by just telling me commands etc. I think would be the only way I will understand sorry! I am asking this after many searches, all being in vein after needing a step involving some sort of internet access, which I can't get! So sorry if it has been answered somewhere, if so, please send me there! Cheers This is what I get when using sudo lspci -v: lspci -v

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  • JMS Step 1 - How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g

    - by John-Brown.Evans
    JMS Step 1 - How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g ol{margin:0;padding:0} .c5{vertical-align:top;width:156pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:0pt 2pt 0pt 2pt} .c7{list-style-type:disc;margin:0;padding:0} .c4{background-color:#ffffff} .c14{color:#1155cc;text-decoration:underline} .c6{height:11pt;text-align:center} .c13{color:inherit;text-decoration:inherit} .c3{padding-left:0pt;margin-left:36pt} .c0{border-collapse:collapse} .c12{text-align:center} .c1{direction:ltr} .c8{background-color:#f3f3f3} .c2{line-height:1.0} .c11{font-style:italic} .c10{height:11pt} .c9{font-weight:bold} .title{padding-top:24pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#000000;font-size:36pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:6pt}.subtitle{padding-top:18pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-style:italic;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Georgia";padding-bottom:4pt} li{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial"} p{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;margin:0;font-family:"Arial"} h1{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666;font-size:18pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h2{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666;font-size:14pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h3{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666;font-size:12pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h4{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666;font-style:italic;font-size:11pt;font-family:"Arial";padding-bottom:0pt} h5{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal;padding-bottom:0pt} h6{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666;font-style:italic;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";padding-bottom:0pt} This example shows the steps to create a simple JMS queue in WebLogic Server 11g for testing purposes. For example, to use with the two sample programs QueueSend.java and QueueReceive.java which will be shown in later examples. Additional, detailed information on JMS can be found in the following Oracle documentation: Oracle® Fusion Middleware Configuring and Managing JMS for Oracle WebLogic Server 11g Release 1 (10.3.6) Part Number E13738-06 http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E23943_01/web.1111/e13738/toc.htm 1. Introduction and Definitions A JMS queue in Weblogic Server is associated with a number of additional resources: JMS Server A JMS server acts as a management container for resources within JMS modules. Some of its responsibilities include the maintenance of persistence and state of messages and subscribers. A JMS server is required in order to create a JMS module. JMS Module A JMS module is a definition which contains JMS resources such as queues and topics. A JMS module is required in order to create a JMS queue. Subdeployment JMS modules are targeted to one or more WLS instances or a cluster. Resources within a JMS module, such as queues and topics are also targeted to a JMS server or WLS server instances. A subdeployment is a grouping of targets. It is also known as advanced targeting. Connection Factory A connection factory is a resource that enables JMS clients to create connections to JMS destinations. JMS Queue A JMS queue (as opposed to a JMS topic) is a point-to-point destination type. A message is written to a specific queue or received from a specific queue. The objects used in this example are: Object Name Type JNDI Name TestJMSServer JMS Server TestJMSModule JMS Module TestSubDeployment Subdeployment TestConnectionFactory Connection Factory jms/TestConnectionFactory TestJMSQueue JMS Queue jms/TestJMSQueue 2. Configuration Steps The following steps are done in the WebLogic Server Console, beginning with the left-hand navigation menu. 2.1 Create a JMS Server Services > Messaging > JMS Servers Select New Name: TestJMSServer Persistent Store: (none) Target: soa_server1  (or choose an available server) Finish The JMS server should now be visible in the list with Health OK. 2.2 Create a JMS Module Services > Messaging > JMS Modules Select New Name: TestJMSModule Leave the other options empty Targets: soa_server1  (or choose the same one as the JMS server)Press Next Leave “Would you like to add resources to this JMS system module” unchecked and  press Finish . 2.3 Create a SubDeployment A subdeployment is not necessary for the JMS queue to work, but it allows you to easily target subcomponents of the JMS module to a single target or group of targets. We will use the subdeployment in this example to target the following connection factory and JMS queue to the JMS server we created earlier. Services > Messaging > JMS Modules Select TestJMSModule Select the Subdeployments  tab and New Subdeployment Name: TestSubdeployment Press Next Here you can select the target(s) for the subdeployment. You can choose either Servers (i.e. WebLogic managed servers, such as the soa_server1) or JMS Servers such as the JMS Server created earlier. As the purpose of our subdeployment in this example is to target a specific JMS server, we will choose the JMS Server option. Select the TestJMSServer created earlier Press Finish 2.4  Create a Connection Factory Services > Messaging > JMS Modules Select TestJMSModule  and press New Select Connection Factory  and Next Name: TestConnectionFactory JNDI Name: jms/TestConnectionFactory Leave the other values at default On the Targets page, select the Advanced Targeting  button and select TestSubdeployment Press Finish The connection factory should be listed on the following page with TestSubdeployment and TestJMSServer as the target. 2.5 Create a JMS Queue Services > Messaging > JMS Modules Select TestJMSModule  and press New Select Queue and Next Name: TestJMSQueueJNDI Name: jms/TestJMSQueueTemplate: NonePress Next Subdeployments: TestSubdeployment Finish The TestJMSQueue should be listed on the following page with TestSubdeployment and TestJMSServer. Confirm the resources for the TestJMSModule. Using the Domain Structure tree, navigate to soa_domain > Services > Messaging > JMS Modules then select TestJMSModule You should see the following resources The JMS queue is now complete and can be accessed using the JNDI names jms/TestConnectionFactory andjms/TestJMSQueue. In the following blog post in this series, I will show you how to write a message to this queue, using the WebLogic sample Java program QueueSend.java.

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  • Cannot locate packages for Citrix install

    - by Noel Evans
    I'm trying to get a Citrix receiver installed on to Ubuntu 14.04 (64 bit) following Ubuntu's docs. The first line of instructions say to get these required packages: sudo apt-get install libmotif4:i386 nspluginwrapper lib32z1 libc6-i386 libxp6:i386 libxpm4:i386 libasound2:i386 But if I paste in that line, I get this error: Reading state information... Done E: Unable to locate package libmotif4 E: Unable to locate package libxp6 E: Unable to locate package libxpm4 E: Unable to locate package libasound2 My repository settings are below. Is there anything I'm missing in there? Otherwise what do I need to do to install these? $ cat /etc/apt/sources.list deb cdrom:[Ubuntu 14.04 LTS _Trusty Tahr_ - Release amd64 (20140417)]/ precise main restricted deb cdrom:[Ubuntu 14.04 LTS _Trusty Tahr_ - Release amd64 (20140417)]/ trusty main restricted deb-src http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu trusty main restricted #Added by software-properties deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ trusty main restricted universe multiverse deb-src http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ trusty main restricted universe multiverse #Added by software-properties deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ trusty-security main restricted universe multiverse deb-src http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ trusty-security main restricted universe multiverse #Added by software-properties deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ trusty-updates main restricted universe multiverse deb-src http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ trusty-updates main restricted universe multiverse #Added by software-properties deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ trusty-proposed main universe restricted multiverse deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ trusty-backports main universe restricted multiverse

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  • JMS Step 3 - Using the QueueReceive.java Sample Program to Read a Message from a JMS Queue

    - by John-Brown.Evans
    JMS Step 3 - Using the QueueReceive.java Sample Program to Read a Message from a JMS Queue ol{margin:0;padding:0} .c18_3{vertical-align:top;width:487.3pt;border-style:solid;background-color:#f3f3f3;border-color:#000000;border-width:1pt;padding:0pt 5pt 0pt 5pt} .c20_3{vertical-align:top;width:487.3pt;border-style:solid;border-color:#ffffff;border-width:1pt;padding:5pt 5pt 5pt 5pt} .c19_3{background-color:#ffffff} .c17_3{list-style-type:circle;margin:0;padding:0} .c12_3{list-style-type:disc;margin:0;padding:0} .c6_3{font-style:italic;font-weight:bold} .c10_3{color:inherit;text-decoration:inherit} .c1_3{font-size:10pt;font-family:"Courier New"} .c2_3{line-height:1.0;direction:ltr} .c9_3{padding-left:0pt;margin-left:72pt} .c15_3{padding-left:0pt;margin-left:36pt} .c3_3{color:#1155cc;text-decoration:underline} .c5_3{height:11pt} .c14_3{border-collapse:collapse} .c7_3{font-family:"Courier New"} .c0_3{background-color:#ffff00} .c16_3{font-size:18pt} .c8_3{font-weight:bold} .c11_3{font-size:24pt} .c13_3{font-style:italic} .c4_3{direction:ltr} .title{padding-top:24pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#000000;font-size:36pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:bold;padding-bottom:6pt}.subtitle{padding-top:18pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#666666;font-style:italic;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Georgia";padding-bottom:4pt} li{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial"} p{color:#000000;font-size:10pt;margin:0;font-family:"Arial"} h1{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:24pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h2{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:18pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h3{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:14pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h4{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:12pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h5{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:11pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} h6{padding-top:0pt;line-height:1.15;text-align:left;color:#888;font-size:10pt;font-family:"Arial";font-weight:normal} This post continues the series of JMS articles which demonstrate how to use JMS queues in a SOA context. In the first post, JMS Step 1 - How to Create a Simple JMS Queue in Weblogic Server 11g we looked at how to create a JMS queue and its dependent objects in WebLogic Server. In the previous post, JMS Step 2 - Using the QueueSend.java Sample Program to Send a Message to a JMS Queue I showed how to write a message to that JMS queue using the QueueSend.java sample program. In this article, we will use a similar sample, the QueueReceive.java program to read the message from that queue. Please review the previous posts if you have not already done so, as they contain prerequisites for executing the sample in this article. 1. Source code The following java code will be used to read the message(s) from the JMS queue. As with the previous example, it is based on a sample program shipped with the WebLogic Server installation. The sample is not installed by default, but needs to be installed manually using the WebLogic Server Custom Installation option, together with many, other useful samples. You can either copy-paste the following code into your editor, or install all the samples. The knowledge base article in My Oracle Support: How To Install WebLogic Server and JMS Samples in WLS 10.3.x (Doc ID 1499719.1) describes how to install the samples. QueueReceive.java package examples.jms.queue; import java.util.Hashtable; import javax.jms.*; import javax.naming.Context; import javax.naming.InitialContext; import javax.naming.NamingException; /** * This example shows how to establish a connection to * and receive messages from a JMS queue. The classes in this * package operate on the same JMS queue. Run the classes together to * witness messages being sent and received, and to browse the queue * for messages. This class is used to receive and remove messages * from the queue. * * @author Copyright (c) 1999-2005 by BEA Systems, Inc. All Rights Reserved. */ public class QueueReceive implements MessageListener { // Defines the JNDI context factory. public final static String JNDI_FACTORY="weblogic.jndi.WLInitialContextFactory"; // Defines the JMS connection factory for the queue. public final static String JMS_FACTORY="jms/TestConnectionFactory"; // Defines the queue. public final static String QUEUE="jms/TestJMSQueue"; private QueueConnectionFactory qconFactory; private QueueConnection qcon; private QueueSession qsession; private QueueReceiver qreceiver; private Queue queue; private boolean quit = false; /** * Message listener interface. * @param msg message */ public void onMessage(Message msg) { try { String msgText; if (msg instanceof TextMessage) { msgText = ((TextMessage)msg).getText(); } else { msgText = msg.toString(); } System.out.println("Message Received: "+ msgText ); if (msgText.equalsIgnoreCase("quit")) { synchronized(this) { quit = true; this.notifyAll(); // Notify main thread to quit } } } catch (JMSException jmse) { System.err.println("An exception occurred: "+jmse.getMessage()); } } /** * Creates all the necessary objects for receiving * messages from a JMS queue. * * @param ctx JNDI initial context * @param queueName name of queue * @exception NamingException if operation cannot be performed * @exception JMSException if JMS fails to initialize due to internal error */ public void init(Context ctx, String queueName) throws NamingException, JMSException { qconFactory = (QueueConnectionFactory) ctx.lookup(JMS_FACTORY); qcon = qconFactory.createQueueConnection(); qsession = qcon.createQueueSession(false, Session.AUTO_ACKNOWLEDGE); queue = (Queue) ctx.lookup(queueName); qreceiver = qsession.createReceiver(queue); qreceiver.setMessageListener(this); qcon.start(); } /** * Closes JMS objects. * @exception JMSException if JMS fails to close objects due to internal error */ public void close()throws JMSException { qreceiver.close(); qsession.close(); qcon.close(); } /** * main() method. * * @param args WebLogic Server URL * @exception Exception if execution fails */ public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception { if (args.length != 1) { System.out.println("Usage: java examples.jms.queue.QueueReceive WebLogicURL"); return; } InitialContext ic = getInitialContext(args[0]); QueueReceive qr = new QueueReceive(); qr.init(ic, QUEUE); System.out.println( "JMS Ready To Receive Messages (To quit, send a \"quit\" message)."); // Wait until a "quit" message has been received. synchronized(qr) { while (! qr.quit) { try { qr.wait(); } catch (InterruptedException ie) {} } } qr.close(); } private static InitialContext getInitialContext(String url) throws NamingException { Hashtable env = new Hashtable(); env.put(Context.INITIAL_CONTEXT_FACTORY, JNDI_FACTORY); env.put(Context.PROVIDER_URL, url); return new InitialContext(env); } } 2. How to Use This Class 2.1 From the file system on Linux This section describes how to use the class from the file system of a WebLogic Server installation. Log in to a machine with a WebLogic Server installation and create a directory to contain the source and code matching the package name, e.g. span$HOME/examples/jms/queue. Copy the above QueueReceive.java file to this directory. Set the CLASSPATH and environment to match the WebLogic server environment. Go to $MIDDLEWARE_HOME/user_projects/domains/base_domain/bin  and execute . ./setDomainEnv.sh Collect the following information required to run the script: The JNDI name of the JMS queue to use In the WebLogic server console > Services > Messaging > JMS Modules > Module name, (e.g. TestJMSModule) > JMS queue name, (e.g. TestJMSQueue) select the queue and note its JNDI name, e.g. jms/TestJMSQueue The JNDI name of the connection factory to use to connect to the queue Follow the same path as above to get the connection factory for the above queue, e.g. TestConnectionFactory and its JNDI name e.g. jms/TestConnectionFactory The URL and port of the WebLogic server running the above queue Check the JMS server for the above queue and the managed server it is targeted to, for example soa_server1. Now find the port this managed server is listening on, by looking at its entry under Environment > Servers in the WLS console, e.g. 8001 The URL for the server to be passed to the QueueReceive program will therefore be t3://host.domain:8001 e.g. t3://jbevans-lx.de.oracle.com:8001 Edit Queue Receive .java and enter the above queue name and connection factory respectively under ... public final static String JMS_FACTORY="jms/TestConnectionFactory"; ... public final static String QUEUE="jms/TestJMSQueue"; ... Compile Queue Receive .java using javac Queue Receive .java Go to the source’s top-level directory and execute it using java examples.jms.queue.Queue Receive   t3://jbevans-lx.de.oracle.com:8001 This will print a message that it is ready to receive messages or to send a “quit” message to end. The program will read all messages in the queue and print them to the standard output until it receives a message with the payload “quit”. 2.2 From JDeveloper The steps from JDeveloper are the same as those used for the previous program QueueSend.java, which is used to send a message to the queue. So we won't repeat them here. Please see the previous blog post at JMS Step 2 - Using the QueueSend.java Sample Program to Send a Message to a JMS Queue and apply the same steps in that example to the QueueReceive.java program. This concludes the example. In the following post we will create a BPEL process which writes a message based on an XML schema to the queue.

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