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  • Oracle Retail Point-of-Service with Mobile Point-of-Service, Release 13.4.1

    - by Oracle Retail Documentation Team
    Oracle Retail Mobile Point-of-Service was previously released as a standalone product. Oracle Retail Mobile Point-of-Service is now a supported extension of Oracle Retail Point-of-Service, Release 13.4.1. Oracle Retail Mobile Point-of-Service provides support for using a mobile device to perform tasks such as scanning items, applying price adjustments, tendering, and looking up item information. Integration with Oracle Retail Store Inventory Management (SIM) If Oracle Retail Mobile Point-of-Service is implemented with Oracle Retail Store Inventory Management (SIM), the following Oracle Retail Store Inventory Management functionality is supported: Inventory lookup at the current store Inventory lookup at buddy stores Validation of serial numbers Technical Overview The Oracle Retail Mobile Point-of-Service server application runs in a domain on Oracle WebLogic. The server supports the mobile devices in the store. On each mobile device, the Mobile POS application is downloaded and then installed. Highlighted End User Documentation Updates and List of Documents  Oracle Retail Point-of-Service with Mobile Point-of-Service Release NotesA high-level overview is included about the release's functional, technical, and documentation enhancements. In addition, a section has been written that addresses Product Support considerations.   Oracle Retail Mobile Point-of-Service Java API ReferenceJava API documentation for Oracle Retail Mobile Point-of-Service is included as part of the Oracle Retail Mobile Point-of-Service Release 13.4.1 documentation set. Oracle Retail Point-of-Service with Mobile Point-of-Service Installation Guide - Volume 1, Oracle StackA new chapter is included with information on installing the Mobile Point-of-Service server and setting up the Mobile POS application. The installer screens for installing the server are included in a new appendix. Oracle Retail Point-of-Service with Mobile Point-of-Service User GuideA new chapter describes the functionality available on a mobile device and how to use Oracle Retail Mobile Point-of-Service on a mobile device. Oracle Retail POS Suite with Mobile Point-of-Service Configuration GuideThe Configuration Guide is updated to indicate which parameters are used for Oracle Retail Mobile Point-of-Service. Oracle Retail POS Suite with Mobile Point-of-Service Implementation Guide - Volume 5, Mobile Point-of-ServiceThis new Implementation Guide volume contains information for extending and customizing both the Mobile POS application for the mobile device and the Oracle Retail Mobile Point-of-Service server. Oracle Retail POS Suite with Mobile Point-of-Service Licensing InformationThe Licensing Information document is updated with the list of third-party open-source software used by Oracle Retail Mobile Point-of-Service. Oracle Retail POS Suite with Mobile Point-of-Service Security GuideThe Security Guide is updated with information on security for mobile devices. Oracle Retail Enhancements Summary (My Oracle Support Doc ID 1088183.1)This enterprise level document captures the major changes for all the products that are part of releases 13.2, 13.3, and 13.4. The functional, integration, and technical enhancements in the Release Notes for each product are listed in this document.

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  • Floating point conversion from Fixed point algorithm

    - by Viks
    Hi, I have an application which is using 24 bit fixed point calculation.I am porting it to a hardware which does support floating point, so for speed optimization I need to convert all fixed point based calculation to floating point based calculation. For this code snippet, It is calculating mantissa for(i=0;i<8207;i++) { // Do n^8/7 calculation and store // it in mantissa and exponent, scaled to // fixed point precision. } So since this calculation, does convert an integer to mantissa and exponent scaled to fixed point precision(23 bit). When I tried converting it to float, by dividing the mantissa part by precision bits and subtracting the exponent part by precision bit, it really does' t work. Please help suggesting a better way of doing it.

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  • adding onTap method on path direction between 2 point

    - by idham
    I have a problem in my Android application I have a path direction on my application and I want to add an onTap method for the path, so if I touch that path my application will display information with alert dialog. This my activity code: hasilrute hr = new hasilrute(); for (int k = 0;k < hr.r2.size(); k++){ String angkot = hr.r2.get(i).angkot; Cursor c = db.getLatLong(hasilrute.a); Cursor cc = db.getLatLong(hasilrute.b); String x = (c.getString(3)+","+c.getString(2)); String xx = (cc.getString(3)+","+cc.getString(2)); String pairs[] = getDirectionData(x, xx); String[] lnglat = pairs[0].split(","); GeoPoint point = new GeoPoint((int) (Double.parseDouble(lnglat[1]) *1E6),(int)(Double.parseDouble(lnglat[0]) * 1E6)); GeoPoint gp1; GeoPoint gp2 = point; for (int j = 1;j < pairs.length; j++){ lnglat = pairs[j].split(","); gp1 = gp2; gp2 = new GeoPoint((int) (Double.parseDouble(lnglat[1]) *1E6),(int) (Double.parseDouble(lnglat[0]) * 1E6)); mapView.getOverlays().add(new jalur(gp1, gp2,angkot)); } } and it's my jalur.java code public class jalur extends Overlay { private GeoPoint gp1; private GeoPoint gp2; private String angkot; private Context mContext; public jalur(GeoPoint gp1, GeoPoint gp2, String angkot){ this.gp1 = gp1; this.gp2 = gp2; this.angkot = angkot; } @Override public boolean draw(Canvas canvas, MapView mapView, boolean shadow, long when){ Projection projection = mapView.getProjection(); if (shadow == false){ if (angkot.equals("Cimahi-Leuwipanjang")){ Paint paint = new Paint(); paint.setAntiAlias(true); Point point = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp1,point); Point point2 = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp2, point2); paint.setColor(Color.rgb(118,171,127)); paint.setStrokeWidth(2); canvas.drawLine((float) point.x, (float) point.y, (float) point2.x, (float) point2.y, paint); }if (angkot.equals("Cimahi-Cangkorah")){ Paint paint = new Paint(); paint.setAntiAlias(true); Point point = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp1,point); Point point2 = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp2, point2); paint.setColor(Color.rgb(67,204,255)); paint.setStrokeWidth(2); canvas.drawLine((float) point.x, (float) point.y, (float) point2.x, (float) point2.y, paint); }if (angkot.equals("Cimindi-Cipatik")){ Paint paint = new Paint(); paint.setAntiAlias(true); Point point = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp1,point); Point point2 = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp2, point2); paint.setColor(Color.rgb(42,82,0)); paint.setStrokeWidth(2); canvas.drawLine((float) point.x, (float) point.y, (float) point2.x, (float) point2.y, paint); }if (angkot.equals("Jalan Kaki")){ Paint paint = new Paint(); paint.setAntiAlias(true); Point point = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp1,point); Point point2 = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp2, point2); paint.setColor(Color.rgb(0,0,0)); paint.setStrokeWidth(2); canvas.drawLine((float) point.x, (float) point.y, (float) point2.x, (float) point2.y, paint); }if (angkot.equals("Cimahi-Padalarang")){ Paint paint = new Paint(); paint.setAntiAlias(true); Point point = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp1,point); Point point2 = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp2, point2); paint.setColor(Color.rgb(229,66,66)); paint.setStrokeWidth(2); canvas.drawLine((float) point.x, (float) point.y, (float) point2.x, (float) point2.y, paint); } if (angkot.equals("Pasantren-Sarijadi")){ Paint paint = new Paint(); paint.setAntiAlias(true); Point point = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp1,point); Point point2 = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp2, point2); paint.setColor(Color.rgb(4,39,255)); paint.setStrokeWidth(2); canvas.drawLine((float) point.x, (float) point.y, (float) point2.x, (float) point2.y, paint); }if (angkot.equals("Cimahi-Parongpong")){ Paint paint = new Paint(); paint.setAntiAlias(true); Point point = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp1,point); Point point2 = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp2, point2); paint.setColor(Color.rgb(141,0,200)); paint.setStrokeWidth(2); canvas.drawLine((float) point.x, (float) point.y, (float) point2.x, (float) point2.y, paint); }if (angkot.equals("Cimahi-Cibeber")){ Paint paint = new Paint(); paint.setAntiAlias(true); Point point = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp1,point); Point point2 = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp2, point2); paint.setColor(Color.rgb(255,246,0)); paint.setStrokeWidth(2); canvas.drawLine((float) point.x, (float) point.y, (float) point2.x, (float) point2.y, paint); }if (angkot.equals("Cimahi-Cimindi")){ Paint paint = new Paint(); paint.setAntiAlias(true); Point point = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp1,point); Point point2 = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp2, point2); paint.setColor(Color.rgb(220,145,251)); paint.setStrokeWidth(2); canvas.drawLine((float) point.x, (float) point.y, (float) point2.x, (float) point2.y, paint); }if (angkot.equals("Cimahi-Contong")){ Paint paint = new Paint(); paint.setAntiAlias(true); Point point = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp1,point); Point point2 = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp2, point2); paint.setColor(Color.rgb(242,138,138)); paint.setStrokeWidth(2); canvas.drawLine((float) point.x, (float) point.y, (float) point2.x, (float) point2.y, paint); }if (angkot.equals("Cimahi-Soreang")){ Paint paint = new Paint(); paint.setAntiAlias(true); Point point = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp1,point); Point point2 = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp2, point2); paint.setColor(Color.rgb(0,255,78)); paint.setStrokeWidth(2); canvas.drawLine((float) point.x, (float) point.y, (float) point2.x, (float) point2.y, paint); }if (angkot.equals("Cimahi-Batujajar")){ Paint paint = new Paint(); paint.setAntiAlias(true); Point point = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp1,point); Point point2 = new Point(); projection.toPixels(gp2, point2); paint.setColor(Color.rgb(137,217,51)); paint.setStrokeWidth(2); canvas.drawLine((float) point.x, (float) point.y, (float) point2.x, (float) point2.y, paint); } } return super.draw(canvas, mapView, shadow, when); } @Override public void draw(Canvas canvas, MapView mapView, boolean shadow){ super.draw(canvas, mapView, shadow); } } thanks for your attention :)

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  • Floating point precision in Visual C++

    - by Luigi Giaccari
    HI, I am trying to use the robust predicates for computational geometry from Jonathan Richard Shewchuk. I am not a programmer, so I am not even sure of what I am saying, I may be doing some basic mistake. The point is the predicates should allow for precise aritmthetic with adaptive floating point precision. On my computer: Asus pro31/S (Core Due Centrino Processor) they do not work. The problem may stay in the fact the my computer may use some improvements in the floating point precision taht conflicts with the one used by Shewchuk. The author says: /* On some machines, the exact arithmetic routines might be defeated by the / / use of internal extended precision floating-point registers. Sometimes / / this problem can be fixed by defining certain values to be volatile, / / thus forcing them to be stored to memory and rounded off. This isn't / / a great solution, though, as it slows the arithmetic down. */ Now what I would like to know is that there is a way, maybe some compiler option, to turn off the internal extended precision floating-point registers. I really appriaciate your help

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  • ray collision with rectangle and floating point accuracy

    - by phq
    I'm trying to solve a problem with a ray bouncing on a box. Actually it is a sphere but for simplicity the box dimensions are expanded by the sphere radius when doing the collision test making the sphere a single ray. It is done by projecting the ray onto all faces of the box and pick the one that is closest. However because I'm using floating point variables I fear that the projected point onto the surface might be interpreted as being below in the next iteration, also I will later allow the sphere to move which might make that scenario more likely. Also the bounce coefficient might be as low as zero, making the sphere continue along the surface. So my naive solution is to project not only forwards but backwards to catch those cases. That is where I got into problems shown in the figure: In the first iteration the first black arrow is calculated and we end up at a point on the surface of the box. In the second iteration the "back projection" hits the other surface making the second black arrow bounce on the wrong surface. If there are several boxes close to each other this has further consequences making the sphere fall through them all. So my main question is how to handle possible floating point accuracy when placing the sphere on the box surface so it does not fall through. In writing this question I got the idea to have a threshold to only accept back projections a certain amount much smaller than the box but larger than the possible accuracy limitation, this would only cause the "false" back projection when the sphere hit the box on an edge which would appear naturally. To clarify my original approach, the arrows shown in the image is not only the path the sphere travels but is also representing a single time step in the simulation. In reality the time step is much smaller about 0.05 of the box size. The path traveled is projected onto possible sides to avoid traveling past a thinner object at higher speeds. In normal situations the floating point accuracy is not an issue but there are two situations where I have the concern. When the new position at the end of the time step is located very close to the surface, very unlikely though. When using a bounce factor of 0, here it happens every time the sphere hit a box. To add some loss of accuracy, the motivation for my concern, is that the sphere and box are in different coordinate systems and thus the sphere location is transformed for every test. This last one is why I'm not willing to stand on luck that one floating point value lying on top of the box always will be interpreted the same. I did not know voronoi regions by name, but looking at it I'm not sure how it would be used in a projection scenario that I'm using here.

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  • Floating point equality and tolerances

    - by doron
    Comparing two floating point number by something like a_float == b_float is looking for trouble since a_float / 3.0 * 3.0 might not be equal to a_float due to round off error. What one normally does is something like fabs(a_float - b_float) < tol. How does one calculate tol? Ideally tolerance should be just larger than the value of one or two of the least significant figures. So if the single precision floating point number is use tol = 10E-6 should be about right. However this does not work well for the general case where a_float might be very small or might be very large. How does one calculate tol correctly for all general cases? I am interested in C or C++ cases specifically.

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  • Floating point inaccuracy examples

    - by David Rutten
    How do you explain floating point inaccuracy to fresh programmers and laymen who still think computers are infinitely wise and accurate? Do you have a favourite example or anecdote which seems to get the idea across much better than an precise, but dry, explanation? How is this taught in Computer Science classes?

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  • Obtaining a world point from a screen point with an orthographic projection

    - by vargonian
    I assumed this was a straightforward problem but it has been plaguing me for days. I am creating a 2D game with an orthographic camera. I am using a 3D camera rather than just hacking it because I want to support rotating, panning, and zooming. Unfortunately the math overwhelms me when I'm trying to figure out how to determine if a clicked point intersects a bounds (let's say rectangular) in the game. I was under the impression that I could simply transform the screen point (the clicked point) by the inverse of the camera's View * Projection matrix to obtain the world coordinates of the clicked point. Unfortunately this is not the case at all; I get some point that seems to be in some completely different coordinate system. So then as a sanity check I tried taking an arbitrary world point and transforming it by the camera's View*Projection matrices. Surely this should get me the corresponding screen point, but even that didn't work, and it is quickly shattering any illusion I had that I understood 3D coordinate systems and the math involved. So, if I could form this into a question: How would I use my camera's state information (view and projection matrices, for instance) to transform a world point to a screen point, and vice versa? I hope the problem will be simpler since I'm using an orthographic camera and can make several assumptions from that. I very much appreciate any help. If it makes a difference, I'm using XNA Game Studio.

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  • Will fixed-point arithmetic be worth my trouble?

    - by Thomas
    I'm working on a fluid dynamics Navier-Stokes solver that should run in real time. Hence, performance is important. Right now, I'm looking at a number of tight loops that each account for a significant fraction of the execution time: there is no single bottleneck. Most of these loops do some floating-point arithmetic, but there's a lot of branching in between. The floating-point operations are mostly limited to additions, subtractions, multiplications, divisions and comparisons. All this is done using 32-bit floats. My target platform is x86 with at least SSE1 instructions. (I've verified in the assembler output that the compiler indeed generates SSE instructions.) Most of the floating-point values that I'm working with have a reasonably small upper bound, and precision for near-zero values isn't very important. So the thought occurred to me: maybe switching to fixed-point arithmetic could speed things up? I know the only way to be really sure is to measure it, that might take days, so I'd like to know the odds of success beforehand. Fixed-point was all the rage back in the days of Doom, but I'm not sure where it stands anno 2010. Considering how much silicon is nowadays pumped into floating-point performance, is there a chance that fixed-point arithmetic will still give me a significant speed boost? Does anyone have any real-world experience that may apply to my situation?

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  • Convert pre-IEEE-574 C++ floating-point numbers to/from C#

    - by Richard Kucia
    Before .Net, before math coprocessors, before IEEE-574, Microsoft defined a bit pattern for floating-point numbers. Old versions of the C++ compiler happily used that definition. I am writing a C# app that needs to read/write such floating-point numbers in a file. How can I do the conversions between the 2 bit formats? I need conversion methods in both directions. This app is going to run in a PocketPC/WinCE environment. Changing the structure of the file is out-of-scope for this project. Is there a C++ compiler option that instructs it to use the old FP format? That would be ideal. I could then exchange data between the C# code and C++ code by using a null-terminated text string, and the C++ methods would be simple wrappers around sprintf and atof functions. At the very least, I'm hoping someone can reply with the bit definitions for the old FP format, so I can put together a low-level bit manipulation algorithm if necessary. Thanks.

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  • Manipulating and comparing floating points in java

    - by Praneeth
    In Java the floating point arithmetic is not represented precisely. For example following snippet of code float a = 1.2; float b= 3.0; float c = a * b; if(c == 3.6){ System.out.println("c is 3.6"); } else { System.out.println("c is not 3.6"); } actually prints "c is not 3.6". I'm not interested in precision beyond 3 decimals (#.###). How can I deal with this problem to multiply floats and compare them reliably? Thanks much

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  • Another floating point question

    - by jeffmax329
    I have read most of the posts on here regarding floating point, and I understand the basic underlying issue that using IEEE 754 (and just by the nature of storing numbers in binary) certain fractions cannot be represented. I am trying to figure out the following: If both Python and JavaScript use the IEEE 754 standard, why is it that executing the following in Python .1 + .1 Results in 0.20000000000000001 (which is to be expected) Where as in Javascript (in at least Chrome and Firefox) the answer is .2 However performing .1 + .2 In both languages results in 0.30000000000000004 In addition, executing var a = 0.3; in JavaScript and printing a results in 0.3 Where as doing a = 0.3 in Python results in 0.29999999999999999 I would like to understand the reason for this difference in behavior. In addition, many of the posts on OS link to a JavaScript port of Java's BigDecimal, but the link is dead. Does anyone have a copy?

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  • Why are floating point values so prolific?

    - by Kibbee
    So, title says it all. Why are floating point values so prolific in computer programming. Due to problems like rounding errors, and not being able to even accurately represent numbers such as 0.1, I really can't see how they got as far as they did. I understand that the computation is faster with floating point numbers, however, I can think of only a few cases that they actually the right data type would be using. If you sat back and think about every time you used a floating point value, how many times did you say, well, some error would be ok, as long as the result was a few microseconds faster. It really makes me think because Jeff was talking about NP completeness, and how heuristics give an answer that is kind of right. And well, computers shouldn't do that. They should give you the answer that is correct. Yet we see floating point values used in many applications where they are completely not valid. What really bugs me, isn't that floating point exists, but that in many languages, there isn't even a viable alternative, non-floating point, decimal value. A lot of programmers when doing financial applications have to fall back to storing the number of cents in an integer field. Which brings with it all kinds of other problems. Why do floats continue to be so prolific, even though they can't represent the real answer, and we expect computers to be accurate? [EDIT] Just to clarify, I was talking about Base 2 floating points, and not base 10 floating points. .Net offers the Decimal data type, which is a base 10 floating point value which offers a much better representation of the numbers we deal with on a daily basis in most computer programs. I find it hard to believe that even modern languages like Java don't support base 10 floating point values, unless you want to move into the realm of things like BigDecimal, which isn't really the right answer either in a lot of situations.

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  • C++ floating point precision

    - by Davinel
    double a = 0.3; std::cout.precision(20); std::cout << a << std::endl; result: 0.2999999999999999889 double a, b; a = 0.3; b = 0; for (char i = 1; i <= 50; i++) { b = b + a; }; std::cout.precision(20); std::cout << b << std::endl; result: 15.000000000000014211 So.. 'a' is smaller than it should be. But if we take 'a' 50 times - result will be bigger than it should be. Why is this? And how to get correct result in this case?

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  • Floating point comparison in STL, BOOST

    - by Paul
    Is there in the STL or in Boost a set of generic simple comparison functions? The one I found are always requiring template parameters, and/or instantiation of a struct template. I'm looking for something with a syntax like : if ( is_greater(x,y) ) { ... } Which could be implemented as : template <typename T> bool is_greater(const T& x, const T& y) { return x > y + Precision<T>::eps; }

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  • Matlab Simulation: Point (symbol) Moving from start point to end point and back

    - by niko
    Hi, I would like to create an animation to demonstrate LDPC coding which is based on Sum-Product Algorithm So far I have created a graph which shows the connections between symbol nodes (left) and parity nodes (right) and would like to animate points travelling from symbol to parity nodes and back. The figure is drawn by executing the following method: function drawVertices(H) hold on; nodesCount = size(H); parityNodesCount = nodesCount(1); symbolNodesCount = nodesCount(2); symbolPoints = zeros(symbolNodesCount, 2); symbolPoints(:, 1) = 0; for i = 0 : symbolNodesCount - 1 ji = symbolNodesCount - i; scatter(0, ji) symbolPoints(i + 1, 2) = ji; end; parityPoints = zeros(parityNodesCount, 2); parityPoints(:, 1) = 10; for i = 0 : parityNodesCount - 1 ji = parityNodesCount - i; y0 = symbolNodesCount/2 - parityNodesCount/2; scatter(10, y0 + ji) parityPoints(i + 1, 2) = y0 + ji; end; axis([-1 11 -1 symbolNodesCount + 2]); axis off %connect vertices d = size(H); for i = 1 : d(1) for j = 1 : d(2) if(H(i, j) == 1) plot([parityPoints(i, 1) symbolPoints(j, 1)], [parityPoints(i, 2) symbolPoints(j, 2)]); end; end; end; So what I would like to do here is to add another method which takes start point (x and y) and end point as arguments and animates a travelling circle (dot) from start to end and back along the displayed lines. I would appreciate if anyone of you could show the solution or suggest any useful tutorial about matlab simulations. Thank you!

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  • 12.04 WiFi issue on a particular access point

    - by user71706
    I have a WiFi access point that I connect to a PC to share its Internet connection with multiple machines, in a training environment. All the machines with 11.04 connect to this access point with no problem, and can access any server on the Internet. These machines have an Intel Wireless -N 1030 BGN chipset (as reported by lspci). Now, my problem is that I don't manage to connect 12.04 machines to this wireless network. The systems I tried do manage to connect (confirmed by Network Manager), but when I try to access a website like http://kernel.org, the browser shows "Connecting to kernel.org...", but displays a "The connection has timed out" error page. Other symptoms: Name resolution works (for example 'nslookup kernel.org') finds kernel.org's IP address 'ping kernel.org' doesn't work The same 12.04 machines have no problem at all with other wireless networks. So there is probably something weird in my access point (though the 11.04 machines are not impacted). Would you have any suggestions for investigating this issue? Thanks, Michael.

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  • a floating toolbar in WTL

    - by freefallr
    I've created a multimedia app that uses DirectShow to display multiple media streams simultaneously. The app is a WTL MDI application. For video windows, I use a CWindowImpl derived class - one per CChildFrame. I'd like to add controls to the video windows (volume ctrls etc). I'd initially thought about adding a slider (volume) control and a couple of buttons to a context menu - but later thought that this might not be the best approach. I was looking at MS Word 2007 - which has a floating toolbar that allows you to change options on highlighted text. I'd like to implement a similar floating toolbar for the video controls. I googled around a bit and found an old post about floating toolbars in WTL. The response was - for a floating toolbar, create a popup window and make it's parent the main window. I think that this sounds like a reasonable approach. my questions: Is this a good approach, or is there a more standard approach for a floating toolbar now in WTL? Should I make the toolbar a child of the video window or the CChildFrame that contains the video window, in order to ensure that it always remains on top of the video? How can I implement transparency in the floating toolbar, as in the floating toolbar in MS word?

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  • Finding distance to the closest point in a point cloud on an uniform grid

    - by erik
    I have a 3D grid of size AxBxC with equal distance, d, between the points in the grid. Given a number of points, what is the best way of finding the distance to the closest point for each grid point (Every grid point should contain the distance to the closest point in the point cloud) given the assumptions below? Assume that A, B and C are quite big in relation to d, giving a grid of maybe 500x500x500 and that there will be around 1 million points. Also assume that if the distance to the nearest point exceds a distance of D, we do not care about the nearest point distance, and it can safely be set to some large number (D is maybe 2 to 10 times d) Since there will be a great number of grid points and points to search from, a simple exhaustive: for each grid point: for each point: if distance between points < minDistance: minDistance = distance between points is not a good alternative. I was thinking of doing something along the lines of: create a container of size A*B*C where each element holds a container of points for each point: define indexX = round((point position x - grid min position x)/d) // same for y and z add the point to the correct index of the container for each grid point: search the container of that grid point and find the closest point if no points in container and D > 0.5d: search the 26 container indices nearest to the grid point for a closest point .. continue with next layer until a point is found or the distance to that layer is greater than D Basically: put the points in buckets and do a radial search outwards until a points is found for each grid point. Is this a good way of solving the problem, or are there better/faster ways? A solution which is good for parallelisation is preferred.

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  • Comparing floating point values

    - by Sauron
    I just read a statement about the floating point value comparison Floating point values shall not be compared using either the == or != operators. Most floating point values have no exact binary representation and have a limited precision. If so what is the best method for comparing two floating point values?

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  • Suspended Sentence is a Free Cross-Platform Point and Click Game

    - by Asian Angel
    Do you want a fun point and click game to play on your favorite operating system? Then get ready to play Suspended Sentence! In the game you are woken from cryogenic sleep to assist in repairing the ship you are traveling on. Can you successfully complete the repairs and get your prison sentence suspended in return? Note: Suspended Sentence is available for Linux, Windows, and Mac. Suspended Sentence Homepage [via OMG! Ubuntu!] Access the Walkthrough for Suspended Sentence Latest Features How-To Geek ETC How To Remove People and Objects From Photographs In Photoshop Ask How-To Geek: How Can I Monitor My Bandwidth Usage? Internet Explorer 9 RC Now Available: Here’s the Most Interesting New Stuff Here’s a Super Simple Trick to Defeating Fake Anti-Virus Malware How to Change the Default Application for Android Tasks Stop Believing TV’s Lies: The Real Truth About "Enhancing" Images The Legend of Zelda – 1980s High School Style [Video] Suspended Sentence is a Free Cross-Platform Point and Click Game Build a Batman-Style Hidden Bust Switch Make Your Clock Creates a Custom Clock for your Android Homescreen Download the Anime Angels Theme for Windows 7 CyanogenMod Updates; Rolls out Android 2.3 to the Less Fortunate

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  • Missing Wireless access point

    - by nvcnvn
    I have an: Ubuntu 12.04 with proprietary Boardcom STA Wireless driver installed BCM43224 802.11a/b/g/n wireless card TP-LINK TD-W8101G 54Mbps Wireless ADSL2+ Modem Router Yesterday before I went to sleep, I still connect to my wireless access point, this morning when I start my laptop I don't see it in the list - there are some neighbors listed but not mine. The WLAN is green, with my old Nokia E72, I still see my access point with 100% signal. I have tried to restart my laptop and turn the firmware off/on by the switch but no help. I have read the WirelessTroubleShootingGuide but I can do anything. Here is some of my card info: *-network description: Wireless interface product: BCM43224 802.11a/b/g/n vendor: Broadcom Corporation physical id: 0 bus info: [email protected]:04:00.0 logical name: eth1 version: 01 serial: c0:cb:38:06:5d:53 width: 64 bits clock: 33MHz capabilities: pm msi pciexpress bus_master cap_list ethernet physical wireless configuration: broadcast=yes driver=wl0 driverversion=5.100.82.38 latency=0 multicast=yes wireless=IEEE 802.11abgn resources: irq:17 memory:f0500000-f0503fff *-network description: Ethernet interface product: RTL8111/8168B PCI Express Gigabit Ethernet controller vendor: Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. physical id: 0 bus info: [email protected]:09:00.0 logical name: eth0 version: 03 serial: f0:4d:a2:42:ab:e4 size: 100Mbit/s capacity: 1Gbit/s width: 64 bits clock: 33MHz capabilities: pm msi pciexpress msix vpd bus_master cap_list rom ethernet physical tp mii 10bt 10bt-fd 100bt 100bt-fd 1000bt 1000bt-fd autonegotiation configuration: autonegotiation=on broadcast=yes driver=r8169 driverversion=2.3LK-NAPI duplex=full firmware=rtl_nic/rtl8168d-1.fw ip=192.168.1.3 latency=0 link=yes multicast=yes port=MII speed=100Mbit/s resources: irq:42 ioport:5000(size=256) memory:f0404000-f0404fff memory:f0400000-f0403fff memory:f0420000-f043ffff

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  • Extending home network using multiple access point originating from another access point

    - by cyberjar09
    I have a home network with the current setup (RJ45 running from main router to access point) : +-------------+ +--------------+ | 192.168.2.1 | |192.168.2.2 | | router +--------------->access point 1| +-----^-------+ +--------------+ | | +-----+--------+ | 192.168.1.1 | | modem | +-----^--------+ | | | | +--+--+ | ISP | +-----+ However I would like to extend the network to two more floors in the house via the existing Access Point (router is too far and not reachable using a network cable, hence I need to extend using current access point). Please see diagram below : +-------------+ +--------------+ +----------------+ | 192.168.2.1 | |192.168.2.2 | | 192.168.2.3 | | router +--------------->access point 1+----------> access point 2 | +-----^-------+ +--------+-----+ +----------------+ | | | | +-----+--------+ | | 192.168.1.1 | | | modem | | +-----^--------+ | +----------------+ | +----------------> 192.168.2.4 | | | access point 3 | | +----------------+ | +--+--+ | ISP | +-----+ Q1 : is this setup possible? Q2 : if possible, will I have to do anything different from what I did to setup access point 1? edit 1 : I am trying to study the dd-wrt documentation to see which would be the correct mode of operation for me Linking Routers but Im confused because I dont see any info on how to use an existing Access point to extend the signal of the SSID. If anyone could point me to the correct wiki for how I should setup AP2 and AP3 based on AP1, it would be very helpful. For AP1, I did the following Use static IP and setup same SSID as primary wireless router use same security as primary wireless router make AP1 point to 192.168.2.1 (primary router) for DHCP Thanks in advance.

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  • Is there a floating point value of x, for which x-x == 0 is false?

    - by Andrew Walker
    In most cases, I understand that a floating point comparison test should be implemented using over a range of values (abs(x-y) < epsilon), but does self subtraction imply that the result will be zero? // can the assertion be triggered? float x = //?; assert( x-x == 0 ) My guess is that nan/inf might be special cases, but I'm more interested in what happens for simple values.

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