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  • Java Spotlight Episode 149: Geertjan Wielenga on NetBeans 7.4 @netbeans @geertjanw

    - by Roger Brinkley
    Interview with Geertjan Wielenga on the NetBeans 7.4 release Right-click or Control-click to download this MP3 file. You can also subscribe to the Java Spotlight Podcast Feed to get the latest podcast automatically. If you use iTunes you can open iTunes and subscribe with this link: Java Spotlight Podcast in iTunes. Show Notes News Everything in JavaFX is open sourced - Media is now opensource openjdk email Java SE 7 Update 45 Released 7u45 Caller-Allowable-Codebase and Trusted-Library Updated Security Baseline (7u45) impacts Java 7u40 and before with High Security settings What to do if your applet is blocked or warns of “mixed code”? LiveConnect changes in 7u45 JDK 8 end-game details and proposal for making a few exceptions Events Oct 28-30, JAX London, London Nov 4-8, Oredev, Malmö, Sweden Nov 6, JFall, Amsterdam, Netherlands Nov 11-15, Devoxx, Belgium Feature Interview Geertjan Wielenga is a principal product manager in Oracle for NetBeans and has been a member of the NetBeans Team for the past 7 years. NetBeans twitter: https://twitter.com/netbeans Geertjan’s twitter: https://twitter.com/geertjanw The Top Ten Coolest Features in NetBeans IDE 7.4 What’s Cool Nighthacking with James Gosling Arun Gupta waves goodbye and says hello JavaOne 2013 Roundup: Java 8 is Revolutionary, Java is back Survey on Java erasure/reification

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  • Gradle for NetBeans RCP

    - by Geertjan
    Start with the NetBeans Paint Application and do the following to build it via Gradle (i.e., no Gradle/NetBeans plugin is needed for the following steps), assuming you've set up Gradle. Do everything below in the Files or Favorites window, not in the Projects window. In the application directory "Paint Application". Create a file named "settings.gradle", with this content: include 'ColorChooser', 'Paint' Create another file in the same location, named "build.gradle", with this content: subprojects { apply plugin: "announce" apply plugin: "java" sourceSets { main { java { srcDir 'src' } resources { srcDir 'src' } } } } In the module directory "Paint". Create a file named "build.gradle", with this content: dependencies { compile fileTree("$rootDir/build/public-package-jars").matching { include '**/*.jar' } } task show << { configurations.compile.each { dep -> println "$dep ${dep.isFile()}" } } Note: The above is a temporary solution, as you can see, the expectation is that the JARs are in the 'build/public-packages-jars' folder, which assumes an Ant build has been done prior to the Gradle build. Now run 'gradle classes' in the "Paint Application" folder and everything will compile correctly. So, this is how the Paint Application now looks: Preferable to the second 'build.gradle' would be this, which uses the JARs found in the NetBeans Platform... netbeansHome = '/home/geertjan/netbeans-dev-201111110600' dependencies { compile files("$rootDir/ColorChooser/release/modules/ext/ColorChooser.jar") def projectXml = new XmlParser().parse("nbproject/project.xml") projectXml.configuration.data."module-dependencies".dependency."code-name-base".each { if (it.text().equals('org.openide.filesystems')) { def dep = "$netbeansHome/platform/core/"+it.text().replace('.','-')+'.jar' compile files(dep) } else if (it.text().equals('org.openide.util.lookup') || it.text().equals('org.openide.util')) { def dep = "$netbeansHome/platform/lib/"+it.text().replace('.','-')+'.jar' compile files(dep) } else { def dep = "$netbeansHome/platform/modules/"+it.text().replace('.','-')+'.jar' compile files(dep) } } } task show << { configurations.compile.each { dep -> println "$dep ${dep.isFile()}" } } However, when you run 'gradle classes' with the above, you get an error like this: geertjan@geertjan:~/NetBeansProjects/PaintApp1/Paint$ gradle classes :Paint:compileJava [ant:javac] Note: Attempting to workaround javac bug #6512707 [ant:javac] [ant:javac] [ant:javac] An annotation processor threw an uncaught exception. [ant:javac] Consult the following stack trace for details. [ant:javac] java.lang.NullPointerException [ant:javac] at com.sun.tools.javac.util.DefaultFileManager.getFileForOutput(DefaultFileManager.java:1058) No idea why the above happens, still trying to figure it out. Once the above works, we can start figuring out how to use the NetBeans Maven repo instead and then the user of the plugin will be able to select whether to use local JARs or JARs from the NetBeans Maven repo. Many thanks to Hans Dockter who put the above together with me today, via Skype!

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  • Mini Theater at OTN Lounge During JavaOne

    - by Tori Wieldt
    This year, the Oracle Technology Network Lounge at JavaOne will be in the Hilton Ballroom, right in the center of theJavaOne DEMOgrounds. We'll have Java experts, community members and OTN staff to answer your questions. We've also even created a "Mini Theater" for casual demos from community members and Oracle staff. We are keeping the slots short, there will be no tests afterwards. It's your chance to talk to the experts 1 on 1. See how easy it is to turn on a lightbulb with Java and a violin. Here is the full schedule: Monday, October 1 9:40-9:50am  Learn about the Oracle Social Network Developer Challenge 11:20-11:30  Update from the Oracle Academy 11:40-11:50  Caroline Kvitka, @OracleJavaMag, Editor-in-Chief of Java Magazine 12:00-12:20pm  SouJava demonstrates Duke's Choice Award Winner JHome 12:20-12:30pm  Geertjan Wielenga (@geertjanw) Shows What's new in NetBeans 12:40-12:50pm  Learn about the OSN Developer Challenge  2:00-2:10pm  Java.net Robotics  2:30-2:40pm  Geertjan Wielenga (@geertjanw) Java EE and NetBeans Tuesday, October 2 9:40-9:50am  Greenfoot/Kinect demo by Michael Kolling 11:20-11:30  Caroline Kvitka, @OracleJavaMag, Editor-in-Chief of Java Magazine 11:40-11:50  Stephen Chin and Jim Weaver, Top Ten JavaFX Features 12:00-12:10pm  Nokia Student Developer 12:20-12:30pm Arun Gupta, HTML 5 and Java EE 7 1:00-1:10pm Update on the Java Community Process (JCP) 1:20-1:30pm  Update from the Oracle Academy  2:00-2:10pm  Java.net Robotics  2:30-2:40pm  Geertjan Wielenga (@geertjanw) NetBeans Java Editor Wednesday, October 3 9:40-9:50am  Greenfoot/Kinect demo by Michael Kolling 11:00-11:10  Caroline Kvitka, @OracleJavaMag, Editor-in-Chief of Java Magazine 11:20-11:30  Angela Caicedo and Jim Weaver, Leveraging JavaFX and HTML5 12:00-12:10pm  Nokia Student Developer 12:10-12:30pm  SouJava demonstrates Duke's Choice Award Winner JHome  2:00-2:10pm  Stephen Chin and Jim Weaver, JavaFX Deployment with Self-Contained Apps  2:30-2:40pm  Geertjan Wielenga (@geertjanw) NetBeans Platform  2:50-3:00pm  Petr Jiricka, Project Easel Changes to this schedule will be announced on @JavaOneConf.

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  • Mini Theater at OTN Lounge During JavaOne

    - by Tori Wieldt
    This year, the Oracle Technology Network Lounge at JavaOne will be in the Hilton Ballroom, right in the center of theJavaOne DEMOgrounds. We'll have Java experts, community members and OTN staff to answer your questions. We've also even created a "Mini Theater" for casual demos from community members and Oracle staff. We are keeping the slots short, there will be no tests afterwards. It's your chance to talk to the experts 1 on 1. See how easy it is to turn on a lightbulb with Java and a violin. Here is the full schedule: Monday, October 1 9:40-9:50am  Learn about the Oracle Social Network Developer Challenge 11:20-11:30  Update from the Oracle Academy 11:40-11:50  Caroline Kvitka, @OracleJavaMag, Editor-in-Chief of Java Magazine 12:00-12:20pm  SouJava demonstrates Duke's Choice Award Winner JHome 12:20-12:30pm  Geertjan Wielenga (@geertjanw) Shows What's new in NetBeans 12:40-12:50pm  Learn about the OSN Developer Challenge  2:00-2:10pm  Java.net Robotics  2:30-2:40pm  Geertjan Wielenga (@geertjanw) Java EE and NetBeans Tuesday, October 2 9:40-9:50am  Greenfoot/Kinect demo by Michael Kolling 11:20-11:30  Caroline Kvitka, @OracleJavaMag, Editor-in-Chief of Java Magazine 11:40-11:50  Stephen Chin and Jim Weaver, Top Ten JavaFX Features 12:00-12:10pm  Nokia Student Developer 12:20-12:30pm Arun Gupta, HTML 5 and Java EE 7 1:00-1:10pm Update on the Java Community Process (JCP) 1:20-1:30pm  Update from the Oracle Academy  2:00-2:10pm  Java.net Robotics  2:30-2:40pm  Geertjan Wielenga (@geertjanw) NetBeans Java Editor Wednesday, October 3 9:40-9:50am  Greenfoot/Kinect demo by Michael Kolling 11:00-11:10  Caroline Kvitka, @OracleJavaMag, Editor-in-Chief of Java Magazine 11:20-11:30  Angela Caicedo and Jim Weaver, Leveraging JavaFX and HTML5 12:00-12:10pm  Nokia Student Developer 12:10-12:30pm  SouJava demonstrates Duke's Choice Award Winner JHome  2:00-2:10pm  Stephen Chin and Jim Weaver, JavaFX Deployment with Self-Contained Apps  2:30-2:40pm  Geertjan Wielenga (@geertjanw) NetBeans Platform  2:50-3:00pm  Petr Jiricka, Project Easel Changes to this schedule will be announced on @JavaOneConf.

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  • Associating Palettes with View TopComponents

    - by Geertjan
    A side effect of changes in NetBeans Platform 7.1 in the NetBeans window system is that palettes can now be created for view TopComponents. Below, a TopComponent in the "explorer" position is selected, which results in the Palette opening and showing items that can be dragged into the TopComponent: And here, in the same application, a TopComponent in the "output" position is now selected, which causes the Palette to open, showing items that are relevant to the TopComponent: I copied code used in the above two TopComponents from this blog entry: https://blogs.oracle.com/geertjan/entry/simple_component_palette Related issue: http://netbeans.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=209238

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  • NetBeans Podcast #60

    - by TinuA
    Download mp3: 43 minutes – 36.8 MBSubscribe to the NetBeans Podcast on iTunes NetBeans Community News with Geertjan and Tinu What's new? •    Take the NetBeans 7.1 Satisfaction Survey. Are there features and improvements you want to see in NetBeans IDE? Submit your request(s). •    Register for JavaOne 2012 in San Francisco. •    Read Geertjan's trip reports from Oracle Developer Day in Romania and Poland. •    Meet up with Geertjan and other Oracle Java evangelists at JavaOne Russia from April 17 - 18. Community Interview: Joel Murach Joel Murach is the author of Murach's Java Programming, a comprehensive training guide to Java that features the NetBeans IDE exclusively. Find out why NetBeans IDE is Murach's choice for teaching developers how to create programs in Java.    •    Other Murach Books with NetBeans IDE: Murach's PHP and MySQL; Murach's Java Servlets and JSP •    NetBeans Zone Interview: Joel Murach, Author of Murach's Java Programming Groovy Support in NetBeans IDE: Martin JanicekDevelopment for Groovy support in NetBeans IDE is back, and NetBeans engineer Martin Janicek gives an update on what features and improvements to expect going forward. •    New NetBeans for Groovy Blog: Get weekly updates about the team's progress; provide feedback. •    To try Groovy support in NetBeans IDE download the daily builds. API Design with Jarda Tulach Jarda Tulach returns from OSGiCon with tales of his experience presenting Netbinox at the conference.*Have ideas for NetBeans Podcast topics? Send them to nbpodcast at netbeans dot org. *Subscribe to the official NetBeans page on Facebook! Check us out as well on Twitter, YouTube, and Google+.

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  • Add Widget via Action in Toolbar

    - by Geertjan
    The question of the day comes from Vadim, who asks on the NetBeans Platform mailing list: "Looking for example showing how to add Widget to Scene, e.g. by toolbar button click." Well, the solution is very similar to this blog entry, where you see a solution provided by Jesse Glick for VisiTrend in Boston: https://blogs.oracle.com/geertjan/entry/zoom_capability Other relevant articles to read are as follows: http://netbeans.dzone.com/news/which-netbeans-platform-action http://netbeans.dzone.com/how-to-make-context-sensitive-actions Let's go through it step by step, with this result in the end, a solution involving 4 classes split (optionally, since a central feature of the NetBeans Platform is modularity) across multiple modules: The Customer object has a "name" String and the Droppable capability has a method "doDrop" which takes a Customer object: public interface Droppable {    void doDrop(Customer c);} In the TopComponent, we use "TopComponent.associateLookup" to publish an instance of "Droppable", which creates a new LabelWidget and adds it to the Scene in the TopComponent. Here's the TopComponent constructor: public CustomerCanvasTopComponent() {    initComponents();    setName(Bundle.CTL_CustomerCanvasTopComponent());    setToolTipText(Bundle.HINT_CustomerCanvasTopComponent());    final Scene scene = new Scene();    final LayerWidget layerWidget = new LayerWidget(scene);    Droppable d = new Droppable(){        @Override        public void doDrop(Customer c) {            LabelWidget customerWidget = new LabelWidget(scene, c.getTitle());            customerWidget.getActions().addAction(ActionFactory.createMoveAction());            layerWidget.addChild(customerWidget);            scene.validate();        }    };    scene.addChild(layerWidget);    jScrollPane1.setViewportView(scene.createView());    associateLookup(Lookups.singleton(d));} The Action is displayed in the toolbar and is enabled only if a Droppable is currently in the Lookup: @ActionID(        category = "Tools",        id = "org.customer.controler.AddCustomerAction")@ActionRegistration(        iconBase = "org/customer/controler/icon.png",        displayName = "#AddCustomerAction")@ActionReferences({    @ActionReference(path = "Toolbars/File", position = 300)})@NbBundle.Messages("AddCustomerAction=Add Customer")public final class AddCustomerAction implements ActionListener {    private final Droppable context;    public AddCustomerAction(Droppable droppable) {        this.context = droppable;    }    @Override    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ev) {        NotifyDescriptor.InputLine inputLine = new NotifyDescriptor.InputLine("Name:", "Data Entry");        Object result = DialogDisplayer.getDefault().notify(inputLine);        if (result == NotifyDescriptor.OK_OPTION) {            Customer customer = new Customer(inputLine.getInputText());            context.doDrop(customer);        }    }} Therefore, when the Properties window, for example, is selected, the Action will be disabled. (See the Zoomable example referred to in the link above for another example of this.) As you can see above, when the Action is invoked, a Droppable must be available (otherwise the Action would not have been enabled). The Droppable is obtained in the Action and a new Customer object is passed to its "doDrop" method. The above in pictures, take note of the enablement of the toolbar button with the red dot, on the extreme left of the toolbar in the screenshots below: The above shows the JButton is only enabled if the relevant TopComponent is active and, when the Action is invoked, the user can enter a name, after which a new LabelWidget is created in the Scene. The source code of the above is here: http://java.net/projects/nb-api-samples/sources/api-samples/show/versions/7.3/misc/WidgetCreationFromAction Note: Showing this as an MVC example is slightly misleading because, depending on which model object ("Customer" and "Droppable") you're looking at, the V and the C are different. From the point of view of "Customer", the TopComponent is the View, while the Action is the Controler, since it determines when the M is displayed. However, from the point of view of "Droppable", the TopComponent is the Controler, since it determines when the Action, i.e., which is in this case the View, displays the presence of the M.

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  • NetBeans Podcast #58

    - by TinuA
    Download mp3: 52 minutes – 44.1 MB Subscribe to the NetBeans Podcast on iTunes NetBeans Community News with Geertjan and Tinu NetBeans IDE 7.1 Release Candidate 1 Download the release candidate build Is NetBeans IDE 7.1 release ready? Give your feedback in the NetBeans Community Acceptance Survey. (Survey deadline is Wednesday, December 7th.) NetBeans Governance Board: Term 19 Sven Reimers is voted in for a second term; Zoran Sevarac is the newbie on the board; and John Jullion Ceccarelli continues as the Oracle representative.  NetBeans Calendar Community Interview: Sven Reimers Software architect and NetBeans Dream Team member Sven Reimers joins Geertjan for a recap of highlights and hot topics from Devoxx 2011. Also covered: His re-election to the NetBeans Governance Board. NetCAT 7.1 Report with Jirka Kovalsky The NetCAT program (NetBeans Community Acceptance Testing) is a customary part of the NetBeans release cycle, giving users the opportunity to help test and get the NetBeans IDE release ready. Program manager Jirka Kovalsky reports back on how the team for 7.1 fared. API Design with Jarda Tulach Jarda has a new API Design book coming out! Visit his API Design site for details. Community Interview: Zoran SevaracZoran Sevarac has an impressive profile: Founder of the open-source project Neuroph, a Java frameworks for neural network development; software engineering teaching assistant; founder of the first NetBeans User Group in Serbia; artificial intelligence researcher; NetBeans Platform Certified trainer; new member of the NetBeans Governance Board. Zoran takes a break from his busy(!) schedule to chat about his experience using NetBeans technology, his efforts to educate the local developer community about Java and NetBeans, as well as his newest role in the NetBeans Community. Neuroph: Smart Java Apps with Neural Networks (Dzone article) More DZone articles about Neuroph and NUG Serbia Have ideas for NetBeans Podcast topics? Send them to nbpodcast at netbeans dot org.

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  • NetBeans Podcast #61

    - by TinuA
    Download mp3: 39 minutes – 31.6 MB Subscribe to the NetBeans Podcast on iTunes NetBeans Community News with Geertjan and Tinu What's NEW? The Smarter and NOW FASTER NetBeans IDE 7.2 available since July. Is it faster for you too? Tell us about it on Twitter! (#netbeans) NetBeans Community Day at JavaOne is BACK!!! Join the NetBeans team in San Francisco on Sunday, September 30th for a full day of sessions about how various Java EE, JavaFX, and NetBeans Platform experts are using NetBeans in the real-world. NetBeans Community Day is just the start of the fun at JavaOne 2012, check out the full listing of ALL NetBeans-related sessions at the conference. NetBeans Governance Board elections are around the corner. Nominate yourself or someone who you think can represent the interest of the NetBeans Community. Email us at nbpodcast at netbeans dot org to get on the ballot in September. Community Interview: Çagatay Çivici, PrimeFaces Çagatay Çivici is the lead architect and founder of PrimeFaces , the popular JSF component library. Find out what the project is about, its inception, how to create PrimeFaces-based application inside NetBeans IDE, and more. Learn more about PrimeFaces at NetBeans Community Day at JavaOne 2012. Dig deeper into PrimeFaces at JavaOne 2012: CON6139 - Lessons Learned in Building Enterprise and Desktop Applications with the NetBeans IDE Community Interview: Timon Veenstra, Agrosense Timon Veenstra is the architect behind Agrosense , an open-source farm management system built on the NetBeans Platform. Find out how Agrosense helps farms run more efficiently and productively, and why NetBeans is the platform of choice for Timon and the Agrosense team. Catch a demo of Agrosense at NetBeans Community Day at JavaOne 2012. API Design with Jarda Tulach Geertjan has been using the Lookup API incorrectly; Jarda sets him on the right path. *Have ideas for NetBeans Podcast topics? Send them to nbpodcast at netbeans dot org. *Subscribe to the official NetBeans page on Facebook! Check us out as well on Twitter, YouTube, and Google+.

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  • iReport for NetBeans IDE 7.4

    - by Geertjan
    A few days ago the iReport Team announced the new 5.5.0 iReport release. With it comes the latest iReport plugin for NetBeans IDE 7.4. The NetBeans iReport plugin is by FAR the most downloaded plugin on the NetBeans Plugin Portal. Here's a direct link to it: http://plugins.netbeans.org/plugin/4425/ireport I installed the plugin into NetBeans IDE 7.4 today and made this small (and silent) movie of the main cool features I found. Sorry it's a bit blurry, comes from conversion from MPEG to AVI. Many thanks to Giulio Toffoli from Jaspersoft for continually enhancing the plugin from release to release, it's really awesome, provides a massive bunch of reporting features, fully justifying the popularity of this plugin. Some documents, more or less up to date, that should help, after following the screencast above: http://community.jaspersoft.com/wiki/designing-report http://community.jaspersoft.com/project/ireport-designer/resources Also, note that YouTube is pretty much flooded with movies on NetBeans and iReport: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=ireport+netbeans&search_sort=video_date_uploaded

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  • Vodacom Call Center Management on the NetBeans Platform

    - by Geertjan
    If you live in South Africa, you know about Vodacom. Vodacom is one of the dominant mobile communication companies in South Africa, and beyond, providing voice, messaging, data, and similar mobile services. Inside Vodacom there's an application named Helios, which is a call centre application that had its inception in 2009 and consists of two parts. Firstly, a web-based front-end that allows a call centre agent to service subscribers using a Google-like search on a knowledge base structured as a collection of FAQs. The web-based front-end uses plain-old HTML + CSS + a good helping of JQuery and JQueryUI. This is delivered via JSR-168 portlets running on a cluster of IBM Portal 6 servers. In turn, the portlets communicate via RMI with several back-end EJB's containing the business logic. These EJB's are deployed on a cluster of Weblogic Application Servers, version 10.3.6. The second part is a NetBeans Platform application used for maintaining and constructing the knowledge base, i.e., the back-end of the web-based front-end. Helios is also used for a number of other maintenance functions, such as access permissions, user maintenance, and news bulletins. Below, in the web-based front-end, call centre agents can enter search terms and are presented with a number of FAQs from the knowledge base. Upon selecting a FAQ article, the agent is presented with the article text, the process to guide the subscriber, system checks that display information specific to the subscriber, and links to related applications and articles: Below, you can see that applications are searchable and can be accessed using the same web-based front-end as shown above. And, as can be seen below, knowledge base FAQs are maintained using the Helios Maintenance Application, which is the Vodacom application built on the NetBeans Platform: Several thousand call centre agent user accounts are administered using the Helios Maintenance Application. Below the main FAQ page is shown, together with the About dialog: Vodacom is happy with the back-end NetBeans Platform application. However, the front-end stack runs on quite old technology. Ideally Vodacom would like to migrate the portlets to Oracle Weblogic Portal or Oracle WebCenter, but this hasn't been accomplished yet. Migrating makes sense as the rest of the application server environment consists entirely of Oracle products.

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  • OrbitFX: JavaFX 8 3D & NetBeans Platform in Space!

    - by Geertjan
    Here is a collection of screenshots from a proof of concept tool being developed by Nickolas Sabey and Sean Phillips from a.i. solutions. Before going further, read a great new article here written on java.net by Kevin Farnham, in light of the Duke's Choice Award (DCA) recently received at JavaOne 2013 by the a.i. solutions team. Here's Sean receiving the award on behalf of the a.i. solutions team, surrounded by the DCA selection committee and other officials: They won the DCA for helping facilitate and deploy the 2014 launch of NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission, using JDK 7, the NetBeans Platform, and JavaFX to create the GEONS Ground Support System, helping reduce software development time by approximately 35%. The prototype tool that Nicklas and Sean are now working on uses JavaFX 3D with the NetBeans Platform and is nicknamed OrbitFX. Much of the early development is being done to experiment with different patterns, so that accuracy is currently not the goal. For example, you'll notice in the screenshots that the Earth is really close to the Sun, which is obviously not correct. The screenshots are generated using Java 8 build 111, together with NetBeans Platform 7.4. Inspired by various JavaOne demos using JavaFX 3D, Nick began development integrating them into their existing NetBeans Platform infrastructure. The 3D scene showing the Sun and Earth objects is all JavaFX 8 3D, demonstrating the use of Phong Material support, along with multiple light and camera objects. Each JavaFX component extends a JFXPanel type, so that each can easily be added to NetBeans Platform TopComponents. Right-clicking an item in the explorer view offers a context menu that animates and centers the 3D scene on the selected celestial body.  With each JavaFX scene component wrapped in a JFXPanel, they can easily be integrated into a NetBeans Platform Visual Library scene.  In this case, Nick and Sean are using an instance of their custom Slipstream PinGraphScene, which is an extension of the NetBeans Platform VMDGraphScene. Now, via the NetBeans Platform Visual Library, the OrbitFX celestial body viewer can be used in the same space as a WorldWind viewer, which is provided by a previously developed plugin. "This is a clear demonstration of the power of the NetBeans Platform as an application development framework," says Sean Phillips. "How else could you have so much rich application support placed literally side by side so easily?"

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  • UNHCR and Stanyslas Matayo Receive Duke's Choice Award 2012

    - by Geertjan
    This year, NetBeans Platform applications winning Duke's Choice Awards were not only AgroSense, by Ordina in the Netherlands, and the air command and control system by NATO... but also Level One, the UNHCR registration and emergency management system. Unfortunately, Stanyslas Matayo, the architect and lead engineer of Level One, was unable to be at JavaOne to receive his award. It would have been really cool to meet him in person, of course, and he would have joined the NetBeans Party and NetBeans Day, as well as the NetBeans Platform panel discussions that happened at various stages throughout JavaOne. Instead, he received his award at Oracle Day 2012 Nairobi, some days ago, where he presented Level One and received the Duke's Choice Award: Level One is the UNHCR (UN refugee agency) application for capturing information on the first level details of refugees in an emergency context. In its recently released initial version, the application was used in Niger to register information about families in emergency contexts. Read more about it here and see the screenshot below. Congratulations, Stanyslas, and the rest of the development team working on this interesting and important project!

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  • Vodacom Call Center Management on the NetBeans Platform

    - by Geertjan
    If you live in South Africa, you know about Vodacom. Vodacom is one of the dominant mobile communication companies in South Africa, and beyond, providing voice, messaging, data, and similar mobile services. Inside Vodacom there's an application named Helios, which is a call centre application that had its inception in 2009 and consists of two parts. Firstly, a web-based front-end that allows a call centre agent to service subscribers using a Google-like search on a knowledge base structured as a collection of FAQs. The web-based front-end uses plain-old HTML + CSS + a good helping of JQuery and JQueryUI. This is delivered via JSR-168 portlets running on a cluster of IBM Portal 6 servers. In turn, the portlets communicate via RMI with several back-end EJB's containing the business logic. These EJB's are deployed on a cluster of Weblogic Application Servers, version 10.3.6. The second part is a NetBeans Platform application used for maintaining and constructing the knowledge base, i.e., the back-end of the web-based front-end. Helios is also used for a number of other maintenance functions, such as access permissions, user maintenance, and news bulletins. Below, in the web-based front-end, call centre agents can enter search terms and are presented with a number of FAQs from the knowledge base. Upon selecting a FAQ article, the agent is presented with the article text, the process to guide the subscriber, system checks that display information specific to the subscriber, and links to related applications and articles: Below, you can see that applications are searchable and can be accessed using the same web-based front-end as shown above. And, as can be seen below, knowledge base FAQs are maintained using the Helios Maintenance Application, which is the Vodacom application built on the NetBeans Platform: Several thousand call centre agent user accounts are administered using the Helios Maintenance Application. Below the main FAQ page is shown, together with the About dialog: Vodacom is happy with the back-end NetBeans Platform application. However, the front-end stack runs on quite old technology. Ideally Vodacom would like to migrate the portlets to Oracle Weblogic Portal or Oracle WebCenter, but this hasn't been accomplished yet. Migrating makes sense as the rest of the application server environment consists entirely of Oracle products.

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  • JavaFX, Google Maps, and NetBeans Platform

    - by Geertjan
    Thanks to a great new article by Rob Terpilowski, and other work and research he describes in that article, it's now trivial to introduce a map component to a NetBeans Platform application. Making use of the GMapsFX library, as described in Rob's article, which provides a JavaFX API for Google Maps, you can very quickly knock this application together. Click to enlarge the image. Here's all the code (from Rob's article): @TopComponent.Description( preferredID = "MapTopComponent", persistenceType = TopComponent.PERSISTENCE_ALWAYS ) @TopComponent.Registration(mode = "editor", openAtStartup = true) @ActionID(category = "Window", id = "org.map.MapTopComponent") @ActionReference(path = "Menu/Window" /*, position = 333 */) @TopComponent.OpenActionRegistration( displayName = "#CTL_MapWindowAction", preferredID = "MapTopComponent" ) @NbBundle.Messages({ "CTL_MapWindowAction=Map", "CTL_MapTopComponent=Map Window", "HINT_MapTopComponent=This is a Map window" }) public class MapWindow extends TopComponent implements MapComponentInitializedListener { protected GoogleMapView mapComponent; protected GoogleMap map; private static final double latitude = 52.3667; private static final double longitude = 4.9000; public MapWindow() { setName(Bundle.CTL_MapTopComponent()); setToolTipText(Bundle.HINT_MapTopComponent()); setLayout(new BorderLayout()); JFXPanel panel = new JFXPanel(); Platform.setImplicitExit(false); Platform.runLater(() -> { mapComponent = new GoogleMapView(); mapComponent.addMapInializedListener(this); BorderPane root = new BorderPane(mapComponent); Scene scene = new Scene(root); panel.setScene(scene); }); add(panel, BorderLayout.CENTER); } @Override public void mapInitialized() { //Once the map has been loaded by the Webview, initialize the map details. LatLong center = new LatLong(latitude, longitude); MapOptions options = new MapOptions(); options.center(center) .mapMarker(true) .zoom(9) .overviewMapControl(false) .panControl(false) .rotateControl(false) .scaleControl(false) .streetViewControl(false) .zoomControl(false) .mapType(MapTypeIdEnum.ROADMAP); map = mapComponent.createMap(options); //Add a couple of markers to the map. MarkerOptions markerOptions = new MarkerOptions(); LatLong markerLatLong = new LatLong(latitude, longitude); markerOptions.position(markerLatLong) .title("My new Marker") .animation(Animation.DROP) .visible(true); Marker myMarker = new Marker(markerOptions); MarkerOptions markerOptions2 = new MarkerOptions(); LatLong markerLatLong2 = new LatLong(latitude, longitude); markerOptions2.position(markerLatLong2) .title("My new Marker") .visible(true); Marker myMarker2 = new Marker(markerOptions2); map.addMarker(myMarker); map.addMarker(myMarker2); //Add an info window to the Map. InfoWindowOptions infoOptions = new InfoWindowOptions(); infoOptions.content("<h2>Center of the Universe</h2>") .position(center); InfoWindow window = new InfoWindow(infoOptions); window.open(map, myMarker); } } Awesome work Rob, will be useful for many developers out there.

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  • View Clipboard & Copy To Clipboard from NetBeans IDE

    - by Geertjan
    Thanks to this code, I can press Ctrl-Alt-V in NetBeans IDE and then view whatever is in the clipboard: import java.awt.Toolkit; import java.awt.datatransfer.DataFlavor; import java.awt.datatransfer.Transferable; import java.awt.datatransfer.UnsupportedFlavorException; import java.awt.event.ActionEvent; import java.awt.event.ActionListener; import java.io.IOException; import javax.swing.JOptionPane; import org.openide.awt.ActionRegistration; import org.openide.awt.ActionReference; import org.openide.awt.ActionReferences; import org.openide.awt.ActionID; import org.openide.util.NbBundle.Messages; @ActionID( category = "Tools", id = "org.demo.ShowClipboardAction") @ActionRegistration( displayName = "#CTL_ShowClipboardAction") @ActionReferences({ @ActionReference(path = "Menu/Tools", position = 5), @ActionReference(path = "Shortcuts", name = "DA-V") }) @Messages("CTL_ShowClipboardAction=Show Clipboard") public final class ShowClipboardAction implements ActionListener { @Override public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) { JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, getClipboard(), "Clipboard Content", 1); } public String getClipboard() { String text = null; Transferable t = Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getSystemClipboard().getContents(null); try { if (t != null && t.isDataFlavorSupported(DataFlavor.stringFlavor)) { text = (String) t.getTransferData(DataFlavor.stringFlavor); } } catch (UnsupportedFlavorException e) { } catch (IOException e) { } return text; } } And now I can also press Ctrl-Alt-C, which copies the path to the current file to the clipboard: import java.awt.Toolkit; import java.awt.datatransfer.Clipboard; import java.awt.datatransfer.StringSelection; import java.awt.event.ActionEvent; import java.awt.event.ActionListener; import org.openide.awt.ActionID; import org.openide.awt.ActionReference; import org.openide.awt.ActionReferences; import org.openide.awt.ActionRegistration; import org.openide.awt.StatusDisplayer; import org.openide.loaders.DataObject; import org.openide.util.NbBundle.Messages; @ActionID( category = "Tools", id = "org.demo.CopyPathToClipboard") @ActionRegistration( displayName = "#CTL_CopyPathToClipboard") @ActionReferences({ @ActionReference(path = "Menu/Tools", position = 0), @ActionReference(path = "Editors/Popup", position = 10), @ActionReference(path = "Shortcuts", name = "DA-C") }) @Messages("CTL_CopyPathToClipboard=Copy Path to Clipboard") public final class CopyPathToClipboardAction implements ActionListener { private final DataObject context; public CopyPathToClipboardAction(DataObject context) { this.context = context; } @Override public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) { String path = context.getPrimaryFile().getPath(); StatusDisplayer.getDefault().setStatusText(path); StringSelection ss = new StringSelection(path); Clipboard clipboard = Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getSystemClipboard(); clipboard.setContents(ss, null); } }

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  • UndoRedo on Nodes

    - by Geertjan
    When a change is made to the property in the Properties Window, below, the undo/redo functionality becomes enabled: When undo/redo are invoked, e.g., via the buttons in the toolbar, the display name of the node changes accordingly. The only problem I have is that the buttons only become enabled when the Person Window is selected, not when the Properties Window is selected, which would be desirable. Here's the Person object: public class Person implements PropertyChangeListener {     private String name;     public static final String PROP_NAME = "name";     public Person(String name) {         this.name = name;     }     public String getName() {         return name;     }     public void setName(String name) {         String oldName = this.name;         this.name = name;         propertyChangeSupport.firePropertyChange(PROP_NAME, oldName, name);     }     private transient final PropertyChangeSupport propertyChangeSupport = new PropertyChangeSupport(this);     public void addPropertyChangeListener(PropertyChangeListener listener) {         propertyChangeSupport.addPropertyChangeListener(listener);     }     public void removePropertyChangeListener(PropertyChangeListener listener) {         propertyChangeSupport.removePropertyChangeListener(listener);     }     @Override     public void propertyChange(PropertyChangeEvent evt) {         propertyChangeSupport.firePropertyChange(evt);     } } And here's the Node with UndoRedo enablement: public class PersonNode extends AbstractNode implements UndoRedo.Provider, PropertyChangeListener {     private UndoRedo.Manager manager = new UndoRedo.Manager();     private boolean undoRedoEvent;     public PersonNode(Person person) {         super(Children.LEAF, Lookups.singleton(person));         person.addPropertyChangeListener(this);         setDisplayName(person.getName());     }     @Override     protected Sheet createSheet() {         Sheet sheet = Sheet.createDefault();         Sheet.Set set = Sheet.createPropertiesSet();         set.put(new NameProperty(getLookup().lookup(Person.class)));         sheet.put(set);         return sheet;     }     @Override     public void propertyChange(PropertyChangeEvent evt) {         if (evt.getPropertyName().equals(Person.PROP_NAME)) {             firePropertyChange(evt.getPropertyName(), evt.getOldValue(), evt.getNewValue());         }     }     public void fireUndoableEvent(String property, Person source, Object oldValue, Object newValue) {         manager.addEdit(new MyAbstractUndoableEdit(source, oldValue, newValue));     }     @Override     public UndoRedo getUndoRedo() {         return manager;     }     @Override     public String getDisplayName() {         Person p = getLookup().lookup(Person.class);         if (p != null) {             return p.getName();         }         return super.getDisplayName();     }     private class NameProperty extends PropertySupport.ReadWrite<String> {         private Person p;         public NameProperty(Person p) {             super("name", String.class, "Name", "Name of Person");             this.p = p;         }         @Override         public String getValue() throws IllegalAccessException, InvocationTargetException {             return p.getName();         }         @Override         public void setValue(String newValue) throws IllegalAccessException, IllegalArgumentException, InvocationTargetException {             String oldValue = p.getName();             p.setName(newValue);             if (!undoRedoEvent) {                 fireUndoableEvent("name", p, oldValue, newValue);                 fireDisplayNameChange(oldValue, newValue);             }         }     }     class MyAbstractUndoableEdit extends AbstractUndoableEdit {         private final String oldValue;         private final String newValue;         private final Person source;         private MyAbstractUndoableEdit(Person source, Object oldValue, Object newValue) {             this.oldValue = oldValue.toString();             this.newValue = newValue.toString();             this.source = source;         }         @Override         public boolean canRedo() {             return true;         }         @Override         public boolean canUndo() {             return true;         }         @Override         public void undo() throws CannotUndoException {             undoRedoEvent = true;             source.setName(oldValue.toString());             fireDisplayNameChange(oldValue, newValue);             undoRedoEvent = false;         }         @Override         public void redo() throws CannotUndoException {             undoRedoEvent = true;             source.setName(newValue.toString());             fireDisplayNameChange(oldValue, newValue);             undoRedoEvent = false;         }     } } Does anyone out there know how to have the Undo/Redo functionality enabled when the Properties Window is selected?

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  • ct.sym steals the ASM class

    - by Geertjan
    Some mild consternation on the Twittersphere yesterday. Marcus Lagergren not being able to find the ASM classes in JDK 8 in NetBeans IDE: And there's no such problem in Eclipse (and apparently in IntelliJ IDEA). Help, does NetBeans (despite being incredibly awesome) suck, after all? The truth of the matter is that there's something called "ct.sym" in the JDK. When javac is compiling code, it doesn't link against rt.jar. Instead, it uses a special symbol file lib/ct.sym with class stubs. Internal JDK classes are not put in that symbol file, since those are internal classes. You shouldn't want to use them, at all. However, what if you're Marcus Lagergren who DOES need these classes? I.e., he's working on the internal JDK classes and hence needs to have access to them. Fair enough that the general Java population can't access those classes, since they're internal implementation classes that could be changed anytime and one wouldn't want all unknown clients of those classes to start breaking once changes are made to the implementation, i.e., this is the rt.jar's internal class protection mechanism. But, again, we're now Marcus Lagergen and not the general Java population. For the solution, read Jan Lahoda, NetBeans Java Editor guru, here: https://netbeans.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=186120 In particular, take note of this: AFAIK, the ct.sym is new in JDK6. It contains stubs for all classes that existed in JDK5 (for compatibility with existing programs that would use private JDK classes), but does not contain implementation classes that were introduced in JDK6 (only API classes). This is to prevent application developers to accidentally use JDK's private classes (as such applications would be unportable and may not run on future versions of JDK). Note that this is not really a NB thing - this is the behavior of javac from the JDK. I do not know about any way to disable this except deleting ct.sym or the option mentioned above. Regarding loading the classes: JVM uses two classpath's: classpath and bootclasspath. rt.jar is on the bootclasspath and has precedence over anything on the "custom" classpath, which is used by the application. The usual way to override classes on bootclasspath is to start the JVM with "-Xbootclasspath/p:" option, which prepends the given jars (and presumably also directories) to bootclasspath. Hence, let's take the first option, the simpler one, and simply delete the "ct.sym" file. Again, only because we need to work with those internal classes as developers of the JDK, not because we want to hack our way around "ct.sym", which would mean you'd not have portable code at the end of the day. Go to the JDK 8 lib folder and you'll find the file: Delete it. Start NetBeans IDE again, either on JDK 7 or JDK 8, doesn't make a difference for these purposes, create a new Java application (or use an existing one), make sure you have set the JDK above as the JDK of the application, and hey presto: The above obviously assumes you have a build of JDK 8 that actually includes the ASM package. And below you can see that not only are the classes found but my build succeeded, even though I'm using internal JDK classes. The yellow markings in the sidebar mean that the classes are imported but not used in the code, where normally, if I hadn't removed "ct.sym", I would have seen red error marking instead, and the code wouldn't have compiled. Note: I've tried setting "-XDignore.symbol.file" in "netbeans.conf" and in other places, but so far haven't got that to work. Simply deleting the "ct.sym" file (or back it up somewhere and put it back when needed) is quite clearly the most straightforward solution. Ultimately, if you want to be able to use those internal classes while still having portable code, do you know what you need to do? You need to create a JDK bug report stating that you need an internal class to be added to "ct.sym". Probably you'll get a motivation back stating WHY that internal class isn't supposed to be used externally. There must be a reason why those classes aren't available for external usage, otherwise they would have been added to "ct.sym". So, now the only remaining question is why the Eclipse compiler doesn't hide the internal JDK classes. Apparently the Eclipse compiler ignores the "ct.sym" file. In other words, at the end of the day, far from being a bug in NetBeans... we have now found a (pretty enormous, I reckon) bug in Eclipse. The Eclipse compiler does not protect you from using internal JDK classes and the code that you create in Eclipse may not work with future releases of the JDK, since the JDK team is simply going to be changing those classes that are not found in the "ct.sym" file while assuming (correctly, thanks to the presence of "ct.sym" mechanism) that no code in the world, other than JDK code, is tied to those classes.

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  • Nimbus Tweaking Help Needed

    - by Geertjan
    I was reading this new article on Synthetica and NetBeans RCP this morning, when I remembered this screenshot from Henry Arousell from Sweden: Here, Nimbus is heavily being used, highlighting 6 areas where Henry would really benefit from any help regarding how the foreground properties should be set: The color of the main menu (and its subsequent unfolded menu options) The TopComponent tab colors (as you can see from the screenshot, they've managed to change the foreground colors of the ones in the editor mode by setting the Nimbus property "TextText"). They cannot manipulate TopComponents in other modes, though. Table header foreground colors The foreground color of any provided composite component, like a JFileChooser or the ICEPdf viewer or any other panel with label components. The progress bar message color. The status bar message color, A Nimbus expert is needed to help here, though it seems to me that some of the solutions have already been identified, or are similar, in the article pointed out above.

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  • Dart and NetBeans IDE 7.4

    - by Geertjan
    Here's the start of Dart in NetBeans IDE. Basic Dart editing support is done and on saving a Dart file the related JavaScript files are automatically generated. In the context of an HTML5 application in NetBeans IDE, that gives you deep integration with the embedded browser and, even better, Chrome, as well as Chrome Developer Tools. Below, notice that the "Sunflower Spectacular" H1 element is selected (click the image to enlarge it to get a better view), which is therefore highlighted in the live DOM view in the bottom left, as well as in the CSS Styles window in the top right, from where the CSS styles can be edited and from where the related files can be opened in the IDE. Identical features are available for Chrome, as well as on Android and iOS. And if you like that, watch this YouTube movie showing how Chrome Developer Tools integration can fit directly into the workflow below. Anyone want to help get this plugin further? What's needed: Much deeper Dart editing support, i.e., right now only very basic syntax coloring is provided, i.e., an ANTLR lexer is integrated into the NetBeans syntax coloring infrastructure. Parsing, error checking, code completion, and some small code templates are needed. A new panel is needed in the Project Properties dialog on NetBeans HTML5 projects for enabling Dart (i.e., similar to enabling Cordova), at which point the "dart.js" file and other Dart artifacts should be added to the project, so that a Dart project is immediately generated and the application should be immediately deployable. Whenever changes are made to a Dart file, Dart should run in the background to create the Dart artifacts in some hidden way, so that the user doesn't see all the Dart artifacts as is currently the case. Some way of recognizing Dart projects (there's a YAML file as an identifier) and creating NetBeans HTML5 projects from that, i.e., from Dart projects outside the IDE. I think that's all... The official Dart Editor is based on Eclipse and requires a massive download of heaps of Eclipse bundles. Compare that to the NetBeans equivalent, which is a very small "HTML5 and PHP" bundle (60 MB), available here, together with the above small Dart plugin. Plus, when you look at how NetBeans IDE integrates with a bunch of Google-oriented projects, i.e., Chrome, Chrome Developer Tools, and Android (via Cordova), that's a pretty interesting toolbox for anyone using Dart. And bear in mind that ANTLRWorks, Microchip, and heaps of other organizations have built and are building their tools on top of NetBeans!

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  • YouTube: Tips by Bitwise Courses on NetBeans

    - by Geertjan
    I really like the potential of YouTube in providing a platform for short info clips that take not much time to produce and about as much time to consume. Huw Collingbourne's Bitwise Courses channel is full of exactly this kind of YouTube clip. Several of his YouTube clips are about or make use of NetBeans. The related Twitter account is @bitwisecourses and the homepage is bitwisecourses.com. Here's a great example, the latest YouTube clip created by Bitwise Courses. Very clear and simple explanation, on a specific and narrow topic, and very short and sweet. And very useful! Didn't know about this feature myself. Direct link to the movie: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b0fKT_hFQpU Here's to more of these, they're wonderful. More such YouTube clips are needed, short and precise, on very specific topics. And I'm very happy to promote them, as you can see.

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  • NetBeans Sources as a Platform

    - by Geertjan
    By default, when you create a new NetBeans module, the 'development IDE' is the platform to which you'll be deploying your module. It's a good idea to create your own platform and check that into your own repo, so that everyone working on your project will be able to work with a standardized platform, rather than whatever happens to be beneath the development IDE your using. Something else you can do is use the NetBeans sources as your platform, once you've checked them out. That's something I did the other day when trying to see whether adding 'setActivatedNodes' to NbSheet was sufficient for getting UndoRedo enabled in the Properties Window. So that's a good use case, i.e., you'd like to change the NetBeans Platform somehow, or you're fixing a bug, in other words, in some way you need to change the NetBeans Platform sources and then would like to try out the result of your changes as a client of your changes. In that scenario, here's how to set up and use a NetBeans Platform from the NetBeans sources. Run 'ant build platform' on the root of the NetBeans sources. You'll end up with nbbuild/netbeans containing a subfolder 'platform' and a subfolder 'harness'. There's your NetBeans Platform. Go to Tools | NetBeans Platform and browse to nbbuild/netbeans', registering it as your NetBeans Platform. Create a new NetBeans module, using the new NetBeans Platform as the platform. Now the cool thing is you can open any of the NetBeans modules from the NetBeans Platform modules in the NetBeans sources. When you change the source code of one of these modules and then build that module, the changed JAR will automatically be added to the right place in the nbbuild/netbeans folder. And when you do a 'clean' on a NetBeans Platform module, the related JAR will be removed from nbbuild/netbeans. In other words, in this way, by changing the NetBeans sources, you're directly changing the platform that your custom module will be running on when you deploy it. That's pretty cool and gives you a more connected relationship to your platform, since you're able to change it in the same way as the custom modules you create.

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  • Notes for a NetBeans IDE 7.4 HTML5 Screencast

    - by Geertjan
    I'm making a screencast that intends to thoroughly introduce NetBeans IDE 7.4 as a tool for HTML, JavaScript, and CSS developers. Here's the current outline, additions and other suggestions are welcome. Getting Started Downloading NetBeans IDE for HTML5 and PHP Examining the NetBeans installation directory, especially netbeans.conf Examining the NetBeans user directory Command line options for starting NetBeans IDE Exploring NetBeans IDE Menus and toolbars Versioning tools Options Window Go through whole Options window Change look and feels Adding themes Syntax coloring Code templates Plugin Manager and Plugin Portal Dark Look and Feel Themes Toggle line wrap Emmet HTML Tidy NetBeans Cheat Sheets Creating HTML5 projects From scratch From online template, e.g., Twitter Bootstrap From ZIP file From folder on disk From sample Editing Useful shortcuts Alt-Enter: see the current hints Alt-Shift-DOT/COMMA: expand selection (CTRL instead of Alt on Mac) Ctrl-Shift-Up/Down: copy up/down Alt-Shift-Up/Down: move up/down Alt-Insert: generate code (Lorum Ipsum) View menu | Show Non-printable Characters Source menu Show keyboard shortcut card Useful hints Surround with Tag Remove Surrounding Tag Useful code completion Link tag for CSS, show completion Script tag for JavaScript, show completion Create code templates in Options window Useful HTML Palette items Unordered List Link Useful code navigation Navigator Navigate menu Useful project settings Project-level deployment settings CSS Preprocessors (SASS/LESS) Cordova support Useful window management Dragging, minimizing, undocking Ctrl-Shift-Enter: distraction-free mode Alt-Shift Enter: maximization Debugging JavaScript debugger Deploying Embedded browser Responsive design Inspect in NetBeans mode Chrome browser with NetBeans plugin Android and iOS browsers Cordova makes native packages On device debugging On device styling Documentation PHP and HTML5 Learning Trail: https://netbeans.org/kb/trails/php.html Contributing Social Media: Twitter, Facebook, blogs Plugin Portal Planning to complete the above screencast this week, will continue editing this page as more useful features arise in my mind or hopefully in the comments in this blog entry!

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  • Java Hint in NetBeans for Identifying JOptionPanes

    - by Geertjan
    I tend to have "JOptionPane.showMessageDialogs" scattered through my code, for debugging purposes. Now I have a way to identify all of them and remove them one by one, since some of them are there for users of the application so shouldn't be removed, via the Refactoring window: Identifying instances of code that I'm interested in is really trivial: import org.netbeans.spi.editor.hints.ErrorDescription; import org.netbeans.spi.java.hints.ConstraintVariableType; import org.netbeans.spi.java.hints.ErrorDescriptionFactory; import org.netbeans.spi.java.hints.Hint; import org.netbeans.spi.java.hints.HintContext; import org.netbeans.spi.java.hints.TriggerPattern; import org.openide.util.NbBundle.Messages; @Hint( displayName = "#DN_ShowMessageDialogChecker", description = "#DESC_ShowMessageDialogChecker", category = "general") @Messages({ "DN_ShowMessageDialogChecker=Found \"ShowMessageDialog\"", "DESC_ShowMessageDialogChecker=Checks for JOptionPane.showMes" }) public class ShowMessageDialogChecker { @TriggerPattern(value = "$1.showMessageDialog", constraints = @ConstraintVariableType(variable = "$1", type = "javax.swing.JOptionPane")) @Messages("ERR_ShowMessageDialogChecker=Are you sure you need this statement?") public static ErrorDescription computeWarning(HintContext ctx) { return ErrorDescriptionFactory.forName( ctx, ctx.getPath(), Bundle.ERR_ShowMessageDialogChecker()); } } Stick the above class, which seriously isn't much code at all, in a module and run it, with this result: Bit trickier to do the fix, i.e., add a bit of code to let the user remove the statement, but I looked in the NetBeans sources and used the System.out fix, which does the same thing:  import com.sun.source.tree.BlockTree; import com.sun.source.tree.StatementTree; import com.sun.source.util.TreePath; import java.util.ArrayList; import java.util.Iterator; import java.util.List; import org.netbeans.api.java.source.CompilationInfo; import org.netbeans.api.java.source.WorkingCopy; import org.netbeans.spi.editor.hints.ErrorDescription; import org.netbeans.spi.editor.hints.Fix; import org.netbeans.spi.java.hints.ConstraintVariableType; import org.netbeans.spi.java.hints.ErrorDescriptionFactory; import org.netbeans.spi.java.hints.Hint; import org.netbeans.spi.java.hints.HintContext; import org.netbeans.spi.java.hints.JavaFix; import org.netbeans.spi.java.hints.TriggerPattern; import org.openide.util.NbBundle.Messages; @Hint( displayName = "#DN_ShowMessageDialogChecker", description = "#DESC_ShowMessageDialogChecker", category = "general") @Messages({ "DN_ShowMessageDialogChecker=Found \"ShowMessageDialog\"", "DESC_ShowMessageDialogChecker=Checks for JOptionPane.showMes" }) public class ShowMessageDialogChecker { @TriggerPattern(value = "$1.showMessageDialog", constraints = @ConstraintVariableType(variable = "$1", type = "javax.swing.JOptionPane")) @Messages("ERR_ShowMessageDialogChecker=Are you sure you need this statement?") public static ErrorDescription computeWarning(HintContext ctx) { Fix fix = new FixImpl(ctx.getInfo(), ctx.getPath()).toEditorFix(); return ErrorDescriptionFactory.forName( ctx, ctx.getPath(), Bundle.ERR_ShowMessageDialogChecker(), fix); } private static final class FixImpl extends JavaFix { public FixImpl(CompilationInfo info, TreePath tp) { super(info, tp); } @Override @Messages("FIX_ShowMessageDialogChecker=Remove the statement") protected String getText() { return Bundle.FIX_ShowMessageDialogChecker(); } @Override protected void performRewrite(TransformationContext tc) throws Exception { WorkingCopy wc = tc.getWorkingCopy(); TreePath statementPath = tc.getPath(); TreePath blockPath = tc.getPath().getParentPath(); while (!(blockPath.getLeaf() instanceof BlockTree)) { statementPath = blockPath; blockPath = blockPath.getParentPath(); if (blockPath == null) { return; } } BlockTree blockTree = (BlockTree) blockPath.getLeaf(); List<? extends StatementTree> statements = blockTree.getStatements(); List<StatementTree> newStatements = new ArrayList<StatementTree>(); for (Iterator<? extends StatementTree> it = statements.iterator(); it.hasNext();) { StatementTree statement = it.next(); if (statement != statementPath.getLeaf()) { newStatements.add(statement); } } BlockTree newBlockTree = wc.getTreeMaker().Block(newStatements, blockTree.isStatic()); wc.rewrite(blockTree, newBlockTree); } } } Aside from now being able to use "Inspect & Refactor" to identify and fix all instances of JOptionPane.showMessageDialog at the same time, you can also do the fixes per instance within the editor:

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  • The ABC of Front End Web Development

    - by Geertjan
    And here it is, the long awaited "ABC" of front end web development, in which the items I never knew existed until I was looking to fill the gaps link off to the sites where more info can be found on them. A is for Android and AngularJS B is for Backbone.js and Bower C is for CSS and Cordova D is for Docker E is for Ember.js and Ext JS F is for Frisby.js G is for Grunt H is for HTML I is for Ionic and iPhone J is for JavaScript, Jasmine, and JSON K is for Knockout.js and Karma L is for LESS M is for Mocha N is for NetBeans and Node.js O is for "Oh no, my JS app is unmaintainable!" P is for PHP, Protractor, and PhoneGap Q is for Queen.js R is for Request.js S is for SASS, Selenium, and Sublime T is for TestFairy U is for Umbrella V is for Vaadin W is for WebStorm X is for XML Y is for Yeoman Z is for Zebra

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