Search Results

Search found 1780 results on 72 pages for 'github'.

Page 1/72 | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  | Next Page >

  • Installing GitHub for Mac - "Github cannot be opened because of a probem"

    - by betitall
    I'm trying to get started using Git for Mac, but I receive an error when I try to run the program. I'm new to GitHub and relatively new to Mac. First, I installed Git using the downloadable .dmg file named "git-1.7.12.3-intel-universal-snow-leopard". I ran the .pkg file contained therein and the install seemed to work fine. I'm using a new macbook pro w/ retina. Then I downloaded the Github for Mac installer, "mac_GitHub for Mac 69.zip". When I double-click the file, it shows that there is a single file of type "Application". Double-clicking that application file produces the error: "GitHub cannot be opened because of a problem". Here are the partial details of that error: Application Specific Information: dyld: launch, loading dependent libraries Dyld Error Message: Library not loaded: @executable_path/../Frameworks/Rebel.framework/Rebel Referenced from: /Applications/GitHub.app/Contents/MacOS/GitHub Reason: no suitable image found. Did find: /Applications/GitHub.app/Contents/MacOS/../Frameworks/Rebel.framework/Rebel: file too short /Applications/GitHub.app/Contents/MacOS/../Frameworks/Rebel.framework/Rebel: file too short Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks.

    Read the article

  • Pointing a subdomain to Github Pages

    - by ratage
    I set up an Octopress blog on Github Pages at myusername.github.com. I now want blog.myusername.me (which currently has a Wordpress blog set up) to point to this Octopress blog. So I followed the instructions here on setting up a custom domain: I ran echo 'blog.myusername.me' >> source/CNAME in my Octopress repository, and then ran rake generate and rake deploy to deploy it to Github. I went to Namecheap, and added a new CNAME under my myusername.me domain: "blog - myusername.github.com - CNAME". Waited a couple hours. However, now when I go to myusername.github.com, it redirects me to blog.myusername.me (which is my old Wordpress blog), which seems like the inverse of what I want. (Going to blog.myusername.me directly still shows my Wordpress blog.) I checked http://www.whatsmydns.net/#CNAME/blog.myusername.me and it seems like my DNS has propagated (myusername.github.com shows up in the right-hand side). Any ideas what I'm doing wrong?

    Read the article

  • Can you use Github App with Beanstalk?

    - by mikemick
    Being new to Git, I wanted to use a GUI (Windows based) and preferred the Github App. However, I would like to integrate this site with a Beanstalkapp account. I'm pretty sure this is possible, but I can't figure it out. Inside of the Github app, I navigate to my repository. When I choose "Tools Settings...", I place the Git Clone URL for the repository provided by Beanstalk into the "Primary Remote (origin)" field in my Github app. Now when I click "Publish" (which says "Click to publish this branch to server" when I hover over it) it changes to "Publishing...". After a few seconds, I get this error: server failure The remote server disconnected. Try again later, or if this persists, contact [email protected] I am pretty sure I set the SSH keys up properly (never done this before). I added the key to both the Beanstalkapp and my Github web account.

    Read the article

  • Connection timeout when accessing Github

    - by Felipe Micaroni Lalli
    I have exactly the same problem as described here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/12849986/connection-timeout-when-accessing-github So I'll just copy & paste: I have some weird problems. When I try to log in my Github account, I get a "net::ERR_EMPTY_RESPONSE" error. I tried with Chrome, Firefox and Opera. In Firefox, if a clean the cache and offline data, it works for a while. Then I can log in, but I still can't create a Github repository, even if I clear the cache again. My friend, in the same network, with Windows, can do whatever he wants on Github's web site, but I can't. I tried many DNS servers, I tried not to set it (my friend doesn't), but it's still not working. My OS: Ubuntu x64 12.04 Ideas, please. And thanks. Also, I can clone any repo but I can't push. I had to change to https://codeplane.com/ due to this problem, but I want to understand why it happens. EDIT: I could clone one repo, but the other one just hangs at this point: [email protected]:~/wa$ git clone [email protected]:felipelalli/micaroni.git Cloning into 'micaroni'... remote: Counting objects: 5238, done. remote: Compressing objects: 100% (3257/3257), done. Receiving objects: 92% (4839/5238), 43.29 MiB | 902 KiB/s

    Read the article

  • Fork dead SVN based project on GitHub

    - by Quinn Bailey
    I previously asked this at stack overflow but it was closed, I believe because 'programmers' is a more appropriate venue for this question. I have done some work on the SVN Importer project (Apache license), which appears to be effectively dead (no published changes in 5 years). I have a login to their svn server but do not have commit rights. At any rate, I'd like to convert this project to Git and push my own changes to GitHub. The GitHub site suggests the svn2git tool for converting svn projects to Git, so I was planning to convert the SVN repository to Git, add my changes, and then push this Git repository to GitHub. I'm wondering, what are the legal requirements and common conventions of this process? Is it acceptable to clone the entire history of the project and move it to GitHub? Also, even though this is essentially a dead project, once I've translated the repository to Git should I put all of my commits onto a non master branch or is it acceptable to use master in this case?

    Read the article

  • github team workflow - to fork or not?

    - by aporat
    We're a small team of web developers currently using subversion but soon we're making a switch to github. I'm looking at different types of github workflows, and we're not sure if the whole forking concept in github for each developer is such a good idea for us. If we use forks, I understand each developer will have his own private remote & local repositories. I'm worried it will make pushing changesets hard and too complex. Also, my biggest concern is that it will force each developer to have 2 remotes: origin (which is the remote fork) and an upstream (which is used to "sync" changes from the main repository). Not sure if it's such a easy way to do things. This is similar to the workflow explained here: https://github.com/usm-data-analysis/usm-data-analysis.github.com/wiki/Git-workflow If we don't use forks, we can probably get by fine by using a central repo creating a branch for each task we're working on, and merge them into the development branch on the same repository. It means we won't be able to restrict merging of branches and might be a little messy to have many branches on the central repository. Any suggestions from teams who tried both workflow?

    Read the article

  • Are forks are treated differently by GitHub?

    - by IQAndreas
    I found that GitHub does not allow you to use the "search" feature on forks (issues are still searchable, just not code). [screenshot] Are there any other cases where forks are treated as "inferior" or at least differently by GitHub? For instance, (assuming you haven't created a website specific to your fork), will forks still show up in Google search results, or will GitHub only provide results for the parent repository?

    Read the article

  • Are these GitHub features implemented in BitBucket?

    - by doug
    I recently joined a company that, while using git for version control, uses BitBucket as remote/master + git interface for projects. This is my first exposure to BitBucket. There are a couple of GitHub features I rely heavily on in my daily workflow and I am trying to find their counterpart in BitBucket or else how I can recreate the same functionality if it is not provided out-of-the-box. In particular, in GitHub I rely heavily on tags (which I realize reside in git) to link commits to issues (feature request, bug report, etc.); in addition, given projects specs are often decomposed into milestones, I use the milestone feature in GitHub Issues to track progress towards our project milestones (ie, in GitHub a milestone is comprised of a sequence of issues, and the commit tagged with the last remaining issue under that Milestone, causes that Milestone to be annotated as completed. I suspect this workflow can be recreated using Jira, which my new employer also uses, but before trying that, I want to learn if it's already implemented and I just can't find it.

    Read the article

  • github team workflow - to fork or not?

    - by aporat
    We're a small team of web developers currently using subversion but soon we're making a switch to github. I'm looking at different types of github workflows, and we're not sure if the whole forking concept in github for each developer is such a good idea for us. If we use forks, I understand each developer will have his own private remote & local repositories. I'm worried it will make pushing changesets hard and too complex. Also, my biggest concern is that it will force each developer to have 2 remotes: origin (which is the remote fork) and an upstream (which is used to "sync" changes from the main repository). Not sure if it's such a easy way to do things. This is similar to the workflow explained here: https://github.com/usm-data-analysis/usm-data-analysis.github.com/wiki/Git-workflow If we don't use forks, we can probably get by fine by using a central repo creating a branch for each task we're working on, and merge them into the development branch on the same repository. It means we won't be able to restrict merging of branches and might be a little messy to have many branches on the central repository. Any suggestions from teams who tried both workflow?

    Read the article

  • Most popular Open-Source License on github?

    - by John R
    This is a two part question: 1) What is the most popular Open-Source License used by developers on github? 2) Assuming people follow the rules - will this license (the most popular on github) assure that my name is always associated with the project - regardless of how it forks or is picked up elsewhere. The reason I ask is I have not yet used github nor released an open source project. My main incentive for releasing a particular project is to develop a name for myself and improve my resume. I have a lot of reading to do, but I suspect that knowing the most popular licensing schemes will reduce my reading and my learning curve.

    Read the article

  • Github Feed affecting my WordPress installation? [on hold]

    - by saul
    Any idea how this fork is affecting my site? I went to verify my website log stats, and realized this may be the cause of a strange redirect constantly happening on my WordPress installation. Here's a line I found on my log: 54.81.91.95 - - [07/May/2014:22:52:08 -0400] "GET /category/selfie/feed/ HTTP/1.1" 200 1826 "-" "feedzirra http://github.com/pauldix/feedzirra/tree/master" And this is the Github fork (or however these are called). https://github.com/feedjira/feedjira/tree/master Basically, I think everytime I update my categories, (selfie in this case), I get redirected to install.php. Probably by triggering some GET function on that feed. to the best of my knowledge, this feed parses all url with this structure, blocking them, kind of like a DDoS attack?? Any ideas how to go about it??

    Read the article

  • Why "Fork me on github"?

    - by NoBugs
    I understand how Github works, but one thing I've been confused about is, why almost every OSS project lately has a "Fork me on Github" link on their homepage. For example, http://jqtjs.com/, http://www.daviddurman.com/flexi-color-picker/, and others. Why is this so common? Is it that they want/need code validation, checking for security/performance improvements that they may not know how to do? Is it meant to show that this is a collaborative project - you're welcome to add improvements? Do they work for Github, or want to promote their service? Oddly enough, I don't think I've seen a "Fork project on Bitbucket" logo recently. My first reaction to that logo was that the project probably needs to be modified (forked) in order to integrate it with anything useful - or that they are encouraging fragmented codebase, encouraging everyone to make their own fork of the project. But I don't think that is the intent.

    Read the article

  • Github Organization Repositories, Issues, Multiple Developers, and Forking - Best Workflow Practices

    - by Jim Rubenstein
    A weird title, yes, but I've got a bit of ground to cover I think. We have an organization account on github with private repositories. We want to use github's native issues/pull-requests features (pull requests are basically exactly what we want as far as code reviews and feature discussions). We found the tool hub by defunkt which has a cool little feature of being able to convert an existing issue to a pull request, and automatically associate your current branch with it. I'm wondering if it is best practice to have each developer in the organization fork the organization's repository to do their feature work/bug fixes/etc. This seems like a pretty solid work flow (as, it's basically what every open source project on github does) but we want to be sure that we can track issues and pull requests from ONE source, the organization's repository. So I have a few questions: Is a fork-per-developer approach appropriate in this case? It seems like it could be a little overkill. I'm not sure that we need a fork for every developer, unless we introduce developers who don't have direct push access and need all their code reviewed. In which case, we would want to institute a policy like that, for those developers only. So, which is better? All developers in a single repository, or a fork for everyone? Does anyone have experience with the hub tool, specifically the pull-request feature? If we do a fork-per-developer (or even for less-privileged devs) will the pull-request feature of hub operate on the pull requests from the upstream master repository (the organization's repository?) or does it have different behavior? EDIT I did some testing with issues, forks, and pull requests and found that. If you create an issue on your organization's repository, then fork the repository from your organization to your own github account, do some changes, merge to your fork's master branch. When you try to run hub -i <issue #> you get an error, User is not authorized to modify the issue. So, apparently that work flow won't work.

    Read the article

  • what are the advantages and disadvantages of putting code for an unfinished project on github

    - by cori
    I'm stating to work on a project that I intend to release as open source via the githubs. What are the advantages of putting the code on github from the outset, as opposed to waiting until the project is in a working state before publishing. If it matters, this particular project is a C# app/service, and I have only a free github account (so I can't make it private and then pull back the covers later)

    Read the article

  • GitHub Integration in Windows Azure Web Site

    - by Shaun
    Microsoft had just announced an update for Windows Azure Web Site (a.k.a. WAWS). There are four major features added in WAWS which are free scaling mode, GitHub integration, custom domain and multi branches. Since I ‘m working in Node.js and I would like to have my code in GitHub and deployed automatically to my Windows Azure Web Site once I sync my code, this feature is a big good news to me.   It’s very simple to establish the GitHub integration in WAWS. First we need a clean WAWS. In its dashboard page click “Set up Git publishing”. Currently WAWS doesn’t support to change the publish setting. So if you have an existing WAWS which published by TFS or local Git then you have to create a new WAWS and set the Git publishing. Then in the deployment page we can see now WAWS supports three Git publishing modes: - Push my local files to Windows Azure: In this mode we will create a new Git repository on local machine and commit, publish our code to Windows Azure through Git command or some GUI. - Deploy from my GitHub project: In this mode we will have a Git repository created on GitHub. Once we publish our code to GitHub Windows Azure will download the code and trigger a new deployment. - Deploy from my CodePlex project: Similar as the previous one but our code would be in CodePlex repository.   Now let’s back to GitHub and create a new publish repository. Currently WAWS GitHub integration only support for public repositories. The private repositories support will be available in several weeks. We can manage our repositories in GitHub website. But as a windows geek I prefer the GUI tool. So I opened the GitHub for Windows, login with my GitHub account and select the “github” category, click the “add” button to create a new repository on GitHub. You can download the GitHub for Windows here. I specified the repository name, description, local repository, do not check the “Keep this code private”. After few seconds it will create a new repository on GitHub and associate it to my local machine in that folder. We can find this new repository in GitHub website. And in GitHub for Windows we can also find the local repository by selecting the “local” category.   Next, we need to associate this repository with our WAWS. Back to windows developer portal, open the “Deploy from my GitHub project” in the deployment page and click the “Authorize Windows Azure” link. It will bring up a new windows on GitHub which let me allow the Windows Azure application can access your repositories. After we clicked “Allow”, windows azure will retrieve all my GitHub public repositories and let me select which one I want to integrate to this WAWS. I selected the one I had just created in GitHub for Windows. So that’s all. We had completed the GitHub integration configuration. Now let’s have a try. In GitHub for Windows, right click on this local repository and click “open in explorer”. Then I added a simple HTML file. 1: <html> 2: <head> 3: </head> 4: <body> 5: <h1> 6: I came from GitHub, WOW! 7: </h1> 8: </body> 9: </html> Save it and back to GitHub for Windows, commit this change and publish. This will upload our changes to GitHub, and Windows Azure will detect this update and trigger a new deployment. If we went back to azure developer portal we can find the new deployment. And our commit message will be shown as the deployment description as well. And here is the page deployed to WAWS.   Hope this helps, Shaun All documents and related graphics, codes are provided "AS IS" without warranty of any kind. Copyright © Shaun Ziyan Xu. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons License.

    Read the article

  • Git Project Dependencies on GitHub

    - by VirtuosiMedia
    I've written a PHP framework and a CMS on top of the framework. The CMS is dependent on the framework, but the framework exists as a self-contained folder within the CMS files. I'd like to maintain them as separate projects on GitHub, but I don't want to have the mess of updating the CMS project every time I update the framework. Ideally, I'd like to have the CMS somehow pull the framework files for inclusion into a predefined sub-directory rather than physically committing those files. Is this possible with Git/GitHub? If so, what do I need to know to make it work? Keep in mind that I'm at a very, very basic level of experience with Git - I can make repositories and commit using the Git plugin for Eclipse, connect to GitHub, and that's about it. I'm currently working solo on the projects, so I haven't had to learn much more about Git so far, but I'd like to open it up to others in the future and I want to make sure I have it right. Also, what should my ideal workflow be for projects with dependencies? Any tips on that subject would also greatly appreciated. If you need more info on my setup, just ask in the comments.

    Read the article

  • Sixeyed.Caching available now on NuGet and GitHub!

    - by Elton Stoneman
    Originally posted on: http://geekswithblogs.net/EltonStoneman/archive/2013/10/22/sixeyed.caching-available-now-on-nuget-and-github.aspxThe good guys at Pluralsight have okayed me to publish my caching framework (as seen in Caching in the .NET Stack: Inside-Out) as an open-source library, and it’s out now. You can get it here: Sixeyed.Caching source code on GitHub, and here: Sixeyed.Caching package v1.0.0 on NuGet. If you haven’t seen the course, there’s a preview here on YouTube: In-Process and Out-of-Process Caches, which gives a good flavour. The library is a wrapper around various cache providers, including the .NET MemoryCache, AppFabric cache, and  memcached*. All the wrappers inherit from a base class which gives you a set of common functionality against all the cache implementations: •    inherits OutputCacheProvider, so you can use your chosen cache provider as an ASP.NET output cache; •    serialization and encryption, so you can configure whether you want your cache items serialized (XML, JSON or binary) and encrypted; •    instrumentation, you can optionally use performance counters to monitor cache attempts and hits, at a low level. The framework wraps up different caches into an ICache interface, and it lets you use a provider directly like this: Cache.Memory.Get<RefData>(refDataKey); - or with configuration to use the default cache provider: Cache.Default.Get<RefData>(refDataKey); The library uses Unity’s interception framework to implement AOP caching, which you can use by flagging methods with the [Cache] attribute: [Cache] public RefData GetItem(string refDataKey) - and you can be more specific on the required cache behaviour: [Cache(CacheType=CacheType.Memory, Days=1] public RefData GetItem(string refDataKey) - or really specific: [Cache(CacheType=CacheType.Disk, SerializationFormat=SerializationFormat.Json, Hours=2, Minutes=59)] public RefData GetItem(string refDataKey) Provided you get instances of classes with cacheable methods from the container, the attributed method results will be cached, and repeated calls will be fetched from the cache. You can also set a bunch of cache defaults in application config, like whether to use encryption and instrumentation, and whether the cache system is enabled at all: <sixeyed.caching enabled="true"> <performanceCounters instrumentCacheTotalCounts="true" instrumentCacheTargetCounts="true" categoryNamePrefix ="Sixeyed.Caching.Tests"/> <encryption enabled="true" key="1234567890abcdef1234567890abcdef" iv="1234567890abcdef"/> <!-- key must be 32 characters, IV must be 16 characters--> </sixeyed.caching> For AOP and methods flagged with the cache attribute, you can override the compile-time cache settings at runtime with more config (keyed by the class and method name): <sixeyed.caching enabled="true"> <targets> <target keyPrefix="MethodLevelCachingStub.GetRandomIntCacheConfiguredInternal" enabled="false"/> <target keyPrefix="MethodLevelCachingStub.GetRandomIntCacheExpiresConfiguredInternal" seconds="1"/> </targets> It’s released under the MIT license, so you can use it freely in your own apps and modify as required. I’ll be adding more content to the GitHub wiki, which will be the main source of documentation, but for now there’s an FAQ to get you started. * - in the course the framework library also wraps NCache Express, but there's no public redistributable library that I can find, so it's not in Sixeyed.Caching.

    Read the article

  • Security issue about making my code public in GitHub

    - by John Doe
    I'm developing a big community/forum website and I'd like to upload my code to GitHub to have at least some sort of version control over it (because I have nothing other than a .rar file as a backup, not even SVN), to let others contribute to the project, and also perhaps using it to let my potential future employers see some of my code as some sort of curriculum. But what I'm wondering now, and I'm suprised I haven't seen anyone mention it before is the security aspect of it. Isn't publishing the code of a website a HUGE security hole? Is like giving a potential hacker or anyone who would like to find any potential exploit possible, even considering that the critical files aren't uploaded (database passwords, authentication scripts, etc.). Of course that there are millions of projects uploaded to GitHub and no one will find mine just 'by chance'. But if they look for it, it would indeed be there. Bottomline: my problem is not about copyright or licenses, but others finding exploits in my website. I'm I missing something here?

    Read the article

  • Forking a repo on GitHub but allowing new issues on the fork

    - by Tom Swirly
    I have previously forked other people's repos on GitHub, and I have noticed that issues stay with the original repo, and that I can't file issues on the forked repo. I now have the following task. I am working for a small business where development was being done by one of the principals on his personal account. He has amicably left the project, and we would like to migrate that project away from his personal account to a new "role" account on GitHub. I would naturally fork the repo, in order to preserve the code history, but then I'll end up with a repo where we can't file new issues, which is quite undesirable. How can I make a copy of this original repo into our new account, ideally still preserving code history, but be able to file new issues within this new account?

    Read the article

  • New cloud development workflow using Github, Cloud9ide and CloudFoundry.

    - by weng
    So time is changing towards cloud development/computing. I'm trying to get the new "cloud" workflow based on the services I'm going to use: Github, Cloud9ide and CloudFoundry. Here is what is on my mind: Github acts like a central (main repo) just like yesterday's local filesystem. Every service will base it service upon this main repo. Workflow: Github: I create a new Github repo served as main repo for the project. Cloud9ide. I open my Github repo and write my tests and implementation (BDD/TDD). When I'm ready I save (commit) it to main repo on Github. X: A running instance of Jenkins detects someone has committed and fetches the latest commit, builds, deploys, tests (yeti and/or selenium) and reports if the tests were passed or not. If not, I make another commit til all tests are passing. X: I run the CloudFoundry commands to push the main Github repo to CloudFoundry's server and it will deploy my app automatically. What I'm still confused about is where this X environment will be. On a local server where I have to install Jenkins? Or could I install it on Cloud9ide (when java is supported) or will it be on another cloud service? Also, that X environment has to be able to fetch (clone) the Github repo and run the build scripts. And since the concept of Cloud9ide is very new and there haven't been any other predecessors I really wonder how the workflow will look like. We all know Github's workflow. We now know CloudFoundry's workflow (deploy/scale with a restful API/command line tool). But how Cloud9Ide will operate is still somewhat unclear to me. Someone on Cloud9ide mentioned that there will be buttons like deploy so I can deploy with one click. But that I guess will depend on what services that deploy process will hook up into etc. Could someone enlighten this cloud workflow topic and fill in the gaps. Thanks.

    Read the article

  • Solution with multiple projects and (GitHub) single issue tracker and repository

    - by Luiz Damim
    I have a Visual Studio solution with multiple projects: Acme.Core Acme.Core.Tests Acme.UI.MvcSite1 Acme.UI.MvcSite2 Acme.UI.WinformsApp1 Acme.UI.WinformsApp2 ... The entire solution is checked-in in a single GitHub (private) repo. Acme.Core contains our business logic and all UI projects are deployables. UI projects have different requirements and features, but some of them are implemented in more than one project. All issues are opened in a single issue tracker and classified using labels ([MvcSite1], [WinformsApp1], etc) but I'm thinking it's starting to get messy. Is it ok to use a single repository and issue tracker to track multiple projects in one solution?

    Read the article

  • Forking project on Github process

    - by Mike Wills
    There is a project on Github that I mostly like and want to use. There are a few things I want to do differently/remove that doesn't make sense for what I want/need. Also I want to add a few things as well. As I understand it, I should fork the project and I can make whatever changes I want and push back to my fork. From there, I also want to occasionally pull into my fork the changes from the original project so I get the latest bug fixes/features. Am I off-base of how I think it should work? How would bring in the changes from the original project?

    Read the article

  • Forking project on Github etiquette

    - by Mike Wills
    There is a project on Github that I mostly like and want to use. There are a few things I want to do differently/remove that doesn't make sense for what I want/need. Also I want to add a few things as well. As I understand it, I should fork the project and I can make whatever changes I want and push back to my fork. From there, I also want to occasionally pull into my fork the changes from the original project so I get the latest bug fixes/features. Am I off-base of how I think it should work? How would bring in the changes from the original project?

    Read the article

  • GitHub OS project how to have a good version and a work in progress version

    - by Para
    I have started my own OS application, I am hosting it on GitHub. My problem is that I push changes to the repository from more than one location so sometimes I want to work on it and sometimes I can't always finish something in time but I would still like to push it anyway so I can fetch it later from my other location. I'd like to be able to somehow have a stable version and have the master branch be a 'work in progress'. How do I do this? Is there some button I can push that will take the code from my master branch and make it into a zip file in my downloads tab and call it a version or should I do this by hand? Would it be better to have the master branch be nice and neat and have a separate branch to play with and then merge the two when the time is right? Would this not cause more problems in the merging phase?

    Read the article

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  | Next Page >