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  • How to introduce web development to non-programmers?

    - by Gulshan
    Once one of my non-programmer friends asked, "I have a cool website idea that I don't want to share. Rather I want to develop it on my own. So, I want to learn web development. Tell me what to do?" And sometimes many other people asked about how to start with web development as a profession. But they are non-programmers or not from Computer Science background. What should I suggest to them? Learning programming from the scratch? Or using CMS-like tools? Or anything else?

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  • What's a nice explanation for recursion?

    - by Gulshan
    This question is inspired by What's a nice explanation for pointers? So, what can be a nice explanation of the recursion? Update: The idea of recursion is not very common in real world. So, it seems a bit confusing to the novice programmers. Though, I guess, they become used to the concept gradually. So, what can be a nice explanation for them to grasp the idea easily? I expected some detailed answers. N.B. : Even I am going to post one answer. But to be fair, it will be few hours later.

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  • What about introduction to programming with C# via LINQPad?

    - by Gulshan
    From different questions/answers/articles in this and some other sites, I got the idea that the introductory language for programming should be- High level Less verbose C# is one of the heavily used high level languages being used these days. It's also multi-paradigm and descendant of C, the lingua-franca of all programming languages. So, I think it has the potential to be the introductory programming language. But I felt it's a bit verbose for the novice learners. Then LINQPad came into my mind. With LINQPad, someone can start with C# without it's verbosity. Because you can just run one statement or few statements or a standalone function with LINQPad. Again you can run a full source file also. Another thing it provide is- using SQL. So, it can be used for learning SQL too. And not to mention, it's free. So, what you guys think about the idea of introducing programming with C# via LINQPad? Any thing to watch out? Any suggestion?

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  • Are C++ templates just a kind of glorified macros?

    - by Gulshan
    From different comparisons among C++ templates and C#/Java generics like this one- http://stackoverflow.com/questions/31693/what-are-the-differences-between-generics-in-c-and-java-and-templates-in-c/31929#31929 I have a got a perception that, C++ templates are implemented by some kind of preprocessing, not compiling. In other words, they are just a kind of C macros. Is this right? Then I felt that, if C++ templates are implemented by preprocessing, dynamic linking(.dll) cannot be used. A quick google search also supports this. And lastly, how can we use macros in C to deliver C++ templates like functionalities? Another thing came in my mind about templates similar to some kind of preprocessor that, there can be integers passed as arguments to some templates. And it even supports kind of recursion. But the recursion is not in the assembly/machine code. So, am I wrong calling templates glorified macros? Unlike normal macros, it has some superior abilities. But isn't it a kind of preprocessing?

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  • Which points should be covered in basic Bachelors' level C++ course?

    - by Gulshan
    I have a young lecturer friend who is going to take the C++ course for the bachelors' degree in CS. He asked me for some suggestions regarding how the course should be organized. Now I am asking you. I have seen many trends in universities which leads to a nasty experience of C++. So, please suggest from a professional programmer's point of view. For your information, the students going to take the course, have taken course like "Introduction to programming with C" in previous semester.

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  • Why Garbage Collection if smart pointers are there

    - by Gulshan
    This days, so many languages are garbage collected. Even it is available for C++ by third parties. But, C++ has RAII and smart pointers. So, what's the point of using garbage collection? Is it doing something extra? And in other languages like C#, if all the references are treated as smart pointers(keeping RAII aside), by specification and by implementation, will there be still any need of garbage collectors? If no, then why this is not so?

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  • Which topics should be covered in a basic undergraduate C++ course?

    - by Gulshan
    I have a young lecturer friend who is going to teach the undergraduate C++ course in CS. He asked me for some suggestions regarding how the course should be organized. Now I am asking you. I have seen many trends in universities which leads to a nasty experience of C++. So, please suggest from a professional programmer's point of view. For your information, the students going to take the course, have taken course like "Introduction to programming with C" in previous semester.

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  • Why binding is not a native feature in most of the languages?

    - by Gulshan
    IMHO binding a variable to another variable or an expression is a very common scenario in mathematics. In fact, in the beginning, many students think the assignment operator(=) is some kind of binding. But in most of the languages, binding is not supported as a native feature. In some languages like C#, binding is supported in some cases with some conditions fulfilled. But IMHO implementing this as a native feature was as simple as changing the following code- int a,b,sum; sum := a + b; a = 10; b = 20; a++; to this- int a,b,sum; a = 10; sum = a + b; b = 20; sum = a + b; a++; sum = a + b; Meaning placing the binding instruction as assignments after every instruction changing values of any of the variable contained in the expression at right side. After this, trimming redundant instructions (or optimization in assembly after compilation) will do. So, why it is not supported natively in most of the languages. Specially in the C-family of languages? Update: From different opinions, I think I should define this proposed "binding" more precisely- This is one way binding. Only sum is bound to a+b, not the vice versa. The scope of the binding is local. Once the binding is established, it cannot be changed. Meaning, once sum is bound to a+b, sum will always be a+b. Hope the idea is clearer now. Update 2: I just wanted this P# feature. Hope it will be there in future.

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  • C#/.net features to cut off assuming no backward compatibility needed?

    - by Gulshan
    Any product or framework evolves. Mainly it's done to catch up the needs of it's users, leverage new computing powers and simply make it better. Sometimes the primary design goal also changes with the product. C# or .net framework is no exception. As we see, the present day 4th version is very much different comparing with the first one. But thing comes as a barricade to this evolution- backward compatibility. In most of frameworks/products there are features would have been cut off if there was no need to support backward compatibility. According to you, what are these features in C#/.net? Please mention one feature per answer.

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  • When to use abstract classes instead of interfaces and extension methods in C#?

    - by Gulshan
    "Abstract class" and "interface" are similar type of ideas, while interface being more abstract. One need of abstract classes was to provide method implementations for the derived classes. But in C#, that need has also been reduced by lately introduced extension methods. So, in C#, when should we use abstract classes instead of using interfaces and extension methods associated with the interface? And now, we can use 'Properties' in interfaces also. A notable example of interface+ extension methods is the Heavily used IEnumerable and it's helper methods. You use Linq and it's all by this extension methods!

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  • Ideal programming language learning sequence?

    - by Gulshan
    What do you think? What is the ideal programming language learning sequence which will cover most of the heavily used languages and paradigms today as well as help to grasp common programming basics, ideas and practices? You can even suggest learning sequence for paradigms rather than languages. N.B. : This is port of the question I asked in stackoverflow and was closed for being subjective and argumentative.

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  • What are the standard practices for database access in .net?

    - by Gulshan
    I have seen weird database access practices in .net. I have seen stored procedures for every database tasks. I have seen every database property name is preceded by it's table name. I have seen fully separate layer/.dll for very few or no business logic. I have seen along with ORMs, there are separate data access layer playing the same role. And with them, I have always heard- "These are the standards you have to maintain". So, what are the real standards for data access in .net? What are the rules you follow?

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  • C# or .Net features to cut off assuming no backward compatibility needed?

    - by Gulshan
    Any product or framework evolves. Mainly it's done to catch up the needs of it's users, leverage new computing powers and simply make it better. Sometimes the primary design goal also changes with the product. C# or .net framework is no exception. As we see, the present day 4th version is very much different comparing with the first one. But thing comes as a barricade to this evolution- backward compatibility. In most of frameworks/products there are features would have been cut off if there was no need to support backward compatibility. According to you, what are these features in C#/.net? Please mention one feature per answer.

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  • Ideal programming language learning sequence? [closed]

    - by Gulshan
    What do you think? What is the ideal programming language learning sequence which will cover most of the heavily used languages and paradigms today as well as help to grasp common programming basics, ideas and practices? You can even suggest learning sequence for paradigms rather than languages. N.B. : This is port of the question I asked in stackoverflow and was closed for being subjective and argumentative.

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  • When to use abstract classes instead of interfaces and extension methods in C#?

    - by Gulshan
    "Abstract class" and "interface" are similar type of ideas, while interface being more abstract. One need of abstract classes was to provide method implementations for the derived classes. But in C#, that need has also been reduced by lately introduced extension methods. So, in C#, when should we use abstract classes instead of using interfaces and extension methods associated with the interface? And now, we can use 'Properties' in interfaces also. A notable example of interface+ extension methods is the Heavily used IEnumerable and it's helper methods. You use Linq and it's all by this extension methods!

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  • Is there a way to play the role of Javascript with any other language like C#?

    - by Gulshan
    Is there a way to play the role of Javascript with any other language like C#? One way came up in my head is, having silverlight installed, using C# instead of Javascript for all the client side scripting (Though C# is not a scripting language). Is it possible? I am not talking about something like GWT(Java) or Script#(C#). Probably the question can be stated as- "With silverlight installed, can I do everything supported by Javascript(like DOM manipulation etc) with C#?" Hope it's clearer.

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  • How is dependency inversion related to higher order functions?

    - by Gulshan
    Today I've just seen this article which described the relevance of SOLID principle in F# development- F# and Design principles – SOLID And while addressing the last one - "Dependency inversion principle", the author said: From a functional point of view, these containers and injection concepts can be solved with a simple higher order function, or hole-in-the-middle type pattern which are built right into the language. But he didn't explain it further. So, my question is, how is the dependency inversion related to higher order functions?

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  • Suggestion for chkstk.asm stackoverfolw exception in C++ with Visual Studio 2010

    - by Gulshan
    I am working with an implementation of merge sort. I am doing C++ Visual Studio 2010. But when I took a array of 300000 integers for timing, it is showing an unhandled stackoverflow exception and taking me to a readonly file named "chkstk.asm". I reduced the size to 200000 and it worked. Again the same code worked with C-free 4 editor (mingw 2.95) without any problem while the size was 400000. Do you have any suggestion to get the code working in Visual Studio? May be the recursion in the mergesort is causing the problem.

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  • Suggestion for chkstk.asm stackoverflow exception in C++ with Visual Studio 2010

    - by Gulshan
    I am working with an implementation of merge sort. I am doing C++ Visual Studio 2010. But when I took a array of 300000 integers for timing, it is showing an unhandled stackoverflow exception and taking me to a readonly file named "chkstk.asm". I reduced the size to 200000 and it worked. Again the same code worked with C-free 4 editor (mingw 2.95) without any problem while the size was 400000. Do you have any suggestion to get the code working in Visual Studio? May be the recursion in the mergesort is causing the problem.

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  • Practical differences between classes and structs in .net (not conceptual)?

    - by Gulshan
    Whenever I tried to search about differences between classes and structs in C# or .net, I ended up with the conceptual overview of the two things like value type or the reference type, where the variables are allocated etc. But I need some practical differences. I have found some like different behavior of assignment operator, having constructors etc. Can anybody provide some more practical differences which will be directly useful while coding? Like the things works with one but not with other or same operation showing different behavior. And some common mistakes regarding these two. Also please suggest where to consider using a struct instead of a class. And where the structs should not be used.

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