Search Results

Search found 28 results on 2 pages for 'henri'.

Page 1/2 | 1 2  | Next Page >

  • Simple doubt related to strings in C

    - by piemesons
    // The first example: char text[] = "henri"; char *p; p = text; *(p + 1) = 'E'; // Output = hEnri // Now If we want to remove the "e" ie hnri, we would go for????? *(p + 1)=????? Please dont say start copying the array. I am looking for the best solution

    Read the article

  • Mac OS X Leopard Kernel Panics getting absurd

    - by Henri Watson
    Today Mac OS X kernel panicked twice on me. The first time, I got this log. The second time, I got this log. A few minutes ago, iTunes started sounding blocky, after quitting FireFox everything went back to normal, I am currently using Opera. These are my system's specs. EDIT: I ran the apple hardware test and got these results. Without extended testing: With extended testing:

    Read the article

  • Surround in Windows 7 with Soundmax

    - by Henri
    Hey guys, I have a asus m2n motherboard with a Soundmax 1988 chip on it. I want to have surround sound in windows 7, but i cant get it to work. I tried a lot of different drivers, including the latest beta for Win 7. The problem is that when I configure the speakers and i do a "Test" all speakers work. But whenever I want to play some video or mp3, only the front speakers work. In vista there was this option called "Surround Fill" that would fix this problem, however, I cant seem to find that in windows 7. (The enhancements tab is completely gone for the speakers, other output devices do have that tab). Anybody knows the fix? Edit: I got it now kind of working by using a trial version of SRS AudioSandbox. However, the quality is quite bad since the program tries to create a real 5.1 of stereo sound. I just want to have stereo over 4 speakers instead of fake 5.1 over 4 speakers.

    Read the article

  • Simple doubt related to strings in C (question in an interview)

    - by piemesons
    // The first example: char text[] = "henri"; char *p; p = text; *(p + 1) = 'E'; // Output = hEnri // Now If we want to remove the "e" ie hnri, we would go for????? *(p + 1)=????? Please dont say start copying the array. I am looking for the best solution. Its an interview question... EDIT I specially mentioned the question that i am not asking for the solution like start moving the element. I thought there must be some other good solution..

    Read the article

  • django customizing form labels

    - by Henri
    I have a problem in customizing labels in a Django form This is the form code in file contact_form.py: from django import forms class ContactForm(forms.Form): def __init__(self, subject_label="Subject", message_label="Message", email_label="Your email", cc_myself_label="Cc myself", *args, **kwargs): super(ContactForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs) self.fields['subject'].label = subject_label self.fields['message'].label = message_label self.fields['email'].label = email_label self.fields['cc_myself'].label = cc_myself_label subject = forms.CharField(widget=forms.TextInput(attrs={'size':'60'})) message = forms.CharField(widget=forms.Textarea(attrs={'rows':15, 'cols':80})) email = forms.EmailField(widget=forms.TextInput(attrs={'size':'60'})) cc_myself = forms.BooleanField(required=False) The view I am using this in looks like: def contact(request, product_id=None): . . . if request.method == 'POST': form = contact_form.ContactForm(request.POST) if form.is_valid(): . . else: form = contact_form.ContactForm( subject_label = "Subject", message_label = "Your Message", email_label = "Your email", cc_myself_label = "Cc myself") The strings used for initializing the labels will eventually be strings dependent on the language, i.e. English, Dutch, French etc. When I test the form the email is not sent and instead of the redirect-page the form returns with: <QueryDict: {u'cc_myself': [u'on'], u'message': [u'message body'], u'email':[u'[email protected]'], u'subject': [u'test message']}>: where the subject label was before. This is obviously a dictionary representing the form fields and their contents. When I change the file contact_form.py into: from django import forms class ContactForm(forms.Form): """ def __init__(self, subject_label="Subject", message_label="Message", email_label="Your email", cc_myself_label="Cc myself", *args, **kwargs): super(ContactForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs) self.fields['subject'].label = subject_label self.fields['message'].label = message_label self.fields['email'].label = email_label self.fields['cc_myself'].label = cc_myself_label """ subject = forms.CharField(widget=forms.TextInput(attrs={'size':'60'})) message = forms.CharField(widget=forms.Textarea(attrs={'rows':15, 'cols':80})) email = forms.EmailField(widget=forms.TextInput(attrs={'size':'60'})) cc_myself = forms.BooleanField(required=False) i.e. disabling the initialization then everything works. The form data is sent by email and the redirect page shows up. So obviously something the the init code isn't right. But what? I would really appreciate some help.

    Read the article

  • Changing the admin edit window display values

    - by Henri
    I have a database table with e.g. a weight value e.g. CREATE TABLE product ( id SERIAL NOT NULL, product_name item_name NOT NULL, . . weight NUMERIC(7,3), -- the weight in kg . . CONSTRAINT PK_product PRIMARY KEY (id) ); This results is the model: class Product(models.Model): . weight = models.DecimalField(max_digits=7, decimal_places=3, blank=True, null=True) . I store the weight in kg's, i.e. 1 kg is stores as 1, 0.1 kg or 100g is stored as 0.1 To make it easier for the user, I display the weight in the Admin list display in grams by specifying: def show_weight(self): if self.weight: weight_in_g = self.weight * 1000 return '%0f' % weight_in_g So if a product weighs e.g. 0.5 kg and is stored in the database as such, the admin list display shows 500 Is there also a way to alter the number shown in the 'Change product' window. This window now shows the value extracted from the database, i.e. 0.5. This will confuse a user when I tell him with the help_text to enter the number in g, while seeing the number of kgs. Before saving the product I override save as follows: def save(self): if self.weight: self.weight = self.weight / 1000 This converts the number entered in grams to kgs.

    Read the article

  • How to deal with multiple sub-type of one super-type in Django admin

    - by Henri
    What would be the best solution for adding/editing multiple sub-types. E.g a super-type class Contact with sub-type class Client and sub-type class Supplier. The way shown here works, but when you edit a Contact you get both inlines i.e. sub-type Client AND sub-type Supplier. So even if you only want to add a Client you also get the fields for Supplier of vice versa. If you add a third sub-type , you get three sub-type field groups, while you actually only want one sub-type group, in the mentioned example: Client. E.g.: class Contact(models.Model): contact_name = models.CharField(max_length=128) class Client(models.Model): contact = models.OneToOneField(Contact, primary_key=True) user_name = models.CharField(max_length=128) class Supplier(models.Model): contact.OneToOneField(Contact, primary_key=True) company_name = models.CharField(max_length=128) and in admin.py class ClientInline(admin.StackedInline): model = Client class SupplierInline(admin.StackedInline): model = Supplier class ContactAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin): inlines = (ClientInline, SupplierInline,) class ClientAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin): ... class SupplierAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin): ... Now when I want to add a Client, i.e. only a Client I edit Contact and I get the inlines for both Client and Supplier. And of course the same for Supplier. Is there a way to avoid this? When I want to add/edit a Client that I only see the Inline for Client and when I want to add/edit a Supplier that I only see the Inline for Supplier, when adding/editing a Contact? Or perhaps there is a different approach. Any help or suggestion will be greatly appreciated.

    Read the article

  • [Symfony] Login to application with GET/POST token

    - by Henri
    I work on a Symfony web application which has a standard login form. To allow users to login more easily we want to give them a link which logs them in directly. I've already build a way to get a token to use, but I have no clue as to how the Symfony login process works, specifically how I can adapt it to take a GET/POST token instead of redirecting to the login page. Any help appreciated! Oh and this is Symfony 1.2 BTW (and no, upgrading is not an option right now)

    Read the article

  • [Symfony 1.2: ckWebServicePlugin 3.0.0] Module name in SOAP requests, how to get rid of them?

    - by Henri
    When I generate a WSDL file with ./symfony webservice:generate-wsdl (where is 'frontend', is 'soap' and is 'http://localhost ') I get a nice soap.wsdl file which works like it should. Except, the methods are not named 'justAMethod' but 'soapService_justAMethod' (where soapService is the module which holds the SOAP methods). How do I omit the module name in the SOAP method names? I know this is possible since the previous release of the software had no module name in the SOAP method names.

    Read the article

  • Securing against dynamic linking in .NET

    - by Henri
    I want to deploy an application with a license attached. However, I want to prevent that my dll can be easily referenced in visual studio. What are the usual ways of doing this? I was thinking about ngen-ing the application to prevent this, however, then the code becomes architecture dependent. Im not targetting any other architecture/platform besides windows, however, ngen-ing the application after making a release build seems like a workaround to me. Are there any other techniques to achieve this?

    Read the article

  • How can I execute CGI files from PHP?

    - by Henri W
    I'm trying to make a web app that will manage my Mercurial repositories for me. I want it so that when I tell it to load repository X: Connect to a MySQL server and make sure X exists. Check if the user is allowed to access the repository. If above is true, get the location of X from a mysql server. Run a hgweb cgi script (python) containing the path of the repository. Here is the problem, I want to: take the hgweb script, modify it, and run it. But I do not want to: take the hgweb script, modify it, write it to a file and redirect there. I am using Apache to run the httpd process.

    Read the article

  • Django forms: how to dynamically create ModelChoiceField labels

    - by Henri
    I would like to create dynamic labels for a forms.ModelChoiceField and I'm wondering how to do that. I have the following form class: class ProfileForm(forms.ModelForm): def __init__(self, data=None, ..., language_code='en', family_name_label='Family name', horoscope_label='Horoscope type', *args, **kwargs): super(ProfileForm, self).__init__(data, *args, **kwargs) self.fields['family_name'].label = family_name_label . . self.fields['horoscope'].label = horoscope_label self.fields['horoscope'].queryset = Horoscope.objects.all() class Meta: model = Profile family_name = forms.CharField(widget=forms.TextInput(attrs={'size':'80', 'class': 'contact_form'})) . . horoscope = forms.ModelChoiceField(queryset = Horoscope.objects.none(), widget=forms.RadioSelect(), empty_label=None) The default labels are defined by the unicode function specified in the Profile definition. However the labels for the radio buttons created by the ModelChoiceField need to be created dynamically. First I thought I could simply override ModelChoiceField as described in the Django documentation. But that creates static labels. It allows you to define any label but once the choice is made, that choice is fixed. So I think I need to adapt add something to init like: class ProfileForm(forms.ModelForm): def __init__(self, data=None, ..., language_code='en', family_name_label='Family name', horoscope_label='Horoscope type', *args, **kwargs): super(ProfileForm, self).__init__(data, *args, **kwargs) self.fields['family_name'].label = family_name_label . . self.fields['horoscope'].label = horoscope_label self.fields['horoscope'].queryset = Horoscope.objects.all() self.fields['horoscope'].<WHAT>??? = ??? Anyone having any idea how to handle this? Any help would be appreciated very much.

    Read the article

  • How can I uninstall NetBeans on a mac?

    - by Henri W
    I currently have NetBeans 6.5 installed on my mac running leopard. I searched Google on how to uninstall it and the NetBeans website says to right click on it, select "Show Package Contents" and the uninstaller should be there, but it isn't. How can I completely uninstall NetBeans in this situation? Thanks!

    Read the article

  • how to add text in a created table in a richtextbox?

    - by francops henri
    I created a table in richtextbox like this : //Since too much string appending go for string builder StringBuilder tableRtf = new StringBuilder(); //beginning of rich text format,dont customize this begining line tableRtf.Append(@"{\rtf1 "); //create 5 rows with 3 cells each for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) { tableRtf.Append(@"\trowd"); //A cell with width 1000. tableRtf.Append(@"\cellx1000"); //Another cell with width 2000.end point is 3000 (which is 1000+2000). tableRtf.Append(@"\cellx2000"); //Another cell with width 1000.end point is 4000 (which is 3000+1000) tableRtf.Append(@"\cellx3000"); //Another cell with width 1000.end point is 4000 (which is 3000+1000) tableRtf.Append(@"\cellx4000"); tableRtf.Append(@"\intbl \cell \row"); //create row } tableRtf.Append(@"\pard"); tableRtf.Append(@"}"); this.misc_tb.Rtf = tableRtf.ToString(); Now I want to know how I can put text in headers and in each cells. Do you have an idea? Thanks

    Read the article

  • NHibernate mapping error SQL Server 2008 Express

    - by developer
    Hi All, I tried an example from NHibernate in Action book and when I try to run the app, it throws an exception saying "Could not compile the mapping document: HelloNHibernate.Employee.hbm.xml" Below is my code, Employee.hbm.xml <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?> <hibernate-mapping xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2" auto-import="true"> <class name="HelloNHibernate.Employee, HelloNHibernate" lazy="false" table="Employee"> <id name="id" access="field"> <generator class="native"/> </id> <property name="name" access="field" column="name"/> <many-to-one access="field" name="manager" column="manager" cascade="all"/> </class> Program.cs using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using NHibernate; using System.Reflection; using NHibernate.Cfg; namespace HelloNHibernate { class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { CreateEmployeeAndSaveToDatabase(); UpdateTobinAndAssignPierreHenriAsManager(); LoadEmployeesFromDatabase(); Console.WriteLine("Press any key to exit..."); Console.ReadKey(); } static void CreateEmployeeAndSaveToDatabase() { Employee tobin = new Employee(); tobin.name = "Tobin Harris"; using (ISession session = OpenSession()) { using (ITransaction transaction = session.BeginTransaction()) { session.Save(tobin); transaction.Commit(); } Console.WriteLine("Saved Tobin to the database"); } } static ISession OpenSession() { if (factory == null) { Configuration c = new Configuration(); c.AddAssembly(Assembly.GetCallingAssembly()); factory = c.BuildSessionFactory(); } return factory.OpenSession(); } static void LoadEmployeesFromDatabase() { using (ISession session = OpenSession()) { IQuery query = session.CreateQuery("from Employee as emp order by emp.name asc"); IList<Employee> foundEmployees = query.List<Employee>(); Console.WriteLine("\n{0} employees found:", foundEmployees.Count); foreach (Employee employee in foundEmployees) Console.WriteLine(employee.SayHello()); } } static void UpdateTobinAndAssignPierreHenriAsManager() { using (ISession session = OpenSession()) { using (ITransaction transaction = session.BeginTransaction()) { IQuery q = session.CreateQuery("from Employee where name='Tobin Harris'"); Employee tobin = q.List<Employee>()[0]; tobin.name = "Tobin David Harris"; Employee pierreHenri = new Employee(); pierreHenri.name = "Pierre Henri Kuate"; tobin.manager = pierreHenri; transaction.Commit(); Console.WriteLine("Updated Tobin and added Pierre Henri"); } } } static ISessionFactory factory; } } Employee.cs using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Linq; using System.Text; namespace HelloNHibernate { class Employee { public int id; public string name; public Employee manager; public string SayHello() { return string.Format("'Hello World!', said {0}.", name); } } } App.config <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?> <configuration> <configSections> <section name="hibernate-configuration" type="NHibernate.Cfg.ConfigurationSectionHandler,NHibernate"/> </configSections> <hibernate-configuration xmlns="urn:nhibernate-configuration-2.2"> <session-factory> <property name="connection.provider">NHibernate.Connection.DriverConnectionProvider</property> <property name="connection.driver_class">NHibernate.Driver.SqlClientDriver</property> <property name="connection.connection_string"> Data Source=SQLEXPRESS2008;Integrated Security=True; User ID=SQL2008;Password=;initial catalog=HelloNHibernate </property> <property name="dialect">NHibernate.Dialect.MsSql2008Dialect</property> <property name="show_sql">false</property> </session-factory> </hibernate-configuration> </configuration>

    Read the article

  • Talking JavaOne with Rock Star Kirk Pepperdine

    - by Janice J. Heiss
    Kirk Pepperdine is not only a JavaOne Rock Star but a Java Champion and a highly regarded expert in Java performance tuning who works as a consultant, educator, and author. He is the principal consultant at Kodewerk Ltd. He speaks frequently at conferences and co-authored the Ant Developer's Handbook. In the rapidly shifting world of information technology, Pepperdine, as much as anyone, keeps up with what's happening with Java performance tuning. Pepperdine will participate in the following sessions: CON5405 - Are Your Garbage Collection Logs Speaking to You? BOF6540 - Java Champions and JUG Leaders Meet Oracle Executives (with Jeff Genender, Mattias Karlsson, Henrik Stahl, Georges Saab) HOL6500 - Finding and Solving Java Deadlocks (with Heinz Kabutz, Ellen Kraffmiller Martijn Verburg, Jeff Genender, and Henri Tremblay) I asked him what technological changes need to be taken into account in performance tuning. “The volume of data we're dealing with just seems to be getting bigger and bigger all the time,” observed Pepperdine. “A couple of years ago you'd never think of needing a heap that was 64g, but today there are deployments where the heap has grown to 256g and tomorrow there are plans for heaps that are even larger. Dealing with all that data simply requires more horse power and some very specialized techniques. In some cases, teams are trying to push hardware to the breaking point. Under those conditions, you need to be very clever just to get things to work -- let alone to get them to be fast. We are very quickly moving from a world where everything happens in a transaction to one where if you were to even consider using a transaction, you've lost." When asked about the greatest misconceptions about performance tuning that he currently encounters, he said, “If you have a performance problem, you should start looking at code at the very least and for that extra step, whip out an execution profiler. I'm not going to say that I never use execution profilers or look at code. What I will say is that execution profilers are effective for a small subset of performance problems and code is literally the last thing you should look at.And what is the most exciting thing happening in the world of Java today? “Interesting question because so many people would say that nothing exciting is happening in Java. Some might be disappointed that a few features have slipped in terms of scheduling. But I'd disagree with the first group and I'm not so concerned about the slippage because I still see a lot of exciting things happening. First, lambda will finally be with us and with lambda will come better ways.” For JavaOne, he is proctoring for Heinz Kabutz's lab. “I'm actually looking forward to that more than I am to my own talk,” he remarked. “Heinz will be the third non-Sun/Oracle employee to present a lab and the first since Oracle began hosting JavaOne. He's got a great message. He's spent a ton of time making sure things are going to work, and we've got a great team of proctors to help out. After that, getting my talk done, the Java Champion's panel session and then kicking back and just meeting up and talking to some Java heads."Finally, what should Java developers know that they currently do not know? “’Write Once, Run Everywhere’ is a great slogan and Java has come closer to that dream than any other technology stack that I've used. That said, different hardware bits work differently and as hard as we try, the JVM can't hide all the differences. Plus, if we are to get good performance we need to work with our hardware and not against it. All this implies that Java developers need to know more about the hardware they are deploying to.” Originally published on blogs.oracle.com/javaone.

    Read the article

  • Talking JavaOne with Rock Star Kirk Pepperdine

    - by Janice J. Heiss
    Kirk Pepperdine is not only a JavaOne Rock Star but a Java Champion and a highly regarded expert in Java performance tuning who works as a consultant, educator, and author. He is the principal consultant at Kodewerk Ltd. He speaks frequently at conferences and co-authored the Ant Developer's Handbook. In the rapidly shifting world of information technology, Pepperdine, as much as anyone, keeps up with what's happening with Java performance tuning. Pepperdine will participate in the following sessions: CON5405 - Are Your Garbage Collection Logs Speaking to You? BOF6540 - Java Champions and JUG Leaders Meet Oracle Executives (with Jeff Genender, Mattias Karlsson, Henrik Stahl, Georges Saab) HOL6500 - Finding and Solving Java Deadlocks (with Heinz Kabutz, Ellen Kraffmiller Martijn Verburg, Jeff Genender, and Henri Tremblay) I asked him what technological changes need to be taken into account in performance tuning. “The volume of data we're dealing with just seems to be getting bigger and bigger all the time,” observed Pepperdine. “A couple of years ago you'd never think of needing a heap that was 64g, but today there are deployments where the heap has grown to 256g and tomorrow there are plans for heaps that are even larger. Dealing with all that data simply requires more horse power and some very specialized techniques. In some cases, teams are trying to push hardware to the breaking point. Under those conditions, you need to be very clever just to get things to work -- let alone to get them to be fast. We are very quickly moving from a world where everything happens in a transaction to one where if you were to even consider using a transaction, you've lost." When asked about the greatest misconceptions about performance tuning that he currently encounters, he said, “If you have a performance problem, you should start looking at code at the very least and for that extra step, whip out an execution profiler. I'm not going to say that I never use execution profilers or look at code. What I will say is that execution profilers are effective for a small subset of performance problems and code is literally the last thing you should look at.And what is the most exciting thing happening in the world of Java today? “Interesting question because so many people would say that nothing exciting is happening in Java. Some might be disappointed that a few features have slipped in terms of scheduling. But I'd disagree with the first group and I'm not so concerned about the slippage because I still see a lot of exciting things happening. First, lambda will finally be with us and with lambda will come better ways.” For JavaOne, he is proctoring for Heinz Kabutz's lab. “I'm actually looking forward to that more than I am to my own talk,” he remarked. “Heinz will be the third non-Sun/Oracle employee to present a lab and the first since Oracle began hosting JavaOne. He's got a great message. He's spent a ton of time making sure things are going to work, and we've got a great team of proctors to help out. After that, getting my talk done, the Java Champion's panel session and then kicking back and just meeting up and talking to some Java heads."Finally, what should Java developers know that they currently do not know? “’Write Once, Run Everywhere’ is a great slogan and Java has come closer to that dream than any other technology stack that I've used. That said, different hardware bits work differently and as hard as we try, the JVM can't hide all the differences. Plus, if we are to get good performance we need to work with our hardware and not against it. All this implies that Java developers need to know more about the hardware they are deploying to.”

    Read the article

  • Talking JavaOne with Rock Star Martijn Verburg

    - by Janice J. Heiss
    JavaOne Rock Stars, conceived in 2005, are the top-rated speakers at each JavaOne Conference. They are awarded by their peers, who, through conference surveys, recognize them for their outstanding sessions and speaking ability. Over the years many of the world’s leading Java developers have been so recognized. Martijn Verburg has, in recent years, established himself as an important mover and shaker in the Java community. His “Diabolical Developer” session at the JavaOne 2011 Conference got people’s attention by identifying some of the worst practices Java developers are prone to engage in. Among other things, he is co-leader and organizer of the thriving London Java User Group (JUG) which has more than 2,500 members, co-represents the London JUG on the Executive Committee of the Java Community Process, and leads the global effort for the Java User Group “Adopt a JSR” and “Adopt OpenJDK” programs. Career highlights include overhauling technology stacks and SDLC practices at Mizuho International, mentoring Oracle on technical community management, and running off shore development teams for AIG. He is currently CTO at jClarity, a start-up focusing on automating optimization for Java/JVM related technologies, and Product Advisor at ZeroTurnaround. He co-authored, with Ben Evans, "The Well-Grounded Java Developer" published by Manning and, as a leading authority on technical team optimization, he is in high demand at major software conferences.Verburg is participating in five sessions, a busy man indeed. Here they are: CON6152 - Modern Software Development Antipatterns (with Ben Evans) UGF10434 - JCP and OpenJDK: Using the JUGs’ “Adopt” Programs in Your Group (with Csaba Toth) BOF4047 - OpenJDK Building and Testing: Case Study—Java User Group OpenJDK Bugathon (with Ben Evans and Cecilia Borg) BOF6283 - 101 Ways to Improve Java: Why Developer Participation Matters (with Bruno Souza and Heather Vancura-Chilson) HOL6500 - Finding and Solving Java Deadlocks (with Heinz Kabutz, Kirk Pepperdine, Ellen Kraffmiller and Henri Tremblay) When I asked Verburg about the biggest mistakes Java developers tend to make, he listed three: A lack of communication -- Software development is far more a social activity than a technical one; most projects fail because of communication issues and social dynamics, not because of a bad technical decision. Sadly, many developers never learn this lesson. No source control -- Developers simply storing code in local filesystems and emailing code in order to integrate Design-driven Design -- The need for some developers to cram every design pattern from the Gang of Four (GoF) book into their source code All of which raises the question: If these practices are so bad, why do developers engage in them? “I've seen a wide gamut of reasons,” said Verburg, who lists them as: * They were never taught at high school/university that their bad habits were harmful.* They weren't mentored in their first professional roles.* They've lost passion for their craft.* They're being deliberately malicious!* They think software development is a technical activity and not a social one.* They think that they'll be able to tidy it up later.A couple of key confusions and misconceptions beset Java developers, according to Verburg. “With Java and the JVM in particular I've seen a couple of trends,” he remarked. “One is that developers think that the JVM is a magic box that will clean up their memory, make their code run fast, as well as make them cups of coffee. The JVM does help in a lot of cases, but bad code can and will still lead to terrible results! The other trend is to try and force Java (the language) to do something it's not very good at, such as rapid web development. So you get a proliferation of overly complex frameworks, libraries and techniques trying to get around the fact that Java is a monolithic, statically typed, compiled, OO environment. It's not a Golden Hammer!”I asked him about the keys to running a good Java User Group. “You need to have a ‘Why,’” he observed. “Many user groups know what they do (typically, events) and how they do it (the logistics), but what really drives users to join your group and to stay is to give them a purpose. For example, within the LJC we constantly talk about the ‘Why,’ which in our case is several whys:* Re-ignite the passion that developers have for their craft* Raise the bar of Java developers in London* We want developers to have a voice in deciding the future of Java* We want to inspire the next generation of tech leaders* To bring the disparate tech groups in London together* So we could learn from each other* We believe that the Java ecosystem forms a cornerstone of our society today -- we want to protect that for the futureLooking ahead to Java 8 Verburg expressed excitement about Lambdas. “I cannot wait for Lambdas,” he enthused. “Brian Goetz and his group are doing a great job, especially given some of the backwards compatibility that they have to maintain. It's going to remove a lot of boiler plate and yet maintain readability, plus enable massive scaling.”Check out Martijn Verburg at JavaOne if you get a chance, and, stay tuned for a longer interview yours truly did with Martijn to be publish on otn/java some time after JavaOne. Originally published on blogs.oracle.com/javaone.

    Read the article

1 2  | Next Page >