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  • Firefox 18 Metro Preview Release now Available for Download

    - by Asian Angel
    With Windows 8 general release fast approaching Mozilla has delivered a new nightly build of Firefox for the operating system. This new build delivers awesome browser goodness for both the Modern UI (Metro) and Desktop modes. Image shown above courtesy of Mozilla Blog. This is what the Modern UI Tile will look like on the Start Screen. Image shown below courtesy of Brian R. Bondy. 7 Ways To Free Up Hard Disk Space On Windows HTG Explains: How System Restore Works in Windows HTG Explains: How Antivirus Software Works

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  • Open Different Types of New Google Documents Directly with These 7 New Chrome Apps

    - by Asian Angel
    Every time you want to open a new document of one kind or another in Google Drive you have to go through the whole ‘menu’ and ‘type selection’ process to do so. Now you can open the desired type directly from the New Tab Page using these terrific new Chrome apps from Google! The best part about this new set of apps is the ability to choose only the ones you want and/or need, then be able to start working on those new documents quickly without all the ‘selection’ hassle. How Hackers Can Disguise Malicious Programs With Fake File Extensions Can Dust Actually Damage My Computer? What To Do If You Get a Virus on Your Computer

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  • Download, Install, and Update Metro-Style Apps from the Windows Store in Windows 8

    - by Lori Kaufman
    The Windows Store is similar to the app stores for Apple iOS and Android devices and Windows phones. It allows you to buy and download both free and paid Metro-style apps for Windows 8. When you purchase an app from the Windows Store, it can be installed on up to five Windows PCs or tablets. A Microsoft email account is also required to download and install apps from the Windows store. NOTE: How-To Geek has released a Geek Trivia app for Windows 8. For more information about the app and for a link to download it, see our article. This article shows you how to download, install, and update Metro-style apps from the Windows Store. We also show you how to uninstall an app from the Metro Start screen. Why Enabling “Do Not Track” Doesn’t Stop You From Being Tracked HTG Explains: What is the Windows Page File and Should You Disable It? How To Get a Better Wireless Signal and Reduce Wireless Network Interference

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  • How to Restore Uninstalled Modern UI Apps that Ship with Windows 8

    - by Lori Kaufman
    Windows 8 ships with built-in apps available on the Modern UI screen (formerly the Metro or Start screen), such as Mail, Calendar, Photos, Music, Maps, and Weather. Installing additional Modern UI apps is easy using the Windows Store, and uninstalling apps is just as easy. What if you accidentally uninstall a built-in app? It can be easily restored with a few clicks of your mouse. To begin, access the Modern UI screen by moving your mouse to the extreme, lower, left corner of the screen and click the Start screen button that displays. NOTE: You can also press the Windows key to access the Modern UI screen. How Hackers Can Disguise Malicious Programs With Fake File Extensions Can Dust Actually Damage My Computer? What To Do If You Get a Virus on Your Computer

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  • Metro, Authentication, and the ASP.NET Web API

    - by Stephen.Walther
    Imagine that you want to create a Metro style app written with JavaScript and you want to communicate with a remote web service. For example, you are creating a movie app which retrieves a list of movies from a movies service. In this situation, how do you authenticate your Metro app and the Metro user so not just anyone can call the movies service? How can you identify the user making the request so you can return user specific data from the service? The Windows Live SDK supports a feature named Single Sign-On. When a user logs into a Windows 8 machine using their Live ID, you can authenticate the user’s identity automatically. Even better, when the Metro app performs a call to a remote web service, you can pass an authentication token to the remote service and prevent unauthorized access to the service. The documentation for Single Sign-On is located here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/live/hh826544.aspx In this blog entry, I describe the steps that you need to follow to use Single Sign-On with a (very) simple movie app. We build a Metro app which communicates with a web service created using the ASP.NET Web API. Creating the Visual Studio Solution Let’s start by creating a Visual Studio solution which contains two projects: a Windows Metro style Blank App project and an ASP.NET MVC 4 Web Application project. Name the Metro app MovieApp and the ASP.NET MVC application MovieApp.Services. When you create the ASP.NET MVC application, select the Web API template: After you create the two projects, your Visual Studio Solution Explorer window should look like this: Configuring the Live SDK You need to get your hands on the Live SDK and register your Metro app. You can download the latest version of the SDK (version 5.2) from the following address: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=29938 After you download the Live SDK, you need to visit the following website to register your Metro app: https://manage.dev.live.com/build Don’t let the title of the website — Windows Push Notifications & Live Connect – confuse you, this is the right place. Follow the instructions at the website to register your Metro app. Don’t forget to follow the instructions in Step 3 for updating the information in your Metro app’s manifest. After you register, your client secret is displayed. Record this client secret because you will need it later (we use it with the web service): You need to configure one more thing. You must enter your Redirect Domain by visiting the following website: https://manage.dev.live.com/Applications/Index Click on your application name, click Edit Settings, click the API Settings tab, and enter a value for the Redirect Domain field. You can enter any domain that you please just as long as the domain has not already been taken: For the Redirect Domain, I entered http://superexpertmovieapp.com. Create the Metro MovieApp Next, we need to create the MovieApp. The MovieApp will: 1. Use Single Sign-On to log the current user into Live 2. Call the MoviesService web service 3. Display the results in a ListView control Because we use the Live SDK in the MovieApp, we need to add a reference to it. Right-click your References folder in the Solution Explorer window and add the reference: Here’s the HTML page for the Metro App: <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta charset="utf-8" /> <title>MovieApp</title> <!-- WinJS references --> <link href="//Microsoft.WinJS.1.0.RC/css/ui-dark.css" rel="stylesheet" /> <script src="//Microsoft.WinJS.1.0.RC/js/base.js"></script> <script src="//Microsoft.WinJS.1.0.RC/js/ui.js"></script> <!-- Live SDK --> <script type="text/javascript" src="/LiveSDKHTML/js/wl.js"></script> <!-- WebServices references --> <link href="/css/default.css" rel="stylesheet" /> <script src="/js/default.js"></script> </head> <body> <div id="tmplMovie" data-win-control="WinJS.Binding.Template"> <div class="movieItem"> <span data-win-bind="innerText:title"></span> <br /><span data-win-bind="innerText:director"></span> </div> </div> <div id="lvMovies" data-win-control="WinJS.UI.ListView" data-win-options="{ itemTemplate: select('#tmplMovie') }"> </div> </body> </html> The HTML page above contains a Template and ListView control. These controls are used to display the movies when the movies are returned from the movies service. Notice that the page includes a reference to the Live script that we registered earlier: <!-- Live SDK --> <script type="text/javascript" src="/LiveSDKHTML/js/wl.js"></script> The JavaScript code looks like this: (function () { "use strict"; var REDIRECT_DOMAIN = "http://superexpertmovieapp.com"; var WEBSERVICE_URL = "http://localhost:49743/api/movies"; function init() { WinJS.UI.processAll().done(function () { // Get element and control references var lvMovies = document.getElementById("lvMovies").winControl; // Login to Windows Live var scopes = ["wl.signin"]; WL.init({ scope: scopes, redirect_uri: REDIRECT_DOMAIN }); WL.login().then( function(response) { // Get the authentication token var authenticationToken = response.session.authentication_token; // Call the web service var options = { url: WEBSERVICE_URL, headers: { authenticationToken: authenticationToken } }; WinJS.xhr(options).done( function (xhr) { var movies = JSON.parse(xhr.response); var listMovies = new WinJS.Binding.List(movies); lvMovies.itemDataSource = listMovies.dataSource; }, function (xhr) { console.log(xhr.statusText); } ); }, function(response) { throw WinJS.ErrorFromName("Failed to login!"); } ); }); } document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", init); })(); There are two constants which you need to set to get the code above to work: REDIRECT_DOMAIN and WEBSERVICE_URL. The REDIRECT_DOMAIN is the domain that you entered when registering your app with Live. The WEBSERVICE_URL is the path to your web service. You can get the correct value for WEBSERVICE_URL by opening the Project Properties for the MovieApp.Services project, clicking the Web tab, and getting the correct URL. The port number is randomly generated. In my code, I used the URL  “http://localhost:49743/api/movies”. Assuming that the user is logged into Windows 8 with a Live account, when the user runs the MovieApp, the user is logged into Live automatically. The user is logged in with the following code: // Login to Windows Live var scopes = ["wl.signin"]; WL.init({ scope: scopes, redirect_uri: REDIRECT_DOMAIN }); WL.login().then(function(response) { // Do something }); The scopes setting determines what the user has permission to do. For example, access the user’s SkyDrive or access the user’s calendar or contacts. The available scopes are listed here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/live/hh243646.aspx In our case, we only need the wl.signin scope which enables Single Sign-On. After the user signs in, you can retrieve the user’s Live authentication token. The authentication token is passed to the movies service to authenticate the user. Creating the Movies Service The Movies Service is implemented as an API controller in an ASP.NET MVC 4 Web API project. Here’s what the MoviesController looks like: using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Linq; using System.Net; using System.Net.Http; using System.Web.Http; using JWTSample; using MovieApp.Services.Models; namespace MovieApp.Services.Controllers { public class MoviesController : ApiController { const string CLIENT_SECRET = "NtxjF2wu7JeY1unvVN-lb0hoeWOMUFoR"; // GET api/values public HttpResponseMessage Get() { // Authenticate // Get authenticationToken var authenticationToken = Request.Headers.GetValues("authenticationToken").FirstOrDefault(); if (authenticationToken == null) { return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.Unauthorized); } // Validate token var d = new Dictionary<int, string>(); d.Add(0, CLIENT_SECRET); try { var myJWT = new JsonWebToken(authenticationToken, d); } catch { return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.Unauthorized); } // Return results return Request.CreateResponse( HttpStatusCode.OK, new List<Movie> { new Movie {Title="Star Wars", Director="Lucas"}, new Movie {Title="King Kong", Director="Jackson"}, new Movie {Title="Memento", Director="Nolan"} } ); } } } Because the Metro app performs an HTTP GET request, the MovieController Get() action is invoked. This action returns a set of three movies when, and only when, the authentication token is validated. The Movie class looks like this: using Newtonsoft.Json; namespace MovieApp.Services.Models { public class Movie { [JsonProperty(PropertyName="title")] public string Title { get; set; } [JsonProperty(PropertyName="director")] public string Director { get; set; } } } Notice that the Movie class uses the JsonProperty attribute to change Title to title and Director to director to make JavaScript developers happy. The Get() method validates the authentication token before returning the movies to the Metro app. To get authentication to work, you need to provide the client secret which you created at the Live management site. If you forgot to write down the secret, you can get it again here: https://manage.dev.live.com/Applications/Index The client secret is assigned to a constant at the top of the MoviesController class. The MoviesController class uses a helper class named JsonWebToken to validate the authentication token. This class was created by the Windows Live team. You can get the source code for the JsonWebToken class from the following GitHub repository: https://github.com/liveservices/LiveSDK/blob/master/Samples/Asp.net/AuthenticationTokenSample/JsonWebToken.cs You need to add an additional reference to your MVC project to use the JsonWebToken class: System.Runtime.Serialization. You can use the JsonWebToken class to get a unique and validated user ID like this: var user = myJWT.Claims.UserId; If you need to store user specific information then you can use the UserId property to uniquely identify the user making the web service call. Running the MovieApp When you first run the Metro MovieApp, you get a screen which asks whether the app should have permission to use Single Sign-On. This screen never appears again after you give permission once. Actually, when I first ran the app, I get the following error: According to the error, the app is blocked because “We detected some suspicious activity with your Online Id account. To help protect you, we’ve temporarily blocked your account.” This appears to be a bug in the current preview release of the Live SDK and there is more information about this bug here: http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/messengerconnect/thread/866c495f-2127-429d-ab07-842ef84f16ae/ If you click continue, and continue running the app, the error message does not appear again.  Summary The goal of this blog entry was to describe how you can validate Metro apps and Metro users when performing a call to a remote web service. First, I explained how you can create a Metro app which takes advantage of Single Sign-On to authenticate the current user against Live automatically. You learned how to register your Metro app with Live and how to include an authentication token in an Ajax call. Next, I explained how you can validate the authentication token – retrieved from the request header – in a web service. I discussed how you can use the JsonWebToken class to validate the authentication token and retrieve the unique user ID.

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  • Real-Time Co-Authoring Feature now Available in Microsoft Office Web Apps

    - by Akemi Iwaya
    The lack of a collaboration feature in Microsoft’s Office Web Apps was a big disappointment for many people, but starting this week, that is no longer a problem. Microsoft has added an awesome new collaboration feature to their Office Web Apps that will help you and your co-workers be more productive than ever before no matter where you are working from now. Screenshot courtesy of the Office 365 Technology Blog. In addition to the new collaboration feature, new updates such as improved formatting controls, the ability to drag and drop cells, new picture cropping functionality, and more has been added to the Office Web Apps line-up. You can learn more about the new updates for each of the Office Web Apps and the new collaboration feature via the blog post linked below. Collaboration just got easier: Real-time co-authoring now available in Office Web Apps [via Ars Technica]     

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  • Saving user details on OnSuspending event for Metro Style Apps

    - by nmarun
    I recently started getting to know about Metro Style Apps on Windows 8. It looks pretty interesting so far and VS2011 definitely helps making it easier to learn and create Metro Style Apps. One of the features available for developers is the ability to save user data so it can be retrieved the next time the app is run after being closed by the user or even launched from back suspended state. Here’s a little history on this whole ‘suspended’ state of a Metro Style app: Once the user say, ‘alt+tab...(read more)

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  • Google I/O 2012 - Putting Together the Pieces: Building Apps with Google Apps Script

    Google I/O 2012 - Putting Together the Pieces: Building Apps with Google Apps Script Saurabh Gupta Learn what's new with Google Apps Script. This session will explore the simplicity of Google Apps Script to build an app that integrates across many Google services. Many of the Google Apps Script services will be covered, demonstrating how Google Apps Script is both a powerful application platform. For all I/O 2012 sessions, go to developers.google.com From: GoogleDevelopers Views: 84 9 ratings Time: 40:59 More in Science & Technology

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  • Chrome Apps Office Hours: Building Apps with Web Intents

    Chrome Apps Office Hours: Building Apps with Web Intents Ask and vote for questions at: goo.gl Web Intents are the core mechanism for building interconnected apps on the Chrome platform. Join Paul Kinlan and Paul Lewis next week as we show you how to build client apps that send data to other web apps, and a service app that will receive input from any intent invocation. From: GoogleDevelopers Views: 0 0 ratings Time: 00:00 More in Science & Technology

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  • Metro: Introduction to the WinJS ListView Control

    - by Stephen.Walther
    The goal of this blog entry is to provide a quick introduction to the ListView control – just the bare minimum that you need to know to start using the control. When building Metro style applications using JavaScript, the ListView control is the primary control that you use for displaying lists of items. For example, if you are building a product catalog app, then you can use the ListView control to display the list of products. The ListView control supports several advanced features that I plan to discuss in future blog entries. For example, you can group the items in a ListView, you can create master/details views with a ListView, and you can efficiently work with large sets of items with a ListView. In this blog entry, we’ll keep things simple and focus on displaying a list of products. There are three things that you need to do in order to display a list of items with a ListView: Create a data source Create an Item Template Declare the ListView Creating the ListView Data Source The first step is to create (or retrieve) the data that you want to display with the ListView. In most scenarios, you will want to bind a ListView to a WinJS.Binding.List object. The nice thing about the WinJS.Binding.List object is that it enables you to take a standard JavaScript array and convert the array into something that can be bound to the ListView. It doesn’t matter where the JavaScript array comes from. It could be a static array that you declare or you could retrieve the array as the result of an Ajax call to a remote server. The following JavaScript file – named products.js – contains a list of products which can be bound to a ListView. (function () { "use strict"; var products = new WinJS.Binding.List([ { name: "Milk", price: 2.44 }, { name: "Oranges", price: 1.99 }, { name: "Wine", price: 8.55 }, { name: "Apples", price: 2.44 }, { name: "Steak", price: 1.99 }, { name: "Eggs", price: 2.44 }, { name: "Mushrooms", price: 1.99 }, { name: "Yogurt", price: 2.44 }, { name: "Soup", price: 1.99 }, { name: "Cereal", price: 2.44 }, { name: "Pepsi", price: 1.99 } ]); WinJS.Namespace.define("ListViewDemos", { products: products }); })(); The products variable represents a WinJS.Binding.List object. This object is initialized with a plain-old JavaScript array which represents an array of products. To avoid polluting the global namespace, the code above uses the module pattern and exposes the products using a namespace. The list of products is exposed to the world as ListViewDemos.products. To learn more about the module pattern and namespaces in WinJS, see my earlier blog entry: http://stephenwalther.com/blog/archive/2012/02/22/metro-namespaces-and-modules.aspx Creating the ListView Item Template The ListView control does not know how to render anything. It doesn’t know how you want each list item to appear. To get the ListView control to render something useful, you must create an Item Template. Here’s what our template for rendering an individual product looks like: <div id="productTemplate" data-win-control="WinJS.Binding.Template"> <div class="product"> <span data-win-bind="innerText:name"></span> <span data-win-bind="innerText:price"></span> </div> </div> This template displays the product name and price from the data source. Normally, you will declare your template in the same file as you declare the ListView control. In our case, both the template and ListView are declared in the default.html file. To learn more about templates, see my earlier blog entry: http://stephenwalther.com/blog/archive/2012/02/27/metro-using-templates.aspx Declaring the ListView The final step is to declare the ListView control in a page. Here’s the markup for declaring a ListView: <div data-win-control="WinJS.UI.ListView" data-win-options="{ itemDataSource:ListViewDemos.products.dataSource, itemTemplate:select('#productTemplate') }"> </div> You declare a ListView by adding the data-win-control to an HTML DIV tag. The data-win-options attribute is used to set two properties of the ListView. The ListView is associated with its data source with the itemDataSource property. Notice that the data source is ListViewDemos.products.dataSource and not just ListViewDemos.products. You need to associate the ListView with the dataSoure property. The ListView is associated with its item template with the help of the itemTemplate property. The ID of the item template — #productTemplate – is used to select the template from the page. Here’s what the complete version of the default.html page looks like: <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta charset="utf-8"> <title>ListViewDemos</title> <!-- WinJS references --> <link href="//Microsoft.WinJS.0.6/css/ui-dark.css" rel="stylesheet"> <script src="//Microsoft.WinJS.0.6/js/base.js"></script> <script src="//Microsoft.WinJS.0.6/js/ui.js"></script> <!-- ListViewDemos references --> <link href="/css/default.css" rel="stylesheet"> <script src="/js/default.js"></script> <script src="/js/products.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <style type="text/css"> .product { width: 200px; height: 100px; border: white solid 1px; } </style> </head> <body> <div id="productTemplate" data-win-control="WinJS.Binding.Template"> <div class="product"> <span data-win-bind="innerText:name"></span> <span data-win-bind="innerText:price"></span> </div> </div> <div data-win-control="WinJS.UI.ListView" data-win-options="{ itemDataSource:ListViewDemos.products.dataSource, itemTemplate:select('#productTemplate') }"> </div> </body> </html> Notice that the page above includes a reference to the products.js file: <script src=”/js/products.js” type=”text/javascript”></script> The page above also contains a Template control which contains the ListView item template. Finally, the page includes the declaration of the ListView control. Summary The goal of this blog entry was to describe the minimal set of steps which you must complete to use the WinJS ListView control to display a simple list of items. You learned how to create a data source, declare an item template, and declare a ListView control.

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  • Metro: Introduction to the WinJS ListView Control

    - by Stephen.Walther
    The goal of this blog entry is to provide a quick introduction to the ListView control – just the bare minimum that you need to know to start using the control. When building Metro style applications using JavaScript, the ListView control is the primary control that you use for displaying lists of items. For example, if you are building a product catalog app, then you can use the ListView control to display the list of products. The ListView control supports several advanced features that I plan to discuss in future blog entries. For example, you can group the items in a ListView, you can create master/details views with a ListView, and you can efficiently work with large sets of items with a ListView. In this blog entry, we’ll keep things simple and focus on displaying a list of products. There are three things that you need to do in order to display a list of items with a ListView: Create a data source Create an Item Template Declare the ListView Creating the ListView Data Source The first step is to create (or retrieve) the data that you want to display with the ListView. In most scenarios, you will want to bind a ListView to a WinJS.Binding.List object. The nice thing about the WinJS.Binding.List object is that it enables you to take a standard JavaScript array and convert the array into something that can be bound to the ListView. It doesn’t matter where the JavaScript array comes from. It could be a static array that you declare or you could retrieve the array as the result of an Ajax call to a remote server. The following JavaScript file – named products.js – contains a list of products which can be bound to a ListView. (function () { "use strict"; var products = new WinJS.Binding.List([ { name: "Milk", price: 2.44 }, { name: "Oranges", price: 1.99 }, { name: "Wine", price: 8.55 }, { name: "Apples", price: 2.44 }, { name: "Steak", price: 1.99 }, { name: "Eggs", price: 2.44 }, { name: "Mushrooms", price: 1.99 }, { name: "Yogurt", price: 2.44 }, { name: "Soup", price: 1.99 }, { name: "Cereal", price: 2.44 }, { name: "Pepsi", price: 1.99 } ]); WinJS.Namespace.define("ListViewDemos", { products: products }); })(); The products variable represents a WinJS.Binding.List object. This object is initialized with a plain-old JavaScript array which represents an array of products. To avoid polluting the global namespace, the code above uses the module pattern and exposes the products using a namespace. The list of products is exposed to the world as ListViewDemos.products. To learn more about the module pattern and namespaces in WinJS, see my earlier blog entry: http://stephenwalther.com/blog/archive/2012/02/22/metro-namespaces-and-modules.aspx Creating the ListView Item Template The ListView control does not know how to render anything. It doesn’t know how you want each list item to appear. To get the ListView control to render something useful, you must create an Item Template. Here’s what our template for rendering an individual product looks like: <div id="productTemplate" data-win-control="WinJS.Binding.Template"> <div class="product"> <span data-win-bind="innerText:name"></span> <span data-win-bind="innerText:price"></span> </div> </div> This template displays the product name and price from the data source. Normally, you will declare your template in the same file as you declare the ListView control. In our case, both the template and ListView are declared in the default.html file. To learn more about templates, see my earlier blog entry: http://stephenwalther.com/blog/archive/2012/02/27/metro-using-templates.aspx Declaring the ListView The final step is to declare the ListView control in a page. Here’s the markup for declaring a ListView: <div data-win-control="WinJS.UI.ListView" data-win-options="{ itemDataSource:ListViewDemos.products.dataSource, itemTemplate:select('#productTemplate') }"> </div> You declare a ListView by adding the data-win-control to an HTML DIV tag. The data-win-options attribute is used to set two properties of the ListView. The ListView is associated with its data source with the itemDataSource property. Notice that the data source is ListViewDemos.products.dataSource and not just ListViewDemos.products. You need to associate the ListView with the dataSoure property. The ListView is associated with its item template with the help of the itemTemplate property. The ID of the item template — #productTemplate – is used to select the template from the page. Here’s what the complete version of the default.html page looks like: <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta charset="utf-8"> <title>ListViewDemos</title> <!-- WinJS references --> <link href="//Microsoft.WinJS.0.6/css/ui-dark.css" rel="stylesheet"> <script src="//Microsoft.WinJS.0.6/js/base.js"></script> <script src="//Microsoft.WinJS.0.6/js/ui.js"></script> <!-- ListViewDemos references --> <link href="/css/default.css" rel="stylesheet"> <script src="/js/default.js"></script> <script src="/js/products.js" type="text/javascript"></script> <style type="text/css"> .product { width: 200px; height: 100px; border: white solid 1px; } </style> </head> <body> <div id="productTemplate" data-win-control="WinJS.Binding.Template"> <div class="product"> <span data-win-bind="innerText:name"></span> <span data-win-bind="innerText:price"></span> </div> </div> <div data-win-control="WinJS.UI.ListView" data-win-options="{ itemDataSource:ListViewDemos.products.dataSource, itemTemplate:select('#productTemplate') }"> </div> </body> </html> Notice that the page above includes a reference to the products.js file: <script src=”/js/products.js” type=”text/javascript”></script> The page above also contains a Template control which contains the ListView item template. Finally, the page includes the declaration of the ListView control. Summary The goal of this blog entry was to describe the minimal set of steps which you must complete to use the WinJS ListView control to display a simple list of items. You learned how to create a data source, declare an item template, and declare a ListView control.

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  • Code and Slides: Getting Started Building Windows 8 HTML/JavaScript Metro Apps

    - by dwahlin
    This presentation is from a talk I gave at the spring 2012 DevConnections conference. It covers some of the key topics you need to know to get started building Windows 8 HTML/JavaScript Metro apps including navigation options, UI surfaces that can be used, controls, data binding and templates, and animations. View more of my presentations here. Sample code shown in the presentation can be found here. A large number of samples are available in the Windows 8 SDK which can be found here.

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  • Windows 8 Apps Unleashed Now in Bookstores!

    - by Stephen.Walther
    My book Windows 8 Apps with HTML5 and JavaScript Unleashed is now in bookstores! Learn how to create Metro apps Windows 8 apps with JavaScript. And the book is in color! All of the code listings and illustrations are in color. Why build Windows 8 apps? When you create a Windows 8 app, you can put your app in the Windows 8 Store. In other words, customers can buy your app directly from Windows. Think iPhone apps, but for a much larger market. In my book, I explain how you can create both game apps and simple productivity apps by creating Windows 8 apps with JavaScript. The book is a short read and I include plenty of code samples that have been tested against the final release of Windows 8. You can buy the book by going to your local Barnes & Noble bookstore or you can buy the book through Amazon by using the following link: It looks like the book is also available for the Kindle: Kindle: Windows 8 Apps with HTML5 and JavaScript Unleashed

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  • Windows 8 Apps Unleashed Now in Bookstores!

    - by Stephen.Walther
    My book Windows 8 Apps with HTML5 and JavaScript Unleashed is now in bookstores! Learn how to create Metro apps Windows 8 apps with JavaScript. And the book is in color! All of the code listings and illustrations are in color. Why build Windows 8 apps? When you create a Windows 8 app, you can put your app in the Windows 8 Store. In other words, customers can buy your app directly from Windows. Think iPhone apps, but for a much larger market. In my book, I explain how you can create both game apps and simple productivity apps by creating Windows 8 apps with JavaScript. The book is a short read and I include plenty of code samples that have been tested against the final release of Windows 8. You can buy the book by going to your local Barnes & Noble bookstore or you can buy the book through Amazon by using the following link: It looks like the book is also available for the Kindle: Kindle: Windows 8 Apps with HTML5 and JavaScript Unleashed

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  • Metro: Introduction to CSS 3 Grid Layout

    - by Stephen.Walther
    The purpose of this blog post is to provide you with a quick introduction to the new W3C CSS 3 Grid Layout standard. You can use CSS Grid Layout in Metro style applications written with JavaScript to lay out the content of an HTML page. CSS Grid Layout provides you with all of the benefits of using HTML tables for layout without requiring you to actually use any HTML table elements. Doing Page Layouts without Tables Back in the 1990’s, if you wanted to create a fancy website, then you would use HTML tables for layout. For example, if you wanted to create a standard three-column page layout then you would create an HTML table with three columns like this: <table height="100%"> <tr> <td valign="top" width="300px" bgcolor="red"> Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column </td> <td valign="top" bgcolor="green"> Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column </td> <td valign="top" width="300px" bgcolor="blue"> Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column </td> </tr> </table> When the table above gets rendered out to a browser, you end up with the following three-column layout: The width of the left and right columns is fixed – the width of the middle column expands or contracts depending on the width of the browser. Sometime around the year 2005, everyone decided that using tables for layout was a bad idea. Instead of using tables for layout — it was collectively decided by the spirit of the Web — you should use Cascading Style Sheets instead. Why is using HTML tables for layout bad? Using tables for layout breaks the semantics of the TABLE element. A TABLE element should be used only for displaying tabular information such as train schedules or moon phases. Using tables for layout is bad for accessibility (The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 is explicit about this) and using tables for layout is bad for separating content from layout (see http://CSSZenGarden.com). Post 2005, anyone who used HTML tables for layout were encouraged to hold their heads down in shame. That’s all well and good, but the problem with using CSS for layout is that it can be more difficult to work with CSS than HTML tables. For example, to achieve a standard three-column layout, you either need to use absolute positioning or floats. Here’s a three-column layout with floats: <style type="text/css"> #container { min-width: 800px; } #leftColumn { float: left; width: 300px; height: 100%; background-color:red; } #middleColumn { background-color:green; height: 100%; } #rightColumn { float: right; width: 300px; height: 100%; background-color:blue; } </style> <div id="container"> <div id="rightColumn"> Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column </div> <div id="leftColumn"> Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column </div> <div id="middleColumn"> Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column </div> </div> The page above contains four DIV elements: a container DIV which contains a leftColumn, middleColumn, and rightColumn DIV. The leftColumn DIV element is floated to the left and the rightColumn DIV element is floated to the right. Notice that the rightColumn DIV appears in the page before the middleColumn DIV – this unintuitive ordering is necessary to get the floats to work correctly (see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/533607/css-three-column-layout-problem). The page above (almost) works with the most recent versions of most browsers. For example, you get the correct three-column layout in both Firefox and Chrome: And the layout mostly works with Internet Explorer 9 except for the fact that for some strange reason the min-width doesn’t work so when you shrink the width of your browser, you can get the following unwanted layout: Notice how the middle column (the green column) bleeds to the left and right. People have solved these issues with more complicated CSS. For example, see: http://matthewjamestaylor.com/blog/holy-grail-no-quirks-mode.htm But, at this point, no one could argue that using CSS is easier or more intuitive than tables. It takes work to get a layout with CSS and we know that we could achieve the same layout more easily using HTML tables. Using CSS Grid Layout CSS Grid Layout is a new W3C standard which provides you with all of the benefits of using HTML tables for layout without the disadvantage of using an HTML TABLE element. In other words, CSS Grid Layout enables you to perform table layouts using pure Cascading Style Sheets. The CSS Grid Layout standard is still in a “Working Draft” state (it is not finalized) and it is located here: http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-grid-layout/ The CSS Grid Layout standard is only supported by Internet Explorer 10 and there are no signs that any browser other than Internet Explorer will support this standard in the near future. This means that it is only practical to take advantage of CSS Grid Layout when building Metro style applications with JavaScript. Here’s how you can create a standard three-column layout using a CSS Grid Layout: <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <style type="text/css"> html, body, #container { height: 100%; padding: 0px; margin: 0px; } #container { display: -ms-grid; -ms-grid-columns: 300px auto 300px; -ms-grid-rows: 100%; } #leftColumn { -ms-grid-column: 1; background-color:red; } #middleColumn { -ms-grid-column: 2; background-color:green; } #rightColumn { -ms-grid-column: 3; background-color:blue; } </style> </head> <body> <div id="container"> <div id="leftColumn"> Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column </div> <div id="middleColumn"> Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column </div> <div id="rightColumn"> Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column </div> </div> </body> </html> When the page above is rendered in Internet Explorer 10, you get a standard three-column layout: The page above contains four DIV elements: a container DIV which contains a leftColumn DIV, middleColumn DIV, and rightColumn DIV. The container DIV is set to Grid display mode with the following CSS rule: #container { display: -ms-grid; -ms-grid-columns: 300px auto 300px; -ms-grid-rows: 100%; } The display property is set to the value “-ms-grid”. This property causes the container DIV to lay out its child elements in a grid. (Notice that you use “-ms-grid” instead of “grid”. The “-ms-“ prefix is used because the CSS Grid Layout standard is still preliminary. This implementation only works with IE10 and it might change before the final release.) The grid columns and rows are defined with the “-ms-grid-columns” and “-ms-grid-rows” properties. The style rule above creates a grid with three columns and one row. The left and right columns are fixed sized at 300 pixels. The middle column sizes automatically depending on the remaining space available. The leftColumn, middleColumn, and rightColumn DIVs are positioned within the container grid element with the following CSS rules: #leftColumn { -ms-grid-column: 1; background-color:red; } #middleColumn { -ms-grid-column: 2; background-color:green; } #rightColumn { -ms-grid-column: 3; background-color:blue; } The “-ms-grid-column” property is used to specify the column associated with the element selected by the style sheet selector. The leftColumn DIV is positioned in the first grid column, the middleColumn DIV is positioned in the second grid column, and the rightColumn DIV is positioned in the third grid column. I find using CSS Grid Layout to be just as intuitive as using an HTML table for layout. You define your columns and rows and then you position different elements within these columns and rows. Very straightforward. Creating Multiple Columns and Rows In the previous section, we created a super simple three-column layout. This layout contained only a single row. In this section, let’s create a slightly more complicated layout which contains more than one row: The following page contains a header row, a content row, and a footer row. The content row contains three columns: <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <style type="text/css"> html, body, #container { height: 100%; padding: 0px; margin: 0px; } #container { display: -ms-grid; -ms-grid-columns: 300px auto 300px; -ms-grid-rows: 100px 1fr 100px; } #header { -ms-grid-column: 1; -ms-grid-column-span: 3; -ms-grid-row: 1; background-color: yellow; } #leftColumn { -ms-grid-column: 1; -ms-grid-row: 2; background-color:red; } #middleColumn { -ms-grid-column: 2; -ms-grid-row: 2; background-color:green; } #rightColumn { -ms-grid-column: 3; -ms-grid-row: 2; background-color:blue; } #footer { -ms-grid-column: 1; -ms-grid-column-span: 3; -ms-grid-row: 3; background-color: orange; } </style> </head> <body> <div id="container"> <div id="header"> Header, Header, Header </div> <div id="leftColumn"> Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column </div> <div id="middleColumn"> Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column </div> <div id="rightColumn"> Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column </div> <div id="footer"> Footer, Footer, Footer </div> </div> </body> </html> In the page above, the grid layout is created with the following rule which creates a grid with three rows and three columns: #container { display: -ms-grid; -ms-grid-columns: 300px auto 300px; -ms-grid-rows: 100px 1fr 100px; } The header is created with the following rule: #header { -ms-grid-column: 1; -ms-grid-column-span: 3; -ms-grid-row: 1; background-color: yellow; } The header is positioned in column 1 and row 1. Furthermore, notice that the “-ms-grid-column-span” property is used to span the header across three columns. CSS Grid Layout and Fractional Units When you use CSS Grid Layout, you can take advantage of fractional units. Fractional units provide you with an easy way of dividing up remaining space in a page. Imagine, for example, that you want to create a three-column page layout. You want the size of the first column to be fixed at 200 pixels and you want to divide the remaining space among the remaining three columns. The width of the second column is equal to the combined width of the third and fourth columns. The following CSS rule creates four columns with the desired widths: #container { display: -ms-grid; -ms-grid-columns: 200px 2fr 1fr 1fr; -ms-grid-rows: 1fr; } The fr unit represents a fraction. The grid above contains four columns. The second column is two times the size (2fr) of the third (1fr) and fourth (1fr) columns. When you use the fractional unit, the remaining space is divided up using fractional amounts. Notice that the single row is set to a height of 1fr. The single grid row gobbles up the entire vertical space. Here’s the entire HTML page: <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <style type="text/css"> html, body, #container { height: 100%; padding: 0px; margin: 0px; } #container { display: -ms-grid; -ms-grid-columns: 200px 2fr 1fr 1fr; -ms-grid-rows: 1fr; } #firstColumn { -ms-grid-column: 1; background-color:red; } #secondColumn { -ms-grid-column: 2; background-color:green; } #thirdColumn { -ms-grid-column: 3; background-color:blue; } #fourthColumn { -ms-grid-column: 4; background-color:orange; } </style> </head> <body> <div id="container"> <div id="firstColumn"> First Column, First Column, First Column </div> <div id="secondColumn"> Second Column, Second Column, Second Column </div> <div id="thirdColumn"> Third Column, Third Column, Third Column </div> <div id="fourthColumn"> Fourth Column, Fourth Column, Fourth Column </div> </div> </body> </html>   Summary There is more in the CSS 3 Grid Layout standard than discussed in this blog post. My goal was to describe the basics. If you want to learn more than you can read through the entire standard at http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-grid-layout/ In this blog post, I described some of the difficulties that you might encounter when attempting to replace HTML tables with Cascading Style Sheets when laying out a web page. I explained how you can take advantage of the CSS 3 Grid Layout standard to avoid these problems when building Metro style applications using JavaScript. CSS 3 Grid Layout provides you with all of the benefits of using HTML tables for laying out a page without requiring you to use HTML table elements.

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  • Metro: Introduction to CSS 3 Grid Layout

    - by Stephen.Walther
    The purpose of this blog post is to provide you with a quick introduction to the new W3C CSS 3 Grid Layout standard. You can use CSS Grid Layout in Metro style applications written with JavaScript to lay out the content of an HTML page. CSS Grid Layout provides you with all of the benefits of using HTML tables for layout without requiring you to actually use any HTML table elements. Doing Page Layouts without Tables Back in the 1990’s, if you wanted to create a fancy website, then you would use HTML tables for layout. For example, if you wanted to create a standard three-column page layout then you would create an HTML table with three columns like this: <table height="100%"> <tr> <td valign="top" width="300px" bgcolor="red"> Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column </td> <td valign="top" bgcolor="green"> Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column </td> <td valign="top" width="300px" bgcolor="blue"> Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column </td> </tr> </table> When the table above gets rendered out to a browser, you end up with the following three-column layout: The width of the left and right columns is fixed – the width of the middle column expands or contracts depending on the width of the browser. Sometime around the year 2005, everyone decided that using tables for layout was a bad idea. Instead of using tables for layout — it was collectively decided by the spirit of the Web — you should use Cascading Style Sheets instead. Why is using HTML tables for layout bad? Using tables for layout breaks the semantics of the TABLE element. A TABLE element should be used only for displaying tabular information such as train schedules or moon phases. Using tables for layout is bad for accessibility (The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0 is explicit about this) and using tables for layout is bad for separating content from layout (see http://CSSZenGarden.com). Post 2005, anyone who used HTML tables for layout were encouraged to hold their heads down in shame. That’s all well and good, but the problem with using CSS for layout is that it can be more difficult to work with CSS than HTML tables. For example, to achieve a standard three-column layout, you either need to use absolute positioning or floats. Here’s a three-column layout with floats: <style type="text/css"> #container { min-width: 800px; } #leftColumn { float: left; width: 300px; height: 100%; background-color:red; } #middleColumn { background-color:green; height: 100%; } #rightColumn { float: right; width: 300px; height: 100%; background-color:blue; } </style> <div id="container"> <div id="rightColumn"> Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column </div> <div id="leftColumn"> Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column </div> <div id="middleColumn"> Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column </div> </div> The page above contains four DIV elements: a container DIV which contains a leftColumn, middleColumn, and rightColumn DIV. The leftColumn DIV element is floated to the left and the rightColumn DIV element is floated to the right. Notice that the rightColumn DIV appears in the page before the middleColumn DIV – this unintuitive ordering is necessary to get the floats to work correctly (see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/533607/css-three-column-layout-problem). The page above (almost) works with the most recent versions of most browsers. For example, you get the correct three-column layout in both Firefox and Chrome: And the layout mostly works with Internet Explorer 9 except for the fact that for some strange reason the min-width doesn’t work so when you shrink the width of your browser, you can get the following unwanted layout: Notice how the middle column (the green column) bleeds to the left and right. People have solved these issues with more complicated CSS. For example, see: http://matthewjamestaylor.com/blog/holy-grail-no-quirks-mode.htm But, at this point, no one could argue that using CSS is easier or more intuitive than tables. It takes work to get a layout with CSS and we know that we could achieve the same layout more easily using HTML tables. Using CSS Grid Layout CSS Grid Layout is a new W3C standard which provides you with all of the benefits of using HTML tables for layout without the disadvantage of using an HTML TABLE element. In other words, CSS Grid Layout enables you to perform table layouts using pure Cascading Style Sheets. The CSS Grid Layout standard is still in a “Working Draft” state (it is not finalized) and it is located here: http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-grid-layout/ The CSS Grid Layout standard is only supported by Internet Explorer 10 and there are no signs that any browser other than Internet Explorer will support this standard in the near future. This means that it is only practical to take advantage of CSS Grid Layout when building Metro style applications with JavaScript. Here’s how you can create a standard three-column layout using a CSS Grid Layout: <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <style type="text/css"> html, body, #container { height: 100%; padding: 0px; margin: 0px; } #container { display: -ms-grid; -ms-grid-columns: 300px auto 300px; -ms-grid-rows: 100%; } #leftColumn { -ms-grid-column: 1; background-color:red; } #middleColumn { -ms-grid-column: 2; background-color:green; } #rightColumn { -ms-grid-column: 3; background-color:blue; } </style> </head> <body> <div id="container"> <div id="leftColumn"> Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column </div> <div id="middleColumn"> Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column </div> <div id="rightColumn"> Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column </div> </div> </body> </html> When the page above is rendered in Internet Explorer 10, you get a standard three-column layout: The page above contains four DIV elements: a container DIV which contains a leftColumn DIV, middleColumn DIV, and rightColumn DIV. The container DIV is set to Grid display mode with the following CSS rule: #container { display: -ms-grid; -ms-grid-columns: 300px auto 300px; -ms-grid-rows: 100%; } The display property is set to the value “-ms-grid”. This property causes the container DIV to lay out its child elements in a grid. (Notice that you use “-ms-grid” instead of “grid”. The “-ms-“ prefix is used because the CSS Grid Layout standard is still preliminary. This implementation only works with IE10 and it might change before the final release.) The grid columns and rows are defined with the “-ms-grid-columns” and “-ms-grid-rows” properties. The style rule above creates a grid with three columns and one row. The left and right columns are fixed sized at 300 pixels. The middle column sizes automatically depending on the remaining space available. The leftColumn, middleColumn, and rightColumn DIVs are positioned within the container grid element with the following CSS rules: #leftColumn { -ms-grid-column: 1; background-color:red; } #middleColumn { -ms-grid-column: 2; background-color:green; } #rightColumn { -ms-grid-column: 3; background-color:blue; } The “-ms-grid-column” property is used to specify the column associated with the element selected by the style sheet selector. The leftColumn DIV is positioned in the first grid column, the middleColumn DIV is positioned in the second grid column, and the rightColumn DIV is positioned in the third grid column. I find using CSS Grid Layout to be just as intuitive as using an HTML table for layout. You define your columns and rows and then you position different elements within these columns and rows. Very straightforward. Creating Multiple Columns and Rows In the previous section, we created a super simple three-column layout. This layout contained only a single row. In this section, let’s create a slightly more complicated layout which contains more than one row: The following page contains a header row, a content row, and a footer row. The content row contains three columns: <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <style type="text/css"> html, body, #container { height: 100%; padding: 0px; margin: 0px; } #container { display: -ms-grid; -ms-grid-columns: 300px auto 300px; -ms-grid-rows: 100px 1fr 100px; } #header { -ms-grid-column: 1; -ms-grid-column-span: 3; -ms-grid-row: 1; background-color: yellow; } #leftColumn { -ms-grid-column: 1; -ms-grid-row: 2; background-color:red; } #middleColumn { -ms-grid-column: 2; -ms-grid-row: 2; background-color:green; } #rightColumn { -ms-grid-column: 3; -ms-grid-row: 2; background-color:blue; } #footer { -ms-grid-column: 1; -ms-grid-column-span: 3; -ms-grid-row: 3; background-color: orange; } </style> </head> <body> <div id="container"> <div id="header"> Header, Header, Header </div> <div id="leftColumn"> Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column, Left Column </div> <div id="middleColumn"> Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column, Middle Column </div> <div id="rightColumn"> Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column, Right Column </div> <div id="footer"> Footer, Footer, Footer </div> </div> </body> </html> In the page above, the grid layout is created with the following rule which creates a grid with three rows and three columns: #container { display: -ms-grid; -ms-grid-columns: 300px auto 300px; -ms-grid-rows: 100px 1fr 100px; } The header is created with the following rule: #header { -ms-grid-column: 1; -ms-grid-column-span: 3; -ms-grid-row: 1; background-color: yellow; } The header is positioned in column 1 and row 1. Furthermore, notice that the “-ms-grid-column-span” property is used to span the header across three columns. CSS Grid Layout and Fractional Units When you use CSS Grid Layout, you can take advantage of fractional units. Fractional units provide you with an easy way of dividing up remaining space in a page. Imagine, for example, that you want to create a three-column page layout. You want the size of the first column to be fixed at 200 pixels and you want to divide the remaining space among the remaining three columns. The width of the second column is equal to the combined width of the third and fourth columns. The following CSS rule creates four columns with the desired widths: #container { display: -ms-grid; -ms-grid-columns: 200px 2fr 1fr 1fr; -ms-grid-rows: 1fr; } The fr unit represents a fraction. The grid above contains four columns. The second column is two times the size (2fr) of the third (1fr) and fourth (1fr) columns. When you use the fractional unit, the remaining space is divided up using fractional amounts. Notice that the single row is set to a height of 1fr. The single grid row gobbles up the entire vertical space. Here’s the entire HTML page: <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <style type="text/css"> html, body, #container { height: 100%; padding: 0px; margin: 0px; } #container { display: -ms-grid; -ms-grid-columns: 200px 2fr 1fr 1fr; -ms-grid-rows: 1fr; } #firstColumn { -ms-grid-column: 1; background-color:red; } #secondColumn { -ms-grid-column: 2; background-color:green; } #thirdColumn { -ms-grid-column: 3; background-color:blue; } #fourthColumn { -ms-grid-column: 4; background-color:orange; } </style> </head> <body> <div id="container"> <div id="firstColumn"> First Column, First Column, First Column </div> <div id="secondColumn"> Second Column, Second Column, Second Column </div> <div id="thirdColumn"> Third Column, Third Column, Third Column </div> <div id="fourthColumn"> Fourth Column, Fourth Column, Fourth Column </div> </div> </body> </html>   Summary There is more in the CSS 3 Grid Layout standard than discussed in this blog post. My goal was to describe the basics. If you want to learn more than you can read through the entire standard at http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-grid-layout/ In this blog post, I described some of the difficulties that you might encounter when attempting to replace HTML tables with Cascading Style Sheets when laying out a web page. I explained how you can take advantage of the CSS 3 Grid Layout standard to avoid these problems when building Metro style applications using JavaScript. CSS 3 Grid Layout provides you with all of the benefits of using HTML tables for laying out a page without requiring you to use HTML table elements.

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  • metro style on windows and android

    - by MRM
    I want to develop a rather simple app using windows 8 metro style for GUI. But i need this app to have the same appearance, GUI, for both platforms, so that end users that uses it both on PC and a mobile device to have the same visual experience and a flawless navigation. So, does anyone have knowledge of a Java framework or library to satisfy these needs? Or maybe a method to create a web-based app using HTML, PHP, JScript etc. (maybe something using a local server, on the same machine, because a web server is out of discussion, at least for the moment)? Any idea, method, technology related to the subject is also helpful. And if what you are thinking at can be used for IOS too, the better.

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  • Metro: Creating an IndexedDbDataSource for WinJS

    - by Stephen.Walther
    The goal of this blog entry is to describe how you can create custom data sources which you can use with the controls in the WinJS library. In particular, I explain how you can create an IndexedDbDataSource which you can use to store and retrieve data from an IndexedDB database. If you want to skip ahead, and ignore all of the fascinating content in-between, I’ve included the complete code for the IndexedDbDataSource at the very bottom of this blog entry. What is IndexedDB? IndexedDB is a database in the browser. You can use the IndexedDB API with all modern browsers including Firefox, Chrome, and Internet Explorer 10. And, of course, you can use IndexedDB with Metro style apps written with JavaScript. If you need to persist data in a Metro style app written with JavaScript then IndexedDB is a good option. Each Metro app can only interact with its own IndexedDB databases. And, IndexedDB provides you with transactions, indices, and cursors – the elements of any modern database. An IndexedDB database might be different than the type of database that you normally use. An IndexedDB database is an object-oriented database and not a relational database. Instead of storing data in tables, you store data in object stores. You store JavaScript objects in an IndexedDB object store. You create new IndexedDB object stores by handling the upgradeneeded event when you attempt to open a connection to an IndexedDB database. For example, here’s how you would both open a connection to an existing database named TasksDB and create the TasksDB database when it does not already exist: var reqOpen = window.indexedDB.open(“TasksDB”, 2); reqOpen.onupgradeneeded = function (evt) { var newDB = evt.target.result; newDB.createObjectStore("tasks", { keyPath: "id", autoIncrement: true }); }; reqOpen.onsuccess = function () { var db = reqOpen.result; // Do something with db }; When you call window.indexedDB.open(), and the database does not already exist, then the upgradeneeded event is raised. In the code above, the upgradeneeded handler creates a new object store named tasks. The new object store has an auto-increment column named id which acts as the primary key column. If the database already exists with the right version, and you call window.indexedDB.open(), then the success event is raised. At that point, you have an open connection to the existing database and you can start doing something with the database. You use asynchronous methods to interact with an IndexedDB database. For example, the following code illustrates how you would add a new object to the tasks object store: var transaction = db.transaction(“tasks”, “readwrite”); var reqAdd = transaction.objectStore(“tasks”).add({ name: “Feed the dog” }); reqAdd.onsuccess = function() { // Tasks added successfully }; The code above creates a new database transaction, adds a new task to the tasks object store, and handles the success event. If the new task gets added successfully then the success event is raised. Creating a WinJS IndexedDbDataSource The most powerful control in the WinJS library is the ListView control. This is the control that you use to display a collection of items. If you want to display data with a ListView control, you need to bind the control to a data source. The WinJS library includes two objects which you can use as a data source: the List object and the StorageDataSource object. The List object enables you to represent a JavaScript array as a data source and the StorageDataSource enables you to represent the file system as a data source. If you want to bind an IndexedDB database to a ListView then you have a choice. You can either dump the items from the IndexedDB database into a List object or you can create a custom data source. I explored the first approach in a previous blog entry. In this blog entry, I explain how you can create a custom IndexedDB data source. Implementing the IListDataSource Interface You create a custom data source by implementing the IListDataSource interface. This interface contains the contract for the methods which the ListView needs to interact with a data source. The easiest way to implement the IListDataSource interface is to derive a new object from the base VirtualizedDataSource object. The VirtualizedDataSource object requires a data adapter which implements the IListDataAdapter interface. Yes, because of the number of objects involved, this is a little confusing. Your code ends up looking something like this: var IndexedDbDataSource = WinJS.Class.derive( WinJS.UI.VirtualizedDataSource, function (dbName, dbVersion, objectStoreName, upgrade, error) { this._adapter = new IndexedDbDataAdapter(dbName, dbVersion, objectStoreName, upgrade, error); this._baseDataSourceConstructor(this._adapter); }, { nuke: function () { this._adapter.nuke(); }, remove: function (key) { this._adapter.removeInternal(key); } } ); The code above is used to create a new class named IndexedDbDataSource which derives from the base VirtualizedDataSource class. In the constructor for the new class, the base class _baseDataSourceConstructor() method is called. A data adapter is passed to the _baseDataSourceConstructor() method. The code above creates a new method exposed by the IndexedDbDataSource named nuke(). The nuke() method deletes all of the objects from an object store. The code above also overrides a method named remove(). Our derived remove() method accepts any type of key and removes the matching item from the object store. Almost all of the work of creating a custom data source goes into building the data adapter class. The data adapter class implements the IListDataAdapter interface which contains the following methods: · change() · getCount() · insertAfter() · insertAtEnd() · insertAtStart() · insertBefore() · itemsFromDescription() · itemsFromEnd() · itemsFromIndex() · itemsFromKey() · itemsFromStart() · itemSignature() · moveAfter() · moveBefore() · moveToEnd() · moveToStart() · remove() · setNotificationHandler() · compareByIdentity Fortunately, you are not required to implement all of these methods. You only need to implement the methods that you actually need. In the case of the IndexedDbDataSource, I implemented the getCount(), itemsFromIndex(), insertAtEnd(), and remove() methods. If you are creating a read-only data source then you really only need to implement the getCount() and itemsFromIndex() methods. Implementing the getCount() Method The getCount() method returns the total number of items from the data source. So, if you are storing 10,000 items in an object store then this method would return the value 10,000. Here’s how I implemented the getCount() method: getCount: function () { var that = this; return new WinJS.Promise(function (complete, error) { that._getObjectStore().then(function (store) { var reqCount = store.count(); reqCount.onerror = that._error; reqCount.onsuccess = function (evt) { complete(evt.target.result); }; }); }); } The first thing that you should notice is that the getCount() method returns a WinJS promise. This is a requirement. The getCount() method is asynchronous which is a good thing because all of the IndexedDB methods (at least the methods implemented in current browsers) are also asynchronous. The code above retrieves an object store and then uses the IndexedDB count() method to get a count of the items in the object store. The value is returned from the promise by calling complete(). Implementing the itemsFromIndex method When a ListView displays its items, it calls the itemsFromIndex() method. By default, it calls this method multiple times to get different ranges of items. Three parameters are passed to the itemsFromIndex() method: the requestIndex, countBefore, and countAfter parameters. The requestIndex indicates the index of the item from the database to show. The countBefore and countAfter parameters represent hints. These are integer values which represent the number of items before and after the requestIndex to retrieve. Again, these are only hints and you can return as many items before and after the request index as you please. Here’s how I implemented the itemsFromIndex method: itemsFromIndex: function (requestIndex, countBefore, countAfter) { var that = this; return new WinJS.Promise(function (complete, error) { that.getCount().then(function (count) { if (requestIndex >= count) { return WinJS.Promise.wrapError(new WinJS.ErrorFromName(WinJS.UI.FetchError.doesNotExist)); } var startIndex = Math.max(0, requestIndex - countBefore); var endIndex = Math.min(count, requestIndex + countAfter + 1); that._getObjectStore().then(function (store) { var index = 0; var items = []; var req = store.openCursor(); req.onerror = that._error; req.onsuccess = function (evt) { var cursor = evt.target.result; if (index < startIndex) { index = startIndex; cursor.advance(startIndex); return; } if (cursor && index < endIndex) { index++; items.push({ key: cursor.value[store.keyPath].toString(), data: cursor.value }); cursor.continue(); return; } results = { items: items, offset: requestIndex - startIndex, totalCount: count }; complete(results); }; }); }); }); } In the code above, a cursor is used to iterate through the objects in an object store. You fetch the next item in the cursor by calling either the cursor.continue() or cursor.advance() method. The continue() method moves forward by one object and the advance() method moves forward a specified number of objects. Each time you call continue() or advance(), the success event is raised again. If the cursor is null then you know that you have reached the end of the cursor and you can return the results. Some things to be careful about here. First, the return value from the itemsFromIndex() method must implement the IFetchResult interface. In particular, you must return an object which has an items, offset, and totalCount property. Second, each item in the items array must implement the IListItem interface. Each item should have a key and a data property. Implementing the insertAtEnd() Method When creating the IndexedDbDataSource, I wanted to go beyond creating a simple read-only data source and support inserting and deleting objects. If you want to support adding new items with your data source then you need to implement the insertAtEnd() method. Here’s how I implemented the insertAtEnd() method for the IndexedDbDataSource: insertAtEnd:function(unused, data) { var that = this; return new WinJS.Promise(function (complete, error) { that._getObjectStore("readwrite").done(function(store) { var reqAdd = store.add(data); reqAdd.onerror = that._error; reqAdd.onsuccess = function (evt) { var reqGet = store.get(evt.target.result); reqGet.onerror = that._error; reqGet.onsuccess = function (evt) { var newItem = { key:evt.target.result[store.keyPath].toString(), data:evt.target.result } complete(newItem); }; }; }); }); } When implementing the insertAtEnd() method, you need to be careful to return an object which implements the IItem interface. In particular, you should return an object that has a key and a data property. The key must be a string and it uniquely represents the new item added to the data source. The value of the data property represents the new item itself. Implementing the remove() Method Finally, you use the remove() method to remove an item from the data source. You call the remove() method with the key of the item which you want to remove. Implementing the remove() method in the case of the IndexedDbDataSource was a little tricky. The problem is that an IndexedDB object store uses an integer key and the VirtualizedDataSource requires a string key. For that reason, I needed to override the remove() method in the derived IndexedDbDataSource class like this: var IndexedDbDataSource = WinJS.Class.derive( WinJS.UI.VirtualizedDataSource, function (dbName, dbVersion, objectStoreName, upgrade, error) { this._adapter = new IndexedDbDataAdapter(dbName, dbVersion, objectStoreName, upgrade, error); this._baseDataSourceConstructor(this._adapter); }, { nuke: function () { this._adapter.nuke(); }, remove: function (key) { this._adapter.removeInternal(key); } } ); When you call remove(), you end up calling a method of the IndexedDbDataAdapter named removeInternal() . Here’s what the removeInternal() method looks like: setNotificationHandler: function (notificationHandler) { this._notificationHandler = notificationHandler; }, removeInternal: function(key) { var that = this; return new WinJS.Promise(function (complete, error) { that._getObjectStore("readwrite").done(function (store) { var reqDelete = store.delete (key); reqDelete.onerror = that._error; reqDelete.onsuccess = function (evt) { that._notificationHandler.removed(key.toString()); complete(); }; }); }); } The removeInternal() method calls the IndexedDB delete() method to delete an item from the object store. If the item is deleted successfully then the _notificationHandler.remove() method is called. Because we are not implementing the standard IListDataAdapter remove() method, we need to notify the data source (and the ListView control bound to the data source) that an item has been removed. The way that you notify the data source is by calling the _notificationHandler.remove() method. Notice that we get the _notificationHandler in the code above by implementing another method in the IListDataAdapter interface: the setNotificationHandler() method. You can raise the following types of notifications using the _notificationHandler: · beginNotifications() · changed() · endNotifications() · inserted() · invalidateAll() · moved() · removed() · reload() These methods are all part of the IListDataNotificationHandler interface in the WinJS library. Implementing the nuke() Method I wanted to implement a method which would remove all of the items from an object store. Therefore, I created a method named nuke() which calls the IndexedDB clear() method: nuke: function () { var that = this; return new WinJS.Promise(function (complete, error) { that._getObjectStore("readwrite").done(function (store) { var reqClear = store.clear(); reqClear.onerror = that._error; reqClear.onsuccess = function (evt) { that._notificationHandler.reload(); complete(); }; }); }); } Notice that the nuke() method calls the _notificationHandler.reload() method to notify the ListView to reload all of the items from its data source. Because we are implementing a custom method here, we need to use the _notificationHandler to send an update. Using the IndexedDbDataSource To illustrate how you can use the IndexedDbDataSource, I created a simple task list app. You can add new tasks, delete existing tasks, and nuke all of the tasks. You delete an item by selecting an item (swipe or right-click) and clicking the Delete button. Here’s the HTML page which contains the ListView, the form for adding new tasks, and the buttons for deleting and nuking tasks: <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta charset="utf-8" /> <title>DataSources</title> <!-- WinJS references --> <link href="//Microsoft.WinJS.1.0.RC/css/ui-dark.css" rel="stylesheet" /> <script src="//Microsoft.WinJS.1.0.RC/js/base.js"></script> <script src="//Microsoft.WinJS.1.0.RC/js/ui.js"></script> <!-- DataSources references --> <link href="indexedDb.css" rel="stylesheet" /> <script type="text/javascript" src="indexedDbDataSource.js"></script> <script src="indexedDb.js"></script> </head> <body> <div id="tmplTask" data-win-control="WinJS.Binding.Template"> <div class="taskItem"> Id: <span data-win-bind="innerText:id"></span> <br /><br /> Name: <span data-win-bind="innerText:name"></span> </div> </div> <div id="lvTasks" data-win-control="WinJS.UI.ListView" data-win-options="{ itemTemplate: select('#tmplTask'), selectionMode: 'single' }"></div> <form id="frmAdd"> <fieldset> <legend>Add Task</legend> <label>New Task</label> <input id="inputTaskName" required /> <button>Add</button> </fieldset> </form> <button id="btnNuke">Nuke</button> <button id="btnDelete">Delete</button> </body> </html> And here is the JavaScript code for the TaskList app: /// <reference path="//Microsoft.WinJS.1.0.RC/js/base.js" /> /// <reference path="//Microsoft.WinJS.1.0.RC/js/ui.js" /> function init() { WinJS.UI.processAll().done(function () { var lvTasks = document.getElementById("lvTasks").winControl; // Bind the ListView to its data source var tasksDataSource = new DataSources.IndexedDbDataSource("TasksDB", 1, "tasks", upgrade); lvTasks.itemDataSource = tasksDataSource; // Wire-up Add, Delete, Nuke buttons document.getElementById("frmAdd").addEventListener("submit", function (evt) { evt.preventDefault(); tasksDataSource.beginEdits(); tasksDataSource.insertAtEnd(null, { name: document.getElementById("inputTaskName").value }).done(function (newItem) { tasksDataSource.endEdits(); document.getElementById("frmAdd").reset(); lvTasks.ensureVisible(newItem.index); }); }); document.getElementById("btnDelete").addEventListener("click", function () { if (lvTasks.selection.count() == 1) { lvTasks.selection.getItems().done(function (items) { tasksDataSource.remove(items[0].data.id); }); } }); document.getElementById("btnNuke").addEventListener("click", function () { tasksDataSource.nuke(); }); // This method is called to initialize the IndexedDb database function upgrade(evt) { var newDB = evt.target.result; newDB.createObjectStore("tasks", { keyPath: "id", autoIncrement: true }); } }); } document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", init); The IndexedDbDataSource is created and bound to the ListView control with the following two lines of code: var tasksDataSource = new DataSources.IndexedDbDataSource("TasksDB", 1, "tasks", upgrade); lvTasks.itemDataSource = tasksDataSource; The IndexedDbDataSource is created with four parameters: the name of the database to create, the version of the database to create, the name of the object store to create, and a function which contains code to initialize the new database. The upgrade function creates a new object store named tasks with an auto-increment property named id: function upgrade(evt) { var newDB = evt.target.result; newDB.createObjectStore("tasks", { keyPath: "id", autoIncrement: true }); } The Complete Code for the IndexedDbDataSource Here’s the complete code for the IndexedDbDataSource: (function () { /************************************************ * The IndexedDBDataAdapter enables you to work * with a HTML5 IndexedDB database. *************************************************/ var IndexedDbDataAdapter = WinJS.Class.define( function (dbName, dbVersion, objectStoreName, upgrade, error) { this._dbName = dbName; // database name this._dbVersion = dbVersion; // database version this._objectStoreName = objectStoreName; // object store name this._upgrade = upgrade; // database upgrade script this._error = error || function (evt) { console.log(evt.message); }; }, { /******************************************* * IListDataAdapter Interface Methods ********************************************/ getCount: function () { var that = this; return new WinJS.Promise(function (complete, error) { that._getObjectStore().then(function (store) { var reqCount = store.count(); reqCount.onerror = that._error; reqCount.onsuccess = function (evt) { complete(evt.target.result); }; }); }); }, itemsFromIndex: function (requestIndex, countBefore, countAfter) { var that = this; return new WinJS.Promise(function (complete, error) { that.getCount().then(function (count) { if (requestIndex >= count) { return WinJS.Promise.wrapError(new WinJS.ErrorFromName(WinJS.UI.FetchError.doesNotExist)); } var startIndex = Math.max(0, requestIndex - countBefore); var endIndex = Math.min(count, requestIndex + countAfter + 1); that._getObjectStore().then(function (store) { var index = 0; var items = []; var req = store.openCursor(); req.onerror = that._error; req.onsuccess = function (evt) { var cursor = evt.target.result; if (index < startIndex) { index = startIndex; cursor.advance(startIndex); return; } if (cursor && index < endIndex) { index++; items.push({ key: cursor.value[store.keyPath].toString(), data: cursor.value }); cursor.continue(); return; } results = { items: items, offset: requestIndex - startIndex, totalCount: count }; complete(results); }; }); }); }); }, insertAtEnd:function(unused, data) { var that = this; return new WinJS.Promise(function (complete, error) { that._getObjectStore("readwrite").done(function(store) { var reqAdd = store.add(data); reqAdd.onerror = that._error; reqAdd.onsuccess = function (evt) { var reqGet = store.get(evt.target.result); reqGet.onerror = that._error; reqGet.onsuccess = function (evt) { var newItem = { key:evt.target.result[store.keyPath].toString(), data:evt.target.result } complete(newItem); }; }; }); }); }, setNotificationHandler: function (notificationHandler) { this._notificationHandler = notificationHandler; }, /***************************************** * IndexedDbDataSource Method ******************************************/ removeInternal: function(key) { var that = this; return new WinJS.Promise(function (complete, error) { that._getObjectStore("readwrite").done(function (store) { var reqDelete = store.delete (key); reqDelete.onerror = that._error; reqDelete.onsuccess = function (evt) { that._notificationHandler.removed(key.toString()); complete(); }; }); }); }, nuke: function () { var that = this; return new WinJS.Promise(function (complete, error) { that._getObjectStore("readwrite").done(function (store) { var reqClear = store.clear(); reqClear.onerror = that._error; reqClear.onsuccess = function (evt) { that._notificationHandler.reload(); complete(); }; }); }); }, /******************************************* * Private Methods ********************************************/ _ensureDbOpen: function () { var that = this; // Try to get cached Db if (that._cachedDb) { return WinJS.Promise.wrap(that._cachedDb); } // Otherwise, open the database return new WinJS.Promise(function (complete, error, progress) { var reqOpen = window.indexedDB.open(that._dbName, that._dbVersion); reqOpen.onerror = function (evt) { error(); }; reqOpen.onupgradeneeded = function (evt) { that._upgrade(evt); that._notificationHandler.invalidateAll(); }; reqOpen.onsuccess = function () { that._cachedDb = reqOpen.result; complete(that._cachedDb); }; }); }, _getObjectStore: function (type) { type = type || "readonly"; var that = this; return new WinJS.Promise(function (complete, error) { that._ensureDbOpen().then(function (db) { var transaction = db.transaction(that._objectStoreName, type); complete(transaction.objectStore(that._objectStoreName)); }); }); }, _get: function (key) { return new WinJS.Promise(function (complete, error) { that._getObjectStore().done(function (store) { var reqGet = store.get(key); reqGet.onerror = that._error; reqGet.onsuccess = function (item) { complete(item); }; }); }); } } ); var IndexedDbDataSource = WinJS.Class.derive( WinJS.UI.VirtualizedDataSource, function (dbName, dbVersion, objectStoreName, upgrade, error) { this._adapter = new IndexedDbDataAdapter(dbName, dbVersion, objectStoreName, upgrade, error); this._baseDataSourceConstructor(this._adapter); }, { nuke: function () { this._adapter.nuke(); }, remove: function (key) { this._adapter.removeInternal(key); } } ); WinJS.Namespace.define("DataSources", { IndexedDbDataSource: IndexedDbDataSource }); })(); Summary In this blog post, I provided an overview of how you can create a new data source which you can use with the WinJS library. I described how you can create an IndexedDbDataSource which you can use to bind a ListView control to an IndexedDB database. While describing how you can create a custom data source, I explained how you can implement the IListDataAdapter interface. You also learned how to raise notifications — such as a removed or invalidateAll notification — by taking advantage of the methods of the IListDataNotificationHandler interface.

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  • Metro Walkthrough: Creating a Task List with a ListView and IndexedDB

    - by Stephen.Walther
    The goal of this blog entry is to describe how you can work with data in a Metro style application written with JavaScript. In particular, we create a super simple Task List application which enables you to create and delete tasks. Here’s a video which demonstrates how the Task List application works: In order to build this application, I had to take advantage of several features of the WinJS library and technologies including: IndexedDB – The Task List application stores data in an IndexedDB database. HTML5 Form Validation – The Task List application uses HTML5 validation to ensure that a required field has a value. ListView Control – The Task List application displays the tasks retrieved from the IndexedDB database in a WinJS ListView control. Creating the IndexedDB Database The Task List application stores all of its data in an IndexedDB database named TasksDB. This database is opened/created with the following code: var db; var req = window.msIndexedDB.open("TasksDB", 1); req.onerror = function () { console.log("Could not open database"); }; req.onupgradeneeded = function (evt) { var newDB = evt.target.result; newDB.createObjectStore("tasks", { keyPath: "id", autoIncrement:true }); }; The msIndexedDB.open() method accepts two parameters: the name of the database to open and the version of the database to open. If a database with a matching version already exists, then calling the msIndexedDB.open() method opens a connection to the existing database. If the database does not exist then the upgradeneeded event is raised. You handle the upgradeneeded event to create a new database. In the code above, the upgradeneeded event handler creates an object store named “tasks” (An object store roughly corresponds to a database table). When you add items to the tasks object store then each item gets an id property with an auto-incremented value automatically. The code above also includes an error event handler. If the IndexedDB database cannot be opened or created, for whatever reason, then an error message is written to the Visual Studio JavaScript Console window. Displaying a List of Tasks The TaskList application retrieves its list of tasks from the tasks object store, which we created above, and displays the list of tasks in a ListView control. Here is how the ListView control is declared: <div id="tasksListView" data-win-control="WinJS.UI.ListView" data-win-options="{ itemDataSource: TaskList.tasks.dataSource, itemTemplate: select('#taskTemplate'), tapBehavior: 'toggleSelect', selectionMode: 'multi', layout: { type: WinJS.UI.ListLayout } }"> </div> The ListView control is bound to the TaskList.tasks.dataSource data source. The TaskList.tasks.dataSource is created with the following code: // Create the data source var tasks = new WinJS.Binding.List(); // Open the database var db; var req = window.msIndexedDB.open("TasksDB", 1); req.onerror = function () { console.log("Could not open database"); }; req.onupgradeneeded = function (evt) { var newDB = evt.target.result; newDB.createObjectStore("tasks", { keyPath: "id", autoIncrement:true }); }; // Load the data source with data from the database req.onsuccess = function () { db = req.result; var tran = db.transaction("tasks"); tran.objectStore("tasks").openCursor().onsuccess = function(event) { var cursor = event.target.result; if (cursor) { tasks.dataSource.insertAtEnd(null, cursor.value); cursor.continue(); }; }; }; // Expose the data source and functions WinJS.Namespace.define("TaskList", { tasks: tasks }); Notice the success event handler. This handler is called when a database is successfully opened/created. In the code above, all of the items from the tasks object store are retrieved into a cursor and added to a WinJS.Binding.List object named tasks. Because the ListView control is bound to the WinJS.Binding.List object, copying the tasks from the object store into the WinJS.Binding.List object causes the tasks to appear in the ListView: Adding a New Task You add a new task in the Task List application by entering the title of a new task into an HTML form and clicking the Add button. Here’s the markup for creating the form: <form id="addTaskForm"> <input id="newTaskTitle" title="New Task" required /> <button>Add</button> </form> Notice that the INPUT element includes a required attribute. In a Metro application, you can take advantage of HTML5 Validation to validate form fields. If you don’t enter a value for the newTaskTitle field then the following validation error message is displayed: For a brief introduction to HTML5 validation, see my previous blog entry: http://stephenwalther.com/blog/archive/2012/03/13/html5-form-validation.aspx When you click the Add button, the form is submitted and the form submit event is raised. The following code is executed in the default.js file: // Handle Add Task document.getElementById("addTaskForm").addEventListener("submit", function (evt) { evt.preventDefault(); var newTaskTitle = document.getElementById("newTaskTitle"); TaskList.addTask({ title: newTaskTitle.value }); newTaskTitle.value = ""; }); The code above retrieves the title of the new task and calls the addTask() method in the tasks.js file. Here’s the code for the addTask() method which is responsible for actually adding the new task to the IndexedDB database: // Add a new task function addTask(taskToAdd) { var transaction = db.transaction("tasks", "readwrite"); var addRequest = transaction.objectStore("tasks").add(taskToAdd); addRequest.onsuccess = function (evt) { taskToAdd.id = evt.target.result; tasks.dataSource.insertAtEnd(null, taskToAdd); } } The code above does two things. First, it adds the new task to the tasks object store in the IndexedDB database. Second, it adds the new task to the data source bound to the ListView. The dataSource.insertAtEnd() method is called to add the new task to the data source so the new task will appear in the ListView (with a nice little animation). Deleting Existing Tasks The Task List application enables you to select one or more tasks by clicking or tapping on one or more tasks in the ListView. When you click the Delete button, the selected tasks are removed from both the IndexedDB database and the ListView. For example, in the following screenshot, two tasks are selected. The selected tasks appear with a teal background and a checkmark: When you click the Delete button, the following code in the default.js file is executed: // Handle Delete Tasks document.getElementById("btnDeleteTasks").addEventListener("click", function (evt) { tasksListView.winControl.selection.getItems().then(function(items) { items.forEach(function (item) { TaskList.deleteTask(item); }); }); }); The selected tasks are retrieved with the TaskList selection.getItem() method. In the code above, the deleteTask() method is called for each of the selected tasks. Here’s the code for the deleteTask() method: // Delete an existing task function deleteTask(listViewItem) { // Database key != ListView key var dbKey = listViewItem.data.id; var listViewKey = listViewItem.key; // Remove item from db and, if success, remove item from ListView var transaction = db.transaction("tasks", “readwrite”); var deleteRequest = transaction.objectStore("tasks").delete(dbKey); deleteRequest.onsuccess = function () { tasks.dataSource.remove(listViewKey); } } This code does two things: it deletes the existing task from the database and removes the existing task from the ListView. In both cases, the right task is removed by using the key associated with the task. However, the task key is different in the case of the database and in the case of the ListView. In the case of the database, the task key is the value of the task id property. In the case of the ListView, on the other hand, the task key is auto-generated by the ListView. When the task is removed from the ListView, an animation is used to collapse the tasks which appear above and below the task which was removed. The Complete Code Above, I did a lot of jumping around between different files in the application and I left out sections of code. For the sake of completeness, I want to include the entire code here: the default.html, default.js, and tasks.js files. Here are the contents of the default.html file. This file contains the UI for the Task List application: <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta charset="utf-8"> <title>Task List</title> <!-- WinJS references --> <link href="//Microsoft.WinJS.0.6/css/ui-dark.css" rel="stylesheet"> <script src="//Microsoft.WinJS.0.6/js/base.js"></script> <script src="//Microsoft.WinJS.0.6/js/ui.js"></script> <!-- TaskList references --> <link href="/css/default.css" rel="stylesheet"> <script src="/js/default.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript" src="js/tasks.js"></script> <style type="text/css"> body { font-size: x-large; } form { display: inline; } #appContainer { margin: 20px; width: 600px; } .win-container { padding: 10px; } </style> </head> <body> <div> <!-- Templates --> <div id="taskTemplate" data-win-control="WinJS.Binding.Template"> <div> <span data-win-bind="innerText:title"></span> </div> </div> <h1>Super Task List</h1> <div id="appContainer"> <form id="addTaskForm"> <input id="newTaskTitle" title="New Task" required /> <button>Add</button> </form> <button id="btnDeleteTasks">Delete</button> <div id="tasksListView" data-win-control="WinJS.UI.ListView" data-win-options="{ itemDataSource: TaskList.tasks.dataSource, itemTemplate: select('#taskTemplate'), tapBehavior: 'toggleSelect', selectionMode: 'multi', layout: { type: WinJS.UI.ListLayout } }"> </div> </div> </div> </body> </html> Here is the code for the default.js file. This code wires up the Add Task form and Delete button: (function () { "use strict"; var app = WinJS.Application; app.onactivated = function (eventObject) { if (eventObject.detail.kind === Windows.ApplicationModel.Activation.ActivationKind.launch) { WinJS.UI.processAll().then(function () { // Get reference to Tasks ListView var tasksListView = document.getElementById("tasksListView"); // Handle Add Task document.getElementById("addTaskForm").addEventListener("submit", function (evt) { evt.preventDefault(); var newTaskTitle = document.getElementById("newTaskTitle"); TaskList.addTask({ title: newTaskTitle.value }); newTaskTitle.value = ""; }); // Handle Delete Tasks document.getElementById("btnDeleteTasks").addEventListener("click", function (evt) { tasksListView.winControl.selection.getItems().then(function(items) { items.forEach(function (item) { TaskList.deleteTask(item); }); }); }); }); } }; app.start(); })(); Finally, here is the tasks.js file. This file contains all of the code for opening, creating, and interacting with IndexedDB: (function () { "use strict"; // Create the data source var tasks = new WinJS.Binding.List(); // Open the database var db; var req = window.msIndexedDB.open("TasksDB", 1); req.onerror = function () { console.log("Could not open database"); }; req.onupgradeneeded = function (evt) { var newDB = evt.target.result; newDB.createObjectStore("tasks", { keyPath: "id", autoIncrement:true }); }; // Load the data source with data from the database req.onsuccess = function () { db = req.result; var tran = db.transaction("tasks"); tran.objectStore("tasks").openCursor().onsuccess = function(event) { var cursor = event.target.result; if (cursor) { tasks.dataSource.insertAtEnd(null, cursor.value); cursor.continue(); }; }; }; // Add a new task function addTask(taskToAdd) { var transaction = db.transaction("tasks", "readwrite"); var addRequest = transaction.objectStore("tasks").add(taskToAdd); addRequest.onsuccess = function (evt) { taskToAdd.id = evt.target.result; tasks.dataSource.insertAtEnd(null, taskToAdd); } } // Delete an existing task function deleteTask(listViewItem) { // Database key != ListView key var dbKey = listViewItem.data.id; var listViewKey = listViewItem.key; // Remove item from db and, if success, remove item from ListView var transaction = db.transaction("tasks", "readwrite"); var deleteRequest = transaction.objectStore("tasks").delete(dbKey); deleteRequest.onsuccess = function () { tasks.dataSource.remove(listViewKey); } } // Expose the data source and functions WinJS.Namespace.define("TaskList", { tasks: tasks, addTask: addTask, deleteTask: deleteTask }); })(); Summary I wrote this blog entry because I wanted to create a walkthrough of building a simple database-driven application. In particular, I wanted to demonstrate how you can use a ListView control with an IndexedDB database to store and retrieve database data.

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  • Metro Walkthrough: Creating a Task List with a ListView and IndexedDB

    - by Stephen.Walther
    The goal of this blog entry is to describe how you can work with data in a Metro style application written with JavaScript. In particular, we create a super simple Task List application which enables you to create and delete tasks. Here’s a video which demonstrates how the Task List application works: In order to build this application, I had to take advantage of several features of the WinJS library and technologies including: IndexedDB – The Task List application stores data in an IndexedDB database. HTML5 Form Validation – The Task List application uses HTML5 validation to ensure that a required field has a value. ListView Control – The Task List application displays the tasks retrieved from the IndexedDB database in a WinJS ListView control. Creating the IndexedDB Database The Task List application stores all of its data in an IndexedDB database named TasksDB. This database is opened/created with the following code: var db; var req = window.msIndexedDB.open("TasksDB", 1); req.onerror = function () { console.log("Could not open database"); }; req.onupgradeneeded = function (evt) { var newDB = evt.target.result; newDB.createObjectStore("tasks", { keyPath: "id", autoIncrement:true }); }; The msIndexedDB.open() method accepts two parameters: the name of the database to open and the version of the database to open. If a database with a matching version already exists, then calling the msIndexedDB.open() method opens a connection to the existing database. If the database does not exist then the upgradeneeded event is raised. You handle the upgradeneeded event to create a new database. In the code above, the upgradeneeded event handler creates an object store named “tasks” (An object store roughly corresponds to a database table). When you add items to the tasks object store then each item gets an id property with an auto-incremented value automatically. The code above also includes an error event handler. If the IndexedDB database cannot be opened or created, for whatever reason, then an error message is written to the Visual Studio JavaScript Console window. Displaying a List of Tasks The TaskList application retrieves its list of tasks from the tasks object store, which we created above, and displays the list of tasks in a ListView control. Here is how the ListView control is declared: <div id="tasksListView" data-win-control="WinJS.UI.ListView" data-win-options="{ itemDataSource: TaskList.tasks.dataSource, itemTemplate: select('#taskTemplate'), tapBehavior: 'toggleSelect', selectionMode: 'multi', layout: { type: WinJS.UI.ListLayout } }"> </div> The ListView control is bound to the TaskList.tasks.dataSource data source. The TaskList.tasks.dataSource is created with the following code: // Create the data source var tasks = new WinJS.Binding.List(); // Open the database var db; var req = window.msIndexedDB.open("TasksDB", 1); req.onerror = function () { console.log("Could not open database"); }; req.onupgradeneeded = function (evt) { var newDB = evt.target.result; newDB.createObjectStore("tasks", { keyPath: "id", autoIncrement:true }); }; // Load the data source with data from the database req.onsuccess = function () { db = req.result; var tran = db.transaction("tasks"); tran.objectStore("tasks").openCursor().onsuccess = function(event) { var cursor = event.target.result; tasks.dataSource.beginEdits(); if (cursor) { tasks.dataSource.insertAtEnd(null, cursor.value); cursor.continue(); } else { tasks.dataSource.endEdits(); }; }; }; // Expose the data source and functions WinJS.Namespace.define("TaskList", { tasks: tasks }); Notice the success event handler. This handler is called when a database is successfully opened/created. In the code above, all of the items from the tasks object store are retrieved into a cursor and added to a WinJS.Binding.List object named tasks. Because the ListView control is bound to the WinJS.Binding.List object, copying the tasks from the object store into the WinJS.Binding.List object causes the tasks to appear in the ListView: Adding a New Task You add a new task in the Task List application by entering the title of a new task into an HTML form and clicking the Add button. Here’s the markup for creating the form: <form id="addTaskForm"> <input id="newTaskTitle" title="New Task" required /> <button>Add</button> </form> Notice that the INPUT element includes a required attribute. In a Metro application, you can take advantage of HTML5 Validation to validate form fields. If you don’t enter a value for the newTaskTitle field then the following validation error message is displayed: For a brief introduction to HTML5 validation, see my previous blog entry: http://stephenwalther.com/blog/archive/2012/03/13/html5-form-validation.aspx When you click the Add button, the form is submitted and the form submit event is raised. The following code is executed in the default.js file: // Handle Add Task document.getElementById("addTaskForm").addEventListener("submit", function (evt) { evt.preventDefault(); var newTaskTitle = document.getElementById("newTaskTitle"); TaskList.addTask({ title: newTaskTitle.value }); newTaskTitle.value = ""; }); The code above retrieves the title of the new task and calls the addTask() method in the tasks.js file. Here’s the code for the addTask() method which is responsible for actually adding the new task to the IndexedDB database: // Add a new task function addTask(taskToAdd) { var transaction = db.transaction("tasks", IDBTransaction.READ_WRITE); var addRequest = transaction.objectStore("tasks").add(taskToAdd); addRequest.onsuccess = function (evt) { taskToAdd.id = evt.target.result; tasks.dataSource.insertAtEnd(null, taskToAdd); } } The code above does two things. First, it adds the new task to the tasks object store in the IndexedDB database. Second, it adds the new task to the data source bound to the ListView. The dataSource.insertAtEnd() method is called to add the new task to the data source so the new task will appear in the ListView (with a nice little animation). Deleting Existing Tasks The Task List application enables you to select one or more tasks by clicking or tapping on one or more tasks in the ListView. When you click the Delete button, the selected tasks are removed from both the IndexedDB database and the ListView. For example, in the following screenshot, two tasks are selected. The selected tasks appear with a teal background and a checkmark: When you click the Delete button, the following code in the default.js file is executed: // Handle Delete Tasks document.getElementById("btnDeleteTasks").addEventListener("click", function (evt) { tasksListView.winControl.selection.getItems().then(function(items) { items.forEach(function (item) { TaskList.deleteTask(item); }); }); }); The selected tasks are retrieved with the TaskList selection.getItem() method. In the code above, the deleteTask() method is called for each of the selected tasks. Here’s the code for the deleteTask() method: // Delete an existing task function deleteTask(listViewItem) { // Database key != ListView key var dbKey = listViewItem.data.id; var listViewKey = listViewItem.key; // Remove item from db and, if success, remove item from ListView var transaction = db.transaction("tasks", IDBTransaction.READ_WRITE); var deleteRequest = transaction.objectStore("tasks").delete(dbKey); deleteRequest.onsuccess = function () { tasks.dataSource.remove(listViewKey); } } This code does two things: it deletes the existing task from the database and removes the existing task from the ListView. In both cases, the right task is removed by using the key associated with the task. However, the task key is different in the case of the database and in the case of the ListView. In the case of the database, the task key is the value of the task id property. In the case of the ListView, on the other hand, the task key is auto-generated by the ListView. When the task is removed from the ListView, an animation is used to collapse the tasks which appear above and below the task which was removed. The Complete Code Above, I did a lot of jumping around between different files in the application and I left out sections of code. For the sake of completeness, I want to include the entire code here: the default.html, default.js, and tasks.js files. Here are the contents of the default.html file. This file contains the UI for the Task List application: <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta charset="utf-8"> <title>Task List</title> <!-- WinJS references --> <link href="//Microsoft.WinJS.0.6/css/ui-dark.css" rel="stylesheet"> <script src="//Microsoft.WinJS.0.6/js/base.js"></script> <script src="//Microsoft.WinJS.0.6/js/ui.js"></script> <!-- TaskList references --> <link href="/css/default.css" rel="stylesheet"> <script src="/js/default.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript" src="js/tasks.js"></script> <style type="text/css"> body { font-size: x-large; } form { display: inline; } #appContainer { margin: 20px; width: 600px; } .win-container { padding: 10px; } </style> </head> <body> <div> <!-- Templates --> <div id="taskTemplate" data-win-control="WinJS.Binding.Template"> <div> <span data-win-bind="innerText:title"></span> </div> </div> <h1>Super Task List</h1> <div id="appContainer"> <form id="addTaskForm"> <input id="newTaskTitle" title="New Task" required /> <button>Add</button> </form> <button id="btnDeleteTasks">Delete</button> <div id="tasksListView" data-win-control="WinJS.UI.ListView" data-win-options="{ itemDataSource: TaskList.tasks.dataSource, itemTemplate: select('#taskTemplate'), tapBehavior: 'toggleSelect', selectionMode: 'multi', layout: { type: WinJS.UI.ListLayout } }"> </div> </div> </div> </body> </html> Here is the code for the default.js file. This code wires up the Add Task form and Delete button: (function () { "use strict"; var app = WinJS.Application; app.onactivated = function (eventObject) { if (eventObject.detail.kind === Windows.ApplicationModel.Activation.ActivationKind.launch) { WinJS.UI.processAll().then(function () { // Get reference to Tasks ListView var tasksListView = document.getElementById("tasksListView"); // Handle Add Task document.getElementById("addTaskForm").addEventListener("submit", function (evt) { evt.preventDefault(); var newTaskTitle = document.getElementById("newTaskTitle"); TaskList.addTask({ title: newTaskTitle.value }); newTaskTitle.value = ""; }); // Handle Delete Tasks document.getElementById("btnDeleteTasks").addEventListener("click", function (evt) { tasksListView.winControl.selection.getItems().then(function(items) { items.forEach(function (item) { TaskList.deleteTask(item); }); }); }); }); } }; app.start(); })(); Finally, here is the tasks.js file. This file contains all of the code for opening, creating, and interacting with IndexedDB: (function () { "use strict"; // Create the data source var tasks = new WinJS.Binding.List(); // Open the database var db; var req = window.msIndexedDB.open("TasksDB", 1); req.onerror = function () { console.log("Could not open database"); }; req.onupgradeneeded = function (evt) { var newDB = evt.target.result; newDB.createObjectStore("tasks", { keyPath: "id", autoIncrement:true }); }; // Load the data source with data from the database req.onsuccess = function () { db = req.result; var tran = db.transaction("tasks"); tran.objectStore("tasks").openCursor().onsuccess = function(event) { var cursor = event.target.result; tasks.dataSource.beginEdits(); if (cursor) { tasks.dataSource.insertAtEnd(null, cursor.value); cursor.continue(); } else { tasks.dataSource.endEdits(); }; }; }; // Add a new task function addTask(taskToAdd) { var transaction = db.transaction("tasks", IDBTransaction.READ_WRITE); var addRequest = transaction.objectStore("tasks").add(taskToAdd); addRequest.onsuccess = function (evt) { taskToAdd.id = evt.target.result; tasks.dataSource.insertAtEnd(null, taskToAdd); } } // Delete an existing task function deleteTask(listViewItem) { // Database key != ListView key var dbKey = listViewItem.data.id; var listViewKey = listViewItem.key; // Remove item from db and, if success, remove item from ListView var transaction = db.transaction("tasks", IDBTransaction.READ_WRITE); var deleteRequest = transaction.objectStore("tasks").delete(dbKey); deleteRequest.onsuccess = function () { tasks.dataSource.remove(listViewKey); } } // Expose the data source and functions WinJS.Namespace.define("TaskList", { tasks: tasks, addTask: addTask, deleteTask: deleteTask }); })(); Summary I wrote this blog entry because I wanted to create a walkthrough of building a simple database-driven application. In particular, I wanted to demonstrate how you can use a ListView control with an IndexedDB database to store and retrieve database data.

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  • error LNK2005: xxx already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\something\LIBCMT.lib(setlocal.obj)

    - by volpack
    Hello, I'm using DCMTK library for reading Dicom files (Image format used in medical image processing.) I'm having a problem in compiling this DCMTK source code. DCMTK uses some additional external libraries (zlib, tiff, libpng, libxml2, libiconv). I know that all libraries should be generated with same Code Generation Options. I've downloaded the compiled versions of these support libraries which are compiled with "Multithreaded DLL" runtime options (/MD). In each project of DCMTK source code I ensured that runtime options are "Multithreaded DLL" (/MD). But still I'm getting these errors: Error 238 error LNK2005: ___iob_func already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 239 error LNK2005: __lock_file already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 240 error LNK2005: __unlock_file already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 241 error LNK2005: __initterm_e already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 242 error LNK2005: _exit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 243 error LNK2005: __exit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 244 error LNK2005: __cexit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 245 error LNK2005: __amsg_exit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 246 error LNK2005: _fflush already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(fflush.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 247 error LNK2005: __errno already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(dosmap.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 248 error LNK2005: __invoke_watson already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(invarg.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 249 error LNK2005: "void __cdecl terminate(void)" ([email protected]@YAXXZ) already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(hooks.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 250 error LNK2005: ___xi_a already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 251 error LNK2005: ___xi_z already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 252 error LNK2005: ___xc_a already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 253 error LNK2005: ___xc_z already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 254 error LNK2005: __unlock already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(mlock.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 255 error LNK2005: __lock already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(mlock.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 256 error LNK2005: __XcptFilter already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(winxfltr.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 257 error LNK2005: _mainCRTStartup already defined in MSVCRT.lib(crtexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 258 error LNK2005: ___set_app_type already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(errmode.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 259 error LNK2005: __configthreadlocale already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(setlocal.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 260 error LNK2005: _getenv already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(getenv.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 261 error LNK2005: __isctype already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(isctype.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 262 error LNK2005: __strnicmp already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(strnicmp.obj) dcmp2pgm Error 263 error LNK2005: __close already defined in LIBCMT.lib(close.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmp2pgm Error 264 error LNK2005: __fileno already defined in LIBCMT.lib(fileno.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmp2pgm Error 265 error LNK2005: _calloc already defined in LIBCMT.lib(calloc.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmp2pgm Error 266 error LNK2005: _atol already defined in LIBCMT.lib(atox.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmp2pgm Error 267 error LNK2005: _strcspn already defined in LIBCMT.lib(strcspn.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmp2pgm Error 268 error LNK2005: __stricmp already defined in LIBCMT.lib(stricmp.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmp2pgm Error 269 error LNK2005: _atoi already defined in LIBCMT.lib(atox.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmp2pgm Error 270 error LNK2005: __lseek already defined in LIBCMT.lib(lseek.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmp2pgm Error 271 error LNK2005: __read already defined in LIBCMT.lib(read.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmp2pgm Error 272 error LNK2005: __write already defined in LIBCMT.lib(write.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmp2pgm Error 273 error LNK2005: __open already defined in LIBCMT.lib(open.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmp2pgm Error 274 error LNK2005: __get_osfhandle already defined in LIBCMT.lib(osfinfo.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmp2pgm Error 278 error LNK1169: one or more multiply defined symbols found C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\Release\dcmp2pgm.exe 1 1 dcmp2pgm Error 201 error LNK2005: ___iob_func already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dcmprscp Error 202 error LNK2005: __lock_file already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dcmprscp Error 203 error LNK2005: __unlock_file already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dcmprscp Error 204 error LNK2005: __initterm_e already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmprscp Error 205 error LNK2005: _exit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmprscp Error 206 error LNK2005: __exit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmprscp Error 207 error LNK2005: __cexit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmprscp Error 208 error LNK2005: __amsg_exit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmprscp Error 209 error LNK2005: _fflush already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(fflush.obj) dcmprscp Error 210 error LNK2005: __errno already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(dosmap.obj) dcmprscp Error 211 error LNK2005: __invoke_watson already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(invarg.obj) dcmprscp Error 212 error LNK2005: "void __cdecl terminate(void)" ([email protected]@YAXXZ) already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(hooks.obj) dcmprscp Error 213 error LNK2005: ___xi_a already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dcmprscp Error 214 error LNK2005: ___xi_z already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dcmprscp Error 215 error LNK2005: ___xc_a already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dcmprscp Error 216 error LNK2005: ___xc_z already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dcmprscp Error 217 error LNK2005: __unlock already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(mlock.obj) dcmprscp Error 218 error LNK2005: __lock already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(mlock.obj) dcmprscp Error 219 error LNK2005: __XcptFilter already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(winxfltr.obj) dcmprscp Error 220 error LNK2005: __stricmp already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(stricmp.obj) dcmprscp Error 221 error LNK2005: _mainCRTStartup already defined in MSVCRT.lib(crtexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0.obj) dcmprscp Error 222 error LNK2005: ___set_app_type already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(errmode.obj) dcmprscp Error 223 error LNK2005: __configthreadlocale already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(setlocal.obj) dcmprscp Error 224 error LNK2005: _getenv already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(getenv.obj) dcmprscp Error 225 error LNK2005: __isctype already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(isctype.obj) dcmprscp Error 226 error LNK2005: __strnicmp already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(strnicmp.obj) dcmprscp Error 227 error LNK2005: __close already defined in LIBCMT.lib(close.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscp Error 228 error LNK2005: __fileno already defined in LIBCMT.lib(fileno.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscp Error 229 error LNK2005: __lseek already defined in LIBCMT.lib(lseek.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscp Error 230 error LNK2005: __read already defined in LIBCMT.lib(read.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscp Error 231 error LNK2005: __write already defined in LIBCMT.lib(write.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscp Error 232 error LNK2005: __open already defined in LIBCMT.lib(open.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscp Error 233 error LNK2005: __get_osfhandle already defined in LIBCMT.lib(osfinfo.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscp Error 237 error LNK1169: one or more multiply defined symbols found C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\Release\dcmprscp.exe 1 1 dcmprscp Error 160 error LNK2005: ___iob_func already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dcmprscu Error 161 error LNK2005: __lock_file already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dcmprscu Error 162 error LNK2005: __unlock_file already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dcmprscu Error 163 error LNK2005: __initterm_e already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmprscu Error 164 error LNK2005: _exit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmprscu Error 165 error LNK2005: __exit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmprscu Error 166 error LNK2005: __cexit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmprscu Error 167 error LNK2005: __amsg_exit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmprscu Error 168 error LNK2005: _fflush already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(fflush.obj) dcmprscu Error 169 error LNK2005: __errno already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(dosmap.obj) dcmprscu Error 170 error LNK2005: __invoke_watson already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(invarg.obj) dcmprscu Error 171 error LNK2005: "void __cdecl terminate(void)" ([email protected]@YAXXZ) already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(hooks.obj) dcmprscu Error 172 error LNK2005: ___xi_a already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dcmprscu Error 173 error LNK2005: ___xi_z already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dcmprscu Error 174 error LNK2005: ___xc_a already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dcmprscu Error 175 error LNK2005: ___xc_z already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dcmprscu Error 176 error LNK2005: __unlock already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(mlock.obj) dcmprscu Error 177 error LNK2005: __lock already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(mlock.obj) dcmprscu Error 178 error LNK2005: __XcptFilter already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(winxfltr.obj) dcmprscu Error 179 error LNK2005: _mainCRTStartup already defined in MSVCRT.lib(crtexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0.obj) dcmprscu Error 180 error LNK2005: ___set_app_type already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(errmode.obj) dcmprscu Error 181 error LNK2005: __configthreadlocale already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(setlocal.obj) dcmprscu Error 182 error LNK2005: _getenv already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(getenv.obj) dcmprscu Error 183 error LNK2005: __isctype already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(isctype.obj) dcmprscu Error 184 error LNK2005: __strnicmp already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(strnicmp.obj) dcmprscu Error 185 error LNK2005: __close already defined in LIBCMT.lib(close.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscu Error 186 error LNK2005: __fileno already defined in LIBCMT.lib(fileno.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscu Error 187 error LNK2005: _calloc already defined in LIBCMT.lib(calloc.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscu Error 188 error LNK2005: _atol already defined in LIBCMT.lib(atox.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscu Error 189 error LNK2005: _strcspn already defined in LIBCMT.lib(strcspn.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscu Error 190 error LNK2005: __stricmp already defined in LIBCMT.lib(stricmp.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscu Error 191 error LNK2005: _atoi already defined in LIBCMT.lib(atox.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscu Error 192 error LNK2005: __lseek already defined in LIBCMT.lib(lseek.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscu Error 193 error LNK2005: __read already defined in LIBCMT.lib(read.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscu Error 194 error LNK2005: __write already defined in LIBCMT.lib(write.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscu Error 195 error LNK2005: __open already defined in LIBCMT.lib(open.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscu Error 196 error LNK2005: __get_osfhandle already defined in LIBCMT.lib(osfinfo.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmprscu Error 200 error LNK1169: one or more multiply defined symbols found C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\Release\dcmprscu.exe dcmprscu Error 119 error LNK2005: ___iob_func already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dcmpsprt Error 120 error LNK2005: __lock_file already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dcmpsprt Error 121 error LNK2005: __unlock_file already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dcmpsprt Error 122 error LNK2005: __initterm_e already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmpsprt Error 123 error LNK2005: _exit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmpsprt Error 124 error LNK2005: __exit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmpsprt Error 125 error LNK2005: __cexit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmpsprt Error 126 error LNK2005: __amsg_exit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dcmpsprt Error 127 error LNK2005: _fflush already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(fflush.obj) dcmpsprt Error 128 error LNK2005: __errno already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(dosmap.obj) dcmpsprt Error 129 error LNK2005: __invoke_watson already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(invarg.obj) dcmpsprt Error 130 error LNK2005: "void __cdecl terminate(void)" ([email protected]@YAXXZ) already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(hooks.obj) dcmpsprt Error 131 error LNK2005: ___xi_a already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dcmpsprt Error 132 error LNK2005: ___xi_z already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dcmpsprt Error 133 error LNK2005: ___xc_a already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dcmpsprt Error 134 error LNK2005: ___xc_z already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dcmpsprt Error 135 error LNK2005: __unlock already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(mlock.obj) dcmpsprt Error 136 error LNK2005: __lock already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(mlock.obj) dcmpsprt Error 137 error LNK2005: __XcptFilter already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(winxfltr.obj) dcmpsprt Error 138 error LNK2005: _mainCRTStartup already defined in MSVCRT.lib(crtexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0.obj) dcmpsprt Error 139 error LNK2005: ___set_app_type already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(errmode.obj) dcmpsprt Error 140 error LNK2005: __configthreadlocale already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(setlocal.obj) dcmpsprt Error 141 error LNK2005: _getenv already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(getenv.obj) dcmpsprt Error 142 error LNK2005: __isctype already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(isctype.obj) dcmpsprt Error 143 error LNK2005: __strnicmp already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\LIBCMT.lib(strnicmp.obj) dcmpsprt Error 144 error LNK2005: __close already defined in LIBCMT.lib(close.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmpsprt Error 145 error LNK2005: __fileno already defined in LIBCMT.lib(fileno.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmpsprt Error 146 error LNK2005: _calloc already defined in LIBCMT.lib(calloc.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmpsprt Error 147 error LNK2005: _atol already defined in LIBCMT.lib(atox.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmpsprt Error 148 error LNK2005: _strcspn already defined in LIBCMT.lib(strcspn.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmpsprt Error 149 error LNK2005: __stricmp already defined in LIBCMT.lib(stricmp.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmpsprt Error 150 error LNK2005: _atoi already defined in LIBCMT.lib(atox.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmpsprt Error 151 error LNK2005: __lseek already defined in LIBCMT.lib(lseek.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmpsprt Error 152 error LNK2005: __read already defined in LIBCMT.lib(read.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmpsprt Error 153 error LNK2005: __write already defined in LIBCMT.lib(write.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmpsprt Error 154 error LNK2005: __open already defined in LIBCMT.lib(open.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmpsprt Error 155 error LNK2005: __get_osfhandle already defined in LIBCMT.lib(osfinfo.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dcmpsprt Error 159 error LNK1169: one or more multiply defined symbols found C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmpstat\apps\Release\dcmpsprt.exe 1 1 dcmpsprt Error 61 error LNK2005: ___iob_func already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dsr2html Error 62 error LNK2005: __lock_file already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dsr2html Error 63 error LNK2005: __unlock_file already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dsr2html Error 64 error LNK2005: __initterm_e already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dsr2html Error 65 error LNK2005: _exit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dsr2html Error 66 error LNK2005: __exit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dsr2html Error 67 error LNK2005: __cexit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dsr2html Error 68 error LNK2005: __amsg_exit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dsr2html Error 69 error LNK2005: _fflush already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(fflush.obj) dsr2html Error 70 error LNK2005: __errno already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(dosmap.obj) dsr2html Error 71 error LNK2005: __invoke_watson already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(invarg.obj) dsr2html Error 72 error LNK2005: "void __cdecl terminate(void)" ([email protected]@YAXXZ) already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(hooks.obj) dsr2html Error 73 error LNK2005: ___xi_a already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dsr2html Error 74 error LNK2005: ___xi_z already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dsr2html Error 75 error LNK2005: ___xc_a already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dsr2html Error 76 error LNK2005: ___xc_z already defined in MSVCRT.lib(cinitexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0init.obj) dsr2html Error 77 error LNK2005: __unlock already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(mlock.obj) dsr2html Error 78 error LNK2005: __lock already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(mlock.obj) dsr2html Error 79 error LNK2005: __XcptFilter already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(winxfltr.obj) dsr2html Error 80 error LNK2005: _mainCRTStartup already defined in MSVCRT.lib(crtexe.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0.obj) dsr2html Error 81 error LNK2005: ___set_app_type already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(errmode.obj) dsr2html Error 82 error LNK2005: __configthreadlocale already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(setlocal.obj) dsr2html Error 83 error LNK2005: _getenv already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(getenv.obj) dsr2html Error 84 error LNK2005: __isctype already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(isctype.obj) dsr2html Error 85 error LNK2005: __close already defined in LIBCMT.lib(close.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dsr2html Error 86 error LNK2005: __fileno already defined in LIBCMT.lib(fileno.obj) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) dsr2html Error 90 error LNK1169: one or more multiply defined symbols found C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\Release\dsr2html.exe 1 1 dsr2html Error 31 error LNK2005: ___iob_func already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dsr2xml Error 32 error LNK2005: __lock_file already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dsr2xml Error 33 error LNK2005: __unlock_file already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(_file.obj) dsr2xml Error 34 error LNK2005: __initterm_e already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCMT.lib(crt0dat.obj) dsr2xml Error 35 error LNK2005: _exit already defined in MSVCRT.lib(MSVCR100.dll) C:\dcmtk-3.5.4-src\CMakeBinaries\dcmsr\apps\LIBCM

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  • Is there a python openid apps-discovery library to get appengine apps onto the apps marketplace

    - by molicule
    I'm looking for info on howto get a google appengine app onto the newly announced google apps marketplace. The page at http://code.google.com/googleapps/marketplace/sso.html does not have a python openid apps-discovery library which seems to be the stumbling block. Has anyone ported an appengine app to the marketplace? or know of the existence of a python openid apps-discovery library? or have a timeline on this? updated: please see comment re: standard python openid library vs library that supports "apps-discovery" updated: apparently it is not currently possible, however it will be soon see http://www.google.com/support/forum/p/apps-apis/thread?tid=52e36f012c2436c3&hl=en

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  • Metro: Namespaces and Modules

    - by Stephen.Walther
    The goal of this blog entry is to describe how you can use the Windows JavaScript (WinJS) library to create namespaces. In particular, you learn how to use the WinJS.Namespace.define() and WinJS.Namespace.defineWithParent() methods. You also learn how to hide private methods by using the module pattern. Why Do We Need Namespaces? Before we do anything else, we should start by answering the question: Why do we need namespaces? What function do they serve? Do they just add needless complexity to our Metro applications? After all, plenty of JavaScript libraries do just fine without introducing support for namespaces. For example, jQuery has no support for namespaces and jQuery is the most popular JavaScript library in the universe. If jQuery can do without namespaces, why do we need to worry about namespaces at all? Namespaces perform two functions in a programming language. First, namespaces prevent naming collisions. In other words, namespaces enable you to create more than one object with the same name without conflict. For example, imagine that two companies – company A and company B – both want to make a JavaScript shopping cart control and both companies want to name the control ShoppingCart. By creating a CompanyA namespace and CompanyB namespace, both companies can create a ShoppingCart control: a CompanyA.ShoppingCart and a CompanyB.ShoppingCart control. The second function of a namespace is organization. Namespaces are used to group related functionality even when the functionality is defined in different physical files. For example, I know that all of the methods in the WinJS library related to working with classes can be found in the WinJS.Class namespace. Namespaces make it easier to understand the functionality available in a library. If you are building a simple JavaScript application then you won’t have much reason to care about namespaces. If you need to use multiple libraries written by different people then namespaces become very important. Using WinJS.Namespace.define() In the WinJS library, the most basic method of creating a namespace is to use the WinJS.Namespace.define() method. This method enables you to declare a namespace (of arbitrary depth). The WinJS.Namespace.define() method has the following parameters: · name – A string representing the name of the new namespace. You can add nested namespace by using dot notation · members – An optional collection of objects to add to the new namespace For example, the following code sample declares two new namespaces named CompanyA and CompanyB.Controls. Both namespaces contain a ShoppingCart object which has a checkout() method: // Create CompanyA namespace with ShoppingCart WinJS.Namespace.define("CompanyA"); CompanyA.ShoppingCart = { checkout: function (){ return "Checking out from A"; } }; // Create CompanyB.Controls namespace with ShoppingCart WinJS.Namespace.define( "CompanyB.Controls", { ShoppingCart: { checkout: function(){ return "Checking out from B"; } } } ); // Call CompanyA ShoppingCart checkout method console.log(CompanyA.ShoppingCart.checkout()); // Writes "Checking out from A" // Call CompanyB.Controls checkout method console.log(CompanyB.Controls.ShoppingCart.checkout()); // Writes "Checking out from B" In the code above, the CompanyA namespace is created by calling WinJS.Namespace.define(“CompanyA”). Next, the ShoppingCart is added to this namespace. The namespace is defined and an object is added to the namespace in separate lines of code. A different approach is taken in the case of the CompanyB.Controls namespace. The namespace is created and the ShoppingCart object is added to the namespace with the following single line of code: WinJS.Namespace.define( "CompanyB.Controls", { ShoppingCart: { checkout: function(){ return "Checking out from B"; } } } ); Notice that CompanyB.Controls is a nested namespace. The top level namespace CompanyB contains the namespace Controls. You can declare a nested namespace using dot notation and the WinJS library handles the details of creating one namespace within the other. After the namespaces have been defined, you can use either of the two shopping cart controls. You call CompanyA.ShoppingCart.checkout() or you can call CompanyB.Controls.ShoppingCart.checkout(). Using WinJS.Namespace.defineWithParent() The WinJS.Namespace.defineWithParent() method is similar to the WinJS.Namespace.define() method. Both methods enable you to define a new namespace. The difference is that the defineWithParent() method enables you to add a new namespace to an existing namespace. The WinJS.Namespace.defineWithParent() method has the following parameters: · parentNamespace – An object which represents a parent namespace · name – A string representing the new namespace to add to the parent namespace · members – An optional collection of objects to add to the new namespace The following code sample demonstrates how you can create a root namespace named CompanyA and add a Controls child namespace to the CompanyA parent namespace: WinJS.Namespace.define("CompanyA"); WinJS.Namespace.defineWithParent(CompanyA, "Controls", { ShoppingCart: { checkout: function () { return "Checking out"; } } } ); console.log(CompanyA.Controls.ShoppingCart.checkout()); // Writes "Checking out" One significant advantage of using the defineWithParent() method over the define() method is the defineWithParent() method is strongly-typed. In other words, you use an object to represent the base namespace instead of a string. If you misspell the name of the object (CompnyA) then you get a runtime error. Using the Module Pattern When you are building a JavaScript library, you want to be able to create both public and private methods. Some methods, the public methods, are intended to be used by consumers of your JavaScript library. The public methods act as your library’s public API. Other methods, the private methods, are not intended for public consumption. Instead, these methods are internal methods required to get the library to function. You don’t want people calling these internal methods because you might need to change them in the future. JavaScript does not support access modifiers. You can’t mark an object or method as public or private. Anyone gets to call any method and anyone gets to interact with any object. The only mechanism for encapsulating (hiding) methods and objects in JavaScript is to take advantage of functions. In JavaScript, a function determines variable scope. A JavaScript variable either has global scope – it is available everywhere – or it has function scope – it is available only within a function. If you want to hide an object or method then you need to place it within a function. For example, the following code contains a function named doSomething() which contains a nested function named doSomethingElse(): function doSomething() { console.log("doSomething"); function doSomethingElse() { console.log("doSomethingElse"); } } doSomething(); // Writes "doSomething" doSomethingElse(); // Throws ReferenceError You can call doSomethingElse() only within the doSomething() function. The doSomethingElse() function is encapsulated in the doSomething() function. The WinJS library takes advantage of function encapsulation to hide all of its internal methods. All of the WinJS methods are defined within self-executing anonymous functions. Everything is hidden by default. Public methods are exposed by explicitly adding the public methods to namespaces defined in the global scope. Imagine, for example, that I want a small library of utility methods. I want to create a method for calculating sales tax and a method for calculating the expected ship date of a product. The following library encapsulates the implementation of my library in a self-executing anonymous function: (function (global) { // Public method which calculates tax function calculateTax(price) { return calculateFederalTax(price) + calculateStateTax(price); } // Private method for calculating state tax function calculateStateTax(price) { return price * 0.08; } // Private method for calculating federal tax function calculateFederalTax(price) { return price * 0.02; } // Public method which returns the expected ship date function calculateShipDate(currentDate) { currentDate.setDate(currentDate.getDate() + 4); return currentDate; } // Export public methods WinJS.Namespace.define("CompanyA.Utilities", { calculateTax: calculateTax, calculateShipDate: calculateShipDate } ); })(this); // Show expected ship date var shipDate = CompanyA.Utilities.calculateShipDate(new Date()); console.log(shipDate); // Show price + tax var price = 12.33; var tax = CompanyA.Utilities.calculateTax(price); console.log(price + tax); In the code above, the self-executing anonymous function contains four functions: calculateTax(), calculateStateTax(), calculateFederalTax(), and calculateShipDate(). The following statement is used to expose only the calcuateTax() and the calculateShipDate() functions: // Export public methods WinJS.Namespace.define("CompanyA.Utilities", { calculateTax: calculateTax, calculateShipDate: calculateShipDate } ); Because the calculateTax() and calcuateShipDate() functions are added to the CompanyA.Utilities namespace, you can call these two methods outside of the self-executing function. These are the public methods of your library which form the public API. The calculateStateTax() and calculateFederalTax() methods, on the other hand, are forever hidden within the black hole of the self-executing function. These methods are encapsulated and can never be called outside of scope of the self-executing function. These are the internal methods of your library. Summary The goal of this blog entry was to describe why and how you use namespaces with the WinJS library. You learned how to define namespaces using both the WinJS.Namespace.define() and WinJS.Namespace.defineWithParent() methods. We also discussed how to hide private members and expose public members using the module pattern.

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