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  • Anyone using a CMS with a DAM back-end for Asset Management?

    - by Valien
    Anyone here have any experience with using a CMS system for content and populating the site with images/assets from a DAM system? Working with a large number of assets (photos, logos, files, etc) that will be stored on a DAM system for management, revisions, etc. Would like to build a front-end system to help serve up the assets for the users as well as keep the general site updated with non-asset information (like what's new, faq's, etc.) Any ideas/thoughts on this from anyone who has been down this path? Thanks! ~Allen

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  • Book Reviews: Art of Community and Eyetracking Web Usability

    - by ultan o'broin
    Holidays time offers a chance to catch up on some user experience and user assistance related material. So, two short book reviews (which I considered using my new Tumblr blog for. More about that another time) coming up. The Art of Community by Jono Bacon Excellent starting point for anyone wanting to get going in the community software (FLOSS, for example) space or understand how to set up, manage, and leverage the collective intelligence of communities for whatever ends. The book is a little too long in my opinion, and of course, usage of what Jono is recommending needs to be nuanced and adapted for enterprise applications space (hardly surprising there is a lot about Ubuntu, Lug Radio, and so on given Jono's interests). Shame there wasn't more information on international, non-English community considerations too. Still, some great ideas and insight into setting up and managing communities that I will leverage (watch out for the results on this blog, later in 2011). One section, on collaborative writing really jumped out. It reinforced the whole idea that to successful community initiatives are based on instigators knowing what makes the community tick in the first place. How about this for insight into user profiles for people who write community user assistance (OK then, "doc") and what tools they might use (in this case, we're talking about Jokosher): "Most people who write documentation for open source software projects would fall into the category of power user. They are technology enthusiasts who are not interested in the super-technical avenues of programming, but want to help out. Many of these people have good writing skills and a good knowledge of using the software, so the documentation fit is natural. With Jokosher we wanted to acknowledge this profile of user. As such, instead of focussing on complex text processing tools, we encouraged our documentation contributors to use a wiki." The book is available for free here, and well as being available from usual sources. Eyetracking Web Usability by Jakob Nielsen and Kara Prentice Another fine book by established experts. I have some field experience of eyetracking studies myself --in the user assistance for enterprise applications space--though Jakob and Kara concentrate on websites for their research here. I would caution how much about websites transfers easily to the applications space, especially enterprise applications, as claimed in the book too. However, Jakob and Kara do make the case very well that understanding design goals (for example, productivity improvement in the case of applications) and the context of the software use is critical. Executing a study using eyetracking technology requires that you know what you want to test, can set up realistic tasks for testing by representative testers, and then analyze the results. Be precise, as lots of data will be generated (I think the authors underplay the effort in analyzing data too). What I found disappointing was the lack of emphasis on eyetracking as only part of the usability solution. It's really for fine-tuning designs in my opinion, and should be used after other design reviews. I also wasn't that crazy about the level of disengagement between the qualitative and quantitative side of this kind of testing that the book indicated. I think it is useful to have testers verbalize their thoughts and for test engineers to prompt, intervene, or guide as necessary. More on cultural or international aspects to usability testing might have been included too (websites are available to everyone). To conclude, I enjoyed the book, took on board some key takeaways about methodologies and found the recommendations sensible and easy to follow (for example about Forms layouts). Applying enterprise applications requirements such as those relating to user profiles, design goals, and overall context of use in conjunction with what's in this book would be the way to go here. It also made me think of how interesting it would be to compare eyetracking findings between website and enterprise applications usage.

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  • UCM 11g is 4 days old!

    - by kyle.hatlestad
    Ok...so I missed posting a blog entry when UCM 11g and the entire ECM suite released on Tuesday. Hopefully you've already seen the announcements on any number of the Oracle ECM blogs out there such as ECM Alerts, Fusion ECM, bex huff, or C4. So I won't bore you with the same talking points like 179 million check-ins per day or 124 web site page hits per second. Instead, I thought I'd show some screenshots of the new features in UCM and URM 11g. WebLogic Server and Enterprise Manager So probably the biggest change in 11g is UCM and URM now run on top of the WebLogic Server application server. This is a huge step as ECM is now on a standard platform with the rest of Oracle Fusion Middleware which makes installation, configuration, and integration consistent among all the products. From a feature perspective, it's also beneficial because it's now integrated with Oracle Enterprise Manager. Enterprise Manager provides a lot of provisioning control over servers as well as performance monitoring and access to logs and debugging information. Desktop Integration Suite Desktop Integration Suite got a complete overhaul for 11g. It exposes a lot more features within Windows Explorer such as saved searches, workflow queue, and checked-out items. It also now support metadata pop-up screens to let users fill in additional metadata when they drag-n-drop files in! And the integration within Office applications has changed significantly by introducing a dedicated UCM menu to do open, save, compare, etc. Site Studio for External Applications In UCM Site Studio 10gR4, a major architectural shift was introduced which brought several new objects such as elements, region definitions, region templates, and placeholder definitions. This truly separated the content from the display and from the definition. It also allowed separation of the content from needing to be rendered on a complete Site Studio page. Well, the new Site Studio for External Applications takes advantage of that architecture and introduces pre-built tags and plug-ins to JDeveloper to allow to go from simply adding a content area to your web application page to building an entire web site, just like you would have done in Site Studio Designer. In addition to these changes, enhancements to the core Site Studio have been added as well. One of the big ones is called Designer Mode which allows power-users to bypass the standard rules defined by the placeholder definition or template and perform any number of additional actions. This reduces the need to go back to Site Studio Designer or JDeveloper to make more advanced changes to the site. Dashboards As part of the updated records management functionality in both UCM and URM, users can now set a dashboard view on their home page to surface common functions in a single view. It has pre-built "portlets" users can choose from to display and organize they way they want. Behind the scenes, these dashboards are stored as Content Folios. So the dashboards themselves are content items that can be revisioned and shared between users. And new dashboard portlets can be easily added (like the User Profile one in the screenshots) by getting a copy of an existing one, modifying the display, and then checking it in as a new one to select from. URM Interface Enhancements URM includes several new UI and usability enhancements in 11g. There is a new view for physical records, a place to configure "favorite" items to quickly get to, and new placement of the records management menu. BI Publisher Reports Records management in UCM and URM now offer reports generated through embedded BI Publisher. Templates are controlled by rich text files checked directly into the repository, so they can be easily modified. Other Features A new Inbound Refinery conversion option is available that does native Microsoft Office HTML conversion. If your IBR is on Windows and you have the native applications loaded, the IBR can use them to produce HTML. A new GUI template editor for Dynamic Converter is available. It's written in Java so is available through all the supported browsers and platforms. The original ActiveX based editor is also still available. The Component Manager interface has changed to help provide an easier and more descriptive way to enable core components that are installed along with UCM. All of the supported components are immediately available to turn on and do not have to be installed separately as in previous versions. My Downloads is located in the My Content Server menu and provides for easy download of client installs including Desktop Integration Suite and Site Studio Designer. Well, hopefully that gives you a taste for some of the new things in 11g. We're all pretty excited here at Oracle about all the new changes and enhancements. Over the next few months I hope to highlight some of these features more in-depth, so keep your eye out for those posts.

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  • New security options in UCM Patch Set 3

    - by kyle.hatlestad
    While the Patch Set 3 (PS3) release was mostly focused on bug fixes and such, some new features sneaked in there. One of those new features is to the security options. In 10gR3 and prior versions, UCM had a component called Collaboration Manager which allowed for project folders to be created and groups of users assigned as members to collaborate on documents. With this component came access control lists (ACL) for content and folders. Users could assign specific security rights on each and every document and folder within a project. And it was even possible to enable these ACL's without having the Collaboration Manager component enabled (see technote# 603148.1). When 11g came out, Collaboration Manager was no longer available. But the configuration settings to turn on ACLs were still there. Well, in PS3 they're implemented slightly differently. And there is a new component available which adds an additional dimension to define security on the object, Roles. So now instead of selecting individual users or groups of users (defined as an Alias in User Admin), you can select a particular role. And if a user has that role, they are granted that level of access. This can allow for a much more flexible and manageable security model instead of trying to manage with just user and group access as people come and go in the organization. The way that it is enabled is still through configuration entries. First log in as an administrator and go to Administration -> Admin Server. On the Component Manager page, click the 'advanced component manager' link in the description paragraph at the top. In the list of Disabled Components, enable the RoleEntityACL component. Then click the General Configuration link on the left. In the Additional Configuration Variables text area, enter the new configuration values: UseEntitySecurity=true SpecialAuthGroups=<comma separated list of Security Groups to honor ACLs> The SpecialAuthGroups should be a list of Security Groups that honor the ACL fields. If an ACL is applied to a content item with a Security Group outside this list, it will be ignored. Save the settings and restart the instance. Upon restart, three new metadata fields will be created: xClbraUserList, xClbraAliasList, xClbraRoleList. If you are using OracleTextSearch as the search indexer, be sure to run a Fast Rebuild on the collection. On the Check In, Search, and Update pages, values are added by simply typing in the value and getting a type-ahead list of possible values. Select the value, click Add and then set the level of access (Read, Write, Delete, or Admin). If all of the fields are blank, then it simply falls back to just Security Group and Account access. For Users and Groups, these values are automatically picked up from the corresponding database tables. In the case of Roles, this is an explicitly defined list of choices that are made available. These values must match the role that is being defined from WebLogic Server or you LDAP/AD repository. To add these values, go to Administration -> Admin Applets -> Configuration Manager. On the Views tab, edit the values for the ExternalRolesView. By default, 'guest' and 'authenticated' are added. Once added to through the view, they will be available to select from for the Roles Access List. As for how they are stored in the metadata fields, each entry starts with it's identifier: ampersand (&) symbol for users, "at" (@) symbol for groups, and colon (:) for roles. Following that is the entity name. And at the end is the level of access in paranthesis. e.g. (RWDA). And each entry is separated by a comma. So if you were populating values through batch loader or an external source, the values would be defined this way. Detailed information on Access Control Lists can be found in the Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Content Server.

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  • Downloading specific video renditions in WebCenter Content

    - by Kyle Hatlestad
    I recently had a question come up on one of my previous blog articles about downloading a specific video rendition.  When accessing image renditions, you simply need to pass in the 'Rendition=<rendition name>' parameter on the GET_FILE service and it will be returned.  But when you try that with videos, you get the error message, "Unable to download '<Content ID>'. The rendition or attachment '<Rendition Name>' could not be found in the list manifest of the revision with internal revision ID '<dID>'. Through the interface, it exposes the ability to download, but utilizes the Content Basket to bundle one or more videos and download them as a zip.   I had never tried this with videos, but thought they had worked the same way.  Well, it turns out you need to pass in an extra parameter in the case of videos.  So if you pass in parameter of 'AuxRenditionType=media', that will allow the GET_FILE service to download the video (e.g. http://server/cs/idcplg?IdcService=GET_FILE&dID=11012&dDocName=WCCBASE9010812&allowInterrupt=1 &Rendition=QuickTime&AuxRenditionType=media).  And if you haven't seen the David After Dentist video, I'd highly recommend it! 

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  • Copy TFS Build Definitions between Projects and Collections

    - by Jakob Ehn
    Originally posted on: http://geekswithblogs.net/jakob/archive/2014/06/05/copy-tfs-build-definitions-between-projects-and-collections.aspxThe last couple of years it has become apparent that using multiple team projects in TFS is generally a bad idea. There are of course exceptions to this, but there are a lot ot things that becomes much easier to do when you put all of your projects and team in the same team project. Fellow ALM MVP Martin Hinshelwood has blogged about this several times, as well as other people in the community. In particular, using the backlog and portfolio management tools makes much more sense when everything is located in the same team project. Consolidating multiple team projects into one is not that easy unfortunately, it involves migrating source code, work items, reports etc.  Another thing that also need to be migrated is build definitions. It is possible to clone build definitions within the same team project using the TFS power tools. The Community TFS Build Manager also lets you clone build definitions to other team projects. But there is no tool that allows you to clone/copy a build definition to another collection. So, I whipped up a simple console application that let you do this. The tool can be downloaded from https://onedrive.live.com/redir?resid=EE034C9F620CD58D!8162&authkey=!ACTr56v1QVowzuE&ithint=file%2c.zip   Using CopyTFSBuildDefinitions You use the tool like this: CopyTFSBuildDefinitions  SourceCollectionUrl  SourceTeamProject  BuildDefinitionName  DestinationCollectionUrl  DestinationTeamProject [NewDefinitionName] Arguments SourceCollectionUrl The URL to the TFS collection that contains the team project with the build definition that you want to copy SourceTeamProject The name of the team project that contains the build definition BuildDefinitionName Name of the build definition DestinationCollectionUrl The URL to the TFS collection that contains the team project that you want to copy your build definition to DestinationTeamProject The name of the team project in the destination collection NewDefinitionName (Optional) Use this to override the name of the new build definition. If you don’t specify this, the name will the same as the original one Example: CopyTFSBuildDefinitions  https://jakob.visualstudio.com DemoProject  WebApplication.CI https://anotheraccount.visualstudio.com     Notes Since we are (potentially) create a build definition in a new collection, there is no guarantee that the various paths that are defined in the build definition exist in the new collection. For example, a build definition refers to server paths in TFVC or repos + branches in TFGit. It also refers to build controllers that definitely don’t exist in the new collection. So there will be some cleanup to do after you copy your build definitions. You can fix some of these using the Community TFS Build Manager, for example it is very easy to apply the correct build controller to a set of build definitions The problem stated above also applies to build process templates. However, the tool tries to find a build process template in the new team project with the same file name as the one that existed in the old team project. If it finds one, it will be used for the new build definition. Otherwise is will use the default build template If you want to run the tool for many build definitions, you can use this SQL scripts, compliments of Mr. Scrum/ALM MVP Richard Hundhausen to generate the necessary commands: USE Tfs_Collection GO SELECT 'CopyTFSBuildDefinitions.exe http://SERVER:8080/tfs/collection "' + P.ProjectName + '" "' + REPLACE(BD.DefinitionName,'\','') + '" http://NEWSERVER:8080/tfs/COLLECTION TEAMPROJECT'   FROM tbl_Project P        INNER JOIN tbl_BuildGroup BG on BG.TeamProject = P.ProjectUri        INNER JOIN tbl_BuildDefinition BD on BD.GroupId = BG.GroupId   ORDER BY P.ProjectName, BD.DefinitionName   Hope that helps, let me know if you have any problems with the tool or if you find it useful

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  • Awarded Visual Studio ALM MVP for 2012!

    - by Jakob Ehn
    Today I received an email from Microsoft stating that: Dear Jakob Ehn, Congratulations! We are pleased to present you with the 2012 Microsoft® MVP Award! This award is given to exceptional technical community leaders who actively share their high quality, real world expertise with others. We appreciate your outstanding contributions in Visual Studio ALM technical communities during the past year.   This is incredibles news and I really want to thank both the people at Microsoft who nominated me and some of the (now) fellow MVP’s that I have worked with over the last year, both as part of the Visual Studio ALM Rangers program and as part of the TFS Build Extensions community project, in particular Mike Fourie and of course my colleague and main source of inspiration Terje Sandström    I’m really looking forward to this year, it’s going to be a blast!

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  • VSDB to SSDT part 3 : command-line deployment with SqlPackage.exe, replacement for Vsdbcmd.exe

    - by Etienne Giust
    For our continuous integration needs, we use a powershell script to handle deployment. A simpler approach would be to have a deployment task embedded within the build process. See the solution provided here by Jakob Ehn (a most interesting read which also dives into the '”deploying from Visual Studio” specifics) : http://geekswithblogs.net/jakob/archive/2012/04/25/deploying-ssdt-projects-with-tfs-build.aspx   For our needs, though, clearly separating our build phase from our deployment phase is important. It allows us to instantly deploy old versions. Also it is more convenient for continuous integration. So we stick with the powershell script approach. With VSDB projects, that script used to call the following command (the vsdbcmd executable was locally available, along with needed libraries): vsdbcmd.exe /a:Deploy /dd /cs:<CONNECTIONSTRING TO TARGET DB> /dsp:SQL /manifest:< PATH TO .deploymanifest FILE>   To be able to do the approximately same thing with a SSDT produced file (dacpac), you would call this command on a machine which has VS2012 installed (or the SSDT installed, see here : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh500335%28v=vs.103%29):   C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SQL Server\110\DAC\bin\SqlPackage.exe /Action:Publish /SourceFile:<PATH TO Database.dacpac FILE> /Profile:<PATH TO .publish.xml FILE>   And from within a powershell script :   & "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SQL Server\110\DAC\bin\SqlPackage.exe" /Action:Publish /SourceFile:<PATH TO Database.dacpac FILE> /Profile:<PATH TO .publish.xml FILE>   The command will consume a publish.xml file where the connection string and the deployment options are specified. You must be familiar with it if you have done some deployments from visual studio. If not, please refer to the above mentioned article by Jakob Ehn.   It is also possible to pass those parameters in the command line. The complete SqlPackage.exe syntax is detailed here : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh550080%28v=vs.103%29.aspx

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  • Repository/Updating/Upgrading Issue

    - by Jakob
    The other day I was asked to upgrade from 13.04 to 13.10, at the time I was busy and hit no. I can not upgrade/update at this point, I get (error -11) or a 404 in terminal. In the software updater I get 'failed to download repository information.' I have tried changing my "Download From" setting to "Best" to "Main" and even a few other countries. And in "Other Software" I have tried disabling packages, but doesn't seem to help what so ever. I have tried several of the other commands to try and fix it, such as -fix missing or sudo apt-get update clean. P.S. This has also affected my thunderbird client, I cannot send/receive emails. Here is my error log when trying to upgrade: [email protected]:~$ sudo update-manager -d gpg: /tmp/tmpvejqvl/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: /tmp/tmpnayby6/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created Traceback (most recent call last): File "/usr/lib/python3/dist-packages/defer/__init__.py", line 483, in _inline_callbacks result = gen.throw(excep) File "/usr/lib/python3/dist-packages/UpdateManager/backend/InstallBackendAptdaemon.py", line 86, in commit True, close_on_done) File "/usr/lib/python3/dist-packages/defer/__init__.py", line 483, in _inline_callbacks result = gen.throw(excep) File "/usr/lib/python3/dist-packages/UpdateManager/backend/InstallBackendAptdaemon.py", line 158, in _run_in_dialog yield trans.run() aptdaemon.errors.TransactionFailed: Transaction failed: Package does not exist Package linux-headers-3.8.0-33 isn't available gpg: /tmp/tmp3kw_hl/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created. And let me throw in my sudo apt-get update too. Which this has been working variably too, but I don't know what to change my repositories to, and disabling does not effect: E: Some index files failed to download. They have been ignored, or old ones used instead. This is the short version, but looks exactly like this fairly consistently. Sometimes it downloads, sometimes it doesn't. Sometimes it tells me I have an update, and doesn't do anything. If it helps, I have recently had issues trying to install Samba as well, and connecting to the office's NAS Drive. Which works now, but I had to edit /etc/fstab/ and a few other things trying to get that to work as well. I understand it could also be a DNS problem, but this has been going on for a few days, as well as I've already tried changing my DNS server via my computer, however I am not allowed to alter the DNS on our company's router.

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  • Digital Asset Management, iPhoto / Aperture server... alternative

    - by Sisyphus
    Afternoon, Clients, 10 : All Apples running either Leopard or Snow Leopard Server : Snow Leopard server, (and I have a old Dell Poweredge 650 at home running Gentoo 2.6, if anybody as a Linux solution). The situation: I work in small design company with 8 people, at present we are looking to consolidate all our image files onto one location, at present we each use our preferred single user DAM solution, be it, Adobe Bridge, iPhoto/Aperture (some don't bother at all) The filetypes commonly used are .psd, .pdf, .eps, .tiff, .jpg and RAW image files. Ideally what is needed: Centralised on one server, but allows us to search via spotlight (not essential, but would be nice) Include searchable metadata information such as date, location, title Open-source or as low cost as possibly Allow simultaneous users to import files So far, I have looked at a few open source DAM, systems, such as Razuna, Gallery (not strictly DAM), ResourceSpace, Notre-DAM, while these are brilliant and open-source, they don't integrate as smoothly with the Desktop as iPhoto and aperture. For iPhoto and aperture, I have tried creating a Shared library on the server (a tad laggy), and also using a drive with no permissions, put a library and letting each client read from it, however if they want to put images onto the library only, it's only supports one user at a time writing to the library... Any ideas what could fulfill our needs? Or is it time to bite the bullet for FinalCut Server? Thanks in advance.

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  • Dependency Replication with TFS 2010 Build

    - by Jakob Ehn
    Some time ago, I wrote a post about how to implement dependency replication using TFS 2008 Build. We use this for Library builds, where we set up a build definition for a common library, and have the build check the resulting assemblies back into source control. The folder is then branched to the applications that need to reference the common library. See the above post for more details. Of course, we have reimplemented this feature in TFS 2010 Build, which results in a much nicer experience for the developer who wants to setup a new library build. Here is how it looks: There is a separate build process template for library builds registered in all team projects The following properties are used to configure the library build: Deploy Folder in Source Control is the server path where the assemblies should be checked in DeploymentFiles is a list of files and/or extensions to what files to check in. Default here is *.dll;*.pdb which means that all assemblies and debug symbols will be checked in. We can also type for example CommonLibrary.*;SomeOtherAssembly.dll in order to exclude other assemblies You can also see that we are versioning the assemblies as part of the build. This is important, since the resulting assemblies will be deployed together with the referencing application.   When the build executes, it will see of the matching assemblies exist in source control, if not, it will add the files automatically:   After the build has finished, we can see in the history of the TestDeploy folder that the build service account has in fact checked in a new version: Nice!   The implementation of the library build process template is not very complicated, it is a combination of customization of the build process template and some custom activities. We use the generic TFActivity (http://geekswithblogs.net/jakob/archive/2010/11/03/performing-checkins-in-tfs-2010-build.aspx) to check in and out files, but for the part that checks if a file exists and adds it to source control, it was easier to do this in a custom activity:   public sealed class AddFilesToSourceControl : BaseCodeActivity { // Files to add to source control [RequiredArgument] public InArgument<IEnumerable<string>> Files { get; set; } [RequiredArgument] public InArgument<Workspace> Workspace { get; set; } // If your activity returns a value, derive from CodeActivity<TResult> // and return the value from the Execute method. protected override void Execute(CodeActivityContext context) { foreach (var file in Files.Get(context)) { if (!File.Exists(file)) { throw new ApplicationException("Could not locate " + file); } var ws = this.Workspace.Get(context); string serverPath = ws.TryGetServerItemForLocalItem(file); if( !String.IsNullOrEmpty(serverPath)) { if (!ws.VersionControlServer.ServerItemExists(serverPath, ItemType.File)) { TrackMessage(context, "Adding file " + file); ws.PendAdd(file); } else { TrackMessage(context, "File " + file + " already exists in source control"); } } else { TrackMessage(context, "No server path for " + file); } } } } This build template is a very nice tool that makes it easy to do dependency replication with TFS 2010. Next, I will add funtionality for automatically merging the assemblies (using ILMerge) as part of the build, we do this to keep the number of references to a minimum.

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  • Improve performance of bind9 service restart

    - by Jakob
    Hi, I'm setting up a name server hosting DNS for a large number of domains, 50,000 - 100,000 domains. I will be using Bind9 and the service will need to be restarted several times a day. I have made some tests and it seems that restart of the Bind9 service scales very poorly with the number of domains. #domains | restart time ----------------------- 10,000 | 3.1 sec 25,000 | 8.9 sec 50,000 | 50 sec 100,000 | 7:50 min Is there some way to speedup the restart of the service? I have noticed that restart only utilizes one core, is there some way for it to use more cores? The Bind9 version is 9.7.1-P2 with default configuration. The server running Bind9 is a Intel Core 2 Due 2.93 GHz with 4 GB memory and Ubuntu Server 10.10. Any help will be appreciated. Jakob

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  • Calling matlab callback/function handle from Java

    - by jakob
    How do I pass a matlab function handle to a Java object and invoke it from within Java (that is, I want Java to tell matlab when it is ready with a calculation). I am trying to use the com.mathworks.jmi.Matlab class for evaluating Matlab expressions in the Java object, but I can't see how to 1) transfer the callback funcktion handle to Java, and 2) invoke it from Java possibly using the com.mathworks.jmi.Matlab class. Thanks, jakob

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  • Multiple Git repositories in one directory

    - by Jakob
    Hello, I would like to deploy a directory to multiple developers having different permissions. So this is one thing Git cannot do. What about creating two repositories in one directory and assigning them different file lists by excluding files managed by the other repository with the .gitignore file. Example: /www/project/.git for all files execpt in /www/project/css /www/project/css/.git - only files in this directory Has anyone tried this solution? Or are there any better ways to handle this issue? Regards, Jakob

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  • How to copy existing movie files on ipad to watch?

    - by Rob Van Dam
    I have an iPad and a desktop running Ubuntu 12.04 with lots of movie files of various formats (avi, mp4, m4v, etc). Is it possible to transfer those files from within linux directly to the iPad (without using iTunes to sync) over USB and then play those movies on the iPad without reformatting/resizing all of them? I've used iTunes in a Windows XP virtualbox instance with other iOS mobile devices before but I would prefer a pure linux approach if possible. (I'm creating this question so that I can share the solution I found because I failed to find a simple, satisfactory answer elsewhere).

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  • Is SSD TRIM support still automatic in 12.10?

    - by dam
    Folks I had automatic TRIM working on my laptop running Ubuntu Precise. As in the TRIM guide I added discard to mount options in /etc/fstab, and hdparm --read-sector read 0s immediately after a rm && sync. Using the very same hardware, laptop and SSD, TRIM seems no longer to be automatic after upgrading to Quantal. I recognise the test in the guide I mentioned above may not necessarily work. SSD erase blocks and all that. But Quantal is at least different. After deleting the file and syncing, its data are still on disk and unerased even after waiting several minutes. fstrim will then 0 the dead file's blocks. Once. Repeat the same test five minutes later, and fstrim does nothing. I figure this is probably really a kernel issue, but that box is too black for my spelunking torch. I'm prepared to believe that kernel 3.5 knows what I want better than I do, and all is well despite appearances, but it looks for all the world like TRIM isn't quite all there any more. Anybody have the scoop on TRIM in Quantal/kernel 3.5?

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  • Coerce Windows to show a thumbnail for my custom file type.

    - by Jakob Ryden
    Hi, I want to use the windows OpenFileDialog class in C# to browse files for my application. I would then like the files to show up with previews in Windows' "thumbnails" view. Is there a simple way to make this happen? I'm thinking there should be a way to encode the files so that Windows simply reads and displays the thumbnail information, even though it's an unsupported file type? I know Windows Vista has a different interface (IThumbnailProvider as opposed to IExtractImage) than Windows XP, but I need it to work across platforms. Thanks! / Jakob

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  • Python minidom and UTF-8 encoded XML with hash references

    - by Jakob Simon-Gaarde
    Hi I am experiencing some difficulty in my home project where I need to parse a SOAP request. The SOAP is generated with gSOAP and involves string parameters with special characters like the danish letters "æøå". gSOAP builds SOAP requests with UTF-8 encoding by default, but instead of sending the special chatacters in raw format (ie. bytes C3A6 for the special character "æ") it sends what I think is called character hash references (ie. &#195;&#166;). I don't completely understand why gSOAP does it this way as I can see that it has marked the incomming payload as being UTF-8 encoded anyway (Content-Type: text/xml; charset=utf-8), but this is besides the question (I think). Anyway I guess gSOAP probably is obeying transport rules, or what? When I parse the request from gSOAP in python with xml.dom.minidom.parseString() I get element values as unicode objects which is fine, but the character hash references are not decoded as UTF-8 character codes. It unescapes the character hash references, but does not decode the string afterwards. In the end I have a unicode string object with UTF-8 encoding: So if the string "æble" is contained in the XML, it comes like this in the request: "&#195;&#166;ble" After parsing the XML the unicode string in the DOM Text Node's data member looks like this: u'\xc3\xa6ble' I would expect it to look like this: u'\xe6ble' What am I doing wrong? Should I unescape the SOAP XML before parsing it, or is it somewhere else I should be looking for the solution, maybe gSOAP? Thanks in advance. Best regards Jakob Simon-Gaarde

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  • Creating a Build Definition using the TFS 2010 API

    - by Jakob Ehn
    In this post I will show how to create a new build definition in TFS 2010 using the TFS API. When creating a build definition manually, using Team Explorer, the necessary steps are lined out in the New Build Definition Wizard:     So, lets see how the code looks like, using the same order. To start off, we need to connect to TFS and get a reference to the IBuildServer object: TfsTeamProjectCollection server = newTfsTeamProjectCollection(newUri("http://<tfs>:<port>/tfs")); server.EnsureAuthenticated(); IBuildServer buildServer = (IBuildServer) server.GetService(typeof (IBuildServer)); General First we create a IBuildDefinition object for the team project and set a name and description for it: var buildDefinition = buildServer.CreateBuildDefinition(teamProject); buildDefinition.Name = "TestBuild"; buildDefinition.Description = "description here..."; Trigger Next up, we set the trigger type. For this one, we set it to individual which corresponds to the Continuous Integration - Build each check-in trigger option buildDefinition.ContinuousIntegrationType = ContinuousIntegrationType.Individual; Workspace For the workspace mappings, we create two mappings here, where one is a cloak. Note the user of $(SourceDir) variable, which is expanded by Team Build into the sources directory when running the build. buildDefinition.Workspace.AddMapping("$/Path/project.sln", "$(SourceDir)", WorkspaceMappingType.Map); buildDefinition.Workspace.AddMapping("$/OtherPath/", "", WorkspaceMappingType.Cloak); Build Defaults In the build defaults, we set the build controller and the drop location. To get a build controller, we can (for example) use the GetBuildController method to get an existing build controller by name: buildDefinition.BuildController = buildServer.GetBuildController(buildController); buildDefinition.DefaultDropLocation = @\\SERVER\Drop\TestBuild; Process So far, this wasy easy. Now we get to the tricky part. TFS 2010 Build is based on Windows Workflow 4.0. The build process is defined in a separate .XAML file called a Build Process Template. By default, every new team team project containtwo build process templates called DefaultTemplate and UpgradeTemplate. In this sample, we want to create a build definition using the default template. We use te QueryProcessTemplates method to get a reference to the default for the current team project   //Get default template var defaultTemplate = buildServer.QueryProcessTemplates(teamProject).Where(p => p.TemplateType == ProcessTemplateType.Default).First(); buildDefinition.Process = defaultTemplate;   There are several build process templates that can be set for the default build process template. Only one of these are required, the ProjectsToBuild parameters which contains the solution(s) and configuration(s) that should be built. To set this info, we use the ProcessParameters property of thhe IBuildDefinition interface. The format of this property is actually just a serialized dictionary (IDictionary<string, object>) that maps a key (parameter name) to a value which can be any kind of object. This is rather messy, but fortunately, there is a helper class called WorkflowHelpers inthe Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Build.Workflow namespace, that simplifies working with this persistence format a bit. The following code shows how to set the BuildSettings information for a build definition: //Set process parameters varprocess = WorkflowHelpers.DeserializeProcessParameters(buildDefinition.ProcessParameters); //Set BuildSettings properties BuildSettings settings = newBuildSettings(); settings.ProjectsToBuild = newStringList("$/pathToProject/project.sln"); settings.PlatformConfigurations = newPlatformConfigurationList(); settings.PlatformConfigurations.Add(newPlatformConfiguration("Any CPU", "Debug")); process.Add("BuildSettings", settings); buildDefinition.ProcessParameters = WorkflowHelpers.SerializeProcessParameters(process); The other build process parameters of a build definition can be set using the same approach   Retention  Policy This one is easy, we just clear the default settings and set our own: buildDefinition.RetentionPolicyList.Clear(); buildDefinition.AddRetentionPolicy(BuildReason.Triggered, BuildStatus.Succeeded, 10, DeleteOptions.All); buildDefinition.AddRetentionPolicy(BuildReason.Triggered, BuildStatus.Failed, 10, DeleteOptions.All); buildDefinition.AddRetentionPolicy(BuildReason.Triggered, BuildStatus.Stopped, 1, DeleteOptions.All); buildDefinition.AddRetentionPolicy(BuildReason.Triggered, BuildStatus.PartiallySucceeded, 10, DeleteOptions.All); Save It! And we’re done, lets save the build definition: buildDefinition.Save(); That’s it!

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  • Executing legacy MSBuild scripts in TFS 2010 Build

    - by Jakob Ehn
    When upgrading from TFS 2008 to TFS 2010, all builds are “upgraded” in the sense that a build definition with the same name is created, and it uses the UpgradeTemplate  build process template to execute the build. This template basically just runs MSBuild on the existing TFSBuild.proj file. The build definition contains a property called ConfigurationFolderPath that points to the TFSBuild.proj file. So, existing builds will run just fine after upgrade. But what if you want to use the new workflow functionality in TFS 2010 Build, but still have a lot of MSBuild scripts that maybe call custom MSBuild tasks that you don’t have the time to rewrite? Then one option is to keep these MSBuild scrips and call them from a TFS 2010 Build workflow. This can be done using the MSBuild workflow activity that is avaiable in the toolbox in the Team Foundation Build Activities section: This activity wraps the call to MSBuild.exe and has the following parameters: Most of these properties are only relevant when actually compiling projects, for example C# project files. When calling custom MSBuild project files, you should focus on these properties: Property Meaning Example CommandLineArguments Use this to send in/override MSBuild properties in your project “/p:MyProperty=SomeValue” or MSBuildArguments (this will let you define the arguments in the build definition or when queuing the build) LogFile Name of the log file where MSbuild will log the output “MyBuild.log” LogFileDropLocation Location of the log file BuildDetail.DropLocation + “\log” Project The project to execute SourcesDirectory + “\BuildExtensions.targets” ResponseFile The name of the MSBuild response file SourcesDirectory + “\BuildExtensions.rsp” Targets The target(s) to execute New String() {“Target1”, “Target2”} Verbosity Logging verbosity Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Build.Workflow.BuildVerbosity.Normal Integrating with Team Build   If your MSBuild scripts tries to use Team Build tasks, they will most likely fail with the above approach. For example, the following MSBuild project file tries to add a build step using the BuildStep task:   <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <Project ToolsVersion="4.0" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003"> <Import Project="$(MSBuildExtensionsPath)\Microsoft\VisualStudio\TeamBuild\Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Build.targets" /> <Target Name="MyTarget"> <BuildStep TeamFoundationServerUrl="$(TeamFoundationServerUrl)" BuildUri="$(BuildUri)" Name="MyBuildStep" Message="My build step executed" Status="Succeeded"></BuildStep> </Target> </Project> When executing this file using the MSBuild activity, calling the MyTarget, it will fail with the following message: The "Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Build.Tasks.BuildStep" task could not be loaded from the assembly \PrivateAssemblies\Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Build.ProcessComponents.dll. Could not load file or assembly 'file:///D:\PrivateAssemblies\Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Build.ProcessComponents.dll' or one of its dependencies. The system cannot find the file specified. Confirm that the <UsingTask> declaration is correct, that the assembly and all its dependencies are available, and that the task contains a public class that implements Microsoft.Build.Framework.ITask. You can see that the path to the ProcessComponents.dll is incomplete. This is because in the Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Build.targets file the task is referenced using the $(TeamBuildRegPath) property. Also note that the task needs the TeamFounationServerUrl and BuildUri properties. One solution here is to pass these properties in using the Command Line Arguments parameter:   Here we pass in the parameters with the corresponding values from the curent build. The build log shows that the build step has in fact been inserted:   The problem as you probably spted is that the build step is insert at the top of the build log, instead of next to the MSBuild activity call. This is because we are using a legacy team build task (BuildStep), and that is how these are handled in TFS 2010. You can see the same behaviour when running builds that are using the UpgradeTemplate, that cutom build steps shows up at the top of the build log.

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  • Building Visual Studio Setup Projects with TFS 2010 Team Build

    - by Jakob Ehn
    One of the most common complaints from people starting to use Team Build is that is doesn’t support building Microsoft’s own Setup and Deployment project (*.vdproj). When creating a default build definition that compiles a solution containing a setup project, you’ll get the following warning: The project file "MyProject.vdproj" is not supported by MSBuild and cannot be built.   This is what the problem is all about. MSBuild, that is used for compiling your projects, does not understand the proprietary vdproj format defined by Microsoft quite some time ago. Unfortunately there is no sign that this will change in the near future, in fact the setup projects has barely changed at all since they were introduced. VS 2010 brings no new features or improvements hen it comes to the setup projects. VS 2010 does include a limited version of InstallShield which promises to be more MSBuild friendly and with more or less the same features as VS setup projects. I hope to get a closer look at this installer project type soon. But, how do we go about to build a Visual Studio setup project and produce an MSI as part of a Team Build process? Well, since only one application known to man understands the vdproj projects, we will have to installa copy of Visual Studio on the build server. Sad but true. After doing this, we use the Visual Studio command line interface (devenv) to perform the build. In this post I will show how to do this by using the InvokeProcess activity directly in a build workflow template. You’ll want to run build your setup projects after you have successfully compiled the projects.   Install Visual Studio 2010 on the build server(s)   Open your build process template /remember to branch or copy the xaml file before modifying it!)   Locate the Try to Compile the Project activity   Drop an instance of the InvokeProcess activity from the toolbox onto the designer, after the Run MSBuild for Project activity   Drop an instance of the WriteBuildMessage activity inside the Handle Standard Output section. Set the Importance property to Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Build.Client.BuildMessageImportance.High (NB: This is necessary if you want the output from devenv to show up in the build log when running the build with the default verbosity) Set the Message property to stdOutput   Drop an instance of the WriteBuildError activity to the Handle Error Output section Set the Message property to errOutput   Select the InvokeProcess activity and set the values of the parameters to:     The finished workflow should look like this:     This will generate the MSI files, but they won’t be copied to the drop location. This is because we are using devenv and not MSBuild, so we have to do this explicitly   Drop a Sequence activity somewhere after the Copy to Drop location activity.   Create a variable in the Sequence activity of type IEnumerable<String> and call it GeneratedInstallers   Drop a FindMatchingFiles activity in the sequence activity and set the properties to:     Drop a ForEach<String> activity after the FindMatchingFiles activity. Set the Value property to GeneratedInstallers   Drop an InvokeProcess activity inside the ForEach activity.  FileName: “xcopy.exe” Arguments: String.Format("""{0}"" ""{1}""", item, BuildDetail.DropLocation) The Sequence activity should look like this:     Save the build process template and check it in.   Run the build and verify that the MSI’s is built and copied to the drop location.   Note 1: One of the drawback of using devenv like this in a team build is that since all the output from the default compilations is placed in the Binaries folder, the outputs is not avaialable when devenv is invoked, which causes the whole solution to rebuild again. In TFS 2008, this was pretty simple to fix by using the CustomizableOutDir property. In TFS 2010, the same feature is not avaialble. Jim Lamb blogged about this recently, have a look at it if you have a problem with this: http://blogs.msdn.com/jimlamb/archive/2010/04/13/customizableoutdir-in-tfs-2010.aspx   Note 2: Although the above solution works, a better approach is to wrap this in a custom activity that you can use in your builds. I will come back to this in a future post.

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  • Getting TF215097 error after modifying a build process template in TFS Team Build 2010

    - by Jakob Ehn
    When embracing Team Build 2010, you typically want to define several different build process templates for different scenarios. Common examples here are CI builds, QA builds and release builds. For example, in a contiuous build you often have no interest in publishing to the symbol store, you might or might not want to associate changesets and work items etc. The build server is often heavily occupied as it is, so you don’t want to have it doing more that necessary. Try to define a set of build process templates that are used across your company. In previous versions of TFS Team Build, there was no easy way to do this. But in TFS 2010 it is very easy so there is no excuse to not do it! :-)   I ran into a scenario today where I had an existing build definition that was based on our release build process template. In this template, we have defined several different build process parameters that control the release build. These are placed into its own sectionin the Build Process Parameters editor. This is done using the ProcessParameterMetadataCollection element, I will explain how this works in a future post.   I won’t go into details on these parametes, the issue for this blog post is what happens when you modify a build process template so that it is no longer compatible with the build definition, i.e. a breaking change. In this case, I removed a parameter that was no longer necessary. After merging the new build process template to one of the projects and queued a new release build, I got this error:   TF215097: An error occurred while initializing a build for build definition <Build Definition Name>: The values provided for the root activity's arguments did not satisfy the root activity's requirements: 'DynamicActivity': The following keys from the input dictionary do not map to arguments and must be removed: <Parameter Name>.  Please note that argument names are case sensitive. Parameter name: rootArgumentValues <Parameter Name> was the parameter that I removed so it was pretty easy to understand why the error had occurred. However, it is not entirely obvious how to fix the problem. When open the build definition everything looks OK, the removed build process parameter is not there, and I can open the build process template without any validation warnings. The problem here is that all settings specific to a particular build definition is stored in the TFS database. In TFS 2005, everything that was related to a build was stored in TFS source control in files (TFSBuild.proj, WorkspaceMapping.xml..). In TFS 2008, many of these settings were moved into the database. Still, lots of things were stored in TFSBuild.proj, such as the solution and configuration to build, wether to execute tests or not. In TFS 2010, all settings for a build definition is stored in the database. If we look inside the database we can see what this looks like. The table tbl_BuildDefinition contains all information for a build definition. One of the columns is called ProcessParameters and contains a serialized representation of a Dictionary that is the underlying object where these settings are stoded. Here is an example:   <Dictionary x:TypeArguments="x:String, x:Object" xmlns="clr-namespace:System.Collections.Generic;assembly=mscorlib" xmlns:mtbwa="clr-namespace:Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Build.Workflow.Activities;assembly=Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Build.Workflow" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"> <mtbwa:BuildSettings x:Key="BuildSettings" ProjectsToBuild="$/PathToProject.sln"> <mtbwa:BuildSettings.PlatformConfigurations> <mtbwa:PlatformConfigurationList Capacity="4"> <mtbwa:PlatformConfiguration Configuration="Release" Platform="Any CPU" /> </mtbwa:PlatformConfigurationList> </mtbwa:BuildSettings.PlatformConfigurations> </mtbwa:BuildSettings> <mtbwa:AgentSettings x:Key="AgentSettings" Tags="Agent1" /> <x:Boolean x:Key="DisableTests">True</x:Boolean> <x:String x:Key="ReleaseRepositorySolution">ERP</x:String> <x:Int32 x:Key="Major">2</x:Int32> <x:Int32 x:Key="Minor">3</x:Int32> </Dictionary> Here we can see that it is really only the non-default values that are persisted into the databasen. So, the problem in my case was that I removed one of the parameteres from the build process template, but the parameter and its value still existed in the build definition database. The solution to the problem is to refresh the build definition and save it. In the process tab, there is a Refresh button that will reload the build definition and the process template and synchronize them:   After refreshing the build definition and saving it, the build was running successfully again.

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  • TFS 2010 Build Custom Activity for Merging Assemblies

    - by Jakob Ehn
    *** The sample build process template discussed in this post is available for download from here: http://cid-ee034c9f620cd58d.office.live.com/self.aspx/BlogSamples/ILMerge.xaml ***   In my previous post I talked about library builds that we use to build and replicate dependencies between applications in TFS. This is typically used for common libraries and tools that several other application need to reference. When the libraries grow in size over time, so does the number of assemblies. So all solutions that uses the common library must reference all the necessary assemblies that they need, and if we for example do a refactoring and extract some code into a new assembly, all the clients must update their references to reflect these changes, otherwise it won’t compile. To improve on this, we use a tool from Microsoft Research called ILMerge (Download from here). It can be used to merge several assemblies into one assembly that contains all types. If you haven’t used this tool before, you should check it out. Previously I have implemented this in builds using a simple batch file that contains the full command, something like this: "%ProgramFiles(x86)%\microsoft\ilmerge\ilmerge.exe" /target:library /attr:ClassLibrary1.bl.dll /out:MyNewLibrary.dll ClassLibrary1.dll ClassLibrar2.dll ClassLibrary3.dll This merges 3 assemblies (ClassLibrary1, 2 and 3) into a new assembly called MyNewLibrary.dll. It will copy the attributes (file version, product version etc..) from ClassLibrary1.dll, using the /attr switch. For more info on ILMerge command line tool, see the above link. This approach works, but requires a little bit too much knowledge for the developers creating builds, therefor I have implemented a custom activity that wraps the use of ILMerge. This makes it much simpler to setup a new build definition and have the build automatically do the merging. The usage of the activity is then implemented as part of the Library Build process template mentioned in the previous post. For this article I have just created a simple build process template that only performs the ILMerge operation.   Below is the code for the custom activity. To make it compile, you need to reference the ILMerge.exe assembly. /// <summary> /// Activity for merging a list of assembies into one, using ILMerge /// </summary> public sealed class ILMergeActivity : BaseCodeActivity { /// <summary> /// A list of file paths to the assemblies that should be merged /// </summary> [RequiredArgument] public InArgument<IEnumerable<string>> InputAssemblies { get; set; } /// <summary> /// Full path to the generated assembly /// </summary> [RequiredArgument] public InArgument<string> OutputFile { get; set; } /// <summary> /// Which input assembly that the attibutes for the generated assembly should be copied from. /// Optional. If not specified, the first input assembly will be used /// </summary> public InArgument<string> AttributeFile { get; set; } /// <summary> /// Kind of assembly to generate, dll or exe /// </summary> public InArgument<TargetKindEnum> TargetKind { get; set; } // If your activity returns a value, derive from CodeActivity<TResult> // and return the value from the Execute method. protected override void Execute(CodeActivityContext context) { string message = InputAssemblies.Get(context).Aggregate("", (current, assembly) => current + (assembly + " ")); TrackMessage(context, "Merging " + message + " into " + OutputFile.Get(context)); ILMerge m = new ILMerge(); m.SetInputAssemblies(InputAssemblies.Get(context).ToArray()); m.TargetKind = TargetKind.Get(context) == TargetKindEnum.Dll ? ILMerge.Kind.Dll : ILMerge.Kind.Exe; m.OutputFile = OutputFile.Get(context); m.AttributeFile = !String.IsNullOrEmpty(AttributeFile.Get(context)) ? AttributeFile.Get(context) : InputAssemblies.Get(context).First(); m.SetTargetPlatform(RuntimeEnvironment.GetSystemVersion().Substring(0,2), RuntimeEnvironment.GetRuntimeDirectory()); m.Merge(); TrackMessage(context, "Generated " + m.OutputFile); } } [Browsable(true)] public enum TargetKindEnum { Dll, Exe } NB: The activity inherits from a BaseCodeActivity class which is an internal helper class which contains some methods and properties useful for moste custom activities. In this case, it uses the TrackeMessage method for writing to the build log. You either need to remove the TrackMessage method calls, or implement this yourself (which is not very hard… ) The custom activity has the following input arguments: InputAssemblies A list with the (full) paths to the assemblies to merge OutputFile The name of the resulting merged assembly AttributeFile Which assembly to use as the template for the attribute of the merged assembly. This argument is optional and if left blank, the first assembly in the input list is used TargetKind Decides what type of assembly to create, can be either a dll or an exe Of course, there are more switches to the ILMerge.exe, and these can be exposed as input arguments as well if you need it. To show how the custom activity can be used, I have attached a build process template (see link at the top of this post) that merges the output of the projects being built (CommonLibrary.dll and CommonLibrary2.dll) into a merged assembly (NewLibrary.dll). The build process template has the following custom process parameters:   The Assemblies To Merge argument is passed into a FindMatchingFiles activity to located all assemblies that are located in the BinariesDirectory folder after the compilation has been performed by Team Build. Here is the complete sequence of activities that performs the merge operation. It is located at the end of the Try, Compile, Test and Associate… sequence: It splits the AssembliesToMerge parameter and appends the full path (using the BinariesDirectory variable) and then enumerates the matching files using the FindMatchingFiles activity. When running the build, you can see that it merges two assemblies into a new one:     And the merged assembly (and associated pdb file) is copied to the drop location together with the rest of the assemblies:

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