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  • c++ meaning of the use of const in the signature

    - by jbu
    Please help me understand the following signature: err_type funcName(const Type& buffer) const; so for the first const, does that mean the contents of Type cannot change or that the reference cannot change? secondly, what does the second const mean? I don't really even have a hint. Thanks in advance, jbu

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  • Indexing vs. no indexing when inserting records

    - by jbu
    I have a few questions about whether or not it would be best to not use indexing. BACKGROUND: My records have a timestamp attribute, and the records will be inserted in order of their timestamps (i.e., inserted chronologically). QUESTIONS: If I DON'T use indexing is it typical for the database to insert the records in the order that they were inserted? If answer to #1 is yes, when I do a "SELECT .. WHERE timestamp X" type query will the database be efficient at it, or will it have to go through every single record since it isn't indexed? I would assume if there were no index, the database would not "know" that the records were inserted in sorted order and could not, therefore, make use of sorted property of the database. I assume a clustered index would be best for these types of records & their inserts. Please let me know what you guys think. Thanks, jbu

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  • C++ stack memory still valid?

    - by jbu
    Hi all, If I create an object on the stack and push it into a list, then the object loses scope (outside of the for loop in the example below) will the object still exist in the list? If the list still holds the object, is that data now invalid/possibly corrupt? Please let me know, and please explain the reasoning.. Thanks, jbu class SomeObject{ public: AnotherObject x; } //And then... void someMethod() { std::list<SomeObject> my_list; for(int i = 0; i < SOME_NUMBER; i++) { SomeObject tmp; my_list.push_back(tmp); //after the for loop iteration, tmp loses scope } my_list.front(); //at this point will my_list be full of valid SomeObjects or will the SomeObjects no longer be valid, even if they still point to dirty data }

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  • C++: Why don't I need to check if references are invalid/null?

    - by jbu
    Hi all, Reading http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/references.html, it says: In general, references should always be valid because you must always initialize a reference. This means that barring some bizarre circumstances (see below), you can be certain that using a reference is just like using a plain old non-reference variable. You don't need to check to make sure that a reference isn't pointing to NULL, and you won't get bitten by an uninitialized reference that you forgot to allocate memory for. My question is how do I know that the object's memory hasn't been freed/deleted AFTER you've initialized the reference. What it comes down to is that I can't take this advice on faith and I need a better explanation. Can anyone shed some light? Thanks, jbu

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  • c++ std::map question about iterator order

    - by jbu
    Hi all, I am a C++ newbie trying to use a map so I can get constant time lookups for the find() method. The problem is that when I use an iterator to go over the elements in the map, elements do not appear in the same order that they were placed in the map. Without maintaining another data structure, is there a way to achieve in order iteration while still retaining the constant time lookup ability? Please let me know. Thanks, jbu edit: thanks for letting me know map::find() isn't constant time.

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  • C++ private pointer "leaking"?

    - by jbu
    I'm going to create a class to hold a long list of parameters that will be passed to a function. Let's use this shorter example: class ParamList{ public: ParamList(string& a_string); string& getString(); //returns my_string private: string& my_string; } My question is this: my_string is private, yet I'm returning the reference to it. Isn't that called something like private pointer leaking in C++? Is this not good programming practice? I want callers of getString to be able to get the reference and also modify it. Please let me know. Thanks, jbu edit1: callers will use getString() and modify the string that was returned.

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  • Java obfuscators

    - by jbu
    I'm looking for a good Java obfuscator. I've done initial research into the following Java obfuscators: proguard, yguard, retroguard, dasho, allatori, jshrink, smokescreen, jobfuscate, marvin, jbco, jode, javaguard, jarg, joga, cafebabe, donquixote, mwobfu, bbmug, zelix klassmaster, sandmark, jcloak, thicket, blufuscator, and java code protector. I tried proguard and it has a really nice GUI, seems really stable, and seems to be the most popular, but it seemed to not like some enumeration on a referenced jar file (not within the code I was trying to obfuscate) which was weird. Yguard seems to require some interaction with ant, which I didn't know too much about. What is a good java obfuscator? It doesn't need to be free, it just needs to work well and be easy to use.

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