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  • GUI to include a .prop file in a VS 2010 project?

    - by jwfearn
    Visual Studio 2010 has no longer uses .vsprops files and instead uses .props files. To include a .vsprops file in a Visual Studio 2008 project, one could right-click the project icon in the Solution Explorer panel, choose Properties, go to the Configuration Properties | General section, and modify the Inherited Project Property Sheets property to contain a list of .vsprops paths. One could also modify the Visual Studio 2008 project file directly. Is there a way in the Visual Studio 2010 GUI to include .props files to a project? The Inherited Project Property Sheets property seems to have been removed. If manual editing of the project file is the only way to include .props files, where can one find documentation on doing it? I'm not talking about adding a .props file to the list of files in the project, I mean how do I tell the project to use a .props file.

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  • Sounds for build error/success in Visual C++?

    - by jwfearn
    On long Visual C++ builds, it would be really helpful to hear some sort of (optional) sounds for such build/compile results as: individual compile error file compile success/failure build success/failure batch build success/failure Does anyone know how to enable sounds for these kinds of build occurrences in Visual C++ (especially Visual C++ 2008 on Vista)?

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  • GUI to add a .props file to a VS 2010 project?

    - by jwfearn
    Visual Studio 2010 has no longer uses .vsprops files and instead uses .props files. To add a .vsprops file to a Visual Studio 2008 project, one could right-click the project icon in the Solution Explorer panel, choose Properties, go to the Configuration Properties | General section, and modify the Inherited Project Property Sheets property to contain a list of .vsprops paths. One could also modify the Visual Studio 2008 project file directly. Is there a way in the Visual Studio 2010 GUI to add .props files to a project? The Inherited Project Property Sheets property seems to have been removed. If manual editing of the project file is the only way to include .props files, where can one find documentation on doing it?

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  • GUI to include a .prop` file to a VS 2010 project?

    - by jwfearn
    Visual Studio 2010 has no longer uses .vsprops files and instead uses .props files. To include a .vsprops file in a Visual Studio 2008 project, one could right-click the project icon in the Solution Explorer panel, choose Properties, go to the Configuration Properties | General section, and modify the Inherited Project Property Sheets property to contain a list of .vsprops paths. One could also modify the Visual Studio 2008 project file directly. Is there a way in the Visual Studio 2010 GUI to include .props files to a project? The Inherited Project Property Sheets property seems to have been removed. If manual editing of the project file is the only way to include .props files, where can one find documentation on doing it? I'm not talking about adding a .props file to the list of files in the project, I mean how do I tell the project to use a .props file.

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  • Environment variable names with parentheses, like %ProgramFiles(x86)%, in PowerShell?

    - by jwfearn
    How does one get the value of environment variable whose name contains parentheses in a PowerShell script? To complicate matters, some variables names contains parentheses while others have similar names without parenteses. For example (using cmd.exe): C:\>set | find "ProgramFiles" CommonProgramFiles=C:\Program Files\Common Files CommonProgramFiles(x86)=C:\Program Files (x86)\Common Files ProgramFiles=C:\Program Files ProgramFiles(x86)=C:\Program Files (x86) We see that %ProgramFiles% is not the same as %ProgramFiles(x86)%. My PowerShell code is failing in a weird way because it's ignoring the part of the environment variable name after the parentheses. Since this happens to match the name of a different, but existing, environment variable I don't fail, I just get the right value of the wrong variable. Here's a test function in the PowerShell scripting language to illustrate my problem: function Do-Test { $ok = "C:\Program Files (x86)" # note space between 's' and '( $bad = "$Env:ProgramFiles" + "(x86)" # uses %ProgramFiles% $bin32 = "$Env:ProgramFiles(x86)" # LINE 6, I want to use %ProgramFiles(x86)% if ( $bin32 -eq $ok ) { Write-Output "Pass" } elseif ( $bin32 -eq $bad ) { Write-Output "Fail: %ProgramFiles% used instead of %ProgramFiles(x86)%" } else { Write-Output "Fail: some other reason" } } And here's the output: PS> Do-Test Fail: %ProgramFiles% used instead of %ProgramFiles(x86)% Is there a simple change I can make to line 6 above to get the correct value of %ProgramFiles(x86)%? *NOTE: In the text of this post I am using batch file syntax for environment variables as a convenient shorthand. For example %SOME_VARIABLE% means "the value of the environment variable whose name is SOME_VARIABLE". If I knew the properly escaped syntax in PowerShell, I wouldn't need to ask this question.*

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  • GUI to include a `.props` file to a VS 2010 project?

    - by jwfearn
    Visual Studio 2010 has no longer uses .vsprops files and instead uses .props files. To add a .vsprops file to a Visual Studio 2008 project, one could right-click the project icon in the Solution Explorer panel, choose Properties, go to the Configuration Properties | General section, and modify the Inherited Project Property Sheets property to contain a list of .vsprops paths. One could also modify the Visual Studio 2008 project file directly. Is there a way in the Visual Studio 2010 GUI to add .props files to a project? The Inherited Project Property Sheets property seems to have been removed. If manual editing of the project file is the only way to include .props files, where can one find documentation on doing it?

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  • Are CMake GLOB and source_group compatible?

    - by jwfearn
    I'm using CMake 2.8.0 (on Windows) with the "Visual Studio 10 Win64" generator. GLOB and source_group don't seem to work together. Is there a way to get this to work? I use file( GLOB ... ) to create a list of .cpp files and then use source_group to create a filter in the generated Visual Studio project: # C:\Users\My Name\hello\CMakeLists.txt cmake_minimum_required( VERSION 2.8 ) project( hello_proj ) file( GLOB HELLO_SRCS *.cpp ) message( "HELLO_SRCS="${HELLO_SRCS} ) #source_group( hello_group ${HELLO_SRCS} ) #line 6: uncomment to get error add_executable( hello_exec ${HELLO_SRCS} ) with line 6 commented out, the project is generated fine: HELLO_SRCS=C:/Users/My Name/hello/hello.cppC:/Users/My Name/hello/print_line.cpp -- Configuring done -- Generating done -- Build files have been written to: C:/Users/My Name/hello with line 6 un-commented, I get an error: HELLO_SRCS=C:/Users/My Name/hello/hello.cppC:/Users/My Name/hello/print_line.cpp CMake Error at CMakeLists.txt:6 (source_group): source_group Unknown argument "C:/Users/My Name/hello/hello.cpp". Perhaps the FILES keyword is missing. -- Configuring incomplete, errors occurred! I notice that output value of ${HELLO_SRCS} does not seem to contain any delimiters between the file names, nor does it have quotes or other delimiters wrapping the file names which contain spaces. Does that have anything to do with my problem? Renaming all directories to avoid spaces is not really an option.

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  • How to rename an alias in PowerShell?

    - by jwfearn
    I want to make my own versions of some of the builtin PowerShell aliases. Rather than completely removing the overridden aliases, I'd like to rename them so I can still use them if I want to. For example, maybe I'll rename set to orig_set and then add my own new definition for set. This is what I've tried so far: PS> alias *set* CommandType Name Definition ----------- ---- ---------- Alias set Set-Variable PS> function Rename-Alias( $s0, $s1 ) { Rename-Item Alias:\$s0 $s1 -Force } PS> Rename-Alias set orig_set PS> alias *set* CommandType Name Definition ----------- ---- ---------- Alias set Set-Variable Any ideas as to why this isn't working?

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  • How to pass the 'argument-line' of one PowerShell function to another?

    - by jwfearn
    I'm trying to write some PowerShell functions that do some stuff and then transparently call through to existing built-in function. I want to pass along all the arguments untouched. I don't want to have to know any details of the arguments. I tired using 'splat' to do this with @args but that didn't work as I expected. In the example below, I've written a toy function called myls which supposed to print hello! and then call the same built-in function, Get-ChildItem, that the built-in alias ls calls with the rest of the argument line intact. What I have so far works pretty well: function myls { Write-Output "hello!" Invoke-Expression("Get-ChildItem "+$MyInvocation.UnboundArguments -join " ") } A correct version of myls should be able to handle being called with no arguments, with one argument, with named arguments, from a line containing multiple semi-colon delimited commands, and with variables in the arguments including string variables containing spaces. The tests below compare myls and the builtin ls: [NOTE: output elided and/or compacted to save space] PS> md C:\p\d\x, C:\p\d\y, C:\p\d\"jay z" PS> cd C:\p\d PS> ls # no args PS> myls # pass PS> cd .. PS> ls d # one arg PS> myls d # pass PS> $a="A"; $z="Z"; $y="y"; $jz="jay z" PS> $a; ls d; $z # multiple statements PS> $a; myls d; $z # pass PS> $a; ls d -Exclude x; $z # named args PS> $a; myls d -Exclude x; $z # pass PS> $a; ls d -Exclude $y; $z # variables in arg-line PS> $a; myls d -Exclude $y; $z # pass PS> $a; ls d -Exclude $jz; $z # variables containing spaces in arg-line PS> $a; myls d -Exclude $jz; $z # FAIL! Is there a way I can re-write myls to get the behavior I want?

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  • Best intro to C++ static metaprogramming?

    - by jwfearn
    Static metaprogramming (aka "template metaprogramming") is a great C++ technique that allows the execution of programs at compile-time. A light bulb went off in my head as soon as I read this canonical metaprogramming example: #include <iostream> using namespace std; template< int n > struct factorial { enum { ret = factorial< n - 1 >::ret * n }; }; template<> struct factorial< 0 > { enum { ret = 1 }; }; int main() { cout << "7! = " << factorial< 7 >::ret << endl; // 5040 return 0; } If one wants to learn more about C++ static metaprogramming, what are the best sources (books, websites, on-line courseware, whatever)?

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