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  • Windows Phone 8 detected as mass storage

    - by legends2k
    From version 8 onwards Windows Phone supports MTP (media transfer protocol) to transfer audio and I thought I could use Rhythmbox to upload music onto my device. Thing is Rhythmbox doesn't display the device under Devices pane (there's no Device pane for that matter). I searched other questions here and tried out installing mtp-tools, mtpfs and also tried gMTP, which doesn't seem to detect the device as a portable player. I see that the device's icon looks like a Camera in dash bar and when I see the address location, it shows gphoto2://[usb:002,013]/, which makes me doubt that it's detected as a camera or as a mass storage device. /.gvfs/gphoto2 mount on usb%3A002,003 is where the actual mount is. What do I do to fix this? I tried creating .is_audio_player too.

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  • GCC (ld) option to strip unreferenced data/functions

    - by legends2k
    I've written an program which uses a library which has numerous functuions, but I only limited functions from it. GCC is the compiler I use. Once I've created a binary, when I used nm to see the symbols in it, it shows all the unwanted (unreferenced) functions which are never used. How do I removed those unreferenced functions and data from the executable? Is the -s option right? I'm tols that it strips all symbol table and relocation data from the binary, but does this remove the function and data too? I'm not sure on how to verify this too, since after using -s nm doesn't work since it's stripped all sym. table data too.

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  • A function's static and dynamic parent

    - by legends2k
    I'm reading Thinking in C++ (vol. 2): Whenever a function is called, information about that function is pushed onto the runtime stack in an activation record instance (ARI), also called a stack frame. A typical stack frame contains (1) the address of the calling function (so execution can return to it), (2) a pointer to the ARI of the function’s static parent (the scope that lexically contains the called function, so variables global to the function can be accessed), and (3) a pointer to the function that called it (its dynamic parent). The path that logically results from repetitively following the dynamic parent links is the dynamic chain, or call chain I'm unable to comprehend what the author means as function's static and dynamic parent. Also am not able to differentiate between item 1, 2 or 3. They all seem to be the same. Can someone please explain this passage to me?

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  • Should a g_object_new have a matching g_object_unref?

    - by legends2k
    I'm using libnotify to show desktop notifications in my application; notify_notification_new() returns a NotifyNotification*, which should be passed as the first param to further function calls of the notification library. There is no notify_notification_free() which frees the pointer it returns. I looked up the source of notify_notification_new() and internally it does a g_object_new(), gets a GObject* and returns it as a NotfiyNotification*, so when my application does the clean up, should I call a g_object_unref() on the pointer returned by notify_notification_new()?

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  • [C++] A minimalistic smart array (container) class template

    - by legends2k
    I've written a (array) container class template (lets call it smart array) for using it in the BREW platform (which doesn't allow many C++ constructs like STD library, exceptions, etc. It has a very minimal C++ runtime support); while writing this my friend said that something like this already exists in Boost called MultiArray, I tried it but the ARM compiler (RVCT) cries with 100s of errors. I've not seen Boost.MultiArray's source, I've just started learning template only lately; template meta programming interests me a lot, although am not sure if this is strictly one, which can be categorised thus. So I want all my fellow C++ aficionados to review it ~ point out flaws, potential bugs, suggestions, optimisations, etc.; somthing like "you've not written your own Big Three which might lead to...". Possibly any criticism that'll help me improve this class and thereby my C++ skills. smart_array.h #include <vector> using std::vector; template <typename T, size_t N> class smart_array { vector < smart_array<T, N - 1> > vec; public: explicit smart_array(vector <size_t> &dimensions) { assert(N == dimensions.size()); vector <size_t>::iterator it = ++dimensions.begin(); vector <size_t> dimensions_remaining(it, dimensions.end()); smart_array <T, N - 1> temp_smart_array(dimensions_remaining); vec.assign(dimensions[0], temp_smart_array); } explicit smart_array(size_t dimension_1 = 1, ...) { static_assert(N > 0, "Error: smart_array expects 1 or more dimension(s)"); assert(dimension_1 > 1); va_list dim_list; vector <size_t> dimensions_remaining(N - 1); va_start(dim_list, dimension_1); for(size_t i = 0; i < N - 1; ++i) { size_t dimension_n = va_arg(dim_list, size_t); assert(dimension_n > 0); dimensions_remaining[i] = dimension_n; } va_end(dim_list); smart_array <T, N - 1> temp_smart_array(dimensions_remaining); vec.assign(dimension_1, temp_smart_array); } smart_array<T, N - 1>& operator[](size_t index) { assert(index < vec.size() && index >= 0); return vec[index]; } size_t length() const { return vec.size(); } }; template<typename T> class smart_array<T, 1> { vector <T> vec; public: explicit smart_array(vector <size_t> &dimension) : vec(dimension[0]) { assert(dimension[0] > 0); } explicit smart_array(size_t dimension_1 = 1) : vec(dimension_1) { assert(dimension_1 > 0); } T& operator[](size_t index) { assert(index < vec.size() && index >= 0); return vec[index]; } size_t length() { return vec.size(); } }; Sample Usage: #include <iostream> using std::cout; using std::endl; int main() { // testing 1 dimension smart_array <int, 1> x(3); x[0] = 0, x[1] = 1, x[2] = 2; cout << "x.length(): " << x.length() << endl; // testing 2 dimensions smart_array <float, 2> y(2, 3); y[0][0] = y[0][1] = y[0][2] = 0; y[1][0] = y[1][1] = y[1][2] = 1; cout << "y.length(): " << y.length() << endl; cout << "y[0].length(): " << y[0].length() << endl; // testing 3 dimensions smart_array <char, 3> z(2, 4, 5); cout << "z.length(): " << z.length() << endl; cout << "z[0].length(): " << z[0].length() << endl; cout << "z[0][0].length(): " << z[0][0].length() << endl; z[0][0][4] = 'c'; cout << z[0][0][4] << endl; // testing 4 dimensions smart_array <bool, 4> r(2, 3, 4, 5); cout << "z.length(): " << r.length() << endl; cout << "z[0].length(): " << r[0].length() << endl; cout << "z[0][0].length(): " << r[0][0].length() << endl; cout << "z[0][0][0].length(): " << r[0][0][0].length() << endl; // testing copy constructor smart_array <float, 2> copy_y(y); cout << "copy_y.length(): " << copy_y.length() << endl; cout << "copy_x[0].length(): " << copy_y[0].length() << endl; cout << copy_y[0][0] << "\t" << copy_y[1][0] << "\t" << copy_y[0][1] << "\t" << copy_y[1][1] << "\t" << copy_y[0][2] << "\t" << copy_y[1][2] << endl; return 0; }

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  • A minimalistic smart array (container) class template

    - by legends2k
    I've written a (array) container class template (lets call it smart array) for using it in the BREW platform (which doesn't allow many C++ constructs like STD library, exceptions, etc. It has a very minimal C++ runtime support); while writing this my friend said that something like this already exists in Boost called MultiArray, I tried it but the ARM compiler (RVCT) cries with 100s of errors. I've not seen Boost.MultiArray's source, I've started learning templates only lately; template meta programming interests me a lot, although am not sure if this is strictly one that can be categorized thus. So I want all my fellow C++ aficionados to review it ~ point out flaws, potential bugs, suggestions, optimizations, etc.; something like "you've not written your own Big Three which might lead to...". Possibly any criticism that will help me improve this class and thereby my C++ skills. Edit: I've used std::vector since it's easily understood, later it will be replaced by a custom written vector class template made to work in the BREW platform. Also C++0x related syntax like static_assert will also be removed in the final code. smart_array.h #include <vector> #include <cassert> #include <cstdarg> using std::vector; template <typename T, size_t N> class smart_array { vector < smart_array<T, N - 1> > vec; public: explicit smart_array(vector <size_t> &dimensions) { assert(N == dimensions.size()); vector <size_t>::iterator it = ++dimensions.begin(); vector <size_t> dimensions_remaining(it, dimensions.end()); smart_array <T, N - 1> temp_smart_array(dimensions_remaining); vec.assign(dimensions[0], temp_smart_array); } explicit smart_array(size_t dimension_1 = 1, ...) { static_assert(N > 0, "Error: smart_array expects 1 or more dimension(s)"); assert(dimension_1 > 1); va_list dim_list; vector <size_t> dimensions_remaining(N - 1); va_start(dim_list, dimension_1); for(size_t i = 0; i < N - 1; ++i) { size_t dimension_n = va_arg(dim_list, size_t); assert(dimension_n > 0); dimensions_remaining[i] = dimension_n; } va_end(dim_list); smart_array <T, N - 1> temp_smart_array(dimensions_remaining); vec.assign(dimension_1, temp_smart_array); } smart_array<T, N - 1>& operator[](size_t index) { assert(index < vec.size() && index >= 0); return vec[index]; } size_t length() const { return vec.size(); } }; template<typename T> class smart_array<T, 1> { vector <T> vec; public: explicit smart_array(vector <size_t> &dimension) : vec(dimension[0]) { assert(dimension[0] > 0); } explicit smart_array(size_t dimension_1 = 1) : vec(dimension_1) { assert(dimension_1 > 0); } T& operator[](size_t index) { assert(index < vec.size() && index >= 0); return vec[index]; } size_t length() { return vec.size(); } }; Sample Usage: #include "smart_array.h" #include <iostream> using std::cout; using std::endl; int main() { // testing 1 dimension smart_array <int, 1> x(3); x[0] = 0, x[1] = 1, x[2] = 2; cout << "x.length(): " << x.length() << endl; // testing 2 dimensions smart_array <float, 2> y(2, 3); y[0][0] = y[0][1] = y[0][2] = 0; y[1][0] = y[1][1] = y[1][2] = 1; cout << "y.length(): " << y.length() << endl; cout << "y[0].length(): " << y[0].length() << endl; // testing 3 dimensions smart_array <char, 3> z(2, 4, 5); cout << "z.length(): " << z.length() << endl; cout << "z[0].length(): " << z[0].length() << endl; cout << "z[0][0].length(): " << z[0][0].length() << endl; z[0][0][4] = 'c'; cout << z[0][0][4] << endl; // testing 4 dimensions smart_array <bool, 4> r(2, 3, 4, 5); cout << "z.length(): " << r.length() << endl; cout << "z[0].length(): " << r[0].length() << endl; cout << "z[0][0].length(): " << r[0][0].length() << endl; cout << "z[0][0][0].length(): " << r[0][0][0].length() << endl; // testing copy constructor smart_array <float, 2> copy_y(y); cout << "copy_y.length(): " << copy_y.length() << endl; cout << "copy_x[0].length(): " << copy_y[0].length() << endl; cout << copy_y[0][0] << "\t" << copy_y[1][0] << "\t" << copy_y[0][1] << "\t" << copy_y[1][1] << "\t" << copy_y[0][2] << "\t" << copy_y[1][2] << endl; return 0; }

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