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  • 2D Array of 2D Arrays (C# / XNA) [on hold]

    - by Lemoncreme
    I want to create a 2D array that contains many other 2D arrays. The problem is I'm not quite sure what I'm doing but this is the initialization code I have: int[,][,] chunk = new int[64, 64][32, 32]; For some reason Visual Studio doesn't like this and says that it's and 'invalid rank specifier'. Also, I'm not sure how to use the nested arrays once I've declared them... Some help and some insight, please?

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  • Best way to blend colors in tile lighting? (XNA)

    - by Lemoncreme
    I have made a color, decent, recursive, fast tile lighting system in my game. It does everything I need except one thing: different colors are not blended at all: Here is my color blend code: return (new Color( (byte)MathHelper.Clamp(color.R / factor, 0, 255), (byte)MathHelper.Clamp(color.G / factor, 0, 255), (byte)MathHelper.Clamp(color.B / factor, 0, 255))); As you can see it does not take the already in place color into account. color is the color of the previous light, which is weakened by the above code by factor. If I wanted to blend using the color already in place, I would use the variable blend. Here is an example of a blend that I tried that failed, using blend: return (new Color( (byte)MathHelper.Clamp(((color.R + blend.R) / 2) / factor, 0, 255), (byte)MathHelper.Clamp(((color.G + blend.G) / 2) / factor, 0, 255), (byte)MathHelper.Clamp(((color.B + blend.B) / 2) / factor, 0, 255))); This color blend produces inaccurate and strange results. I need a blend that is accurate, like the first example, that blends the two colors together. What is the best way to do this?

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  • Grid-Based 2D Lighting Problems

    - by Lemoncreme
    I am aware this question has been asked before, but unfortunately I am new to the language, so the complicated explanations I've found do not help me in the least. I need a lighting engine for my game, and I've tried some procedural lighting systems. This method works the best: if (light[xx - 1, yy] > light[xx, yy]) light[xx, yy] = light[xx - 1, yy] - lightPass; if (light[xx, yy - 1] > light[xx, yy]) light[xx, yy] = light[xx, yy - 1] - lightPass; if (light[xx + 1, yy] > light[xx, yy]) light[xx, yy] = light[xx + 1, yy] - lightPass; if (light[xx, yy + 1] > light[xx, yy]) light[xx, yy] = light[xx, yy + 1] - lightPass; (Subtracts adjacent values by 'lightPass' variable if they are more bright) (It's in a for() loop) This is all fine and dandy except for a an obvious reason: The system favors whatever comes first in the for() loop This is what the above code looks like applied to my game: If I could get some help on creating a new procedural or otherwise lighting system I would really appreciate it!

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