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  • LEGO Lord of the Rings – The Orcs Point of View [Video]

    - by Asian Angel
    Everyone is familiar with the main storyline from Lord of the Rings, but there are yet untold tales waiting to be heard. This humorous video presents part of the story from the Orcs’ point of view. LEGO Lord of the Rings: Orcs [via BoingBoing] HTG Explains: Why Do Hard Drives Show the Wrong Capacity in Windows? Java is Insecure and Awful, It’s Time to Disable It, and Here’s How What Are the Windows A: and B: Drives Used For?

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  • The Lord of the Rings Project Charts Middle Earth by the Numbers

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    How many characters from the Lord of the Rings series can you name? 923? That’s the number of entries in the LOTR Project–a collection of data that links family trees, timelines, and statistical curiosities about Middle Earth. In addition to families trees and the above chart mapping out the shift in lifespans over the ages of Middle Earth, you’ll find charts mapping out age distributions, the race and gender composition of Middle Earth, populations, time and distance traveled by the Hobbits in pursuit of their quest, and so more. The site is a veritable almanac of trivia about the Lord of the Rings and related books and media. Hit up the link below to explore the facts and figures of Middle Earth. LOTR Project [via Flowing Data] How Hackers Can Disguise Malicious Programs With Fake File Extensions Can Dust Actually Damage My Computer? What To Do If You Get a Virus on Your Computer

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  • Encouraging software engineers to track time

    - by M. Dudley
    How can I encourage my coworkers to track the time they spend resolving issues and implementing features? We have software to do this, but they just don't enter the numbers. I want the team to get better at providing project estimates by comparing our past estimates to actual time spent. I suspect that my coworkers don't see the personal benefit, since they're not often involved in project scheduling.

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  • jQuery Time Entry with Time Navigation Keys

    - by Rick Strahl
    So, how do you display time values in your Web applications? Displaying date AND time values in applications is lot less standardized than date display only. While date input has become fairly universal with various date picker controls available, time entry continues to be a bit of a non-standardized. In my own applications I tend to use the jQuery UI DatePicker control for date entries and it works well for that. Here's an example: The date entry portion is well defined and it makes perfect sense to have a calendar pop up so you can pick a date from a rich UI when necessary. However, time values are much less obvious when it comes to displaying a UI or even just making time entries more useful. There are a slew of time picker controls available but other than adding some visual glitz, they are not really making time entry any easier. Part of the reason for this is that time entry is usually pretty simple. Clicking on a dropdown of any sort and selecting a value from a long scrolling list tends to take more user interaction than just typing 5 characters (7 if am/pm is used). Keystrokes can make Time Entry easier Time entry maybe pretty simple, but I find that adding a few hotkeys to handle date navigation can make it much easier. Specifically it'd be nice to have keys to: Jump to the current time (Now) Increase/decrease minutes Increase/decrease hours The timeKeys jQuery PlugIn Some time ago I created a small plugin to handle this scenario. It's non-visual other than tooltip that pops up when you press ? to display the hotkeys that are available: Try it Online The keys loosely follow the ancient Quicken convention of using the first and last letters of what you're increasing decreasing (ie. H to decrease, R to increase hours and + and - for the base unit or minutes here). All navigation happens via the keystrokes shown above, so it's all non-visual, which I think is the most efficient way to deal with dates. To hook up the plug-in, start with the textbox:<input type="text" id="txtTime" name="txtTime" value="12:05 pm" title="press ? for time options" /> Note the title which might be useful to alert people using the field that additional functionality is available. To hook up the plugin code is as simple as:$("#txtTime").timeKeys(); You essentially tie the plugin to any text box control. OptionsThe syntax for timeKeys allows for an options map parameter:$(selector).timeKeys(options); Options are passed as a parameter map object which can have the following properties: timeFormatYou can pass in a format string that allows you to format the date. The default is "hh:mm t" which is US time format that shows a 12 hour clock with am/pm. Alternately you can pass in "HH:mm" which uses 24 hour time. HH, hh, mm and t are translated in the format string - you can arrange the format as you see fit. callbackYou can also specify a callback function that is called when the date value has been set. This allows you to either re-format the date or perform post processing (such as displaying highlight if it's after a certain hour for example). Here's another example that uses both options:$("#txtTime").timeKeys({ timeFormat: "HH:mm", callback: function (time) { showStatus("new time is: " + time.toString() + " " + $(this).val() ); } }); The plugin code itself is fairly simple. It hooks the keydown event and checks for the various keys that affect time navigation which is straight forward. The bulk of the code however deals with parsing the time value and formatting the output using a Time class that implements parsing, formatting and time navigation methods. Here's the code for the timeKeys jQuery plug-in:/// <reference path="jquery.js" /> /// <reference path="ww.jquery.js" /> (function ($) { $.fn.timeKeys = function (options) { /// <summary> /// Attaches a set of hotkeys to time fields /// + Add minute - subtract minute /// H Subtract Hour R Add houR /// ? Show keys /// </summary> /// <param name="options" type="object"> /// Options: /// timeFormat: "hh:mm t" by default HH:mm alternate /// callback: callback handler after time assignment /// </param> /// <example> /// var proxy = new ServiceProxy("JsonStockService.svc/"); /// proxy.invoke("GetStockQuote",{symbol:"msft"},function(quote) { alert(result.LastPrice); },onPageError); ///</example> if (this.length < 1) return this; var opt = { timeFormat: "hh:mm t", callback: null } $.extend(opt, options); return this.keydown(function (e) { var $el = $(this); var time = new Time($el.val()); //alert($(this).val() + " " + time.toString() + " " + time.date.toString()); switch (e.keyCode) { case 78: // [N]ow time = new Time(new Date()); break; case 109: case 189: // - time.addMinutes(-1); break; case 107: case 187: // + time.addMinutes(1); break; case 72: //H time.addHours(-1); break; case 82: //R time.addHours(1); break; case 191: // ? if (e.shiftKey) $(this).tooltip("<b>N</b> Now<br/><b>+</b> add minute<br /><b>-</b> subtract minute<br /><b>H</b> Subtract Hour<br /><b>R</b> add hour", 4000, { isHtml: true }); return false; default: return true; } $el.val(time.toString(opt.timeFormat)); if (opt.callback) { // call async and set context in this element setTimeout(function () { opt.callback.call($el.get(0), time) }, 1); } return false; }); } Time = function (time, format) { /// <summary> /// Time object that can parse and format /// a time values. /// </summary> /// <param name="time" type="object"> /// A time value as a string (12:15pm or 23:01), a Date object /// or time value. /// /// </param> /// <param name="format" type="string"> /// Time format string: /// HH:mm (23:01) /// hh:mm t (11:01 pm) /// </param> /// <example> /// var time = new Time( new Date()); /// time.addHours(5); /// time.addMinutes(10); /// var s = time.toString(); /// /// var time2 = new Time(s); // parse with constructor /// var t = time2.parse("10:15 pm"); // parse with .parse() method /// alert( t.hours + " " + t.mins + " " + t.ampm + " " + t.hours25) ///</example> var _I = this; this.date = new Date(); this.timeFormat = "hh:mm t"; if (format) this.timeFormat = format; this.parse = function (time) { /// <summary> /// Parses time value from a Date object, or string in format of: /// 12:12pm or 23:01 /// </summary> /// <param name="time" type="any"> /// A time value as a string (12:15pm or 23:01), a Date object /// or time value. /// /// </param> if (!time) return null; // Date if (time.getDate) { var t = {}; var d = time; t.hours24 = d.getHours(); t.mins = d.getMinutes(); t.ampm = "am"; if (t.hours24 > 11) { t.ampm = "pm"; if (t.hours24 > 12) t.hours = t.hours24 - 12; } time = t; } if (typeof (time) == "string") { var parts = time.split(":"); if (parts < 2) return null; var time = {}; time.hours = parts[0] * 1; time.hours24 = time.hours; time.mins = parts[1].toLowerCase(); if (time.mins.indexOf("am") > -1) { time.ampm = "am"; time.mins = time.mins.replace("am", ""); if (time.hours == 12) time.hours24 = 0; } else if (time.mins.indexOf("pm") > -1) { time.ampm = "pm"; time.mins = time.mins.replace("pm", ""); if (time.hours < 12) time.hours24 = time.hours + 12; } time.mins = time.mins * 1; } _I.date.setMinutes(time.mins); _I.date.setHours(time.hours24); return time; }; this.addMinutes = function (mins) { /// <summary> /// adds minutes to the internally stored time value. /// </summary> /// <param name="mins" type="number"> /// number of minutes to add to the date /// </param> _I.date.setMinutes(_I.date.getMinutes() + mins); } this.addHours = function (hours) { /// <summary> /// adds hours the internally stored time value. /// </summary> /// <param name="hours" type="number"> /// number of hours to add to the date /// </param> _I.date.setHours(_I.date.getHours() + hours); } this.getTime = function () { /// <summary> /// returns a time structure from the currently /// stored time value. /// Properties: hours, hours24, mins, ampm /// </summary> return new Time(new Date()); h } this.toString = function (format) { /// <summary> /// returns a short time string for the internal date /// formats: 12:12 pm or 23:12 /// </summary> /// <param name="format" type="string"> /// optional format string for date /// HH:mm, hh:mm t /// </param> if (!format) format = _I.timeFormat; var hours = _I.date.getHours(); if (format.indexOf("t") > -1) { if (hours > 11) format = format.replace("t", "pm") else format = format.replace("t", "am") } if (format.indexOf("HH") > -1) format = format.replace("HH", hours.toString().padL(2, "0")); if (format.indexOf("hh") > -1) { if (hours > 12) hours -= 12; if (hours == 0) hours = 12; format = format.replace("hh", hours.toString().padL(2, "0")); } if (format.indexOf("mm") > -1) format = format.replace("mm", _I.date.getMinutes().toString().padL(2, "0")); return format; } // construction if (time) this.time = this.parse(time); } String.prototype.padL = function (width, pad) { if (!width || width < 1) return this; if (!pad) pad = " "; var length = width - this.length if (length < 1) return this.substr(0, width); return (String.repeat(pad, length) + this).substr(0, width); } String.repeat = function (chr, count) { var str = ""; for (var x = 0; x < count; x++) { str += chr }; return str; } })(jQuery); The plugin consists of the actual plugin and the Time class which handles parsing and formatting of the time value via the .parse() and .toString() methods. Code like this always ends up taking up more effort than the actual logic unfortunately. There are libraries out there that can handle this like datejs or even ww.jquery.js (which is what I use) but to keep the code self contained for this post the plugin doesn't rely on external code. There's one optional exception: The code as is has one dependency on ww.jquery.js  for the tooltip plugin that provides the small popup for all the hotkeys available. You can replace that code with some other mechanism to display hotkeys or simply remove it since that behavior is optional. While we're at it: A jQuery dateKeys plugIn Although date entry tends to be much better served with drop down calendars to pick dates from, often it's also easier to pick dates using a few simple hotkeys. Navigation that uses + - for days and M and H for MontH navigation, Y and R for YeaR navigation are a quick way to enter dates without having to resort to using a mouse and clicking around to what you want to find. Note that this plugin does have a dependency on ww.jquery.js for the date formatting functionality.$.fn.dateKeys = function (options) { /// <summary> /// Attaches a set of hotkeys to date 'fields' /// + Add day - subtract day /// M Subtract Month H Add montH /// Y Subtract Year R Add yeaR /// ? Show keys /// </summary> /// <param name="options" type="object"> /// Options: /// dateFormat: "MM/dd/yyyy" by default "MMM dd, yyyy /// callback: callback handler after date assignment /// </param> /// <example> /// var proxy = new ServiceProxy("JsonStockService.svc/"); /// proxy.invoke("GetStockQuote",{symbol:"msft"},function(quote) { alert(result.LastPrice); },onPageError); ///</example> if (this.length < 1) return this; var opt = { dateFormat: "MM/dd/yyyy", callback: null }; $.extend(opt, options); return this.keydown(function (e) { var $el = $(this); var d = new Date($el.val()); if (!d) d = new Date(1900, 0, 1, 1, 1); var month = d.getMonth(); var year = d.getFullYear(); var day = d.getDate(); switch (e.keyCode) { case 84: // [T]oday d = new Date(); break; case 109: case 189: d = new Date(year, month, day - 1); break; case 107: case 187: d = new Date(year, month, day + 1); break; case 77: //M d = new Date(year, month - 1, day); break; case 72: //H d = new Date(year, month + 1, day); break; case 191: // ? if (e.shiftKey) $el.tooltip("<b>T</b> Today<br/><b>+</b> add day<br /><b>-</b> subtract day<br /><b>M</b> subtract Month<br /><b>H</b> add montH<br/><b>Y</b> subtract Year<br/><b>R</b> add yeaR", 5000, { isHtml: true }); return false; default: return true; } $el.val(d.formatDate(opt.dateFormat)); if (opt.callback) // call async setTimeout(function () { opt.callback.call($el.get(0),d); }, 10); return false; }); } The logic for this plugin is similar to the timeKeys plugin, but it's a little simpler as it tries to directly parse the date value from a string via new Date(inputString). As mentioned it also uses a helper function from ww.jquery.js to format dates which removes the logic to perform date formatting manually which again reduces the size of the code. And the Key is… I've been using both of these plugins in combination with the jQuery UI datepicker for datetime values and I've found that I rarely actually pop up the date picker any more. It's just so much more efficient to use the hotkeys to navigate dates. It's still nice to have the picker around though - it provides the expected behavior for date entry. For time values however I can't justify the UI overhead of a picker that doesn't make it any easier to pick a time. Most people know how to type in a time value and if they want shortcuts keystrokes easily beat out any pop up UI. Hopefully you'll find this as useful as I have found it for my code. Resources Online Sample Download Sample Project © Rick Strahl, West Wind Technologies, 2005-2011Posted in jQuery  HTML   Tweet (function() { var po = document.createElement('script'); po.type = 'text/javascript'; po.async = true; po.src = 'https://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js'; var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(po, s); })();

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  • How to change system time or force a time sync

    - by cpury
    My laptop is probably running out of CMOS battery, I know I have to fix it soon, but until then, this very annoying issue keeps me from using it. Scenario: My system clock is reset to 15/12/08 11:00 AM every time I turn on my computer. This has all sorts of side-effects, one of the more annoying being that I can't log into my gmail. At first I just waited for a time sync to happen, as I have that activated and all. It never happened. I googled and didn't find any way of enforcing a time sync, which I found very strange. Is there really none? Setting the time and date by hand is also a problem. For my 12.10 installation, the time & date settings are bugged. I remember it being for my last, older installation as well, though. Of course the easiest way should be to just manually edit the date and time fields by entering a new date. This is possible in theory, but the changes are reverted as soon as the text boxes loose focus. The other way to do it is to click the +-buttons for a long, long time. The first time I did that, the changes weren't stored either. I found out that afterwards I have to switch from manual to internet-sync mode and wait ~5 seconds until the in the top left corner of my system the new time is shown, or otherwise it won't have effect. So a nice solution would be one of the following: Setting the time/date by hand, maybe via terminal, so I can just enter the right values. Or, a command that would enforce an immediate time sync, that I can run after booting. I know I have to change the batteries soon, but this is seriously keeping me from working...

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  • Is there a constant for "end of time"?

    - by Nick Rosencrantz
    For some systems, the time value 9999-12-31 is used as the "end of time" as the end of the time that the computer can calculate. But what if it changes? Wouldn't it be better to define this time as a builtin variable? In C and other programming languages there usually is a variable such as MAX_INT or similar to get the largest value an integer could have. Why is there not a similar function for MAX_TIME i.e. set the variable to the "end of time" which for many systems usually is 9999-12-31. To avoid the problem of hardcoding to a wrong year (9999) could these systems introduce a variable for the "end of time"?

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  • How is time calculation performed by a computer?

    - by Jorge Mendoza
    I need to add a certain feature to a module in a given project regarding time calculation. For this specific case I'm using Java and reading through the documentation of the Date class I found out the time is calculated in milliseconds starting from January 1, 1970, 00:00:00 GMT. I think it's safe to assume there is a similar "starting date" in other languages so I guess the specific implementation in Java doesn't matter. How is the time calculation performed by the computer? How does it know exactly how many milliseconds have passed from that given "starting date and time" to the current date and time?

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  • Most pain-free time registration software for developers ?

    - by driis
    I work as a consultant in a medium-sized firm. We need to keep track of time spent on individual tasks and which customers to bill to. Our current system for doing this is an old in-house system, that needs to be retired for various reasons. Most developers don't like registering time, so I am looking for the best tool for this job, that minimizes the time needed to register time. Must have features: Must be simple and easy to use. Must have reporting feature to use for billing. Must have an API, so we can integrate in-house tools. Registering time should be based on hours worked (ie. today, worked on Customer A, Task B from 8 AM to 12 AM). TFS integration is a plus, but not needed (ie. register time on a work item) May be open source or a paid product; doesn't really matter. What would you recommend ?

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  • Unit testing time-bound code

    - by maasg
    I'm currently working on an application that does a lot of time-bound operations. That is, based on long now = System.currentTimeMillis();, and combined with an scheduler, it will calculate periods of time that parametrize the execution of some operations. e.g.: public void execute(...) { // executed by an scheduler each x minutes final int now = (int) TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toSeconds(System.currentTimeMillis()); final int alignedTime = now - now % getFrequency() ; final int startTime = alignedTime - 2 * getFrequency(); final int endTimeSecs = alignedTime - getFrequency(); uploadData(target, startTime, endTimeSecs); } Most parts of the application are unit-tested independently of time (in this case, uploadData has a natural unit test), but I was wondering about best practices for testing time-bound parts that rely on System.currentTimeMillis() ?

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  • Hard-copy approaches to time tracking

    - by STW
    I have a problem: I suck at tracking time-on-task for specific feature/defects/etc while coding them. I tend to jump between tasks a fair bit (partly due to the inherit juggling required by professional software development, partly due to my personal tendancy to focus on the code itself and not the business process around code). My personal preference is for a hard-copy system. Even with gabillions of pixels of real-estate on-screen I find it terribly distracting to keep a tracking window convienient; either I forget about it or it gets in my ways. So, looking for suggestions on time-tracking. My only requirement is a simple system to track start/stop times per task. I've considered going as far as buying a time-clock and giving each ticket a dedicated time-card. When I start working on it, punch-in; when done working, punch-out.

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  • What You Said: How You Track Your Time

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Earlier this week we asked you to share your favorite time tracking tips, tricks, and tools. Now we’re back to highlight the techniques HTG readers use to keep tabs on their time. While more than one of you expressed confusion over the idea of tracking how you spend all your time, many of you were more than happy to share the reasons for and the methods you use to stay on top of your time expenditures. Scott uses a fluid and flexible project management tool: I use kanbanflow.com, with two boards to manage task prioritisation and backlog. One board called ‘Current Work’ has three columns ‘Do Today’, ‘In Progress’ and ‘Done’. The other is called ‘Backlog’, which splits tasks into priority groups – ‘Distractions (NU+NI)’, ‘Goals (NU+I)’, ‘Interruptions (U+NI)’, ‘Interruptions (U+NI)’ and ‘Critical (U+I)’, where U is Urgent and I is Important (and N is Not). At the end of each day, I move things from my Backlog to my ‘Current Work’ board, with the idea to keep complete Goals before they become Critical. That way I can focus on ‘Current Work’ Do Today so I don’t feel overwhelmed and can plan my day. As priorities change or interruptions pop up, it’s just a matter of moving tasks between boards. I have both tabs open in my browser all day – this is probably good for knowledge workers strapped to their desk, not so good for those in meetings all day. In that case, go with the calendar on your phone. While the above description might make it sound really technical, we took the cloud-based app for a spin and found the interface to be very flexible and easy to use. Can Dust Actually Damage My Computer? What To Do If You Get a Virus on Your Computer Why Enabling “Do Not Track” Doesn’t Stop You From Being Tracked

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  • Calculate time in all countries for fixed time in one of them [migrated]

    - by Muiz
    I have table with all countries GMT/UTC timezones, I need to see what time is in the rest of the countries when in USA is 11am-3pm Not on particular date just know the difference in time. I did my calculation like that I -5 GMT in USA and time is 11am then in Russia for example is +4 GMT. 5+4+11=20pm in Russia when USA is 11am, this works with countries that have + GMT zone but ones that have minus it shows wrong time. I am working in Excel please help me with advice on how to do it.

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  • WS2008 NTP - Using time.windows.com,0x9 - Time always skewed forwards

    - by David
    I have a domain controller configured to use time.windows.com (with 0x09 flags set). I've noticed that frequently the systems' clock is fast - it varies from 10 minutes to even 45 minutes. I always have to keep resetting the system date/time back to what it should be. When I run "w32tm /query /source" it tells me it's using time.windows.com, and obviously I trust Microsoft not to serve incorrect times, but why is my server's clock fast? EDIT: There are a few Time-Service events in the System log: Event ID: 142 Message: The time service has stopped advertising as a time source because the local clock is not synchronized. Event ID: 139 Message: The time service has started advertising as a time source. These two messages appear in pairs every hour or so. Event 142 appears 14 to 16 minutes after 139 appears. Going back a few months, these events appear: Event ID: 35 Message: The time service is now synchronizing the system time with the time source time.windows.com,0x9 (ntp.m|0x9|0.0.0.0:123-65.55.21.21:123). Event ID: 37 Message: The time provider NtpClient is currently receiving valid time data from time.windows.com,0x9 (ntp.m|0x9|0.0.0.0:123-65.55.21.21:123). Event ID: 47 Message: Time Provider NtpClient: No valid response has been received from manually configured peer time.windows.com,0x9 after 8 attempts to contact it. This peer will be discarded as a time source and NtpClient will attempt to discover a new peer with this DNS name. The error was: The time sample was rejected because: The peer is not synchronized, or it has been too long since the peer's last synchronization. These three events only appear once in the log, back in October.

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  • LEGO Lord of the Rings Cut Scenes Spliced into a Full Length Movie [Video]

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    If you take all the cut scenes from the LEGO Lord of the Rings video game and splice them end-to-end, the result is an hour and a half LEGO Lord of the Rings movie. Check out the full video here. Courtesy of SpaceTopGames, this mega splice includes every cut scene from the video game, weighs in at one hour and thirty one minutes, and actually works really well as a movie when strung all together. LEGO Lord of the Rings – All Cutscenes [via Freeware Genius] HTG Explains: Does Your Android Phone Need an Antivirus? How To Use USB Drives With the Nexus 7 and Other Android Devices Why Does 64-Bit Windows Need a Separate “Program Files (x86)” Folder?

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  • How do NTP Servers Manage to Stay so Accurate?

    - by Akemi Iwaya
    Many of us have had the occasional problem with our computers and other devices retaining accurate time settings, but a quick sync with an NTP server makes all well again. But if our own devices can lose accuracy, how do NTP servers manage to stay so accurate? Today’s Question & Answer session comes to us courtesy of SuperUser—a subdivision of Stack Exchange, a community-driven grouping of Q&A web sites. Photo courtesy of LEOL30 (Flickr). The Question SuperUser reader Frank Thornton wants to know how NTP servers are able to remain so accurate: I have noticed that on my servers and other machines, the clocks always drift so that they have to sync up to remain accurate. How do the NTP server clocks keep from drifting and always remain so accurate? How do the NTP servers manage to remain so accurate? The Answer SuperUser contributor Michael Kjorling has the answer for us: NTP servers rely on highly accurate clocks for precision timekeeping. A common time source for central NTP servers are atomic clocks, or GPS receivers (remember that GPS satellites have atomic clocks onboard). These clocks are defined as accurate since they provide a highly exact time reference. There is nothing magical about GPS or atomic clocks that make them tell you exactly what time it is. Because of how atomic clocks work, they are simply very good at, having once been told what time it is, keeping accurate time (since the second is defined in terms of atomic effects). In fact, it is worth noting that GPS time is distinct from the UTC that we are more used to seeing. These atomic clocks are in turn synchronized against International Atomic Time or TAI in order to not only accurately tell the passage of time, but also the time. Once you have an exact time on one system connected to a network like the Internet, it is a matter of protocol engineering enabling transfer of precise times between hosts over an unreliable network. In this regard a Stratum 2 (or farther from the actual time source) NTP server is no different from your desktop system syncing against a set of NTP servers. By the time you have a few accurate times (as obtained from NTP servers or elsewhere) and know the rate of advancement of your local clock (which is easy to determine), you can calculate your local clock’s drift rate relative to the “believed accurate” passage of time. Once locked in, this value can then be used to continuously adjust the local clock to make it report values very close to the accurate passage of time, even if the local real-time clock itself is highly inaccurate. As long as your local clock is not highly erratic, this should allow keeping accurate time for some time even if your upstream time source becomes unavailable for any reason. Some NTP client implementations (probably most ntpd daemon or system service implementations) do this, and others (like ntpd’s companion ntpdate which simply sets the clock once) do not. This is commonly referred to as a drift file because it persistently stores a measure of clock drift, but strictly speaking it does not have to be stored as a specific file on disk. In NTP, Stratum 0 is by definition an accurate time source. Stratum 1 is a system that uses a Stratum 0 time source as its time source (and is thus slightly less accurate than the Stratum 0 time source). Stratum 2 again is slightly less accurate than Stratum 1 because it is syncing its time against the Stratum 1 source and so on. In practice, this loss of accuracy is so small that it is completely negligible in all but the most extreme of cases. Have something to add to the explanation? Sound off in the comments. Want to read more answers from other tech-savvy Stack Exchange users? Check out the full discussion thread here.

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  • See the Lord of the Rings Epic from the Perspective of Mordor [eBook]

    - by ETC
    Much like the wildly popular book “Wicked” mixed up the good/bad dichotomy in the Wizard of Oz, “The Last Ring-Bearer” shows us the Mordor’s take on the Lord of the Rings. The work of a Russian paleontologist, Kirill Yeskov, “The Last Ring-Bearer” frames the conflict in the Lord of the Rings from the perspective of the citizens of Mordor. Salon magazine offers this summary, as part of their larger review: In Yeskov’s retelling, the wizard Gandalf is a war-monger intent on crushing the scientific and technological initiative of Mordor and its southern allies because science “destroys the harmony of the world and dries up the souls of men!” He’s in cahoots with the elves, who aim to become “masters of the world,” and turn Middle-earth into a “bad copy” of their magical homeland across the sea. Barad-dur, also known as the Dark Tower and Sauron’s citadel, is, by contrast, described as “that amazing city of alchemists and poets, mechanics and astronomers, philosophers and physicians, the heart of the only civilization in Middle-earth to bet on rational knowledge and bravely pitch its barely adolescent technology against ancient magic.” Hit up the link below to grab a PDF of the official English translation of Yeskov’s work. The Last Ring-Bearer [via Salon] Latest Features How-To Geek ETC How To Make Hundreds of Complex Photo Edits in Seconds With Photoshop Actions How to Enable User-Specific Wireless Networks in Windows 7 How to Use Google Chrome as Your Default PDF Reader (the Easy Way) How To Remove People and Objects From Photographs In Photoshop Ask How-To Geek: How Can I Monitor My Bandwidth Usage? Internet Explorer 9 RC Now Available: Here’s the Most Interesting New Stuff Lucky Kid Gets Playable Angry Birds Cake [Video] See the Lord of the Rings Epic from the Perspective of Mordor [eBook] Smart Taskbar Is a Thumb Friendly Android Task Launcher Comix is an Awesome Comics Archive Viewer for Linux Get the MakeUseOf eBook Guide to Speeding Up Windows for Free Need Tech Support? Call the Star Wars Help Desk! [Video Classic]

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  • heroku time zone problem, logging local server time

    - by Ole Morten Amundsen
    UPDATE: Ok, I didn't formulate a good Q to be answered. I still struggle with heroku being on -07:00 UTC and I at +02:200 UTC. Q: How do I get the log written in the correct Time.zone ? The 9 hours difference, heroku (us west) - norway, is distracting to work with. I get this in my production.log (using heroku logs): Processing ProductionController#create to xml (for 81.26.51.35 at 2010-04-28 23:00:12) [POST] How do I get it to write 2010-04-29 08:00:12 +02:00 GMT ? Note that I'm running at heroku and cannot set the server time myself, as one could do at your amazon EC2 servers. Below is my previous question, I'll leave it be as it holds some interesting information about time and zones. Why does Time.now yield the server local time when I have set the another time zone in my environment.rb config.time_zone = 'Copenhagen' I've put this in a view <p> Time.zone <%= Time.zone %> </p> <p> Time.now <%= Time.now %> </p> <p> Time.now.utc <%= Time.now.utc %> </p> <p> Time.zone.now <%= Time.zone.now %> </p> <p> Time.zone.today <%= Time.zone.today %> </p> rendering this result on my app at heroku Time.zone (GMT+01:00) Copenhagen Time.now Mon Apr 26 08:28:21 -0700 2010 Time.now.utc Mon Apr 26 15:28:21 UTC 2010 Time.zone.now 2010-04-26 17:28:21 +0200 Time.zone.today 2010-04-26 Time.zone.now yields the correct result. Do I have to switch from Time.now to Time.zone.now, everywhere? Seems cumbersome. I truly don't care what the local time of the server is, it's giving me loads of trouble due to extensive use of Time.now. Am I misunderstanding anything fundamental here?

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  • JVM system time runs faster than HP UNIX OS system time

    - by winston
    Hello I have the following output from a simple debug jsp: Weblogic Startup Since: Friday, October 19, 2012, 08:36:12 AM Database Current Time: Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 11:43:44 AM Weblogic JVM Current Time: Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 11:45:38 AM Line 1 was a recorded variable during WebLogic webapp startup. Line 2 was output from database query select sysdate from dual; Line 3 was output from java code new Date() I have checked from shell date command that line 2 output conforms with OS time. The output of line 3 was mysterious. I don't know how it comes from Java VM. On another machine with same setting, the same jsp output like this: Weblogic Startup Since: Tuesday, December 11, 2012, 02:29:06 PM Database Current Time: Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 11:51:48 AM Weblogic JVM Current Time: Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 11:51:50 AM Another machine: Weblogic Startup Since: Monday, December 10, 2012, 05:00:34 PM Database Current Time: Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 11:52:03 AM Weblogic JVM Current Time: Wednesday, December 12, 2012, 11:52:07 AM Findings: the pattern shows that the longer Weblogic startup, the larger the discrepancy of OS time with JVM time. Anybody could help on HP JVM? On HP UNIX, NTP was done daily. Anyway here comes the server versions: HP-UX machinex B.11.31 U ia64 2426956366 unlimited-user license java version "1.6.0.04" Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0.04-jinteg_28_apr_2009_04_46-b00) Java HotSpot(TM) Server VM (build 11.3-b02-jre1.6.0.04-rc2, mixed mode) WebLogic Server Version: 10.3.2.0 Java properties java.runtime.name=Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment java.runtime.version=1.6.0.04-jinteg_28_apr_2009_04_46-b00 java.vendor=Hewlett-Packard Co. java.vendor.url=http\://www.hp.com/go/Java java.version=1.6.0.04 java.vm.name=Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM java.vm.info=mixed mode java.vm.specification.vendor=Sun Microsystems Inc. java.vm.vendor="Hewlett-Packard Company" sun.arch.data.model=64 sun.cpu.endian=big sun.cpu.isalist=ia64r0 sun.io.unicode.encoding=UnicodeBig sun.java.launcher=SUN_STANDARD sun.jnu.encoding=8859_1 sun.management.compiler=HotSpot 64-Bit Server Compiler sun.os.patch.level=unknown os.name=HP-UX os.version=B.11.31

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  • Apple: Time capsule, 2 questions

    - by Patrick
    1) Can I use time capsule as server ? Can I run operating systems on it ? 2) I'm using time machine with my mac with time capsule. Let's say my mac crashes, and I cannot use it anymore. Can i restore my mac disk on another laptop from time capsule ? In other words, can I have a perfect copy of my mac hard disk on another mac ? thanks

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  • Windows Media Player - always show Current Time/Total Time

    - by Siim K
    I'm using Windows Media Player 12 on Windows 7. When I open a video file then it by default only shows the current position (time). If I click on it once then it changes to format Current Time / Total Time Is there any way to make this format permanent (registry hack/some setting I have not noticed)? Right now every time I close WMP and open another file it's back to the default (only current time) setting.

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  • Help to calculate hours and minutes between two time periods in Excel 2007

    - by Mestika
    Hi, I’m working on a very simple timesheet for my work in Excel 2007 but have ran into trouble about calculate the hours and minutes between two time periods. I have a field: timestart which could be for example: 08:30 Then I have a field timestop which could be for example: 12:30 I can easy calculate the result myself which is 4 hours but how do I create a “total” table all the way down the cell that calculate the hours spend on each entry? I’ve tried to play around with the time settings but it just give me wrong numbers each time. Sincerely Mestika

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  • How should I log time spent on multiple tasks?

    - by xenoterracide
    In Joel's blog on evidence based scheduling he suggests making estimates based on the smallest unit of work and logging extra work back to the original task. The problem I'm now experiencing is that I'll have create object A with subtask method A which creates object B and test all of the above. I create tasks for each of these that seems to be resulting in ok-ish estimates (need practice), but when I go to log work I find that I worked on 4 tasks at once because I tweak method A and find a bug in the test and refactor object B all while coding it. How should I go about logging this work? should I say I spent, for example, 2 hours on each of the 4 tasks I worked on in the 8 hour day?

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  • Time tracking tool for monitoring application usage

    - by wizlog
    I want to know how I'm really using my computer, and where the time goes (eg. I have an English paper due, and I intend on getting it done, its 2:30 PM... no wait, its 8:30 PM...). What software can tell me- a. what programs I use, and when b. within programs like Google Chrome or Firefox, which tabs do I spend the most time on. (So I know if I'm spending the time playing a game, or watching a movie on Hulu...)

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  • How to change time (Advanced Eastern Time) on Slackware 8.1

    - by r0ca
    Hi all, I have a linux (Slackware) machine and the time/date is like, June 23rd 2003, 10:00am (It's 11 here) and I am not able to set the time to have it correct. I change the timezome to Montreal but the time is still wrong. Is there a way to force it to sync with my domain controler or even another online NTP server? Thanks, David.

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  • Amazon EC2 instances changes server time/date on reboots and other time weirdness

    - by puffpio
    I have a windows instance up in EC2. I manually set the timezone to Pacific. 1) For some reason using window's built in time sync doesn't work in the instance...but whatever. I turn off automatic time syncing... but 2) On reboot the time on the server changes! For example, if i reboot it at 4PM on Wednesday, when the server comes back up it will read 12 noon on Thursday! As a result any access to Amazon's other services like SImpleDB fail because the timestamps generated are too far off the current time. Has anyone seen this or figured this out?

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