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  • Why is Robert C. Martin called Uncle Bob?

    - by Lernkurve
    Is there a story behind it? I did a Google search for "Why is Robert C. Martin called Uncle Bob?" but didn't find an answer. More context There is this pretty well-know person in the software engineering world named Robert C. Martin. He speaks at conferences and has published many excellent books one of which is Clean Code (Amazon). He is the founder and CEO of Object Mentor Inc. Robert C. Martin is also called Uncle Bob. But I can't figure out why.

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  • Not so long ago in a city not so far away by Carlos Martin

    - by Maria Sandu
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 This is the story of how the EMEA Presales Center turned an Oracle intern into a trusted technology advisor for both Oracle’s Sales and customers. It was the summer of 2011 when I was finishing my Computer Engineering studies as well as my internship at Oracle when I was offered what could possibly be THE dream job for any young European Computer Engineer. Apart from that, it also seemed like the role was particularly tailored to me as I could leverage almost everything I learned at University and during the internship. And all of it in one of the best cities to live in, not only from my home country but arguably from Europe: Malaga! A day at EPC As part of the EPC Technology pillar, and later on completely focused on WebCenter, there was no way to describe a normal day on the job as each day had something unique. Some days I was researching documentation in order to elaborate accurate answers for a customer’s question within a Request for Information or Proposal (RFI/RFP), other days I was doing heavy programming in order to bring a Proof of Concept (PoC) for a customer to life and last not but least, some days I presented to the customer via webconference the demo I built for them the past weeks. So as you can see, the role has research, development and presentation, could you ask for more? Well, don’t worry because there IS more! Internationality As the organization’s name suggests, EMEA Presales Center, it is the Center of Presales within Europe, Middle East and Africa so I got the chance to work with great professionals from all this regions, expanding my network and learning things from one country to apply them to others. In addition to that, the teams based in the Malaga office are comprised of many young professionals hailing mainly from Western and Central European countries (although there are a couple of exceptions!) with very different backgrounds and personalities which guaranteed many laughs and stories during lunch or coffee breaks (or even while working on projects!). Furthermore, having EPC offices in Bucharest and Bangalore and thanks to today’s tele-presence technologies, I was working every day with people from India or Romania as if they were sitting right next to me and the bonding with them got stronger day by day. Career development Apart from the research and self-study I’ve earlier mentioned, one of the EPC’s Key Performance Indicators (KPI) is that 15% of your time is spent on training so you get lots and lots of trainings in order to develop both your technical product knowledge and your presentation, negotiation and other soft skills. Sometimes the training is via webcast, sometimes the trainer comes to the office and sometimes, the best times, you get to travel abroad in order to attend a training, which also helps you to further develop your network by meeting face to face with many people you only know from some email or instant messaging interaction. And as the months go by, your skills improving at a very fast pace, your relevance increasing with each new project you successfully deliver, it’s only a matter of time (and a bit of self-promoting!) that you get the attention of the manager of a more senior team and are offered the opportunity to take a new step in your professional career. For me it took 2 years to move to my current position, Technology Sales Consultant at the Oracle Direct organization. During those 2 years I had built a good relationship with the Oracle Direct Spanish sales and sales managers, who are also based in the Malaga office. I supported their former Sales Consultant in a couple of presentations and demos and were very happy with my overall performance and attitude so even before the position got eventually vacant, I got a heads-up from then in advance that their current Sales Consultant was going to move to a different position. To me it felt like a natural step, same as when I joined EPC, I had at least a 50% of the “homework” already done but wanted to experience that extra 50% to add new product and soft skills to my arsenal. The rest is history, I’ve been in the role for more than half a year as I’m writing this, achieved already some important wins, gained a lot of trust and confidence in front of customers and broadened my view of Oracle’s Fusion Middleware portfolio. I look back at the 2 years I spent in EPC and think: “boy, I’d recommend that experience to absolutely anyone with the slightest interest in IT, there are so many different things you can do as there are different kind of roles you can end up taking thanks to the experience gained at EPC” /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

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  • "Agile Principles, Patterns, and Practices in C#": Is this just a .NET-translation of the popular Uncle Bob book?

    - by Louis Rhys
    I found this book sold on Amazon Agile Principles, Patterns, and Practices in C#, written by Robert C Martin and Micah Martin. Is it merely a .NET port of the older, more popular Agile Software Development, Principles, Patterns, and Practices? Or is it just a new book trying to take advantage of the other book's popularity? If I am a .NET developer who hasn't read either book, which one would you recommend?

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  • Sourcecode for Paymentroll example in Robert C. Martin book

    - by bitbonk
    Throughout the book "Agile Principles, Patterns, and Practices in C#" by Robert C. Martin a small Paymentroll application is build. While most of the source code is printed in place, some classes are missing and some are incomplete. The book says on the firest page: The book includes many source code examples that are also available for download from the authors' Web site. Unfortunately this seems to be a lie. Unless either this is not the author's website (the book forgets to mention the authors website adress) or I am blind. Does anyone have the comlete source code for that book preferably in form of a Visual Studio project or knows where I can find it.

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  • Question About Example In Robert C Martin's _Clean Code_

    - by Jonah
    This is a question about the concept of a function doing only one thing. It won't make sense without some relevant passages for context, so I'll quote them here. They appear on pgs 37-38: To say this differently, we want to be able to read the program as though it were a set of TO paragraphs, each of which is describing the current level of abstraction and referencing subsequent TO paragraphs at the next level down. To include the setups and teardowns, we include setups, then we include the test page content, and then we include the teardowns. To include the setups, we include the suite setup if this is a suite, then we include the regular setup. It turns out to be very dif?cult for programmers to learn to follow this rule and write functions that stay at a single level of abstraction. But learning this trick is also very important. It is the key to keeping functions short and making sure they do “one thing.” Making the code read like a top-down set of TO paragraphs is an effective technique for keeping the abstraction level consistent. He then gives the following example of poor code: public Money calculatePay(Employee e) throws InvalidEmployeeType { switch (e.type) { case COMMISSIONED: return calculateCommissionedPay(e); case HOURLY: return calculateHourlyPay(e); case SALARIED: return calculateSalariedPay(e); default: throw new InvalidEmployeeType(e.type); } } and explains the problems with it as follows: There are several problems with this function. First, it’s large, and when new employee types are added, it will grow. Second, it very clearly does more than one thing. Third, it violates the Single Responsibility Principle7 (SRP) because there is more than one reason for it to change. Fourth, it violates the Open Closed Principle8 (OCP) because it must change whenever new types are added. Now my questions. To begin, it's clear to me how it violates the OCP, and it's clear to me that this alone makes it poor design. However, I am trying to understand each principle, and it's not clear to me how SRP applies. Specifically, the only reason I can imagine for this method to change is the addition of new employee types. There is only one "axis of change." If details of the calculation needed to change, this would only affect the submethods like "calculateHourlyPay()" Also, while in one sense it is obviously doing 3 things, those three things are all at the same level of abstraction, and can all be put into a TO paragraph no different from the example one: TO calculate pay for an employee, we calculate commissioned pay if the employee is commissioned, hourly pay if he is hourly, etc. So aside from its violation of the OCP, this code seems to conform to Martin's other requirements of clean code, even though he's arguing it does not. Can someone please explain what I am missing? Thanks.

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  • Game of Thrones : l'arme secrète de George R. R. Martin contre les virus, un PC sous DOS avec Wordstar 4.0 et sans internet

    Game of Thrones : L'arme secrète de George R. R. Martin contre les virus George R. R. MARTIN, auteur de la saga Game of Thrones et co-producteur de la série du même nom a révélé à un Talk-show américain avoir une arme secrète contre les virus qui pourraient attaquer son ordinateur et détruire ses documents. Pour écrire ses livres, il se sert d'un ordinateur non relié à internet et qui fonctionne sous DOS et comme traitement de texte Wordstar 4,0 ! À la question « pourquoi rester avec ce vieux...

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  • Installing MySQL without root access

    - by vinay
    I am trying to install MySQL without root permissions. I ran through the following steps: Download MySQL Community Server 5.5.8 Linux - Generic Compressed TAR Archive Unpack it, for example to: /home/martin/mysql Create a my.cnf file in your home directory. The file contents should be: [server] user=martin basedir=/home/martin/mysql datadir=/home/martin/sql_data socket=/home/martin/socket port=3666 Go to the /home/martin/mysql directory and execute: ./scripts/mysql_install_db --defaults-file=~/my.cnf --user=martin --basedir=/home/martin/mysql --datadir=/home/martin/sql_data --socket=/home/martin/socket Your MySQL server is ready. Start it with this command: ./bin/mysqld_safe --defaults-file=~/my.cnf & When I try to change the password of MySQL it gives the error: Cannot connect to mysql server through socket '/tmp/mysql.sock' How can I change this path and see whether the mysql.sock is created or not?

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  • Visual Studio ALM MVP of the Year 2011

    - by Martin Hinshelwood
    For some reason this year some of my peers decided to vote for me as a contender for Visual Studio ALM MVP of the year. I am not sure what I did to deserve this, but a number of people have commented that I have a rather useful blog. I feel wholly unworthy to join the ranks of previous winners: Ed Blankenship (2010) Martin Woodward (2009) Thank you to everyone who voted regardless of who you voted for. If there was a prize for the best group of MVP’s then the Visual Studio ALM MVP would be a clear winner, as would the product group of product groups that is Visual Studio ALM Group. To use a phrase that I have learned since moving to Seattle and probably use too much: you guys are all just awesome. I have tried my best in the last year to document not only every problem that I have had with Team Foundation Server (TFS), but also to document as many of the things I am doing as possible. I have taken some of Adam Cogan’s rules to heart and when a customer asks me a question I always blog the answer and send them a link. This allows both my blog and my understanding of TFS to grow while creating a useful bank of content. The idea is that if one customer asks, all benefit. I try, when writing for my blog, to capture both the essence and the context for a problem being solved. This allows more people to benefit as they do not need to understand the specifics of an environment to gain value. I have a number of goals for this year that I think will help increase value in the community: persuade my new colleagues at Northwest Cadence to do more blogging (Steve, Jeff, Shad and Rennie) Rangers Project – TFS Iteration Automation with Willy-Peter Schaub, Bill Essary, Martin Hinshelwood, Mike Fourie, Jeff Bramwell and Brian Blackman Write a book on the Team Foundation Server API with Willy-Peter Schaub, Mike Fourie and Jeff Bramwell write more useful blog posts I do not think that these things are beyond the realms of do-ability, but we will see…

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  • ubuntu one not syncing

    - by Martin
    I am really starting to despair as I have been trying ubuntu one for several months, trying it on several machines, and it has caused me loads of different issues wasting me a lot of time. It is not straight forward to use, it should be a piece of software that runs in background and users should not think about checking all the time if it is really doing it's job. Of course I have been searching around this website and other forums but couldn't find an answer to my situation. Yesterday I had several problems with the client not syncing and using a lot of the machine's RAM, up and CPU. I had to reboot on several occasions and leave the office's PC on overnight in order to sync a few files of not more than a few MB. Today I am experiencing another problem: I have decided to do a test putting a small file in my ubuntu one shared folder. Ubuntu one is not detecting it (now already more than an hour), therefore not uploading it to the server. [email protected]:~$ u1sdtool --status State: QUEUE_MANAGER connection: With User With Network description: processing the commands pool is_connected: True is_error: False is_online: True queues: IDLE and [email protected]:~$ u1sdtool --current-transfers Current uploads: 0 Current downloads: 0 I am running Ubuntu 11.04 64 with all recent updates. On my other machine the transfer of files seems to be completely frozen, with around 10 files in the queue but no transfer whatsoever. Another curious issue is on my Ubuntu 10.10 laptop where ubuntu one seems to have completly disappeared from Nautilus context menu, folder/file sync status icons missing. I have therefore been forced to upgrade to 11.04 on this machine. Anyway, now I would like to solve the ** processing the commands pool ** issue and make sure the client

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  • Are today's general purpose languages at the right level of abstarction ?

    - by KeesDijk
    Today Uncle Bob Martin, a genuine hero, showed this video In this video Bob Martin claims that our programming languages are at the right level for our problems at this time. One of the reasons I get from this video as that he Bob Martin sees us detail managers and our problems are at the detail level. This is the first time I have to disagree with Bob Martin and was wondering what the people at programmers think about this. First there is a difference between MDA and MDE MDA in itself hasn't worked and I blame way to much formalisation at a level you can't formalize these kind of problems. MDE and MDD are still trying to prove themselves and in my mind show great promise. e.g. look at MetaEdit The detail still needs to be management in my mind, but you do so in one place (framework or generators) instead of at multiple places. Right for our kind of problems ? I think depends on what problems you look at. Do the current programming languages keep up with the current demands on time to market ? Are they good at bridging the business IT communication gap ? So what do you think ?

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  • Are today's general purpose languages at the right level of abstraction ?

    - by KeesDijk
    Today Uncle Bob Martin, a genuine hero, showed this video In this video Bob Martin claims that our programming languages are at the right level for our problems at this time. One of the reasons I get from this video as that Bob Martin sees us as detail managers and our problems are at the detail level. This is the first time I have to disagree with Bob Martin and was wondering what the people at programmers think about this. First there is a difference between MDA and MDE MDA in itself hasn't worked and I blame way to much formalisation at a level you can't formalize these kind of problems. MDE and MDD are still trying to prove themselves and in my mind show great promise. e.g. look at MetaEdit The detail still needs to be management in my mind, but you do so in one place (framework or generators) instead of at multiple places. Right for our kind of problems ? I think depends on what problems you look at. Do the current programming languages keep up with the current demands on time to market ? Are they good at bridging the business IT communication gap ? So what do you think ?

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  • Slide-decks from recent Adelaide SQL Server UG meetings

    - by Rob Farley
    The UK has been well represented this summer at the Adelaide SQL Server User Group, with presentations from Chris Testa-O’Neill (isn’t that the right link? Maybe try this one) and Martin Cairney. The slides are available here and here. I thought I’d particularly mention Martin’s, and how it’s relevant to this month’s T-SQL Tuesday. Martin spoke about Policy-Based Management and the Enterprise Policy Management Framework – something which is remarkably under-used, and yet which can really impact your ability to look after environments. If you have policies set up, then you can easily test each of your SQL instances to see if they are still satisfying a set of policies as defined. Automation (the topic of this month’s T-SQL Tuesday) should mean that your life is made easier, thereby enabling to you to do more. It shouldn’t remove the human element, but should remove (most of) the human errors. People still need to manage the situation, and work out what needs to be done, etc. We haven’t reached a point where computers can replace people, but they are very good at replace the mundaneness and monotony of our jobs. They’ve made our lives more interesting (although many would rightly argue that they have also made our lives more complex) by letting us focus on the stuff that changes. Martin named his talk Put Your Feet Up, which nicely expresses the fact that managing systems shouldn’t be about running around checking things all the time. It must be about having systems in place which tell you when things aren’t going well. It’s never quite as simple as being able to actually put your feet up, but certainly no system should require constant attention. It’s definitely a policy we at LobsterPot adhere to, whether it’s an alert to let us know that an ETL package has run successfully, or a script that generates some code for a report. If things can be automated, it reduces the chance of error, reduces the repetitive nature of work, and in general, keeps both consultants and clients much happier.

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  • Slide-decks from recent Adelaide SQL Server UG meetings

    - by Rob Farley
    The UK has been well represented this summer at the Adelaide SQL Server User Group, with presentations from Chris Testa-O’Neill (isn’t that the right link? Maybe try this one) and Martin Cairney. The slides are available here and here. I thought I’d particularly mention Martin’s, and how it’s relevant to this month’s T-SQL Tuesday. Martin spoke about Policy-Based Management and the Enterprise Policy Management Framework – something which is remarkably under-used, and yet which can really impact your ability to look after environments. If you have policies set up, then you can easily test each of your SQL instances to see if they are still satisfying a set of policies as defined. Automation (the topic of this month’s T-SQL Tuesday) should mean that your life is made easier, thereby enabling to you to do more. It shouldn’t remove the human element, but should remove (most of) the human errors. People still need to manage the situation, and work out what needs to be done, etc. We haven’t reached a point where computers can replace people, but they are very good at replace the mundaneness and monotony of our jobs. They’ve made our lives more interesting (although many would rightly argue that they have also made our lives more complex) by letting us focus on the stuff that changes. Martin named his talk Put Your Feet Up, which nicely expresses the fact that managing systems shouldn’t be about running around checking things all the time. It must be about having systems in place which tell you when things aren’t going well. It’s never quite as simple as being able to actually put your feet up, but certainly no system should require constant attention. It’s definitely a policy we at LobsterPot adhere to, whether it’s an alert to let us know that an ETL package has run successfully, or a script that generates some code for a report. If things can be automated, it reduces the chance of error, reduces the repetitive nature of work, and in general, keeps both consultants and clients much happier.

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  • Scrum for Team Foundation Server 2010

    - by Martin Hinshelwood
    I will be presenting a session on “Scrum for TFS2010” not once, but twice! If you are going to be at the Aberdeen Partner Group meeting on 27th April, or DDD Scotland on 8th May then you may be able to catch my session. Credit: I want to give special thanks to Aaron Bjork from Microsoft who provided me with most of my material He is a Scrum and Power Point genius. Scrum for Team Foundation Server 2010 Synopsis Visual Studio ALM (formerly Visual Studio Team System (VSTS)) and Team Foundation Server (TFS) are the cornerstones of development on the Microsoft .NET platform. These are the best tools for a team to have successful projects and for the developers to have a focused and smooth software development process. For TFS 2010 Microsoft is heavily investing in Scrum and has already started moving some teams across to using it. Martin will not be going in depth with Scrum but you can find out more about Scrum by reading the Scrum Guide and you can even asses your Scrum knowledge by having a go at the Scrum Open Assessment. Come and see Martin Hinshelwood, Visual Studio ALM MVP and Solution Architect from SSW show you: How to successfully gather requirements with User stories How to plan a project using TFS 2010 and Scrum How to work with a product backlog in TFS 2010 The right way to plan a sprint with TFS 2010 Tracking your progress The right way to use work items What you can use from the built in reporting as well as the Project portals available on from the SharePoint dashboard The important reports to give your Product Owner / Project Manager Walk away knowing how to see the project health and progress. Visual Studio ALM is designed to help address many of these traditional problems faced by teams. It does so by providing a set of integrated tools to help teams improve their software development activities and to help managers better support the software development processes. During this session we will cover the lifecycle of creating work items and how this fits into Scrum using Visual Studio ALM and Team Foundation Server. If you want to know more about how to do Scrum with TFS then there is a new course that has been created in collaboration with Microsoft and Scrum.org that is going to be the official course for working with TFS 2010. SSW has Professional Scrum Developer Trainers who specialise in training your developers in implementing Scrum with Microsoft's Visual Studio ALM tools. Ken Schwaber and and Sam Guckenheimer: Professional Scrum Development Technorati Tags: Scrum,VS ALM,VS 2010,TFS 2010

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  • Scrum for Team Foundation Server 2010

    - by Martin Hinshelwood
    I will be presenting a session on “Scrum for TFS2010” not once, but twice! If you are going to be at the Aberdeen Partner Group meeting on 27th April, or DDD Scotland on 8th May then you may be able to catch my session. Credit: I want to give special thanks to Aaron Bjork from Microsoft who provided me with most of my material He is a Scrum and Power Point genius. Updated 9th May 2010 – I have now presented at both of these sessions  and posted about it. Scrum for Team Foundation Server 2010 Synopsis Visual Studio ALM (formerly Visual Studio Team System (VSTS)) and Team Foundation Server (TFS) are the cornerstones of development on the Microsoft .NET platform. These are the best tools for a team to have successful projects and for the developers to have a focused and smooth software development process. For TFS 2010 Microsoft is heavily investing in Scrum and has already started moving some teams across to using it. Martin will not be going in depth with Scrum but you can find out more about Scrum by reading the Scrum Guide and you can even asses your Scrum knowledge by having a go at the Scrum Open Assessment. You can also read SSW’s Rules to Better Scrum using TFS which have been developed during our own Scrum implementations. Come and see Martin Hinshelwood, Visual Studio ALM MVP and Solution Architect from SSW show you: How to successfully gather requirements with User stories How to plan a project using TFS 2010 and Scrum How to work with a product backlog in TFS 2010 The right way to plan a sprint with TFS 2010 Tracking your progress The right way to use work items What you can use from the built in reporting as well as the Project portals available on from the SharePoint dashboard The important reports to give your Product Owner / Project Manager Walk away knowing how to see the project health and progress. Visual Studio ALM is designed to help address many of these traditional problems faced by teams. It does so by providing a set of integrated tools to help teams improve their software development activities and to help managers better support the software development processes. During this session we will cover the lifecycle of creating work items and how this fits into Scrum using Visual Studio ALM and Team Foundation Server. If you want to know more about how to do Scrum with TFS then there is a new course that has been created in collaboration with Microsoft and Scrum.org that is going to be the official course for working with TFS 2010. SSW has Professional Scrum Developer Trainers who specialise in training your developers in implementing Scrum with Microsoft's Visual Studio ALM tools. Ken Schwaber and and Sam Guckenheimer: Professional Scrum Development Technorati Tags: Scrum,VS ALM,VS 2010,TFS 2010

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  • Exchange ActiveSync with multiple email addresses

    - by Martin Robins
    I have Exchange 2007 SP2, and I have successfully connected my Windows Mobile phone via Exchange ActiveSync and can send and receive emails. I have two addresses within my Exchange mailbox, [email protected] and [email protected], with the second being set as the reply address. When I view my email addresses on my device, I see both of these email addresses, however when I send new messages it always selects the first email address as the reply address and not the second. It is probably worth pointing out that, like in the example provided above, the email addresses are shown alphabetically and the address being selected is the first alphabetically (just in case that matters). I would like to set the device to always select the reply address specified in the mailbox, or at least be able to ensure that the address I want is selected if I have to select it manually on the device, but cannot find any way to make this happen. Can anybody help?

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  • Exchange ActiveSync with muliple email addresses

    - by Martin Robins
    I have Exchange 2007 SP2, and I have successfully connected my Windows Mobile phone via Exchange ActiveSync and can send and receive emails. I have two addresses within my Exchange mailbox, [email protected] and [email protected], with the second being set as the reply address. When I view my email addresses on my device, I see both of these email addresses, however when I send new messages it always selects the first email address as the reply address and not the second. It is probably worth pointing out that, like in the example provided above, the email addresses are shown alphabetically and the address being selected is the first alphabetically (just in case that matters). I would like to set the device to always select the reply address specified in the mailbox, or at least be able to ensure that the address I want is selected if I have to select it manually on the device, but cannot find any way to make this happen. Can anybody help?

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  • How to create an NFS proxy by using kernel server & client?

    - by Martin C. Martin
    I have a file server that exports as NFS. On an Ubuntu machine I mount that, then try to export it as an NFS volume. When I go to export it, I get the message: exportfs: /test/nfs-mount-point does not support NFS export How can I get this to work, or at least get more information as to what the problem is? Exact steps: Unbuntu 12.04 mount -f nfs myfileserver.com:/server-dir /test/nfs-mount-point [Works fine, I can read & write files] /etc/exports contains: /test/nfs-mount-point *(rw,no_subtree_check) sudo /etc/init.d/nfs-kernel-server restart Stopping NFS kernel daemon [ OK ] Unexporting directories for NFS kernel daemon... [ OK ] Exporting directories for NFS kernel daemon... exportfs: /test/nfs-mount-point does not support NFS export [ OK ] Starting NFS kernel daemon [ OK ]

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  • Sharing code in LGPL and proprietary software

    - by Martin
    Hi I'm working on a piece of software that'll be released as a dll under LGPL. The software interfaces with hardware from a small company that has provided me with the needed libraries and some code to use them correctly (not only headers but its all in a separate file). As far as i know, the same code is used in their proprietary software that they don't intend to open source but they'd be fine releasing the piece of code they've given me. Now here's the question: What license could be used on the code I got from the company? I guess using GPL or LGPL would make them violate GPL when using the same code in their other software. Is MIT a good idea? Is it ok to just include a file with MIT license on it in my otherwise LGPL:ed project? Since I'm not the copyright holder, I'd have to ask the company to apply the license obviously but that shouldn't be a problem. Thanks /Martin

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  • Can I perform a distribution upgrade without rebooting?

    - by Martin Eve
    Hi, I would, ideally, like to run a distribution upgrade that doesn't end in a complete reboot of the machine (owing to an irritation in my hardware that requires a period of disconnection from the power supply before my SSD can be detected). What would be the procedure for doing this from a desktop environment? I would image: dist-upgrade shutdown all graphical services restart X I'd appreciate any advice (particularly on the exact procedure for step 2, if this correct). NB. I'm using KSplice for in-memory kernel patching, so the kernel is already dealt with. Many thanks, Martin

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  • Open source engagement as a professional reference

    - by Martin
    if one commits his or her time to an open source project, he or she may be invest a substantial amount of time without getting paid. As much as altruism is appreciable, I wonder whether it "counts" as an activity which can be shown and is valued in job applications. If the company is worth your time and working power, which it should be in my honest opinion. So I wonder whether there is something like a common practice in open source projects for this matters. Say, something like Mr. Martin has been working on our project for five years and has contributed this and that,[...] I we wish him very best for his future. Mr. ChiefofProject I think this is a just concern. Do have experiences you can share?

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  • Silverlight Cream for January 14, 2011 -- #1027

    - by Dave Campbell
    In this Issue: Sigurd Snørteland, Yochay Kiriaty, WindowsPhoneGeek(-2-), Jesse Liberty(-2-), Kunal Chowdhury, Martin Krüger(-2-), Jonathan Cardy. Above the Fold: Silverlight: "Image Viewer using a GridSplitter control" Martin Krüger WP7: "Implementing WP7 ToggleImageControl from the ground up: Part1" WindowsPhoneGeek VS2010 Templates: "MVVM Project Templates for Visual Studio 2010" Jonathan Cardy From SilverlightCream.com: BabySmash7 - a WP7 children's game (source code included) Sigurd Snørteland not only brings Scott Hanselman's Baby Smash to WP7, but he's delivering the source to us as well as discussion of the app. Windows Push Notification Server Side Helper Library Yochay Kiriaty has a tutorial up on Push Notification... not explaining them, but a discussion of a WP7 Push Recipe that provides an easy way for sending all 3 kinds of push notification messages currently supported. Implementing WP7 ToggleImageControl from the ground up: Part1 WindowsPhoneGeek has a great 2-part series up on building a useful WP7 custom control -- a ToggleImage control... this part 1 is definition, deciding on Visual states, etc... buckle up... this is good stuff Implementing WP7 ToggleImageControl from the ground up: Part2 Part 2 in WindowsPhoneGeek's series is also up and where the real fun lives -- implementing the behavior of the control... and the source is available at the end of this post. The Full Stack #5 – Entity Framework Code First Jesse Liberty has episode 5 of the "Full Stack" series he and Jon Galloway are doing and are discussing Entity Framework Code First. Windows Phone From Scratch #18 – MVVM Light Toolkit Soup To Nuts 3 Jesse Liberty also has part 3 of his MVVMLight and WP7 post up and is digging into messaging in this one... for example view <--> ViewModel communication. Exploring Ribbon Control for Silverlight (Part - 1) Kunal Chowdhury has part 1 of a series up on using the Silverlight Ribbon Control from DevComponents... lots of information and a great intro to a great control. Image Viewer using a GridSplitter control Martin Krüger has a very nice picture viewer up as a demo and code available that simply uses the GridSplitter to implement tha aperture... check it out. How to: Gentle animation of a magnify effect Martin Krüger's latest is a take-off on a prior post he links to called 'just for fun' in which he smoothly animates a magnify effect... just very cool animation... explanation and source. MVVM Project Templates for Visual Studio 2010 Jonathan Cardy has a couple resources you probably wanna grab... two MVVM project templates for VS2010... one WPF and one Silverlight Stay in the 'Light! Twitter SilverlightNews | Twitter WynApse | WynApse.com | Tagged Posts | SilverlightCream Join me @ SilverlightCream | Phoenix Silverlight User Group Technorati Tags: Silverlight    Silverlight 3    Silverlight 4    Windows Phone MIX10

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  • Expando Object and dynamic property pattern

    - by Al.Net
    I have read about 'dynamic property pattern' of Martin Fowler in his site under the tag 1997 in which he used dictionary kind of stuff to achieve this pattern. And I have come across about Expando object in c# very recently. When I see its implementation, I am able to see IDictionary implemented. So Expando object uses dictionary to store dynamic properties and is it what, Martin Fowler already defined 15 years ago?

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