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  • ASP.NET MVC 3 Hosting :: New Features in ASP.NET MVC 3

    - by mbridge
    Razor View Engine The Razor view engine is a new view engine option for ASP.NET MVC that supports the Razor templating syntax. The Razor syntax is a streamlined approach to HTML templating designed with the goal of being a code driven minimalist templating approach that builds on existing C#, VB.NET and HTML knowledge. The result of this approach is that Razor views are very lean and do not contain unnecessary constructs that get in the way of you and your code. ASP.NET MVC 3 Preview 1 only supports C# Razor views which use the .cshtml file extension. VB.NET support will be enabled in later releases of ASP.NET MVC 3. For more information and examples, see Introducing “Razor” – a new view engine for ASP.NET on Scott Guthrie’s blog. Dynamic View and ViewModel Properties A new dynamic View property is available in views, which provides access to the ViewData object using a simpler syntax. For example, imagine two items are added to the ViewData dictionary in the Index controller action using code like the following: public ActionResult Index() {          ViewData["Title"] = "The Title";          ViewData["Message"] = "Hello World!"; } Those properties can be accessed in the Index view using code like this: <h2>View.Title</h2> <p>View.Message</p> There is also a new dynamic ViewModel property in the Controller class that lets you add items to the ViewData dictionary using a simpler syntax. Using the previous controller example, the two values added to the ViewData dictionary can be rewritten using the following code: public ActionResult Index() {     ViewModel.Title = "The Title";     ViewModel.Message = "Hello World!"; } “Add View” Dialog Box Supports Multiple View Engines The Add View dialog box in Visual Studio includes extensibility hooks that allow it to support multiple view engines, as shown in the following figure: Service Location and Dependency Injection Support ASP.NET MVC 3 introduces improved support for applying Dependency Injection (DI) via Inversion of Control (IoC) containers. ASP.NET MVC 3 Preview 1 provides the following hooks for locating services and injecting dependencies: - Creating controller factories. - Creating controllers and setting dependencies. - Setting dependencies on view pages for both the Web Form view engine and the Razor view engine (for types that derive from ViewPage, ViewUserControl, ViewMasterPage, WebViewPage). - Setting dependencies on action filters. Using a Dependency Injection container is not required in order for ASP.NET MVC 3 to function properly. Global Filters ASP.NET MVC 3 allows you to register filters that apply globally to all controller action methods. Adding a filter to the global filters collection ensures that the filter runs for all controller requests. To register an action filter globally, you can make the following call in the Application_Start method in the Global.asax file: GlobalFilters.Filters.Add(new MyActionFilter()); The source of global action filters is abstracted by the new IFilterProvider interface, which can be registered manually or by using Dependency Injection. This allows you to provide your own source of action filters and choose at run time whether to apply a filter to an action in a particular request. New JsonValueProviderFactory Class The new JsonValueProviderFactory class allows action methods to receive JSON-encoded data and model-bind it to an action-method parameter. This is useful in scenarios such as client templating. Client templates enable you to format and display a single data item or set of data items by using a fragment of HTML. ASP.NET MVC 3 lets you connect client templates easily with an action method that both returns and receives JSON data. Support for .NET Framework 4 Validation Attributes and IvalidatableObject The ValidationAttribute class was improved in the .NET Framework 4 to enable richer support for validation. When you write a custom validation attribute, you can use a new IsValid overload that provides a ValidationContext instance. This instance provides information about the current validation context, such as what object is being validated. This change enables scenarios such as validating the current value based on another property of the model. The following example shows a sample custom attribute that ensures that the value of PropertyOne is always larger than the value of PropertyTwo: public class CompareValidationAttribute : ValidationAttribute {     protected override ValidationResult IsValid(object value,              ValidationContext validationContext) {         var model = validationContext.ObjectInstance as SomeModel;         if (model.PropertyOne > model.PropertyTwo) {            return ValidationResult.Success;         }         return new ValidationResult("PropertyOne must be larger than PropertyTwo");     } } Validation in ASP.NET MVC also supports the .NET Framework 4 IValidatableObject interface. This interface allows your model to perform model-level validation, as in the following example: public class SomeModel : IValidatableObject {     public int PropertyOne { get; set; }     public int PropertyTwo { get; set; }     public IEnumerable<ValidationResult> Validate(ValidationContext validationContext) {         if (PropertyOne <= PropertyTwo) {            yield return new ValidationResult(                "PropertyOne must be larger than PropertyTwo");         }     } } New IClientValidatable Interface The new IClientValidatable interface allows the validation framework to discover at run time whether a validator has support for client validation. This interface is designed to be independent of the underlying implementation; therefore, where you implement the interface depends on the validation framework in use. For example, for the default data annotations-based validator, the interface would be applied on the validation attribute. Support for .NET Framework 4 Metadata Attributes ASP.NET MVC 3 now supports .NET Framework 4 metadata attributes such as DisplayAttribute. New IMetadataAware Interface The new IMetadataAware interface allows you to write attributes that simplify how you can contribute to the ModelMetadata creation process. Before this interface was available, you needed to write a custom metadata provider in order to have an attribute provide extra metadata. This interface is consumed by the AssociatedMetadataProvider class, so support for the IMetadataAware interface is automatically inherited by all classes that derive from that class (notably, the DataAnnotationsModelMetadataProvider class). New Action Result Types In ASP.NET MVC 3, the Controller class includes two new action result types and corresponding helper methods. HttpNotFoundResult Action The new HttpNotFoundResult action result is used to indicate that a resource requested by the current URL was not found. The status code is 404. This class derives from HttpStatusCodeResult. The Controller class includes an HttpNotFound method that returns an instance of this action result type, as shown in the following example: public ActionResult List(int id) {     if (id < 0) {                 return HttpNotFound();     }     return View(); } HttpStatusCodeResult Action The new HttpStatusCodeResult action result is used to set the response status code and description. Permanent Redirect The HttpRedirectResult class has a new Boolean Permanent property that is used to indicate whether a permanent redirect should occur. A permanent redirect uses the HTTP 301 status code. Corresponding to this change, the Controller class now has several methods for performing permanent redirects: - RedirectPermanent - RedirectToRoutePermanent - RedirectToActionPermanent These methods return an instance of HttpRedirectResult with the Permanent property set to true. Breaking Changes The order of execution for exception filters has changed for exception filters that have the same Order value. In ASP.NET MVC 2 and earlier, exception filters on the controller with the same Order as those on an action method were executed before the exception filters on the action method. This would typically be the case when exception filters were applied without a specified order Order value. In MVC 3, this order has been reversed in order to allow the most specific exception handler to execute first. As in earlier versions, if the Order property is explicitly specified, the filters are run in the specified order. Known Issues When you are editing a Razor view (CSHTML file), the Go To Controller menu item in Visual Studio will not be available, and there are no code snippets.

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  • ASP.NET 4 Hosting :: ValidateRequest=”false” not working in .Net 4.0 (VS.Net 2010)

    - by mbridge
    When we migrated our project from .NET 3.5 to .NET 4.0, we can get this error: Error: System.Web.HttpRequestValidationException A potentially dangerous Request.Form value was detected from the client (ctl00$CC$txtAnswer=\”… World\r\n\r\nI am doing Testin…\”).”} System.Web.HttpRequestValidationException at System.Web.HttpRequest.ValidateString(String value, String collectionKey, RequestValidationSource requestCollection)    at System.Web.HttpRequest.ValidateNameValueCollection(NameValueCollection nvc, RequestValidationSource requestCollection)    at System.Web.HttpRequest.get_Form()    at System.Web.HttpRequest.get_HasForm()    at System.Web.UI.Page.GetCollectionBasedOnMethod(Boolean dontReturnNull)    at System.Web.UI.Page.DeterminePostBackMode()    at System.Web.UI.Page.ProcessRequestMain(Boolean includeStagesBeforeAsyncPoint, Boolean includeStagesAfterAsyncPoint)    at System.Web.UI.Page.ProcessRequest(Boolean includeStagesBeforeAsyncPoint, Boolean includeStagesAfterAsyncPoint)    at System.Web.UI.Page.ProcessRequest()    at System.Web.UI.Page.ProcessRequestWithNoAssert(HttpContext context)    at System.Web.UI.Page.ProcessRequest(HttpContext context)    at ASP.displaypost_aspx.ProcessRequest(HttpContext context) in c:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\Temporary ASP.NET Files\root\a37c2f81\cfc4c927\App_Web_i2rujncl.9.cs:line 0    at System.Web.HttpApplication.CallHandlerExecutionStep.System.Web.HttpApplication.IExecutionStep.Execute()    at System.Web.HttpApplication.ExecuteStep(IExecutionStep step, Boolean& completedSynchronously) What is the Cause? In ASP.NET 4, by default, request validation is enabled for all requests, because it is enabled before the BeginRequest phase of an HTTP request. As a result, request validation applies to requests for all ASP.NET resources, not just .aspx page requests. This includes requests such as Web service calls and custom HTTP handlers. Request validation is also active when custom HTTP modules are reading the contents of an HTTP request. Solution: To revert to the behavior of the ASP.NET 2.0 request validation feature, add the following setting in the Web.config file: <system.web>  <httpRuntime requestValidationMode=”2.0? /> </system.web>

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  • SharePoint 2010 Hosting :: Error – HTTP Error 401.1 when Accessing Your SharePoint 2010 Site

    - by mbridge
    When attempting to view a MOSS (SharePoint) 2007 or SharePoint 2010 site locally from a Web Front End (WFE) you get an error stating: “HTTP Error 401.1 – Unauthorized: Access is denied due to invalid credentials.” I have noticed that this happens on Windows 2003/2008 Server SP1/SP2/R2 when using Host Headers and Alternate Access Mappings on a web application in MOSS 2007. If you can access the site from remote machines and cannot access the site from the server itself, then this might be your issue. For all my newer farm installs this includes SharePoint 2007 (MOSS) and SharePoint 2010. I use method number 2 on all SharePoint and SQL Servers in the farm. If you cannot access the web site locally or remotely from other machines then there is an issue with security on the site and/or possibly a Kerberos related security issue I implemented fix #2 listed in the following Microsoft KB Article. I implemented this fix on all servers in the MOSS 2007 Farm (WFE’s and Indexing/Search Server). If using method 1, you would add all Host Headers and Alternate Access Mappings for all web applications to the BackConnectionHostNames value, then you will be able to access the sites locally from the WFE’s. Microsoft KB Link: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/896861 Method 1: Specify Host Names Please follow this steps: 1. Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK. 2. In Registry Editor, locate and then click the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa\MSV1_0 3. Right-click MSV1_0, point to New, and then click Multi-String Value. 4. Type BackConnectionHostNames, and then press ENTER. 5. Right-click BackConnectionHostNames, and then click Modify. 6. In the Value data box, type the host name or the host names for the sites that are on the local computer, and then click OK. 7. Quit Registry Editor, and then restart the IISAdmin service. Method 2: Disable the Loopback Check  Please follow this steps: 1. Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK 2. In Registry Editor, locate and then click the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa 3. Right-click Lsa, point to New, and then click DWORD Value. 4. Type DisableLoopbackCheck, and then press ENTER. 5. Right-click DisableLoopbackCheck, and then click Modify. 6. In the Value data box, type 1, and then click OK. 7. Quit Registry Editor, and then restart your computer. Give it try and good luck.

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  • Visual Studio 2010 Hosting :: Connect to MySQL Database from Visual Studio VS2010

    - by mbridge
    So, in order to connect to a MySql database from VS2010 you need to 1. download the latest version of the MySql Connector/NET from http://www.mysql.com/downloads/connector/net/ 2. install the connector (if you have an older version you need to remove it from Control Panel -> Add / Remove Programs) 3. open Visual Studio 2010 4. open Server Explorer Window (View -> Server Explorer) 5. use Connect to Database button 6. in the Choose Data Source windows select MySql Database and press Continue 7. in the Add Connection window - set server name: 127.0.0.1 or localhost for MySql server running on local machine or an IP address for a remote server - username and password - if the the above data is correct and the connection can be made, you have the possibility to select the database If you want to connect to a MySql database from a C# application (Windows or Web) you can use the next sequence: //define the connection reference and initialize it MySql.Data.MySqlClient.MySqlConnection msqlConnection = null; msqlConnection = new MySql.Data.MySqlClient.MySqlConnection(“server=localhost;user id=UserName;Password=UserPassword;database=DatabaseName;persist security info=False”);     //define the command reference MySql.Data.MySqlClient.MySqlCommand msqlCommand = new MySql.Data.MySqlClient.MySqlCommand();     //define the connection used by the command object msqlCommand.Connection = this.msqlConnection;     //define the command text msqlCommand.CommandText = "SELECT * FROM TestTable;"; try {     //open the connection     this.msqlConnection.Open();     //use a DataReader to process each record     MySql.Data.MySqlClient.MySqlDataReader msqlReader = msqlCommand.ExecuteReader();     while (msqlReader.Read())     {         //do something with each record     } } catch (Exception er) {     //do something with the exception } finally {     //always close the connection     this.msqlConnection.Close(); }.

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  • Silverlight 5 Hosting :: Features in Silverlight 5 and Release Date

    - by mbridge
    Silverlight 5 is finally announced in the Silverlight FireStarter Event on the 2nd December, 2010. This new version of Silverlight which was earlier labeled as 'Future of Microsoft Silverlight' has now come much closer to go live as the first Silverlight 5 Beta version is expected to be shipped during the early months of 2011. However for the full fledged and the final release of Silverlight 5, we have to wait many more months as the same is likely to be made available within the Q3 2011. As would have been usually expected, this latest edition would feature many new capabilities thereby extending the developer productivity to a whole new dimension of premium media experience and feature-rich business applications. It comes along with many new feature updates as well as the inclusion of new technologies to improve the standard of the Silverlight applications which are now fine-tuned to produce next generation business and media solutions that is capable to meet the requirements of the advanced web-based app development. The Silverlight 5 is all set to replace the previous fourth version which now includes more than forty new features while also dropping various deprecated elements that was prevalent earlier. It has brought around some major performance enhancements and also included better support for various other tools and technologies. Following are some of the changes that are registered to be available under the Silverlight 5 Beta edition which is scheduled to be launched during the Q1 2011. Silverlight 5 : Premium Media Experiences The media features of Silverlight 5 has seen some major enhancements with a lot of optimizations being made to deliver richer solutions. It's capability has now been extended to make things easier, faster and capable of performing the desired tasks in the most efficient manner. The Silverlight media solutions has already been a part of many companies in the recent days where various on-demand Silverlight services were featured but with the arrival of the next generation premium media solution of Silverlight 5, it is expected to register new heights of success and global user acclamation for using it with many esteemed web-based projects and media solutions. - The most happening element in the new Silverlight 5 will be its support for utilizing the GPU based hardware acceleration which is intended to lower down the CPU load to a significant extent and thereby allowing faster rendering of media contents without consuming much resources. This feature is believed to be particularly helpful for low configured machines to run full HD media content without any lagging caused due to processor load. It will hence be one great feature to revolutionize the new generation high quality media contents to be available within the web in a more efficient manner with its hardware decoded video playback capabilities. - With the inclusion of hardware video decoding to minimize the processor load, the Silverlight 5 also comes with another optimization enhancement to also reduce the power consumption level by making new methods to deal with the power-saver settings. With this optimization in effect, the computer would be automatically allowed to switch to sleep mode while no video playback is in progress and also to prevent any screensavers to popup and cause annoyances during any video playback. There would also be other power saver options which will be made available to best suit the users requirements and purpose. - The Silverlight trickplay feature is another great way to tweak any silverlight powered media content as is used for many video tutorial sites or for dealing with any sort of presentations. This feature enables the user to modify the playback speed to either slowdown or speedup during the playback durations based on the requirements without compromising on the quality of output. Normally such manipulations always makes the content's audio to go off-pitch, but the same will not be the case with TrickPlay and the audio would seamlessly progress with the video without skipping any of its part. - In addition to all of the above, the new Silverlight 5 will be featuring wireless control of all the media contents by making use of remote controllers. With the use of such remote devices, it will be easier to handle the various media playback controls thereby providing more freedom while experiencing the premium media services. Silverlight 5 : Business Application Development The application development standard has been extended with more possibilities by bringing forth new and useful technologies and also reviving the existing methods to work better than what it was used to. From the UI improvements to advanced technical aspects, the Silverlight 5 scores high on all grounds to produce great next generation business delivered applications by putting in more creativity and resourceful touch to all the apps being produced with it. - The WPF feature of Silverlight is made more effective by introducing new standards of Databinding which is intended to improve the productivity standards of the Silverlight application developer. It brings in a lot of convenience in debugging the databinding components or expressions and hence making things work in a flawless manner. Some additional features related to databinding includes that of Ancestor RelativeSource, Implicit DataTemplates and Model View ViewModel (MVVM) support with DataContextChanged event and many other new features relating it. - It now comes with a refined text and printing service which facilitates better clarity of the text rendering and also many positive changes which are being applied to the layout pattern. New supports has been added to include OpenType font, multi-column text, linked-text containers and character leading support to name a few among the available features.This also includes some important printing aspects like that of Postscript Vector Printing API which allows to program our printing tasks in a user defined way and Pivot functionality for visualization concerns of informations. - The Graphics support is the key improvements being incorporated which now enables to utilize three dimensional graphics pattern using GPU acceleration. It can manage to provide some really cool visualizations being curved to provide media contents within the business apps with also the support for full HD contents at 1080p quality. - Silverlight 5 includes the support for 64-bit operating systems and relevant browsers and is also optimized to provide better performance. It can support the background thread for the networking which can reduce the latency of the network to a considerable extent. The Out-of-Browser functionality adds the support for utilizing various libraries and also the Win32 API. It also comes with testing support with VS 2010 which is mostly an automated procedure and has also enabled increased security aspects of all the Silverlight 5 developed applications by using the improved version of group policy support.

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  • ASP.NET MVC 3 Hosting :: How to Deploy Web Apps Using ASP.NET MVC 3, Razor and EF Code First - Part I

    - by mbridge
    First, you can download the source code from http://efmvc.codeplex.com. The following frameworks will be used for this step by step tutorial. public class Category {     public int CategoryId { get; set; }     [Required(ErrorMessage = "Name Required")]     [StringLength(25, ErrorMessage = "Must be less than 25 characters")]     public string Name { get; set;}     public string Description { get; set; }     public virtual ICollection<Expense> Expenses { get; set; } } Expense Class public class Expense {             public int ExpenseId { get; set; }            public string  Transaction { get; set; }     public DateTime Date { get; set; }     public double Amount { get; set; }     public int CategoryId { get; set; }     public virtual Category Category { get; set; } }    Define Domain Model Let’s create domain model for our simple web application Category Class We have two domain entities - Category and Expense. A single category contains a list of expense transactions and every expense transaction should have a Category. In this post, we will be focusing on CRUD operations for the entity Category and will be working on the Expense entity with a View Model object in the later post. And the source code for this application will be refactored over time. The above entities are very simple POCO (Plain Old CLR Object) classes and the entity Category is decorated with validation attributes in the System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations namespace. Now we want to use these entities for defining model objects for the Entity Framework 4. Using the Code First approach of Entity Framework, we can first define the entities by simply writing POCO classes without any coupling with any API or database library. This approach lets you focus on domain model which will enable Domain-Driven Development for applications. EF code first support is currently enabled with a separate API that is runs on top of the Entity Framework 4. EF Code First is reached CTP 5 when I am writing this article. Creating Context Class for Entity Framework We have created our domain model and let’s create a class in order to working with Entity Framework Code First. For this, you have to download EF Code First CTP 5 and add reference to the assembly EntitFramework.dll. You can also use NuGet to download add reference to EEF Code First. public class MyFinanceContext : DbContext {     public MyFinanceContext() : base("MyFinance") { }     public DbSet<Category> Categories { get; set; }     public DbSet<Expense> Expenses { get; set; }         }   The above class MyFinanceContext is derived from DbContext that can connect your model classes to a database. The MyFinanceContext class is mapping our Category and Expense class into database tables Categories and Expenses using DbSet<TEntity> where TEntity is any POCO class. When we are running the application at first time, it will automatically create the database. EF code-first look for a connection string in web.config or app.config that has the same name as the dbcontext class. If it is not find any connection string with the convention, it will automatically create database in local SQL Express database by default and the name of the database will be same name as the dbcontext class. You can also define the name of database in constructor of the the dbcontext class. Unlike NHibernate, we don’t have to use any XML based mapping files or Fluent interface for mapping between our model and database. The model classes of Code First are working on the basis of conventions and we can also use a fluent API to refine our model. The convention for primary key is ‘Id’ or ‘<class name>Id’.  If primary key properties are detected with type ‘int’, ‘long’ or ‘short’, they will automatically registered as identity columns in the database by default. Primary key detection is not case sensitive. We can define our model classes with validation attributes in the System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations namespace and it automatically enforces validation rules when a model object is updated or saved. Generic Repository for EF Code First We have created model classes and dbcontext class. Now we have to create generic repository pattern for data persistence with EF code first. If you don’t know about the repository pattern, checkout Martin Fowler’s article on Repository Let’s create a generic repository to working with DbContext and DbSet generics. public interface IRepository<T> where T : class     {         void Add(T entity);         void Delete(T entity);         T GetById(long Id);         IEnumerable<T> All();     } RepositoryBasse – Generic Repository class protected MyFinanceContext Database {     get { return database ?? (database = DatabaseFactory.Get()); } } public virtual void Add(T entity) {     dbset.Add(entity);            }        public virtual void Delete(T entity) {     dbset.Remove(entity); }   public virtual T GetById(long id) {     return dbset.Find(id); }   public virtual IEnumerable<T> All() {     return dbset.ToList(); } } DatabaseFactory class public class DatabaseFactory : Disposable, IDatabaseFactory {     private MyFinanceContext database;     public MyFinanceContext Get()     {         return database ?? (database = new MyFinanceContext());     }     protected override void DisposeCore()     {         if (database != null)             database.Dispose();     } } Unit of Work If you are new to Unit of Work pattern, checkout Fowler’s article on Unit of Work . According to Martin Fowler, the Unit of Work pattern "maintains a list of objects affected by a business transaction and coordinates the writing out of changes and the resolution of concurrency problems." Let’s create a class for handling Unit of Work public interface IUnitOfWork {     void Commit(); } UniOfWork class public class UnitOfWork : IUnitOfWork {     private readonly IDatabaseFactory databaseFactory;     private MyFinanceContext dataContext;       public UnitOfWork(IDatabaseFactory databaseFactory)     {         this.databaseFactory = databaseFactory;     }       protected MyFinanceContext DataContext     {         get { return dataContext ?? (dataContext = databaseFactory.Get()); }     }       public void Commit()     {         DataContext.Commit();     } } The Commit method of the UnitOfWork will call the commit method of MyFinanceContext class and it will execute the SaveChanges method of DbContext class.   Repository class for Category In this post, we will be focusing on the persistence against Category entity and will working on other entities in later post. Let’s create a repository for handling CRUD operations for Category using derive from a generic Repository RepositoryBase<T>. public class CategoryRepository: RepositoryBase<Category>, ICategoryRepository     {     public CategoryRepository(IDatabaseFactory databaseFactory)         : base(databaseFactory)         {         }                } public interface ICategoryRepository : IRepository<Category> { } If we need additional methods than generic repository for the Category, we can define in the CategoryRepository. Dependency Injection using Unity 2.0 If you are new to Inversion of Control/ Dependency Injection or Unity, please have a look on my articles at http://weblogs.asp.net/shijuvarghese/archive/tags/IoC/default.aspx. I want to create a custom lifetime manager for Unity to store container in the current HttpContext. public class HttpContextLifetimeManager<T> : LifetimeManager, IDisposable {     public override object GetValue()     {         return HttpContext.Current.Items[typeof(T).AssemblyQualifiedName];     }     public override void RemoveValue()     {         HttpContext.Current.Items.Remove(typeof(T).AssemblyQualifiedName);     }     public override void SetValue(object newValue)     {         HttpContext.Current.Items[typeof(T).AssemblyQualifiedName] = newValue;     }     public void Dispose()     {         RemoveValue();     } } Let’s create controller factory for Unity in the ASP.NET MVC 3 application.                 404, String.Format(                     "The controller for path '{0}' could not be found" +     "or it does not implement IController.",                 reqContext.HttpContext.Request.Path));       if (!typeof(IController).IsAssignableFrom(controllerType))         throw new ArgumentException(                 string.Format(                     "Type requested is not a controller: {0}",                     controllerType.Name),                     "controllerType");     try     {         controller= container.Resolve(controllerType) as IController;     }     catch (Exception ex)     {         throw new InvalidOperationException(String.Format(                                 "Error resolving controller {0}",                                 controllerType.Name), ex);     }     return controller; }   } Configure contract and concrete types in Unity Let’s configure our contract and concrete types in Unity for resolving our dependencies. private void ConfigureUnity() {     //Create UnityContainer               IUnityContainer container = new UnityContainer()                 .RegisterType<IDatabaseFactory, DatabaseFactory>(new HttpContextLifetimeManager<IDatabaseFactory>())     .RegisterType<IUnitOfWork, UnitOfWork>(new HttpContextLifetimeManager<IUnitOfWork>())     .RegisterType<ICategoryRepository, CategoryRepository>(new HttpContextLifetimeManager<ICategoryRepository>());                 //Set container for Controller Factory                ControllerBuilder.Current.SetControllerFactory(             new UnityControllerFactory(container)); } In the above ConfigureUnity method, we are registering our types onto Unity container with custom lifetime manager HttpContextLifetimeManager. Let’s call ConfigureUnity method in the Global.asax.cs for set controller factory for Unity and configuring the types with Unity. protected void Application_Start() {     AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas();     RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilters.Filters);     RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes);     ConfigureUnity(); } Developing web application using ASP.NET MVC 3 We have created our domain model for our web application and also have created repositories and configured dependencies with Unity container. Now we have to create controller classes and views for doing CRUD operations against the Category entity. Let’s create controller class for Category Category Controller public class CategoryController : Controller {     private readonly ICategoryRepository categoryRepository;     private readonly IUnitOfWork unitOfWork;           public CategoryController(ICategoryRepository categoryRepository, IUnitOfWork unitOfWork)     {         this.categoryRepository = categoryRepository;         this.unitOfWork = unitOfWork;     }       public ActionResult Index()     {         var categories = categoryRepository.All();         return View(categories);     }     [HttpGet]     public ActionResult Edit(int id)     {         var category = categoryRepository.GetById(id);         return View(category);     }       [HttpPost]     public ActionResult Edit(int id, FormCollection collection)     {         var category = categoryRepository.GetById(id);         if (TryUpdateModel(category))         {             unitOfWork.Commit();             return RedirectToAction("Index");         }         else return View(category);                 }       [HttpGet]     public ActionResult Create()     {         var category = new Category();         return View(category);     }           [HttpPost]     public ActionResult Create(Category category)     {         if (!ModelState.IsValid)         {             return View("Create", category);         }                     categoryRepository.Add(category);         unitOfWork.Commit();         return RedirectToAction("Index");     }       [HttpPost]     public ActionResult Delete(int  id)     {         var category = categoryRepository.GetById(id);         categoryRepository.Delete(category);         unitOfWork.Commit();         var categories = categoryRepository.All();         return PartialView("CategoryList", categories);       }        } Creating Views in Razor Now we are going to create views in Razor for our ASP.NET MVC 3 application.  Let’s create a partial view CategoryList.cshtml for listing category information and providing link for Edit and Delete operations. CategoryList.cshtml @using MyFinance.Helpers; @using MyFinance.Domain; @model IEnumerable<Category>      <table>         <tr>         <th>Actions</th>         <th>Name</th>          <th>Description</th>         </tr>     @foreach (var item in Model) {             <tr>             <td>                 @Html.ActionLink("Edit", "Edit",new { id = item.CategoryId })                 @Ajax.ActionLink("Delete", "Delete", new { id = item.CategoryId }, new AjaxOptions { Confirm = "Delete Expense?", HttpMethod = "Post", UpdateTargetId = "divCategoryList" })                           </td>             <td>                 @item.Name             </td>             <td>                 @item.Description             </td>         </tr>         }       </table>     <p>         @Html.ActionLink("Create New", "Create")     </p> The delete link is providing Ajax functionality using the Ajax.ActionLink. This will call an Ajax request for Delete action method in the CategoryCotroller class. In the Delete action method, it will return Partial View CategoryList after deleting the record. We are using CategoryList view for the Ajax functionality and also for Index view using for displaying list of category information. Let’s create Index view using partial view CategoryList  Index.chtml @model IEnumerable<MyFinance.Domain.Category> @{     ViewBag.Title = "Index"; }    <h2>Category List</h2>    <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.unobtrusive-ajax.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>    <div id="divCategoryList">               @Html.Partial("CategoryList", Model) </div> We can call the partial views using Html.Partial helper method. Now we are going to create View pages for insert and update functionality for the Category. Both view pages are sharing common user interface for entering the category information. So I want to create an EditorTemplate for the Category information. We have to create the EditorTemplate with the same name of entity object so that we can refer it on view pages using @Html.EditorFor(model => model) . So let’s create template with name Category. Category.cshtml @model MyFinance.Domain.Category <div class="editor-label"> @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Name) </div> <div class="editor-field"> @Html.EditorFor(model => model.Name) @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Name) </div> <div class="editor-label"> @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Description) </div> <div class="editor-field"> @Html.EditorFor(model => model.Description) @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Description) </div> Let’s create view page for insert Category information @model MyFinance.Domain.Category   @{     ViewBag.Title = "Save"; }   <h2>Create</h2>   <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script> <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.unobtrusive.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>   @using (Html.BeginForm()) {     @Html.ValidationSummary(true)     <fieldset>         <legend>Category</legend>                @Html.EditorFor(model => model)               <p>             <input type="submit" value="Create" />         </p>     </fieldset> }   <div>     @Html.ActionLink("Back to List", "Index") </div> ViewStart file In Razor views, we can add a file named _viewstart.cshtml in the views directory  and this will be shared among the all views with in the Views directory. The below code in the _viewstart.cshtml, sets the Layout page for every Views in the Views folder.     @{     Layout = "~/Views/Shared/_Layout.cshtml"; } Tomorrow, we will cotinue the second part of this article. :)

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  • ASP.NET 4 Hosting :: How to Debug Your ASP.NET Applications

    - by mbridge
    Remote debugging of a process is a privilege, and like all privileges, it must be granted to a user or group of users before its operation is allowed. The Microsoft .NET Framework and Microsoft Visual Studio .NET provide two mechanisms to enable remote debugging support: The Debugger Users group and the "Debug programs" user right. Debugger Users Group When you debug a remote .NET Framework-based application, the Debugger on your computer must communicate with the remote computer using DCOM. The remote server must grant the Debugger access, and it does this by granting access to all members of the Debugger Users group. Therefore, you must ensure that you are a member of the Debugger Users group on that computer. This is a local security group, meaning that it is visible to only the computer where it exists. To add yourself or a group to the Debugger Users group, follow these steps: 1. Right-click the My Computer icon on the Desktop and choose Manage from the context menu. 2. Browse to the Groups node, which is found under the Local Users and Groups node of System Tools. 3. In the right pane, double-click the Debugger Users group. 4. Add your user account or a group account of which you are a member. Debug Programs User Right To debug programs that run under an account that is different from your account, you must be granted the "Debug programs" user right on the computer where the program runs. By default, only the Administrators group is granted this user right. You can check this by opening Local Security Policy on the computer. To do so, follow these steps: 1. Click Start, Administrative Tools, and then Local Security Policy. 2. Browse to the User Rights Assignment node under the Local Policies node. 3. In the right pane, double-click the "Debug programs" user right. 4. Add your user account or a group account of which you are a member.

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  • SharePoint 2010 Hosting :: How to Customize SharePoint 2010 Global Navigation

    - by mbridge
    Requirements - SharePoint Foundation or SharePoint Server 2010 site - SharePoint Designer 2010 Steps 1. The first step in my process was to download from codeplex a starter masterpage http://startermasterpages.codeplex.com/ . 2. Once you downloaded the starter master page, open up your SharePoint site in SharePoint Designer 2010 and on the left in the “Site Objects “ area click on the folder “All Files” and drill down to catalogs >> masterpages . Once you are in the Masterpage folder copy and paste the _starter.master into this folder. 3. The first step in the customization process is to create your custom style sheet. To create your custom style sheet, click on the “all Files” folder and click on “Style Library.” Right click in the style library section and choose Style sheet. Once the style sheet is created, rename it style.css. Now open the style sheet you created in SharePoint Designer. 4. In this next step you will copy and paste the SharePoint core styles for the global navigation into your custom style sheet. Copy and paste the css below into the style sheet and save file .s4-tn{ padding:0px; margin:0px; } .s4-tn ul.static{ white-space:nowrap; } .s4-tn li.static > .menu-item{ /* [ReplaceColor(themeColor:"Dark2")] */ color:#3b4f65; white-space:nowrap; border:1px solid transparent; padding:4px 10px; display:inline-block; height:15px; vertical-align:middle; } .s4-tn ul.dynamic{ /* [ReplaceColor(themeColor:"Light2")] */ background-color:white; /* [ReplaceColor(themeColor:"Dark2-Lighter")] */ border:1px solid #D9D9D9; } .s4-tn li.dynamic > .menu-item{ display:block; padding:3px 10px; white-space:nowrap; font-weight:normal; } .s4-tn li.dynamic > a:hover{ font-weight:normal; /* [ReplaceColor(themeColor:"Light2-Lighter")] */ background-color:#D9D9D9; } .s4-tn li.static > a:hover { /* [ReplaceColor(themeColor:"Accent1")] */ color:#44aff6; text-decoration:underline; } 5. Once you created the style sheet, go back to the masterpage folder and open the _starter.master file and in the Customization category click edit file. 6. Next, when the edit file opens make sure you view it in split view. Now you are going to search for the reference to our custom masterpage in the code. Make sure you are scrolled to the top in the code section and press “ctrl f” on the key board. This will pop up the find and replace tool. In the” find what field”, copy and paste and then click find next. 7. Now, in the code replace You have now referenced your custom style sheet in your masterpage. 8. The next step is to locate your Global Navigation control, make sure you are scrolled to the top in the code section and press “ctrl f” on the key board. This will pop up the find and replace tool. In the” find what field”, copy and paste ID="TopNavigationMenuV4” and then click find next. Once you find ID="TopNavigationMenuV4” , you should see the following block of code which is the global navigation control: ID="TopNavigationMenuV4" Runat="server" EnableViewState="false" DataSourceID="topSiteMap" AccessKey="" UseSimpleRendering="true" UseSeparateCss="false" Orientation="Horizontal" StaticDisplayLevels="1" MaximumDynamicDisplayLevels="1" SkipLinkText="" CssClass="s4-tn" 9. In the global navigation code above you should see CssClass="s4-tn" . As an additional step you can replace "s4-tn" your own custom name like CssClass="MyNav" . If you can the name of the CSS class make sure you update your custom style sheet with the new name, example below: .MyNav{ padding:0px; margin:0px; } .MyNav ul.static{ white-space:nowrap; } 10. At this point you are ready to brand your global navigation. The next step is to modify your style.css with your customizations to the default SharePoint styles. Have fun styling and make sure you save your work often. Hope it helps!!

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  • ASP.NET MVC 3 Hosting :: ASP.NET MVC 3 First Look

    - by mbridge
    MVC 3 View Enhancements MVC 3 introduces two improvements to the MVC view engine: - Ability to select the view engine to use. MVC 3 allows you to select from any of your  installed view engines from Visual Studio by selecting Add > View (including the newly introduced ASP.NET “Razor” engine”): - Support for the next ASP.NET “Razor” syntax. The newly previewed Razor syntax is a concise lightweight syntax. MVC 3 Control Enhancements - Global Filters: ASP.NET MVC 3  allows you to specify that a filter which applies globally to all Controllers within an app by adding it to the GlobalFilters collection.  The RegisterGlobalFilters() method is now included in the default Global.asax class template and so provides a convenient place to do this since is will then be called by the Application_Start() method: void RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilterCollection filters) { filters.Add(new HandleLoggingAttribute()); filters.Add(new HandleErrorAttribute()); } void Application_Start() { RegisterGlobalFilters (GlobalFilters.Filters); } - Dynamic ViewModel Property : MVC 3 augments the ViewData API with a new “ViewModel” property on Controller which is of type “dynamic” – and therefore enables you to use the new dynamic language support in C# and VB pass ViewData items using a cleaner syntax than the current dictionary API. Public ActionResult Index() { ViewModel.Message = "Hello World"; return View(); } - New ActionResult Types : MVC 3 includes three new ActionResult types and helper methods: 1. HttpNotFoundResult – indicates that a resource which was requested by the current URL was not found. HttpNotFoundResult will return a 404 HTTP status code to the calling client. 2. PermanentRedirects – The HttpRedirectResult class contains a new Boolean “Permanent” property which is used to indicate that a permanent redirect should be done. Permanent redirects use a HTTP 301 status code.  The Controller class  includes three new methods for performing these permanent redirects: RedirectPermanent(), RedirectToRoutePermanent(), andRedirectToActionPermanent(). All  of these methods will return an instance of the HttpRedirectResult object with the Permanent property set to true. 3. HttpStatusCodeResult – used for setting an explicit response status code and its associated description. MVC 3 AJAX and JavaScript Enhancements MVC 3 ships with built-in JSON binding support which enables action methods to receive JSON-encoded data and then model-bind it to action method parameters. For example a jQuery client-side JavaScript could define a “save” event handler which will be invoked when the save button is clicked on the client. The code in the event handler then constructs a client-side JavaScript “product” object with 3 fields with their values retrieved from HTML input elements. Finally, it uses jQuery’s .ajax() method to POST a JSON based request which contains the product to a /theStore/UpdateProduct URL on the server: $('#save').click(function () { var product = { ProdName: $('#Name').val() Price: $('#Price').val(), } $.ajax({ url: '/theStore/UpdateProduct', type: "POST"; data: JSON.stringify(widget), datatype: "json", contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8", success: function () { $('#message').html('Saved').fadeIn(), }, error: function () { $('#message').html('Error').fadeIn(), } }); return false; }); MVC will allow you to implement the /theStore/UpdateProduct URL on the server by using an action method as below. The UpdateProduct() action method will accept a strongly-typed Product object for a parameter. MVC 3 can now automatically bind an incoming JSON post value to the .NET Product type on the server without having to write any custom binding. [HttpPost] public ActionResult UpdateProduct(Product product) { // save logic here return null } MVC 3 Model Validation Enhancements MVC 3 builds on the MVC 2 model validation improvements by adding   support for several of the new validation features within the System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations namespace in .NET 4.0: - Support for the new DataAnnotations metadata attributes like DisplayAttribute. - Support for the improvements made to the ValidationAttribute class which now supports a new IsValid overload that provides more info on  the current validation context, like what object is being validated. - Support for the new IValidatableObject interface which enables you to perform model-level validation and also provide validation error messages which are specific to the state of the overall model. MVC 3 Dependency Injection Enhancements MVC 3 includes better support for applying Dependency Injection (DI) and also integrating with Dependency Injection/IOC containers. Currently MVC 3 Preview 1 has support for DI in the below places: - Controllers (registering & injecting controller factories and injecting controllers) - Views (registering & injecting view engines, also for injecting dependencies into view pages) - Action Filters (locating and  injecting filters) And this is another important blog about Microsoft .NET and technology: - Windows 2008 Blog - SharePoint 2010 Blog - .NET 4 Blog And you can visit here if you're looking for ASP.NET MVC 3 hosting

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  • SharePoint 2010 Hosting :: SharePoint 2010 Custom Web Template

    - by mbridge
    SharePoint 2010 offers some changes and additions to the SharePoint 2007 approach. Site definitions and publishing providers remain largely the same, but site templates created from the SharePoint UI or SharePoint Designer are now saved to a .WSP file, the same solution deployment packaging file format used for deploying custom SharePoint solutions. Site Templates saved to a .WSP solution file can be imported into Visual Studio for additional customization. Introducing the WebTemplate Feature Element The WebTemplate element, introduced in SharePoint 2010, allows site templates to be defined and deployed as a Feature as part of a solution package. A WebTemplate element feature can be used to deploy site templates in either a Farm or Sandbox solution - without modification. If deployed as a Farm feature and solution, site templates will appear in the site collection provisioning page in Central Administration and can be used to provision new site collections, or within a Site Collection to create sub-sites. If deployed as a Site feature and Sandbox solution, site templates will appear within the site collection to support creating a root site or sub-sites. Creating a new WebTemplate Feature in Visual Studio 2010 In addition to supporting the ability to save and import Site Templates created from the SharePoint UI into Visual Studio for customization, it can also be used to create new site templates from scratch. In the following sample we will walk through how to create a new WebTemplate solution based on  a customized version of the out-of-box Blank Site. 1. Create a new Empty SharePoint Project in Visual Studio 2010. 2. Add a new Empty Element to the project. we like to create folders for each type of element in our solution, so in our sample, we have created a Web Templates folder, and then added the BLANKENT element. NOTE: The Elements folder MUST share the same name as the WebTemplate name property. 3. Open the empty Elements.xml and add the <WebTemplate /> element block. 4. Copy the default.aspx and ONET.XML files from the STS site definition location at 14\TEMPLATES\Site Templates\STS. We will customize the ONET.XML in the next section. Open the properties for each file and set the Deployment Type to ElementFile. This ensures the files are deployed with the Element when included in a Feature. 5. By default a new feature is added to the solution for you automatically when a new element is added to the solution. Rename and edit the feature as appropriate. Select Farm for the scope to deploy the WebTemplate to the entire farm, or Site for a sandboxed solution. Customize the ONET.XML At this point, you have a working WebTemplate solution that will deploy the identical site to the out-of-box Blank Site, however the ONET.XML supporting the STS site definition contains 3 configurations – essentially 3 separate site templates and can be simplified before customizing. In the following sample, we have trimmed the ONET.XML to the essentials for a single Site Template, and added references to the <SiteFeatures /> and <WebFeatures /> elements to include the SharePoint Standard and Enterprise features. We have left the top-level navigation bar, and the default page module intact, but removed all other extraneous markup.

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  • ASP.NET MVC 3 Hosting :: Rolling with Razor in MVC v3 Preview

    - by mbridge
    Razor is an alternate view engine for asp.net MVC.  It was introduced in the “WebMatrix” tool and has now been released as part of the asp.net MVC 3 preview 1.  Basically, Razor allows us to replace the clunky <% %> syntax with a much cleaner coding model, which integrates very nicely with HTML.  Additionally, it provides some really nice features for master page type scenarios and you don’t lose access to any of the features you are currently familiar with, such as HTML helper methods. First, download and install the ASP.NET MVC Preview 1.  You can find this at http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=cb42f741-8fb1-4f43-a5fa-812096f8d1e8&displaylang=en. Now, follow these steps to create your first asp.net mvc project using Razor: 1. Open Visual Studio 2010 2. Create a new project.  Select File->New->Project (Shift Control N) 3. You will see the list of project types which should look similar to what’s shown:   4. Select “ASP.NET MVC 3 Web Application (Razor).”  Set the application name to RazorTest and the path to c:projectsRazorTest for this tutorial. If you select accidently select ASPX, you will end up with the standard asp.net view engine and template, which isn’t what you want. 5. For this tutorial, and ONLY for this tutorial, select “No, do not create a unit test project.”  In general, you should create and use a unit test project.  Code without unit tests is kind of like diet ice cream.  It just isn’t very good. Now, once we have this done, our brand new project will be created.    In all likelihood, Visual Studio will leave you looking at the “HomeController.cs” class, as shown below: Immediately, you should notice one difference.  The Index action used to look like: public ActionResult Index () { ViewData[“Message”] = “Welcome to ASP.Net MVC!”; Return View(); } While this will still compile and run just fine, ASP.Net MVC 3 has a much nicer way of doing this: public ActionResult Index() { ViewModel.Message = “Welcome to ASP.Net MVC!”; Return View(); } Instead of using ViewData we are using the new ViewModel object, which uses the new dynamic data typing of .Net 4.0 to allow us to express ourselves much more cleanly.  This isn’t a tutorial on ALL of MVC 3, but the ViewModel concept is one we will need as we dig into Razor. What comes in the box? When we create a project using the ASP.Net MVC 3 Template with Razor, we get a standard project setup, just like we did in ASP.NET MVC 2.0 but with some differences.  Instead of seeing “.aspx” view files and “.ascx” files, we see files with the “.cshtml” which is the default razor extension.  Before we discuss the details of a razor file, one thing to keep in mind is that since this is an extremely early preview, intellisense is not currently enabled with the razor view engine.  This is promised as an updated before the final release.  Just like with the aspx view engine, the convention of the folder name for a set of views matching the controller name without the word “Controller” still stands.  Similarly, each action in the controller will usually have a corresponding view file in the appropriate view directory.  Remember, in asp.net MVC, convention over configuration is key to successful development! The initial template organizes views in the following folders, located in the project under Views: - Account – The default account management views used by the Account controller.  Each file represents a distinct view. - Home – Views corresponding to the appropriate actions within the home controller. - Shared – This contains common view objects used by multiple views.  Within here, master pages are stored, as well as partial page views (user controls).  By convention, these partial views are named “_XXXPartial.cshtml” where XXX is the appropriate name, such as _LogonPartial.cshtml.  Additionally, display templates are stored under here. With this in mind, let us take a look at the index.cshtml file under the home view directory.  When you open up index.cshtml you should see 1:   @inherits System.Web.Mvc.WebViewPage 2:  @{ 3:          View.Title = "Home Page"; 4:       LayoutPage = "~/Views/Shared/_Layout.cshtml"; 5:   } 6:  <h2>@View.Message</h2> 7:  <p> 8:     To learn more about ASP.NET MVC visit <a href="http://asp.net/mvc" title="ASP.NET MVC     9:    Website">http://asp.net/mvc</a>. 10:  </p> So looking through this, we observe the following facts: Line 1 imports the base page that all views (using Razor) are based on, which is System.Web.Mvc.WebViewPage.  Note that this is different than System.Web.MVC.ViewPage which is used by asp.net MVC 2.0 Also note that instead of the <% %> syntax, we use the very simple ‘@’ sign.  The View Engine contains enough context sensitive logic that it can even distinguish between @ in code and @ in an email.  It’s a very clean markup.  Line 2 introduces the idea of a code block in razor.  A code block is a scoping mechanism just like it is in a normal C# class.  It is designated by @{… }  and any C# code can be placed in between.  Note that this is all server side code just like it is when using the aspx engine and <% %>.  Line 3 allows us to set the page title in the client page’s file.  This is a new feature which I’ll talk more about when we get to master pages, but it is another of the nice things razor brings to asp.net mvc development. Line 4 is where we specify our “master” page, but as you can see, you can place it almost anywhere you want, because you tell it where it is located.  A Layout Page is similar to a master page, but it gains a bit when it comes to flexibility.  Again, we’ll come back to this in a later installment.  Line 6 and beyond is where we display the contents of our view.  No more using <%: %> intermixed with code.  Instead, we get to use very clean syntax such as @View.Message.  This is a lot easier to read than <%:@View.Message%> especially when intermixed with html.  For example: <p> My name is @View.Name and I live at @View.Address </p> Compare this to the equivalent using the aspx view engine <p> My name is <%:View.Name %> and I live at <%: View.Address %> </p> While not an earth shaking simplification, it is easier on the eyes.  As  we explore other features, this clean markup will become more and more valuable.

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  • SharePoint 2010 Hosting :: Hiding SharePoint 2010 Ribbon From Anonymous Users

    - by mbridge
    The user interface improvements in SharePoint 2010 as a whole are truly amazing. Microsoft has brought this already impressive product leaps and bounds in terms of accessibility, standards, and usability. One thing you might be aware of is the new and quite useful “ribbon” control that appears by default at the top of every SharePoint 2010 master page. Here’s a sneak peek: You’ll see this ribbon not only in the 2010 web interface, but also throughout the entire family of Office products coming out this year. Even SharePoint Designer 2010 makes use of the ribbon in a very flexible and useful way. Hiding The Ribbon In SharePoint 2010, the ribbon is used almost exclusively for content creation and site administration. It doesn’t make much sense to show the ribbon on a public-facing internet site (in fact, it can really retract from your site’s design when it appears), so you’ll probably want to hide the ribbon when users aren’t logged in. Here’s how it works: <SharePoint:SPSecurityTrimmedControl PermissionsString="ManagePermissions" runat="server">     <div id="s4-ribbonrow" class="s4-pr s4-ribbonrowhidetitle">         <!-- Ribbon code appears here... -->     </div> </SharePoint:SPSecurityTrimmedControl> In your master page, find the SharePoint ribbon by looking for the line of code that begins with <div id=”s4-ribbonrow”>. Place the SPSecurityTrimmedControl code around your ribbon to conditionally hide it based on user permissions. In our example, we’ve hidden the ribbon from any user who doesn’t have the ManagePermissions ability, which is going to be almost any user short of a site administrator. Other Permission Levels You can specify different permission levels for the SPSecurityTrimmedControl, allowing you to configure exactly who can see the SharePoint 2010 ribbon. Basically, this control will hide anything inside of it when users don’t have the specified PermissionString. The available options include: 1. List Permissions - ManageLists - CancelCheckout - AddListItems - EditListItems - DeleteListItems - ViewListItems - ApproveItems - OpenItems - ViewVersionsDeleteVersions - CreateAlerts - ViewFormPages 2. Site Permissions - ManagePermissions - ViewUsageData - ManageSubwebs - ManageWeb - AddAndCustomizePages - ApplyThemeAndBorder - ApplyStyleSheets - CreateGroups - BrowseDirectories - CreateSSCSite - ViewPages - EnumeratePermissions - BrowseUserInfo - ManageAlerts - UseRemoteAPIs - UseClientIntegration - Open - EditMyUserInfo 3. Personal Permissions - ManagePersonalViews - AddDelPrivateWebParts - UpdatePersonalWebParts You can use this control to hide anything in your master page or on related page layouts, so be sure to keep it in mind when you’re trying to hide/show things conditionally based on user permission. The One Catch You may notice that the login control (or welcome control) is actually inside the ribbon by default in SharePoint 2010. You’ll probably want to pull this control out of the ribbon and place it elsewhere on your page. Just look for the line of code that looks like this: <wssuc:Welcome id="IdWelcome" runat="server" EnableViewState=”false”/> Move this code out of the ribbon and into another location within your master page. Save your changes, check in and approve all files, and anonymous users will never know your site is built on SharePoint 2010!

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  • SharePoint 2007 Hosting :: How to Move a Document from One Lbrary to Another

    - by mbridge
    Moving a document using a SharePoint Designer workflow involves copying the document to the SharePoint document library you want to move the document to, and then deleting the document from the current document library it is in. You can use the Copy List Item action to copy the document and the Delete item action to delete the document. To create a SharePoint Designer workflow that can move a document from one document library to another: 1. In SharePoint Designer 2007, open the SharePoint site on which the document library that contains the documents to move is located. 2. On the Define your new workflow screen of the Workflow Designer, enter a name for the workflow, select the document library you want to attach the workflow to (this would be a document library containing documents to move), select Allow this workflow to be manually started from an item, and click Next. 3. On the Step 1 screen of the Workflow Designer, click Actions, and then click More Actions from the drop-down menu. 4. On the Workflow Actions dialog box, select List Actions from the category drop-down list box, select Copy List Item from the actions list, and click Add. The following text is added to the Workflow Designer: Copy item in this list to this list 5. On the Step 1 screen of the Workflow Designer, click the first this list (representing the document library to copy the document from) in the text of the Copy List Item action. 6. On the Choose List Item dialog box, leave Current Item selected, and click OK. 7. On the Step 1 screen of the Workflow Designer, click the second this list (representing the document library to copy the document to) in the text of the Copy List Item action, and select the document library (this is the document library to where you want to move the document) from the drop-down list box that appears. 8. On the Step 1 screen of the Workflow Designer, click Actions, and then click More Actions from the drop-down menu. 9. On the Workflow Actions dialog box, select List Actions from the category drop-down list box, select Delete Item from the actions list, and click Add. The following text is added to the Workflow Designer: then Delete item in this list 10. On the Step 1 screen of the Workflow Designer, click this list in the text of the Delete Item action. 11. On the Choose List Item dialog box, leave Current Item selected and click OK. The final text for the workflow should now look like: Copy item in DocLib1 to DocLib2   then Delete item in DocLib1 where DocLib1 is the SharePoint document library containing the document to move and DocLib2 the document library to move the document to. 12. On the Step 1 screen of the Workflow Designer, click Finish. How to Test the Workflow? 1. Go to the SharePoint document library to which you attached the workflow, click on a document, and select Workflows from the drop-down menu. 2. On the Workflows page, click the name of your SharePoint Designer workflow. 3. On the workflow initiation page, click Start.

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  • SharePoint 2010 Hosting - ASPHostPortal :: Installing SSRS 2008 R2 on SharePoint 2010

    - by mbridge
    What do you need first? Please download SQL Server® 2008 R2 November CTP Reporting Services Add-in for Microsoft SharePoint® Technologies 2010 and please follow this steps: 1. Install a SharePoint technology instance. (Already did this when installing PowerPivot with SharePoint) 2. Install SQL Server 2008 R2 November CTP Reporting Services and specify that the report server use SharePoint Integrated mode 3. Configure Reporting Services 4. Download the Reporting Services Add-in by clicking the rsSharePoint.msi link later on this page. To start the installation immediately, click Run After installing Reporting services and the add-in your reporting server is ready to be integrated with SharePoint, in SharePoint 2010 we have some new admin screens. To integrate go to central admin, general application settings: When you successfully installed the add-in a reporting services icon will be there. Click Reporting Services Integration: Add the report server web service url (To get the URL, open the Reporting Services Configuration tool, connect to the report server, and click Web Service URL. Click the URL to verify it works. Copy the URL and paste it into Report Server Web Service URL.), select your authentication mode (windows authentication is prefered). Add a username and password of your admin account. Click ok to configure and start the integration. After the installation you can set the reporting services default. What is changed in SP2010 is that there isn’t a report library available. You have to add content types to a default library. So go to a site collection, site actions, View all site content. Create a Asset library: Now we have to make sure we can add reports to the library. To do this we have to add content types: Open the library, click on library tools, library settings, Under Content Types, click Add from existing site content types. In the Select Content Types section, in Select site content types from, click the arrow to select Reporting Services. In the Available Site Content Types list, click Report Builder, Report Data Source and Report and then click Add to move the selected content type to the Content types to add list. Now we are ready to upload reports and execute them from within our webparts: Another interesting post: - Integrating SharePoint 2010 and SQL 2008 R2

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  • ASP.NET MVC 2 Hosting :: MVC2 deploy - Could not load file or assembly 'System.Web.MVC, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35' or one of its dependencies.

    - by mbridge
    A new MVC 2 project worked on my local machine but when it was deployed to the test server it gave the error 'Could not load file or assembly 'System.Web.Mvc, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35' or one of its dependencies.' I have the full Visual Studio 2010 installed on my local machine but just the .NET 4 framework installed on the test servers. It seems the MVC assemblies do not come with .NET 4 framework itself so how to make MVC 2 work on the test servers? When I installed Visual Studio 2010 on my local machine it came with all the fruit included (.NET4 framework, MVC2 etc) so the System.Web.Mvc.dll can be found in my machine's GAC (C:\Windows\assembly). However, since there is no need to bloat the web servers only the plain old .NET4 framework has been installed on the test servers. This does NOT include the MVC assembly and that is why it cannot be found by the web application. You need this assembly to be on your web servers that you are deploying to but you want to avoid having to copy them into the GAC manually and doing all that gacutil mess or maybe you don't have access to your servers if they are hosted by provider. Solution You need to make the System.Web.Mvc assembly bin deployable... okay that doesn't sound easy but here is how to do it for the necessary MVC references: Simply right click the reference and select 'Properties' Then change 'Copy Local' to 'True': Note If your server has .NET 3.5 sp1 installed the new(ish) assemblies System.Web.Routing and System.Web.Abstractions will already be in the GAC. If you had previously deployed an MVC 1 application to a .NET 3.5 server you may remember having to deploy the other two assemblies too. Since MVC2 requires at least .NET 3.5 sp1 you will not need to worry about these assemblies, just System.Web.Mvc

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  • ASP.NET MVC 3 Hosting :: MVC 2 Strongly Typed HTML Helper and Enhanced Validation Sample

    - by mbridge
    In lue of the off the official release of ASP.NET MVC 2 RTM, I decided I would put together a quick sample of the enhanced HTML.Helpers and validation controls. I am going to use my sample event site where I will have a form so a user can search for information about a certain events. So when the Search page loads the Search action is fired return my strongly typed model. to the view.    1: [HttpGet]    2: public ViewResult Search(): public ViewResult Search()    3: {    4:     IList<EventsModel> result = _eventsService.GetEventList();    5:     var viewModel = new EventSearchModel    6:                         {    7:                             EventList = new SelectList(result, "EventCode","EventName","Select Event")    8:                         };    9:     return View(viewModel);  10: } Nothing special here, although I did want to show how to load up a strongly typed drop down list because that hung me up for a little bit. So to that, I am going to pass back a SelectList to the view and my HTML helper should no how to load this. So lets take a look at the mark up for the view.    1: <%@ Page Title="" Language="C#" MasterPageFile="~/Views/Shared/Site.Master"    2: Inherits="System.Web.Mvc.ViewPage<EventsSample.Models.EventSearchModel>" %>    3:     4: <asp:Content ID="Content1" ContentPlaceHolderID="TitleContent" runat="server">    5:     Search    6: </asp:Content>    7:     8: <asp:Content ID="Content2" ContentPlaceHolderID="MainContent" runat="server">    9:   10:     <h2>Search for Events</h2>  11:   12:     <% using (Html.BeginForm("Search","Events")) {%>  13:         <%= Html.ValidationSummary(true) %>  14:          15:         <fieldset>  16:             <legend>Fields</legend>  17:              18:             <div class="editor-label">  19:                 <%= Html.LabelFor(model => model.EventNumber) %>  20:             </div>  21:             <div class="editor-field">  22:                 <%= Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.EventNumber) %>  23:                 <%= Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.EventNumber) %>  24:             </div>  25:              26:             <div class="editor-label">  27:                 <%= Html.LabelFor(model => model.GuestLastName) %>  28:             </div>  29:             <div class="editor-field">  30:                 <%= Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.GuestLastName) %>  31:                 <%= Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.GuestLastName) %>  32:             </div>  33:              34:             <div class="editor-label">  35:                 <%= Html.LabelFor(model => model.EventName) %>  36:             </div>  37:             <div class="editor-field">  38:                 <%= Html.DropDownListFor(model => model.EventName, Model.EventList,"Select Event") %>  39:                 <%= Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.EventName) %>  40:             </div>  41:              42:             <p>  43:                 <input type="submit" value="Save" />  44:             </p>  45:         </fieldset>  46:   47:     <% } %>  48:   49:     <div>  50:         <%= Html.ActionLink("Back to List", "Index") %>  51:     </div>  52:   53: </asp:Content> A nice feature is the scaffolding that MVC has to generate code. I simply right clicked inside my Search() action, inside the EventsController and selected “Add View” and then I selected my strongly typed object that I wanted to pass to the view and also selected that I wanted the content type be “Edit”. With that the aspx page was completely generated, although I did have to go back in and change the textbox for the Event Names to a drop down list of the names to select from. The new feature with MVC 2 are the strongly typed HTML helpers. So now, my textboxes, drop down list, and validation helpers are all strongly typed to my model.  This features gives you the benefits of intellisense and also makes it easier to debug. “The Gu” has a great post about the feature in case you want more details. The DropDownListFor function to generate the drop down list was a little tricky for me. You first need to use a Lanbda expression to pass in the property you want the selected value assigned to in your model, and then you need to pass in the list directly from the model. Validations To validate the form, you can use the strongly type validation HTML helpers which will inspect your model and return errors if the validation fails. The definitions of these rules are set directly on the Model itself so lets take a look.    1: using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;    2: using System.Web.Mvc;    3:     4: namespace EventsSample.Models    5: {    6:     public class EventSearchModel    7:     {    8:         [Required(ErrorMessage = "Please enter the event number.")]    9:         [RegularExpression(@"\w{6}",  10:             ErrorMessage = "The Event Number must be 6 letters and/or numbers.")]  11:         public string EventNumber { get; set; }  12:   13:         [Required(ErrorMessage = "Please enter the guest's last name.")]  14:         [RegularExpression(@"^[A-Za-zÀ-ÖØ-öø-ÿ1-9 '\-\.]{1,22}$",  15:             ErrorMessage = "The gueest's last name must 1 to 20 characters.")]  16:         public string GuestLastName { get; set; }  17:   18:         public string EventName { get; set; }  19:         public SelectList EventList { get; set; }  20:     }  21: } Pretty cool! Okay, the only thing left to do is perform the validation in the POST action.    1: [HttpPost]    2: public ViewResult Search(EventSearchModel eventSearchModel)    3: {    4:     if (ModelState.IsValid) return View("SearchResults");    5:     else    6:     {    7:          IList<EventsModel> result = _eventsService.GetEventList();    8:         eventSearchModel.EventList = new SelectList(result, "EVentCode","EventName");   9:   10:         return View(eventSearchModel);  11:     }  12: }  13:     } If the form entries are valid, here I am simply displaying the SearchResult, but in a real world sample I would also go out get the results first. You get the idea though. In my case, when the form is not valid, I also had to reload my SelectList with the event names before I loaded the page again. Remember this is MVC, no _VieState here :) So that’s it. Now my form is validating the data and when it fails it looks like this.

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  • Crystal Report 2010 Hosting Has Been Supported by ASPHostPortal

    - by mbridge
    This is the press release from ASPHostPortal and I see that they have supported Crystal Report 2010. For the complete information, please read this press release. :-)   ASPHostPortal is a premiere web hosting company that specialized in Windows and ASP.NET-based hosting. Now, ASPHostPortal.com supports the new Crystal Report 2010 Hosting. For more information about this new product, please visit ASPHostPortal official website at http://www.asphostportal.com or http://asphostportal.com/Cheap-Crystal-Report-2010-Hosting.aspx. Crystal Reports is a business intelligence application used to design and generate reports from a wide range of data sources. Several other applications, such as Microsoft Visual Studio, bundle an OEM version of Crystal Reports as a general purpose reporting tool. Crystal Reports became the de facto standard report writer when Microsoft released it with Visual Basic. "ASPHostPortal has again proved its existence in hosting industry with the launch of the new Crystal Report 2010 Hosting," said Dean Thomas, General Manager of ASPHostPortal. "Crystal Reports 2010 is a powerful, dynamic, actionable reporting solution that helps you design, explore, visualize, and deliver reports via the web or embedded in enterprise applications. It enables end users to consume reports with stunning visualizations, conduct on-report business modelling, and execute decisions instantly from the report itself—reducing dependency on IT and developers." "Get a clearer view of your business performance with our industry-leading report designer and visualization combined solution. You'll be able to create highly formatted reports with what-if scenario models, interactive dashboards and charts," said Chris Thompson, Sales Manager ASPHostPortal. "Here you can see the demonstration of Crystal Report 2010, http://crystalreportdemo.asphostportal.com."

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  • ASP.NET MVC 3 Hosting :: How to Upgrade ASP.NET MVC 2 Project to ASP.NET MVC 3

    - by mbridge
    ASP.NET MVC 3 can be installed side by side with ASP.NET MVC 2 on the same computer, which gives you flexibility in choosing when to upgrade an ASP.NET MVC 2 application to ASP.NET MVC 3. The simplest way to upgrade is to create a new ASP.NET MVC 3 project and copy all the views, controllers, code, and content files from the existing MVC 2 project to the new project and then to update the assembly references in the new project to match the old project. If you have made changes to the Web.config file in the MVC 2 project, you must also merge those changes with the Web.config file in the MVC 3 project. To manually upgrade an existing ASP.NET MVC 2 application to version 3, do the following: 1. In both Web.config files in the MVC 3 project, globally search and replace the MVC version. Find the following: System.Web.Mvc, Version=2.0.0.0 Replace it with the following System.Web.Mvc, Version=3.0.0.0 There are three changes in the root Web.config and four in the Views\Web.config file. 2. In Solution Explorer, delete the reference to System.Web.Mvc (which points to the version 2 DLL). Then add a reference to System.Web.Mvc (v3.0.0.0). 3. In Solution Explorer, right-click the project name and then select Unload Project. Then right-click again and select Edit ProjectName.csproj. 4. Locate the ProjectTypeGuids element and replace {F85E285D-A4E0-4152-9332-AB1D724D3325} with {E53F8FEA-EAE0-44A6-8774-FFD645390401}. 5. Save the changes and then right-click the project and select Reload Project. 6. If the project references any third-party libraries that are compiled using ASP.NET MVC 2, add the following highlighted bindingRedirect element to the Web.config file in the application root under the configuration section: <runtime>   <assemblyBinding >     <dependentAssembly>       <assemblyIdentity name="System.Web.Mvc"           publicKeyToken="31bf3856ad364e35"/>       <bindingRedirect oldVersion="2.0.0.0" newVersion="3.0.0.0"/>     </dependentAssembly>   </assemblyBinding> </runtime> Another ASP.NET MVC 3 article: - Rolling with Razor in MVC v3 Preview - Deploying ASP.NET MVC 3 web application to server where ASP.NET MVC 3 is not installed - RenderAction with ASP.NET MVC 3 Sessionless Controllers

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  • ASP.NET Hosting :: ASP.NET File Upload Control

    - by mbridge
    The asp.net FileUpload control allows a user to browse and upload files to the web server. From developers perspective, it is as simple as dragging and dropping the FileUpload control to the aspx page. An extra control, like a Button control, or some other control is needed, to actually save the file. <asp:FileUploadID="FileUpload1"runat="server"/> <asp:ButtonID="B1"runat="server"Text="Save"OnClick="B1_Click"/> By default, the FileUpload control allows a maximum of 4MB file to be uploaded and the execution timeout is 110 seconds. These properties can be changed from within the web.config file’s httpRuntime section. The maxRequestLength property determines the maximum file size that can be uploaded. The executionTimeout property determines the maximum time for execution. <httpRuntimemaxRequestLength="8192"executionTimeout="220"/> From code behind, the mime type, size of the file, file name and the extension of the file can be obtained. The maximum file size that can be uploaded can be obtained and modified using the System.Web.Configuration.HttpRuntimeSection class. Files can be alternatively saved using the System.IO.HttpFileCollection class. This collection class can be populated using the Request.Files property. The collection contains HttpPostedFile class which contains a reference to the class. using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Linq; using System.Web; using System.Web.UI; using System.Web.UI.WebControls; using System.IO; using System.Configuration; using System.Web.Configuration;   namespace WebApplication1 {     public partial class WebControls : System.Web.UI.Page     {         protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)         {         }           //Using FileUpload control to upload and save files         protected void B1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)         {             if (FileUpload1.HasFile && FileUpload1.PostedFile.ContentLength > 0)             {                 //mime type of the uploaded file                 string mimeType = FileUpload1.PostedFile.ContentType;                   //size of the uploaded file                 int size = FileUpload1.PostedFile.ContentLength; // bytes                   //extension of the uploaded file                 string extension = System.IO.Path.GetExtension(FileUpload1.FileName);                                  //save file                 string path = Server.MapPath("path");                                 FileUpload1.SaveAs(path + FileUpload1.FileName);                              }             //maximum file size allowed             HttpRuntimeSection rt = new HttpRuntimeSection();             rt.MaxRequestLength = rt.MaxRequestLength * 2;             int length = rt.MaxRequestLength;                     //execution timeout             TimeSpan ts = rt.ExecutionTimeout;             double secomds = ts.TotalSeconds;           }           //Using Request.Files to save files         private void AltSaveFile()         {             HttpFileCollection coll = Request.Files;             for (int i = 0; i < coll.Count; i++)             {                 HttpPostedFile file = coll[i];                   if (file.ContentLength > 0)                     ;//do something             }         }     } }

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  • ASP.NET MVC 3 Hosting :: Deploying ASP.NET MVC 3 web application to server where ASP.NET MVC 3 is not installed

    - by mbridge
    You can built sample application on ASP.NET MVC 3 for deploying it to your hosting first. To try it out first put it to web server where ASP.NET MVC 3 installed. In this posting I will tell you what files you need and where you can find them. Here are the files you need to upload to get application running on server where ASP.NET MVC 3 is not installed. Also you can deploying ASP.NET MVC 3 web application to server where ASP.NET MVC 3 is not installed like this example: you can change reference to System.Web.Helpers.dll to be the local one so it is copied to bin folder of your application. First file in this list is my web application dll and you don’t need it to get ASP.NET MVC 3 running. All other files are located at the following folder: C:\Program Files\Microsoft ASP.NET\ASP.NET Web Pages\v1.0\Assemblies\ If there are more files needed in some other scenarios then please leave me a comment here. And… don’t forget to convert the folder in IIS to application. While developing an application locally, this isn’t a problem. But when you are ready to deploy your application to a hosting provider, this might well be a problem if the hoster does not have the ASP.NET MVC assemblies installed in the GAC. Fortunately, ASP.NET MVC is still bin-deployable. If your hosting provider has ASP.NET 3.5 SP1 installed, then you’ll only need to include the MVC DLL. If your hosting provider is still on ASP.NET 3.5, then you’ll need to deploy all three. It turns out that it’s really easy to do so. Also, ASP.NET MVC runs in Medium Trust, so it should work with most hosting providers’ Medium Trust policies. It’s always possible that a hosting provider customizes their Medium Trust policy to be draconian. Deployment is easy when you know what to copy in archive for publishing your web site on ASP.NET MVC 3 or later versions. What I like to do is use the Publish feature of Visual Studio to publish to a local directory and then upload the files to my hosting provider. If your hosting provider supports FTP, you can often skip this intermediate step and publish directly to the FTP site. The first thing I do in preparation is to go to my MVC web application project and expand the References node in the project tree. Select the aforementioned three assemblies and in the Properties dialog, set Copy Local to True. Now just right click on your application and select Publish. This brings up the following Publish wizard Notice that in this example, I selected a local directory. When I hit Publish, all the files needed to deploy my app are available in the directory I chose, including the assemblies that were in the GAC. Another ASP.NET MVC 3 article: - New Features in ASP.NET MVC 3 - ASP.NET MVC 3 First Look

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  • ASP.NET 4 Hosting :: How to set up Forms Authentication for your ASP.NET web site

    - by mbridge
    Please follow this steps: 1. Log in to your Control Panel. 2. From the menu, select Databases ? SQL Server 2008. 3. Click the Create User button. 4. Enter a user name and password and click Save. In this demonstration, the user name is dotnetuser and the password is dotnetuserpass. 5. Click the Create Database button. 6. Enter a database name and grant access to the user you created above and click Save. In this demonstration the database is called DotNetAuthentication. 7. Locate and run the ASP.NET SQL Server Setup Wizard. This file is located in your .NET framework directory and is named aspnet_regsql.exe (example: C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\aspnet_regsql.exe). 8. Click Next and choose Configure SQL Server for application services. 9. Click Next and enter the server name and database log in credentials. The server name is the web site pointer address to where your application will be published and the log in credentials are the SQL server user name and password created earlier. 10. Click Next twice and the wizard will take a moment to complete the scripting actions that populate the new database with all the objects necessary to configure the ASP.NET provider.  Once complete, click Finish to close the wizard. 11. Finally, modify the web.config file in your ASP.NET web application to use the database you created.

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  • SharePoint 2010 Hosting :: HTTP Error 503. The Service in Unavailable.

    - by mbridge
    Error Message: HTTP Error 503. The service in unavailable. The application pool is shutdown and the Event Viewer indicates: Log Name:      Application Source:        Microsoft-Windows-User Profiles Service Date:          4/24/2010 4:58:28 PM Event ID:      1500 Task Category: None Level:         Error Keywords: User:          GUERILLA\spapppool Computer:      SPS2010RTM.guerilla.local Description: Windows cannot log you on because your profile cannot be loaded. Check that you are connected to the network, and that your network is functioning correctly. DETAIL – Unspecified error Solution: Option 1 – Log on locally with the service account once to create a local profile for it. Option 2 - Modify the application pool by going into IIS > Application Pools > Right-Click offending app pool > Advanced Settings > Set “Load User Profile” to False. Give it try!! Good luck!!

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  • SharePoint 2010 Hosting :: Setting Default Column Values on a Folder Programmatically

    - by mbridge
    The reason I write this post today is because my initial searches on the Internet provided me with nothing on the topic.  I was hoping to find a reference to the SDK but I didn’t have any luck.  What I want to do is set a default column value on an existing folder so that new items in that folder automatically inherit that value.  It’s actually pretty easy to do once you know what the class is called in the API.  I did some digging and discovered that class is MetadataDefaults. It can be found in Microsoft.Office.DocumentManagement.dll.  Note: if you can’t find it in the GAC, this DLL is in the 14/CONFIG/BIN folder and not the 14/ISAPI folder.  Add a reference to this DLL in your project.  In my case, I am building a console application, but you might put this in an event receiver or workflow. In my example today, I have simple custom folder and document content types.  I have one shared site column called DocumentType.  I have a document library which each of these content types registered.  In my document library, I have a folder named Test and I want to set its default column values using code.  Here is what it looks like.  Start by getting a reference to the list in question.  This assumes you already have a SPWeb object.  In my case I have created it and it is called site. SPList customDocumentLibrary = site.Lists["CustomDocuments"]; You then pass the SPList object to the MetadataDefaults constructor. MetadataDefaults columnDefaults = new MetadataDefaults(customDocumentLibrary); Now I just need to get my SPFolder object in question and pass it to the meethod SetFieldDefault.  This takes a SPFolder object, a string with the name of the SPField to set the default on, and finally the value of the default (in my case “Memo”). SPFolder testFolder = customDocumentLibrary.RootFolder.SubFolders["Test"]; columnDefaults.SetFieldDefault(testFolder, "DocumentType", "Memo"); You can set multiple defaults here.  When you’re done, you will need to call .Update(). columnDefaults.Update(); Here is what it all looks like together. using (SPSite siteCollection = new SPSite("http://sp2010/sites/ECMSource")) {     using (SPWeb site = siteCollection.OpenWeb())     {         SPList customDocumentLibrary = site.Lists["CustomDocuments"];         MetadataDefaults columnDefaults = new MetadataDefaults(customDocumentLibrary);          SPFolder testFolder = customDocumentLibrary.RootFolder.SubFolders["Test"];         columnDefaults.SetFieldDefault(testFolder, "DocumentType", "Memo");         columnDefaults.Update();     } } You can verify that your property was set correctly on the Change Default Column Values page in your list This is something that I could see used a lot on an ItemEventReceiver attached to a folder to do metadata inheritance.  Whenever, the user changed the value of the folder’s property, you could have it update the default.  Your code might look something columnDefaults.SetFieldDefault(properties.ListItem.Folder, "MyField", properties.ListItem[" This is a great way to keep the child items updated any time the value a folder’s property changes.  I’m also wondering if this can be done via CAML.  I tried saving a site template, but after importing I got an error on the default values page.  I’ll keep looking and let you know what I find out.

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  • SharePoint 2010 Hosting :: Sending SMS Alerts in SharePoint 2010 Over Office Mobile Service Protocol (OMS)

    - by mbridge
    In this post, I want to share the exciting news of SharePoint's 2010 new feature. Finally it's possible to send SMS directly from SharePoint to mobile phones. The advantages of sending SMS instead of Email messages are obvious: SMS alerts or reminders that are received on mobile phones are more preferred than Email messages that can be lost in the mass of spam. The interface is standard as it's very similar to previous versions of the product. Adjustments are easy to do, simply enter the address of the Office Mobile Service (OMS) web-service which you want to use for sending messages, then specify the connection parameters. Further details on Office Mobile Service is available below. The Test Service button checks if OMS web-service is accessible using provided URL (user name and password are not verified). This check is needed because OMS web-service URL depends on the mobile operator and country. It's now possible to select the method of sending alerts in alerts settings. Email option is selected by default. Alerts delivery method is displayed in the list of existing alerts. Office Mobile Service (OMS) SharePoint 2010 uses exterior servers similar to SMTP servers for sending SMS alerts. However, Microsoft started development and promotion of their own protocol instead of using existing ones. That is how Office Mobile Service (OMS) appeared. This open protocol enables clients to send text and multimedia messages (mobile messages) remotely to the server which processes these messages and delivers them to mobile phones.  Typical scenario of utilizing this protocol is data transfer between computer application and mobile phone. The recipient can answer messages and the server in return will deliver the answer by SMTP protocol, i.e. by email.  Key quality of this protocol is that it's built on base of HTPP(S) and SOAP protocols.     This means that in fact SMS gateway must support typified web-service. What do you get from web-service? What you get is the ability to send SMS from any platform you want.  The protocol is being developed at the moment and version 0.2 from 08/28/2009 was available when the article was published.  For promotion of their protocol and simplifying server search, Microsoft represented web-service http://messaging.office.microsoft.com/HostingProviders.aspx that helps to receive the list of providers, which supports OMS protocol and message delivery to your operator.  All you need to do is decide which provider to use, complete the agreement, then adjust the SharePoint connection parameters and start working.  Some providers advertise themselves not only for clients but for mobile operators as well. They offer automatic adding to the list of the Office Mobile Service Providers.  To view the full specifications of OMS, please go to http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd774103.aspx.

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  • Reporting Services 2008 Hosting :: How to Solve Error - "Maximum request length exceeded."

    - by mbridge
    Problem: How to Solve it? Please change your web.config file for SSRS which located on your Report Server. You can see the picture below: Edit this Web config file adding or replacin with this line <httpRuntime executionTimeout = "9000" maxRequestLength="500000" /> This will incress the timeout and the length of the data able to be pushed to the report server. Here is a sample of where I added it in my config file:

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