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  • How can I eager-load a child collection mapped to a non-primary key in NHibernate 2.1.2?

    - by David Rubin
    Hi, I have two objects with a many-to-many relationship between them, as follows: public class LeftHandSide { public LeftHandSide() { Name = String.Empty; Rights = new HashSet<RightHandSide>(); } public int Id { get; set; } public string Name { get; set; } public ICollection<RightHandSide> Rights { get; set; } } public class RightHandSide { public RightHandSide() { OtherProp = String.Empty; Lefts = new HashSet<LeftHandSide>(); } public int Id { get; set; } public string OtherProp { get; set; } public ICollection<LeftHandSide> Lefts { get; set; } } and I'm using a legacy database, so my mappings look like: Notice that LeftHandSide and RightHandSide are associated by a different column than RightHandSide's primary key. <class name="LeftHandSide" table="[dbo].[lefts]" lazy="false"> <id name="Id" column="ID" unsaved-value="0"> <generator class="identity" /> </id> <property name="Name" not-null="true" /> <set name="Rights" table="[dbo].[lefts2rights]"> <key column="leftId" /> <!-- THIS IS THE IMPORTANT BIT: I MUST USE PROPERTY-REF --> <many-to-many class="RightHandSide" column="rightProp" property-ref="OtherProp" /> </set> </class> <class name="RightHandSide" table="[dbo].[rights]" lazy="false"> <id name="Id" column="id" unsaved-value="0"> <generator class="identity" /> </id> <property name="OtherProp" column="otherProp" /> <set name="Lefts" table="[dbo].[lefts2rights]"> <!-- THIS IS THE IMPORTANT BIT: I MUST USE PROPERTY-REF --> <key column="rightProp" property-ref="OtherProp" /> <many-to-many class="LeftHandSide" column="leftId" /> </set> </class> The problem comes when I go to do a query: LeftHandSide lhs = _session.CreateCriteria<LeftHandSide>() .Add(Expression.IdEq(13)) .UniqueResult<LeftHandSide>(); works just fine. But LeftHandSide lhs = _session.CreateCriteria<LeftHandSide>() .Add(Expression.IdEq(13)) .SetFetchMode("Rights", FetchMode.Join) .UniqueResult<LeftHandSide>(); throws an exception (see below). Interestingly, RightHandSide rhs = _session.CreateCriteria<RightHandSide>() .Add(Expression.IdEq(127)) .SetFetchMode("Lefts", FetchMode.Join) .UniqueResult<RightHandSide>(); seems to be perfectly fine as well. NHibernate.Exceptions.GenericADOException Message: Error performing LoadByUniqueKey[SQL: SQL not available] Source: NHibernate StackTrace: c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Type\EntityType.cs(563,0): at NHibernate.Type.EntityType.LoadByUniqueKey(String entityName, String uniqueKeyPropertyName, Object key, ISessionImplementor session) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Type\EntityType.cs(428,0): at NHibernate.Type.EntityType.ResolveIdentifier(Object value, ISessionImplementor session, Object owner) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Type\EntityType.cs(300,0): at NHibernate.Type.EntityType.NullSafeGet(IDataReader rs, String[] names, ISessionImplementor session, Object owner) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Persister\Collection\AbstractCollectionPersister.cs(695,0): at NHibernate.Persister.Collection.AbstractCollectionPersister.ReadElement(IDataReader rs, Object owner, String[] aliases, ISessionImplementor session) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Collection\Generic\PersistentGenericSet.cs(54,0): at NHibernate.Collection.Generic.PersistentGenericSet`1.ReadFrom(IDataReader rs, ICollectionPersister role, ICollectionAliases descriptor, Object owner) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Loader\Loader.cs(706,0): at NHibernate.Loader.Loader.ReadCollectionElement(Object optionalOwner, Object optionalKey, ICollectionPersister persister, ICollectionAliases descriptor, IDataReader rs, ISessionImplementor session) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Loader\Loader.cs(385,0): at NHibernate.Loader.Loader.ReadCollectionElements(Object[] row, IDataReader resultSet, ISessionImplementor session) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Loader\Loader.cs(326,0): at NHibernate.Loader.Loader.GetRowFromResultSet(IDataReader resultSet, ISessionImplementor session, QueryParameters queryParameters, LockMode[] lockModeArray, EntityKey optionalObjectKey, IList hydratedObjects, EntityKey[] keys, Boolean returnProxies) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Loader\Loader.cs(453,0): at NHibernate.Loader.Loader.DoQuery(ISessionImplementor session, QueryParameters queryParameters, Boolean returnProxies) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Loader\Loader.cs(236,0): at NHibernate.Loader.Loader.DoQueryAndInitializeNonLazyCollections(ISessionImplementor session, QueryParameters queryParameters, Boolean returnProxies) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Loader\Loader.cs(1649,0): at NHibernate.Loader.Loader.DoList(ISessionImplementor session, QueryParameters queryParameters) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Loader\Loader.cs(1568,0): at NHibernate.Loader.Loader.ListIgnoreQueryCache(ISessionImplementor session, QueryParameters queryParameters) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Loader\Loader.cs(1562,0): at NHibernate.Loader.Loader.List(ISessionImplementor session, QueryParameters queryParameters, ISet`1 querySpaces, IType[] resultTypes) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Loader\Criteria\CriteriaLoader.cs(73,0): at NHibernate.Loader.Criteria.CriteriaLoader.List(ISessionImplementor session) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Impl\SessionImpl.cs(1936,0): at NHibernate.Impl.SessionImpl.List(CriteriaImpl criteria, IList results) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Impl\CriteriaImpl.cs(246,0): at NHibernate.Impl.CriteriaImpl.List(IList results) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Impl\CriteriaImpl.cs(237,0): at NHibernate.Impl.CriteriaImpl.List() c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Impl\CriteriaImpl.cs(398,0): at NHibernate.Impl.CriteriaImpl.UniqueResult() c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Impl\CriteriaImpl.cs(263,0): at NHibernate.Impl.CriteriaImpl.UniqueResult[T]() D:\proj\CMS3\branches\nh_auth\DomainModel2Tests\Authorization\TempTests.cs(46,0): at CMS.DomainModel.Authorization.TempTests.Test1() Inner Exception System.Collections.Generic.KeyNotFoundException Message: The given key was not present in the dictionary. Source: mscorlib StackTrace: at System.ThrowHelper.ThrowKeyNotFoundException() at System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary`2.get_Item(TKey key) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Persister\Entity\AbstractEntityPersister.cs(2047,0): at NHibernate.Persister.Entity.AbstractEntityPersister.GetAppropriateUniqueKeyLoader(String propertyName, IDictionary`2 enabledFilters) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Persister\Entity\AbstractEntityPersister.cs(2037,0): at NHibernate.Persister.Entity.AbstractEntityPersister.LoadByUniqueKey(String propertyName, Object uniqueKey, ISessionImplementor session) c:\opt\nhibernate\2.1.2\source\src\NHibernate\Type\EntityType.cs(552,0): at NHibernate.Type.EntityType.LoadByUniqueKey(String entityName, String uniqueKeyPropertyName, Object key, ISessionImplementor session) I'm using NHibernate 2.1.2 and I've been debugging into the NHibernate source, but I'm coming up empty. Any suggestions? Thanks so much!

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  • Need help with NHibernate / Fluent NHibernate mapping

    - by Mark Boltuc
    Let's say your have the following table structure: ============================== | Case | ============================== | Id | int | | ReferralType | varchar(10) | +---------| ReferralId | int |---------+ | ============================== | | | | | | | ====================== ====================== ====================== | SourceA | | SourceB | | SourceC | ====================== ====================== ====================== | Id | int | | Id | int | | Id | int | | Name | varchar(50) | | Name | varchar(50) | | Name | varchar(50) | ====================== ====================== ====================== Based on the ReferralType the ReferralId contains id to the SourceA, SourceB, or SourceC I'm trying to figure out how to map this using Fluent NHibernate or just plain NHibernate into an object model. I've tried a bunch of different things but I haven't been succesful. Any ideas? The object model might be something like: public class Case { public int Id { get; set; } public Referral { get; set; } } public class Referral { public string Type { get; set; } public int Id { get; set; } public string Name { get; set; } }

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  • Using Fluent NHibernate with Castle Windsor and the NHibernate Facility

    - by Andrew
    Ive managed to get Fluent NHibernate 1.1 playing nicely with Castle Windsor 2.1. This involved me recompiling NHibernate.ByteCode.Castle.dll and it all works fine. Ive managed to do the same thing this time with Castle Windsor 2.5, havent tried it yet but its not complaining which is good enough for me at the moment. However Im also using the Castle NHibernate Facility and that is another story. The version of the NHibernate Facility that is compatible with Castle 2.5 requires a much later version of NHibernate. Is there an easy way to get the NHibernate Facility to work with NHibernate 2.1 and Castle Core 2.5?

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  • Differences Between NHibernate and Entity Framework

    - by Ricardo Peres
    Introduction NHibernate and Entity Framework are two of the most popular O/RM frameworks on the .NET world. Although they share some functionality, there are some aspects on which they are quite different. This post will describe this differences and will hopefully help you get started with the one you know less. Mind you, this is a personal selection of features to compare, it is by no way an exhaustive list. History First, a bit of history. NHibernate is an open-source project that was first ported from Java’s venerable Hibernate framework, one of the first O/RM frameworks, but nowadays it is not tied to it, for example, it has .NET specific features, and has evolved in different ways from those of its Java counterpart. Current version is 3.3, with 3.4 on the horizon. It currently targets .NET 3.5, but can be used as well in .NET 4, it only makes no use of any of its specific functionality. You can find its home page at NHForge. Entity Framework 1 came out with .NET 3.5 and is now on its second major version, despite being version 4. Code First sits on top of it and but came separately and will also continue to be released out of line with major .NET distributions. It is currently on version 4.3.1 and version 5 will be released together with .NET Framework 4.5. All versions will target the current version of .NET, at the time of their release. Its home location is located at MSDN. Architecture In NHibernate, there is a separation between the Unit of Work and the configuration and model instances. You start off by creating a Configuration object, where you specify all global NHibernate settings such as the database and dialect to use, the batch sizes, the mappings, etc, then you build an ISessionFactory from it. The ISessionFactory holds model and metadata that is tied to a particular database and to the settings that came from the Configuration object, and, there will typically be only one instance of each in a process. Finally, you create instances of ISession from the ISessionFactory, which is the NHibernate representation of the Unit of Work and Identity Map. This is a lightweight object, it basically opens and closes a database connection as required and keeps track of the entities associated with it. ISession objects are cheap to create and dispose, because all of the model complexity is stored in the ISessionFactory and Configuration objects. As for Entity Framework, the ObjectContext/DbContext holds the configuration, model and acts as the Unit of Work, holding references to all of the known entity instances. This class is therefore not lightweight as its NHibernate counterpart and it is not uncommon to see examples where an instance is cached on a field. Mappings Both NHibernate and Entity Framework (Code First) support the use of POCOs to represent entities, no base classes are required (or even possible, in the case of NHibernate). As for mapping to and from the database, NHibernate supports three types of mappings: XML-based, which have the advantage of not tying the entity classes to a particular O/RM; the XML files can be deployed as files on the file system or as embedded resources in an assembly; Attribute-based, for keeping both the entities and database details on the same place at the expense of polluting the entity classes with NHibernate-specific attributes; Strongly-typed code-based, which allows dynamic creation of the model and strongly typing it, so that if, for example, a property name changes, the mapping will also be updated. Entity Framework can use: Attribute-based (although attributes cannot express all of the available possibilities – for example, cascading); Strongly-typed code mappings. Database Support With NHibernate you can use mostly any database you want, including: SQL Server; SQL Server Compact; SQL Server Azure; Oracle; DB2; PostgreSQL; MySQL; Sybase Adaptive Server/SQL Anywhere; Firebird; SQLLite; Informix; Any through OLE DB; Any through ODBC. Out of the box, Entity Framework only supports SQL Server, but a number of providers exist, both free and commercial, for some of the most used databases, such as Oracle and MySQL. See a list here. Inheritance Strategies Both NHibernate and Entity Framework support the three canonical inheritance strategies: Table Per Type Hierarchy (Single Table Inheritance), Table Per Type (Class Table Inheritance) and Table Per Concrete Type (Concrete Table Inheritance). Associations Regarding associations, both support one to one, one to many and many to many. However, NHibernate offers far more collection types: Bags of entities or values: unordered, possibly with duplicates; Lists of entities or values: ordered, indexed by a number column; Maps of entities or values: indexed by either an entity or any value; Sets of entities or values: unordered, no duplicates; Arrays of entities or values: indexed, immutable. Querying NHibernate exposes several querying APIs: LINQ is probably the most used nowadays, and really does not need to be introduced; Hibernate Query Language (HQL) is a database-agnostic, object-oriented SQL-alike language that exists since NHibernate’s creation and still offers the most advanced querying possibilities; well suited for dynamic queries, even if using string concatenation; Criteria API is an implementation of the Query Object pattern where you create a semi-abstract conceptual representation of the query you wish to execute by means of a class model; also a good choice for dynamic querying; Query Over offers a similar API to Criteria, but using strongly-typed LINQ expressions instead of strings; for this, although more refactor-friendlier that Criteria, it is also less suited for dynamic queries; SQL, including stored procedures, can also be used; Integration with Lucene.NET indexer is available. As for Entity Framework: LINQ to Entities is fully supported, and its implementation is considered very complete; it is the API of choice for most developers; Entity-SQL, HQL’s counterpart, is also an object-oriented, database-independent querying language that can be used for dynamic queries; SQL, of course, is also supported. Caching Both NHibernate and Entity Framework, of course, feature first-level cache. NHibernate also supports a second-level cache, that can be used among multiple ISessionFactorys, even in different processes/machines: Hashtable (in-memory); SysCache (uses ASP.NET as the cache provider); SysCache2 (same as above but with support for SQL Server SQL Dependencies); Prevalence; SharedCache; Memcached; Redis; NCache; Appfabric Caching. Out of the box, Entity Framework does not have any second-level cache mechanism, however, there are some public samples that show how we can add this. ID Generators NHibernate supports different ID generation strategies, coming from the database and otherwise: Identity (for SQL Server, MySQL, and databases who support identity columns); Sequence (for Oracle, PostgreSQL, and others who support sequences); Trigger-based; HiLo; Sequence HiLo (for databases that support sequences); Several GUID flavors, both in GUID as well as in string format; Increment (for single-user uses); Assigned (must know what you’re doing); Sequence-style (either uses an actual sequence or a single-column table); Table of ids; Pooled (similar to HiLo but stores high values in a table); Native (uses whatever mechanism the current database supports, identity or sequence). Entity Framework only supports: Identity generation; GUIDs; Assigned values. Properties NHibernate supports properties of entity types (one to one or many to one), collections (one to many or many to many) as well as scalars and enumerations. It offers a mechanism for having complex property types generated from the database, which even include support for querying. It also supports properties originated from SQL formulas. Entity Framework only supports scalars, entity types and collections. Enumerations support will come in the next version. Events and Interception NHibernate has a very rich event model, that exposes more than 20 events, either for synchronous pre-execution or asynchronous post-execution, including: Pre/Post-Load; Pre/Post-Delete; Pre/Post-Insert; Pre/Post-Update; Pre/Post-Flush. It also features interception of class instancing and SQL generation. As for Entity Framework, only two events exist: ObjectMaterialized (after loading an entity from the database); SavingChanges (before saving changes, which include deleting, inserting and updating). Tracking Changes For NHibernate as well as Entity Framework, all changes are tracked by their respective Unit of Work implementation. Entities can be attached and detached to it, Entity Framework does, however, also support self-tracking entities. Optimistic Concurrency Control NHibernate supports all of the imaginable scenarios: SQL Server’s ROWVERSION; Oracle’s ORA_ROWSCN; A column containing date and time; A column containing a version number; All/dirty columns comparison. Entity Framework is more focused on Entity Framework, so it only supports: SQL Server’s ROWVERSION; Comparing all/some columns. Batching NHibernate has full support for insertion batching, but only if the ID generator in use is not database-based (for example, it cannot be used with Identity), whereas Entity Framework has no batching at all. Cascading Both support cascading for collections and associations: when an entity is deleted, their conceptual children are also deleted. NHibernate also offers the possibility to set the foreign key column on children to NULL instead of removing them. Flushing Changes NHibernate’s ISession has a FlushMode property that can have the following values: Auto: changes are sent to the database when necessary, for example, if there are dirty instances of an entity type, and a query is performed against this entity type, or if the ISession is being disposed; Commit: changes are sent when committing the current transaction; Never: changes are only sent when explicitly calling Flush(). As for Entity Framework, changes have to be explicitly sent through a call to AcceptAllChanges()/SaveChanges(). Lazy Loading NHibernate supports lazy loading for Associated entities (one to one, many to one); Collections (one to many, many to many); Scalar properties (thing of BLOBs or CLOBs). Entity Framework only supports lazy loading for: Associated entities; Collections. Generating and Updating the Database Both NHibernate and Entity Framework Code First (with the Migrations API) allow creating the database model from the mapping and updating it if the mapping changes. Extensibility As you can guess, NHibernate is far more extensible than Entity Framework. Basically, everything can be extended, from ID generation, to LINQ to SQL transformation, HQL native SQL support, custom column types, custom association collections, SQL generation, supported databases, etc. With Entity Framework your options are more limited, at least, because practically no information exists as to what can be extended/changed. It features a provider model that can be extended to support any database. Integration With Other Microsoft APIs and Tools When it comes to integration with Microsoft technologies, it will come as no surprise that Entity Framework offers the best support. For example, the following technologies are fully supported: ASP.NET (through the EntityDataSource); ASP.NET Dynamic Data; WCF Data Services; WCF RIA Services; Visual Studio (through the integrated designer). Documentation This is another point where Entity Framework is superior: NHibernate lacks, for starters, an up to date API reference synchronized with its current version. It does have a community mailing list, blogs and wikis, although not much used. Entity Framework has a number of resources on MSDN and, of course, several forums and discussion groups exist. Conclusion Like I said, this is a personal list. I may come as a surprise to some that Entity Framework is so behind NHibernate in so many aspects, but it is true that NHibernate is much older and, due to its open-source nature, is not tied to product-specific timeframes and can thus evolve much more rapidly. I do like both, and I chose whichever is best for the job I have at hands. I am looking forward to the changes in EF5 which will add significant value to an already interesting product. So, what do you think? Did I forget anything important or is there anything else worth talking about? Looking forward for your comments!

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  • Polymorphic NHibernate mappings

    - by Ben Aston
    I have an interface IUserLocation and a concrete type UserLocation. When I use ICriteria, specifying the interface IUserLocation, I want NHibernate to instantiate a collection of the concrete UserLocation type. I have created an HBM mapping file using the table per concrete type strategy (shown below). However, when I query NHibernate using ICriteria I get: NHibernate cannot instantiate abstract class or interface MyNamespace.IUserLocation Can anyone see why this is? (source code for the relevant bit of NHibernate here (I think)) My ICriteria: var filter = DetachedCriteria.For<IUserLocation>() .Add(Restrictions.Eq("UserId", userId)); return filter.GetExecutableCriteria(UoW.Session) .List<IUserLocation>(); My mapping file: <hibernate-mapping xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2" default-lazy="true"> <class xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2" name="MyNamespace.IUserLocation,MyAssembly" abstract="true" table="IUserLocations"> <composite-id> <key-property name="UserId" column="UserId" type="System.Guid"></key-property> <key-many-to-one name="Location" column="LocationId" class="MyNamespace.ILocation,MyAssembly"></key-many-to-one> </composite-id> <union-subclass table="UserLocations" name="MyNamespace2.UserLocation,MyAssembly2"> <property name="IsAdmin" /> </union-subclass> </class> </hibernate-mapping>

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  • NHibernate exception on query

    - by Yoav
    I'm getting a mapping exception doing the most basic query. This is my domain class: public class Project { public virtual string PK { get; set; } public virtual string Id { get; set; } public virtual string Name { get; set; } public virtual string Description { get; set; } } And the mapping class: public class ProjectMap :ClassMap<Project> { public ProjectMap() { Table("PROJECTS"); Id(x => x.PK, "PK"); Map(x => x.Id, "ID"); Map(x => x.Name, "NAME"); Map(x => x.Description, "DESCRIPTION"); } } Configuration: public ISessionFactory SessionFactory { return Fluently.Configure() .Database(MsSqlCeConfiguration.Standard.ShowSql().ConnectionString(c => c.Is("data source=" + path))) .Mappings(m => m.FluentMappings.AddFromAssemblyOf<Project>()) .BuildSessionFactory(); } And query: IList project; using (ISession session = SessionFactory.OpenSession()) { IQuery query = session.CreateQuery("from Project"); project = query.List<Project>(); } I'm getting the exception on the query line: NHibernate.Hql.Ast.ANTLR.QuerySyntaxException: Project is not mapped [from Project] at NHibernate.Hql.Ast.ANTLR.SessionFactoryHelperExtensions.RequireClassPersister(String name) at NHibernate.Hql.Ast.ANTLR.Tree.FromElementFactory.AddFromElement() at NHibernate.Hql.Ast.ANTLR.Tree.FromClause.AddFromElement(String path, IASTNode alias) at NHibernate.Hql.Ast.ANTLR.HqlSqlWalker.fromElement() at NHibernate.Hql.Ast.ANTLR.HqlSqlWalker.fromElementList() at NHibernate.Hql.Ast.ANTLR.HqlSqlWalker.fromClause() at NHibernate.Hql.Ast.ANTLR.HqlSqlWalker.unionedQuery() at NHibernate.Hql.Ast.ANTLR.HqlSqlWalker.query() at NHibernate.Hql.Ast.ANTLR.HqlSqlWalker.selectStatement() at NHibernate.Hql.Ast.ANTLR.HqlSqlWalker.statement() at NHibernate.Hql.Ast.ANTLR.HqlSqlTranslator.Translate() at NHibernate.Hql.Ast.ANTLR.QueryTranslatorImpl.Analyze(HqlParseEngine parser, String collectionRole) at NHibernate.Hql.Ast.ANTLR.QueryTranslatorImpl.DoCompile(IDictionary`2 replacements, Boolean shallow, String collectionRole) at NHibernate.Hql.Ast.ANTLR.QueryTranslatorImpl.Compile(IDictionary`2 replacements, Boolean shallow) at NHibernate.Engine.Query.HQLQueryPlan..ctor(String hql, String collectionRole, Boolean shallow, IDictionary`2 enabledFilters, ISessionFactoryImplementor factory) at NHibernate.Engine.Query.QueryPlanCache.GetHQLQueryPlan(String queryString, Boolean shallow, IDictionary`2 enabledFilters) at NHibernate.Impl.AbstractSessionImpl.GetHQLQueryPlan(String query, Boolean shallow) at NHibernate.Impl.AbstractSessionImpl.CreateQuery(String queryString) I assume something is wrong with my query.

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  • NHibernate Tools: Visual NHibernate

    - by Ricardo Peres
    You probably know that I’m a big fan of Slyce Software’s Visual NHibernate. To me, it is the best tool for generating your entities and mappings from an existing database (it also allows you to go the other way, but I honestly have never used it that way). What I like most about it: Great support: folks at Slyce always listen to your suggestions, give you feedback in a timely manner, and I was even lucky enough to have some of my suggestions implemented! The templating engine, which is very powerful, and more user-friendly than, for example, MyGeneration’s; one of the included templates is Sharp Architecture; Advanced model validations: it even warns you about having lazy properties declared in non-lazy entities; Integration with NHibernate Validator and generation of validation rules automatically based on the database, or on user-defined model settings; The designer: they opted for not displaying all entities in a single screen, which I think was a good decision; has support for all inheritance strategies (table per class hierarchy, table per class, table per concrete class); Generation of FluentNHibernate mappings as well as hbm.xml. I could name others, but… why don’t you see for yourself? There is a demo version available for downloading. By the way, I am in no way related to Slyce, I just happen to like their software!

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  • Named query not known error trying to call a stored proc using Fluent NHibernate

    - by Hamman359
    I'm working on setting up NHibernate for a project and I have a few queries that, due to their complexity, we will be leaving as stored procedures. I'd like to be able to use NHibernate to call the sprocs, but have run into an error I can't figure out. Since I'm using Fluent NHibernate I'm using mixed mode mapping as recommended here. However, when I run the app I get a "Named query not known: AccountsGetSingle" exception and I can't figure out why. I think I might have a problem with my HBM mapping since I'm not very familiar with using them but I'm not sure. My NHibernate configuration code is: private ISessionFactory CreateSessionFactory() { return Fluently.Configure() .Database(MsSqlConfiguration.MsSql2005 .ConnectionString((conn => conn.FromConnectionStringWithKey("CIDB"))) .ShowSql()) .Mappings(m => { m.HbmMappings.AddFromAssemblyOf<Account>(); m.FluentMappings.AddFromAssemblyOf<Account>(); }) .BuildSessionFactory(); } My hbm.xml file is: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?> <hibernate-mapping xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2"> <sql-query name="AccountsGetSingle"> <return alias="Account" class="Core, Account"></return> exec AccountsGetSingle </sql-query> </hibernate-mapping> And the code where I am calling the sproc looks like this: public Account Get() { return _conversation.Session .GetNamedQuery("AccountsGetSingle") .UniqueResult<Account>(); } Any thoughts or ideas would be appreciated. Thanks.

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  • fluentnhibernate and nhibernate validator version error

    - by Thad
    We have a project using FluentNibernate to map the entities. Now I need to add some format validation to these maps. For Nullable, Length and such we are currently using the mappings. I added NHibernate Validator to the project, but received a compile time error about needing NHibernate version 2.1.2.4000. So I upgraded to that version just to get a run-time error stating that it could not find NHibernate 2.1.0.4000. Could I write extension methods to do the validation using FluentNibernate? Do I have to recompile both using the same version of NHibernate? The preferred method would be to use a release of these. Any other device would appreciated.

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  • Fluent | Nhibernate multiple inheritance mapping?

    - by Broken Pipe
    I'm trying to map this classes: public interface IBusinessObject { Guid Id { get; set; } } public class Product { public virtual Guid Id { get; set; } public virtual int ProductTypeId { get; set; } } public class ProductWeSell : Product, IBusinessObject { } public class ProductWeDontSell : Product { } Using this Fluent mapping code: public class IBusinessObjectMap : ClassMap<IBusinessObject> { public IBusinessObjectMap() { Id(t => t.Id).GeneratedBy.Guid(); Table("BusinessObject"); } } public class ProductMap : ClassMap<Product> { public ProductMap() { Id(t => t.Id); DiscriminateSubClassesOnColumn("ProductTypeId", "null").Nullable(); } } public class ProductWeSellMap : SubclassMap<ProductWeSell> { public ProductWeSellMap() { DiscriminatorValue(1); KeyColumn("Id"); } } public class ProductWeDontSellMap : SubclassMap<ProductWeDontSell> { public ProductWeDontSellMap() { DiscriminatorValue(2); KeyColumn("Id"); } } But I get {"Duplicate class/entity mapping ProductWeSell"} error. And if we take a look at generated HBM, indeed it's duplicated, but i have no idea how to write this mapping without duplicating it if it's possible at all. Produced hbm: <hibernate-mapping xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2"> <class xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2" name="IBusinessObject" table="BusinessObject"> <joined-subclass name="ProductWeSell" table="ProductWeSell"/> </class> </hibernate-mapping> <hibernate-mapping xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2"> <class xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2" discriminator-value="null" name="Product" table="Product"> <discriminator type="String"> <column name="ProductTypeId" not-null="false" /> </discriminator> <subclass name="ProductWeDontSell" discriminator-value="2" /> <subclass name="ProductWeSell" discriminator-value="1" /> </class> </hibernate-mapping> So far I was unable to figure out how to map this using fluent Nhibernate (i haven't tried mapping this using hmb files). Any help appreciated Fluent or HBM files. The thing I'm trying to solve look identical to this topic: NHibernate inheritance mapping question

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  • Entity with Guid ID is not inserted by NHibernate

    - by DanK
    I am experimenting with NHibernate (version 2.1.0.4000) with Fluent NHibernate Automapping. My test set of entities persists fine with default integer IDs I am now trying to use Guid IDs with the entities. Unfortunately changing the Id property to a Guid seems to stop NHibernate inserting objects. Here is the entity class: public class User { public virtual int Id { get; private set; } public virtual string FirstName { get; set; } public virtual string LastName { get; set; } public virtual string Email { get; set; } public virtual string Password { get; set; } public virtual List<UserGroup> Groups { get; set; } } And here is the Fluent NHibernate configuration I am using: SessionFactory = Fluently.Configure() //.Database(SQLiteConfiguration.Standard.InMemory) .Database(MsSqlConfiguration.MsSql2008.ConnectionString(@"Data Source=.\SQLEXPRESS;Initial Catalog=NHibernateTest;Uid=NHibernateTest;Password=password").ShowSql()) .Mappings(m => m.AutoMappings.Add( AutoMap.AssemblyOf<TestEntities.User>() .UseOverridesFromAssemblyOf<UserGroupMappingOverride>())) .ExposeConfiguration(x => { x.SetProperty("current_session_context_class","web"); }) .ExposeConfiguration(Cfg => _configuration = Cfg) .BuildSessionFactory(); Here is the log output when using an integer ID: 16:23:14.287 [4] DEBUG NHibernate.Event.Default.DefaultSaveOrUpdateEventListener - saving transient instance 16:23:14.291 [4] DEBUG NHibernate.Event.Default.AbstractSaveEventListener - saving [TestEntities.User#<null>] 16:23:14.299 [4] DEBUG NHibernate.Event.Default.AbstractSaveEventListener - executing insertions 16:23:14.309 [4] DEBUG NHibernate.Event.Default.AbstractSaveEventListener - executing identity-insert immediately 16:23:14.313 [4] DEBUG NHibernate.Persister.Entity.AbstractEntityPersister - Inserting entity: TestEntities.User (native id) 16:23:14.321 [4] DEBUG NHibernate.AdoNet.AbstractBatcher - Opened new IDbCommand, open IDbCommands: 1 16:23:14.321 [4] DEBUG NHibernate.AdoNet.AbstractBatcher - Building an IDbCommand object for the SqlString: INSERT INTO [User] (FirstName, LastName, Email, Password) VALUES (?, ?, ?, ?); select SCOPE_IDENTITY() 16:23:14.322 [4] DEBUG NHibernate.Persister.Entity.AbstractEntityPersister - Dehydrating entity: [TestEntities.User#<null>] 16:23:14.323 [4] DEBUG NHibernate.Type.StringType - binding null to parameter: 0 16:23:14.323 [4] DEBUG NHibernate.Type.StringType - binding null to parameter: 1 16:23:14.323 [4] DEBUG NHibernate.Type.StringType - binding 'ertr' to parameter: 2 16:23:14.324 [4] DEBUG NHibernate.Type.StringType - binding 'tretret' to parameter: 3 16:23:14.329 [4] DEBUG NHibernate.SQL - INSERT INTO [User] (FirstName, LastName, Email, Password) VALUES (@p0, @p1, @p2, @p3); select SCOPE_IDENTITY();@p0 = NULL, @p1 = NULL, @p2 = 'ertr', @p3 = 'tretret' and here is the output when using a Guid: 16:50:14.008 [4] DEBUG NHibernate.Event.Default.DefaultSaveOrUpdateEventListener - saving transient instance 16:50:14.012 [4] DEBUG NHibernate.Event.Default.AbstractSaveEventListener - generated identifier: d74e1bd3-1c01-46c8-996c-9d370115780d, using strategy: NHibernate.Id.GuidCombGenerator 16:50:14.013 [4] DEBUG NHibernate.Event.Default.AbstractSaveEventListener - saving [TestEntities.User#d74e1bd3-1c01-46c8-996c-9d370115780d] This is where it silently fails, with no exception thrown or further log entries. It looks like it is generating the Guid ID correctly for the new object, but is just not getting any further than that. Is there something I need to do differently in order to use Guid IDs? Thanks, Dan.

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  • NHibernate (3.1.0.4000) NullReferenceException using Query<> and NHibernate Facility

    - by TigerShark
    I have a problem with NHibernate, I can't seem to find any solution for. In my project I have a simple entity (Batch), but whenever I try and run the following test, I get an exception. I've triede a couple of different ways to perform a similar query, but almost identical exception for all (it differs in which LINQ method being executed). The first test: [Test] public void QueryLatestBatch() { using (var session = SessionManager.OpenSession()) { var batch = session.Query<Batch>() .FirstOrDefault(); Assert.That(batch, Is.Not.Null); } } The exception: System.NullReferenceException : Object reference not set to an instance of an object. at NHibernate.Linq.NhQueryProvider.PrepareQuery(Expression expression, ref IQuery query, ref NhLinqExpression nhQuery) at NHibernate.Linq.NhQueryProvider.Execute(Expression expression) at System.Linq.Queryable.FirstOrDefault(IQueryable`1 source) The second test: [Test] public void QueryLatestBatch2() { using (var session = SessionManager.OpenSession()) { var batch = session.Query<Batch>() .OrderBy(x => x.Executed) .Take(1) .SingleOrDefault(); Assert.That(batch, Is.Not.Null); } } The exception: System.NullReferenceException : Object reference not set to an instance of an object. at NHibernate.Linq.NhQueryProvider.PrepareQuery(Expression expression, ref IQuery query, ref NhLinqExpression nhQuery) at NHibernate.Linq.NhQueryProvider.Execute(Expression expression) at System.Linq.Queryable.SingleOrDefault(IQueryable`1 source) However, this one is passing (using QueryOver<): [Test] public void QueryOverLatestBatch() { using (var session = SessionManager.OpenSession()) { var batch = session.QueryOver<Batch>() .OrderBy(x => x.Executed).Asc .Take(1) .SingleOrDefault(); Assert.That(batch, Is.Not.Null); Assert.That(batch.Executed, Is.LessThan(DateTime.Now)); } } Using the QueryOver< API is not bad at all, but I'm just kind of baffled that the Query< API isn't working, which is kind of sad, since the First() operation is very concise, and our developers really enjoy LINQ. I really hope there is a solution to this, as it seems strange if these methods are failing such a simple test. EDIT I'm using Oracle 11g, my mappings are done with FluentNHibernate registered through Castle Windsor with the NHibernate Facility. As I wrote, the odd thing is that the query works perfectly with the QueryOver< API, but not through LINQ.

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  • Fluent NHibernate: mapping complex many-to-many (with additional columns) and setting fetch

    - by HackedByChinese
    I need a Fluent NHibernate mapping that will fulfill the following (if nothing else, I'll also take the appropriate NHibernate XML mapping and reverse engineer it). DETAILS I have a many-to-many relationship between two entities: Parent and Child. That is accomplished by an additional table to store the identities of the Parent and Child. However, I also need to define two additional columns on that mapping that provide more information about the relationship. This is roughly how I've defined my types, at least the relevant parts (where Entity is some base type that provides an Id property and checks for equivalence based on that Id): public class Parent : Entity { public virtual IList<ParentChildRelationship> Children { get; protected set; } public virtual void AddChildRelationship(Child child, int customerId) { var relationship = new ParentChildRelationship { CustomerId = customerId, Parent = this, Child = child }; if (Children == null) Children = new List<ParentChildRelationship>(); if (Children.Contains(relationship)) return; relationship.Sequence = Children.Count; Children.Add(relationship); } } public class Child : Entity { // child doesn't care about its relationships } public class ParentChildRelationship { public int CustomerId { get; set; } public Parent Parent { get; set; } public Child Child { get; set; } public int Sequence { get; set; } public override bool Equals(object obj) { if (ReferenceEquals(null, obj)) return false; if (ReferenceEquals(this, obj)) return true; var other = obj as ParentChildRelationship; if (return other == null) return false; return (CustomerId == other.CustomerId && Parent == other.Parent && Child == other.Child); } public override int GetHashCode() { unchecked { int result = CustomerId; result = Parent == null ? 0 : (result*397) ^ Parent.GetHashCode(); result = Child == null ? 0 : (result*397) ^ Child.GetHashCode(); return result; } } } The tables in the database look approximately like (assume primary/foreign keys and forgive syntax): create table Parent ( id int identity(1,1) not null ) create table Child ( id int identity(1,1) not null ) create table ParentChildRelationship ( customerId int not null, parent_id int not null, child_id int not null, sequence int not null ) I'm OK with Parent.Children being a lazy loaded property. However, the ParentChildRelationship should eager load ParentChildRelationship.Child. Furthermore, I want to use a Join when I eager load. The SQL, when accessing Parent.Children, NHibernate should generate an equivalent query to: SELECT * FROM ParentChildRelationship rel LEFT OUTER JOIN Child ch ON rel.child_id = ch.id WHERE parent_id = ? OK, so to do that I have mappings that look like this: ParentMap : ClassMap<Parent> { public ParentMap() { Table("Parent"); Id(c => c.Id).GeneratedBy.Identity(); HasMany(c => c.Children).KeyColumn("parent_id"); } } ChildMap : ClassMap<Child> { public ChildMap() { Table("Child"); Id(c => c.Id).GeneratedBy.Identity(); } } ParentChildRelationshipMap : ClassMap<ParentChildRelationship> { public ParentChildRelationshipMap() { Table("ParentChildRelationship"); CompositeId() .KeyProperty(c => c.CustomerId, "customerId") .KeyReference(c => c.Parent, "parent_id") .KeyReference(c => c.Child, "child_id"); Map(c => c.Sequence).Not.Nullable(); } } So, in my test if i try to get myParentRepo.Get(1).Children, it does in fact get me all the relationships and, as I access them from the relationship, the Child objects (for example, I can grab them all by doing parent.Children.Select(r => r.Child).ToList()). However, the SQL that NHibernate is generating is inefficient. When I access parent.Children, NHIbernate does a SELECT * FROM ParentChildRelationship WHERE parent_id = 1 and then a SELECT * FROM Child WHERE id = ? for each child in each relationship. I understand why NHibernate is doing this, but I can't figure out how to set up the mapping to make NHibernate query the way I mentioned above.

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  • NHibernate SubclassMap gives DuplicateMappingException

    - by stiank81
    I'm using NHibernate to handle my database - with Fluent configuration. I'm not using Automappings. All mappings are written explicitly, and everything is working just fine. Now I wanted to add my first mapping to a subclass, using the SubclassMap, and I run into problems. With the simplest possible setup an Nhibernate DuplicateMappingException is thrown, saying that the subclass is mapped more than once: NHibernate.MappingException : Could not compile the mapping document: (XmlDocument) ---- NHibernate.DuplicateMappingException : Duplicate class/entity mapping MyNamespace.SubPerson I get this with my simple classes written for testing: public class Person { public int Id { get; set; } public string Name { get; set; } } public class SubPerson : Person { public string Foo { get; set; } } With the following mappings: public class PersonMapping : ClassMap<Person> { public PersonMapping() { Not.LazyLoad(); Id(c => c.Id); Map(c => c.Name); } } public class SubPersonMapping : SubclassMap<SubPerson> { public SubPersonMapping() { Not.LazyLoad(); Map(m => m.Foo); } } Any idea why this is happening? If there were automappings involved I guess it might have been caused by the automappings adding a mapping too, but there should be no automapping. I create my database specifying a fluent mapping: private static ISession CreateSession() { var cfg = Fluently.Configure(). Database(SQLiteConfiguration.Standard.ShowSql().UsingFile("unit_test.db")). Mappings(m => m.FluentMappings.AddFromAssemblyOf<SomeClassInTheAssemblyContainingAllMappings>()); var sessionSource = new SessionSource(cfg.BuildConfiguration().Properties, new TestModel()); var session = sessionSource.CreateSession(); _sessionSource.BuildSchema(session); return session; } Again; note that this only happens with SubclassMap. ClassMap's are working just fine!

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  • NHibernate DuplicateMappingException when mapping abstract class and subclass

    - by stiank81
    I have an abstract class, and subclasses of this, and I want to map this to my database using NHibernate. I'm using Fluent, and read on the wiki how to do the mapping. But when I add the mapping of the subclass an NHibernate.DuplicateMappingException is thrown when it is mapping. Why? Here are my (simplified) classes: public abstract class FieldValue { public int Id { get; set; } public abstract object Value { get; set; } } public class StringFieldValue : FieldValue { public string ValueAsString { get; set; } public override object Value { get { return ValueAsString; } set { ValueAsString = (string)value; } } } And the mappings: public class FieldValueMapping : ClassMap<FieldValue> { public FieldValueMapping() { Id(m => m.Id).GeneratedBy.HiLo("1"); // DiscriminateSubClassesOnColumn("type"); } } public class StringValueMapping : SubclassMap<StringFieldValue> { public StringValueMapping() { Map(m => m.ValueAsString).Length(100); } } And the exception: NHibernate.MappingException : Could not compile the mapping document: (XmlDocument) ---- NHibernate.DuplicateMappingException : Duplicate class/entity mapping NamespacePath.StringFieldValue Any ideas?

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  • How to map an IDictionary<String, CustomCollectionType> in NHibernate

    - by devonlazarus
    Very close to what I'm trying to do but not quite the answer I think I'm looking for: How to map IDictionary<string, Entity> in Fluent NHibernate I'm trying to implement an IDictionary<String, IList<MyEntity>>and map this collection to the database using NHibernate. I do understand that you cannot map collections of collections directly in NHibernate, but I do need the functionality of accessing an ordered list of elements by key. I've implemented IUserCollectionType for my IList<MyEntity> so that I can use IDictionary<String, MyCustomCollectionType> but am struggling with how to get the map to work as I'd like. Details This is the database I'm trying to model: ------------------------ -------------------- | EntityAttributes | | Entities | ------------------------ ------------------ -------------------- | EntityAttributeId PK | | Attributes | | EntityId PK | <- | EntityId FK | ------------------ | DateCreated | | AttributeId FK | -> | AttributeId PK | -------------------- | AttributeValue | | AttributeName | ------------------------ ------------------ Here are my domain classes: public class Entity { public virtual Int32 Id { get; private set; } public virtual DateTime DateCreated { get; private set; } ... } public class EavEntity : Entity { public virtual IDictionary<String, EavEntityAttributeList> Attributes { get; protected set; } ... } public class EavAttribute : Entity { public virtual String Name { get; set; } ... } public class EavEntityAttribute : Entity { public virtual EavEntity EavEntity { get; private set; } public virtual EavAttribute EavAttribute { get; private set; } public virtual Object AttributeValue { get; set; } ... } public class EavEntityAttributeList : List<EavEntityAttribute> { } I've also implemented the NH-specific custom collection classes IUserCollectionType and PersistentList And here is my mapping so far: <hibernate-mapping xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2" ...> <class xmlns="urn:nhibernate-mapping-2.2" name="EavEntity" table="Entities"> <id name="Id" type="System.Int32"> <column name="EntityId" /> <generator class="identity" /> </id> ... <map cascade="all-delete-orphan" collection-type="EavEntityAttributeListType" name="EntityAttributes"> <key> <column name="EntityId" /> </key> <index type="System.String"> <column name="Name" /> </index> <one-to-many class="EavEntityAttributeList" /> </map> </class> </hibernate-mapping> I know the <map> tag is partially correct, but I'm not sure how to get NH to utilize my IUserCollectionType to persist the model to the database. What I'd like to see (and this isn't right, I know) is something like: <map cascade="all-delete-orphan" collection-type="EavEntityAttributeListType" name="EntityAttributes"> <key> <column name="EntityId" /> </key> <index type="System.String"> <column name="Name" /> </index> <list> <index column="DisplayOrder"> <one-to-many class="EntityAttributes"> </list> </map> Does anyone have any suggestions on how to properly map that IDictionary<String, EavEntityAttributeList> collection? I am using Fluent NH so I'll take examples using that library, but I'm hand mappings are just as helpful here.

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  • Nhibernate, mapping as (n)varchar max ?

    - by Quandary
    Question: In nHiberne, I map a string like this: [NHibernate.Mapping.Attributes.Property(Name = "MLST_Description", Type = "String", Length = 400)] which maps string to nvarchar(400) This one [NHibernate.Mapping.Attributes.Property(Name = "MLST_Description", Type = "String")] maps to nvarchar(255) But how can I map to nvarchar(max) ?

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  • Using a nHibernate wrapper with fluent nHibernate

    - by alex
    Is it possible to use something like this wrapper with fluent configuration? http://jeffreypalermo.com/blog/use-this-nhibernate-wrapper-to-keep-your-repository-classes-simple/ If so, where would I add the fluent config? Also, would this be suited to use in both asp.net and windows applications? I'm planning to use the repository pattern, using this to create my nHibernate session?

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  • Triggers in NHibernate

    - by Felipe
    Hi everybody, I'd like to know if is there something like a Trigger (of databases) in NHibernate that I can use per entity ? I'd like to make a history of each record, and with triggers I can compare the old value and new value of each property and generate a register of history. I've heard about Audit in NHibernate, but it's for all entities, if there isn't another way... how Can I separete a block per entity ? Thanks

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  • Nhibernate: Stop it from joining to a table that is not needed

    - by Aaron
    I have two tables (tbArea, tbPost) that relate to the following classes. class Area { int ID string Name ... } class Post { int ID string Title Area Area ... } These two classes map up with Fluent Nhibernate. Below is the post mapping. public class PostMapping : ClassMap<Post> { public PostMapping() { Cache.NonStrictReadWrite(); this.Table("tbPost"); Id(x => x.ID) .Column("PostID") .GeneratedBy .Identity(); References(x => x.Area) .ForeignKey("AreaID") .Column("AreaID"); ... } } Any time I perform a query on the Post table "where AreaID = 1(any AreaId)", nhibernate will join to the area table. (What Nhibernate generates for a query) SELECT post fields , area fields (automatically added) FROM tbPost p LEFT JOIN tbArea a on p.areaid = a.areaid where p.areaid = 1 I have tried setting Area to LazyLoad, to Fetch.Select, ReadOnly, and any other setting on the reference and still it will always join to Area. I am trying to optimize the backend database queries, and since I don't need the area object loaded just filtered I would like to eliminate the unnecessary join to Area each time I Query post. What configurations do I need to change or mappings to get area to still be related to post in my objects, but not query it when I filter on AreaID?

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