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  • OOP vs Frameworks (DRY, Organisation, Readability)

    - by benhowdle89
    In terms of organisation, code-readability and DRY programming, which, between OOP and Frameworks shows more of these 3 attributes? I'm aware that inline, procedural coding is viewed by many as a thing of the past, so which is the best route to take for these two? Just to clarify what i mean by OOP and frameworks From Wikipedia: Object-oriented programming (OOP) is a programming paradigm In computer programming, a software framework is an abstraction in which common code providing generic functionality can be selectively overridden or specialized by user code, thus providing specific functionality

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  • Some solid OOP criticism?

    - by Bubba88
    Hi! I want to ask you to provide me with some articles (maybe books), which you possibly have found very convincing criticising the OOP methodology. I have read some in the WWW on this topic and I didn't really find a 'definitive demotivator'. It's not much about my personal attitude to the OOP, but I really would like to have something constructive, rigorous foundation for any kind of discussion and just abstract thinking. You can post some original research too, but please be very constructive (as my personal request). Thank you very much!

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  • Interview Questions in OOP

    - by Fero
    Hi all, I faced the below interview questions in OOP under PHP language. Kindly clear my clarifications regarding this. I am very confused. As i am a beginner to OOP i got too confused. Could anyone clarify these things clearly? Difference between Abstract class and interface. Interviewer : Let us consider abstract class contains three abstract methods such as a,b,c and interface contains three methods a,b,c. In this case these do the same functionality. Then why are going for abstract and why are we going for interface. Me : ? static keyword. Interviewer: We call static method without creating object by using scope resolution operator in PHP. As well as we can able to call concrete methods also. Then what is need of static keyword there? Me : .... final keyword. Interviewer: Give me any scenario of using final keyword. Me : For db connection related method Interviewer: Other than that? Me: ... Constructor. Interviewer: What is the use of constructor? Me : There is no need for object to access this. It will call automatically when the class calls. Interviewer: Other than that? Me : .... Thanks in advance...

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  • Where can I learn about every OOP concept?

    - by Mel
    I'm looking for some material that can explain all the concepts related to OOP that doesn't deviate too much from the point. I want something short and understandable for a beginner. I know some of these can be found on wikipedia, but wikipedia is full of minor and sometimes big mistakes and I don't think that is the best choice for learning something. Where should I start ? Also, please don't recommend books of 1000 pages or such.

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  • OOP for unit testing : The good, the bad and the ugly

    - by Jeff
    I have recently read Miško Hevery's pdf guide to writing testable code in which its stated that you should limit your classes instanciations in your constructors. I understand that its what you should do because it allow you to easily mock you objects that are send as parameters to your class. But when it comes to writing actual code, i often end up with things like that (exemple is in PHP using Zend Framework but I think it's self explanatory) : class Some_class { private $_data; private $_options; private $_locale; public function __construct($data, $options = null) { $this->_data = $data; if ($options != null) { $this->_options = $options; } $this->_init(); } private function _init() { if(isset($this->_options['locale'])) { $locale = $this->_options['locale']; if ($locale instanceof Zend_Locale) { $this->_locale = $locale; } elseif (Zend_Locale::isLocale($locale)) { $this->_locale = new Zend_Locale($locale); } else { $this->_locale = new Zend_Locale(); } } } } Acording to my understanding of Miško Hevery's guide, i shouldn't instanciate the Zend_Local in my class but push it through the constructor (Which can be done through the options array in my example). I am wondering what would be the best practice to get the most flexibility for unittesing this code and aswell, if I want to move away from Zend Framework. Thanks in advance

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  • How can i handle a form submit using REAL OOP in PHP

    - by Lorence
    Im used to java and creating UML.. and i was wondering how can PHP be OOP, the objects live only until you make a request.. then they destroy, so if im using a database is useless to create a class and add the members (variables) to the class, they will be useless.. i cant pass the main system object from one page to another, or similar so how can PHP be compare to jave? you never do OOP .. i mean REAL OOP.. not creating classes , in fact your index will be a procedural file with some object instance and then ? how about if i make a html form and i want to submit the data.. i have to call a file which is not a class is a php procedural file were i grab the submited data with POST, from that file you will instance a class and do some logic there.. but for me thats not pure OOP.. can somebody point me to the right way of OOP using a form submit example ? Thanks!

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  • Does OOP make sense for small scripts?

    - by Fabian
    I mostly write small scripts in python, about 50 - 250 lines of code. I usually don't use any objects, just straightforward procedural programming. I know OOP basics and I have used object in other programming languages before, but for small scripts I don't see how objects would improve them. But maybe that is just my limited experience with OOP. Am I missing something by not trying harder to use objects, or does OOP just not make a lot of sense for small scripts?

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  • Does learning a functional language make a better OOP programmer?

    - by GavinH
    As a Java/C#/C++ programmer I hear a lot of talk about functional languages, but have never found a need to learn one. I've also heard that the higher level of thinking introduced in functional languages makes you a better OOP/procedural language programmer. Can anyone confirm this? In what ways does it improve your programming skills? What is a good choice of language to learn with the goal of improving skills in a less sophisticated language?

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  • Good Training Sources for OOP PHP, Anyone ?

    - by Codex73
    Hey Guys. I will like to see if everybody could share any good training sources on OOP on PHP language. Good Training Sources for OOP (Object Oriented Programming) PHP, anyone ? I've seen numerous tutorials, mostly superficial, some of them bad. Please share anything good either commercial or free, Video or Written.

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  • Correct OOP design without getters?

    - by kane77
    I recently read that getters/setters are evil and I have to say it makes sense, yet when I started learning OOP one of the first things I learned was "Encapsulate your fields" so I learned to create class give it some fields, create getters, setters for them and create constructor where I initialize these fields. And every time some other class needs to manipulate this object (or for instance display it) I pass it the object and it manipulate it using getters/setters. I can see problems with this approach. But how to do it right? For instance displaying/rendering object that is "data" class - let's say Person, that has name and date of birth. Should the class have method for displaying the object where some Renderer would be passed as an argument? Wouldn't that violate principle that class should have only one purpose (in this case store state) so it should not care about presentation of this object. Can you suggest some good resources where best practices in OOP design are presented? I'm planning to start a project in my spare time and I want it to be my learning project in correct OOP design..

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  • Question about functional OOP style in JavaScript

    - by valums
    I prefer to use functional OOP style for my code (similar to the module pattern) because it helps me to avoid the "new" keyword and all problems with the scope of "this" keyword in callbacks. But I've run into a few minor issues with it. I would like to use the following code to create a class. namespace.myClass = function(){ var self = {}, somePrivateVar1; // initialization code that would call // private or public methods privateMethod(); self.publicMethod(); // sorry, error here function privateMethod(){} self.publicMethod = function(){}; return self; } The problem is that I can't call public methods from my initialization code, as these functions are not defined yet. The obvious solution would be to create an init method, and call it before "return self" line. But maybe you know a more elegant solution? Also, how do you usually handle inheritance with this pattern? I use the following code, butI would like to hear your ideas and suggestions. namespace.myClass2 = function(){ var self = namespace.parentClass(), somePrivateVar1; var superMethod = self.someMethod; self.someMethod = function(){ // example shows how to overwrite parent methods superMethod(); }; return self; } Edit. For those who asked what are the reasons for choosing this style of OOP, you can look into following questions: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1557386/prototypal-vs-functional-oop-in-javascript http://stackoverflow.com/questions/383402/is-javascript-s-new-keyword-considered-harmful

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  • Disadvantage of OOP?

    - by Bragaadeesh
    Typically i dont want to know the specifics of the cons of OOPs, but it felt kind of weird when I had an argument at an interview I attended recently. The question that was posted to me was to tell me one disadvantage of OOP (Object Oriented Programming). At that time, I felt OOP to be the most matured level of programming after the procedural/functional models. So I replied to him that I dont see any negatives at all. But the interviewer said there are few and I asked him to list one if he does not mind. He gave an example that I cant digest well, he said that OOP pattern does not strictly implement inheritance rules and cited the satellite/rocket example where the body parts will disintegrate periodically to remove weight during rocket launch and said that inheritance does not support this. His example kind of felt very weird to me the reason being the application of inheritance to this example. Then I left the example aside and I had this doubt - Can we unplug class hierarchies in such a manner (I am kind of confident in Java its not possible) in an ideal Object Oriented Design?

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  • A bit confused about OOP and PHP.

    - by Pirkka
    Hello I have programmed with procedural style a lot before and in these few months I have decided to go OOP. Im a bit confused about OOP and PHP. Lets say I have Categories table and Pages table in my database. I would like to do a page-class and a category-class. Lets say I would have a page that showed information about the category and there would be a list of pages that belong to the category. How would I implement that in OOP way? I have thought that the category class would have a property (array) that would contain all the pages that it has. Well then comes the part that I`m confused about. Should I have a method that would get all the pages with correct categoryID from the database and should I instantiate all the rows as an Page-object? Or should I have a setPages-method in the Category-class and getAllPages-method in the Pages-class and with that method I would set all the pages to the Category-class. Huh Im lost. :D

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  • why is OOP hard for me?

    - by netrox
    I have trouble writing OOP in PHP... I understand the concept but I never create classes for my projects... mainly because it's often a small project and nothing complex. But when I read OOP, it seems more difficult to code than writing simple procedural statements. It also seems to take a lot of room as well with so many empty abstract classes and that can be easily lost in the land of objects... it's becoming like a junkyard to me. Also, I noticed that virtually all instructions on how to use OOP use "car" or "cat" or "dog" analogies. Hello... we're not dealing with animals or cars... we're dealing with windows or consoles. You can talk about analogies to death and I will never learn. What I want is see a code that's written to show how objects are created - not, "aCow-moo!" For example, I want to see a browser window object displaying say... three inputs. I want to see an "object" created to output a window with three inputs then I want to see how overriding works, like change the window object to display only two inputs instead of three inputs. I think that would make learning more easy, wouldn't it? Any recommended tutorials of that nature instead of quacks, moos, and woofs.

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  • How to explain OOP concepts to a non technical person?

    - by John
    I often try to avoid telling people I'm a programmer because most of the time I end up explaining to them what that really means. When I tell them I'm programming in Java they often ask general questions about the language and how it differs from x and y. I'm also not good at explaining things because 1) I don't have that much experience in the field and 2) I really hate explaining things to non-technical people. They say that you truly understand things once you explain them to someone else, in this case how would you explain OOP terminology and concepts to a non technical person?

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  • Is there a programming language with not a tree but tags idea behind OOP?

    - by kolupaev
    I'm thinking about tree structures, and I feel that I don't like them. It's like when you have a shop, then you try to put all products to tree-like catalog, and then you need to place one product to multiple categories, now you have multiple routing, bla-bla. I don't feel like everything in the world could be put to a tree. Instead, I like idea of tags. I would like to store everything with tags. With tags I could do much more. I can even simulate trees if I want. I want to have tag-based filesystem! But hey - modern OOP paradigm with inheritance is based on tree. I want to see how it is when you don't have such basement. Closest thing I found is mixins in some languages. Do you know what else is also about this ideas?

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  • AS3 OOP MVC with PHP

    - by Pepe Sanchez
    Im new to ActionScript and Flex 3... im trying to develop an MVC 100% OOP application with Flex 3 using MXML,AS3 and PHP. M (PHP) V (MXML) C (AS3) The 3 layers i choose for my development. I have 10 AS3 classes that are object related between them and some inherit or implement interfaces. The only problem here is how to interact 100% OOP with my model. In this case my model has to be a PHP Class that needs to be called from AS3 (the controller). For example the AS3 class : Patient have a method called Save: public function Save(data:Array) : void { /* PHP call - model layer */ } I want to create an instance of my PHP Patient Model class that connects to the DB and insert the data array into it. What should i use ? how can i also return a variable to AS3 ? What happen to as3 if there is a cached Exception in PHP ? Thanks in advanced :)

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  • PHP OOP Concepts (Value Objects / Data Access Objects)

    - by Iuhiz
    Hi, I've just started to learn PHP OOP, previously I have been doing PHP in a procedural manner. I was reading this article and I've got a couple of quick questions, How is the constructor for value objects commonly defined? As one that takes in all "data members" as parameters or stick to the default constructor and use mutator / accessor methods to set / get data members? Is this actually the recommended way to start doing PHP OOP? Cos honestly, the concepts explained in the article was a tad confusing for me. Cheers

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  • OOP Design of items in a Point-of-Sale system

    - by Jonas
    I am implementing a Point-of-Sale system. In the system I represent an Item in three places, and I wounder how I should represent them in OOP. First I have the WarehouseItem, that contains price, purchase price, info about the supplier, suppliers price, info about the product and quantity in warehouse. Then I have CartItem, which contains the same fields as WarehouseItem, but adds NrOfItems and Discount. And finally I have ReceiptItem, thats contains an item where I have stripped of info about the supplier, and only contains the price that was payed. Are there any OOP-recommendations, best-practices or design patterns that I could apply for this? I don't really know if CartItem should contain (wrap) an WarehouseItem, or extend it, or if I just should copy the fields that I need. Maybe I should create an Item-class where I keep all common fields, and then extend it to WarehouseItem, CartItem and ReceiptItem. Sometimes I think that it is good to keep the field of the item and just display the information that is needed.

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  • Learning OOP Design

    - by waiwai933
    I've read Head First Java, and I understand how OOP works. Here's my problem: I'm a PHP programmer, and while I've used OOP in PHP, I'm having trouble figuring out what should be an object and what methods to give it. For example, let's say I have a app that allows people to log in and edit a document. Why should the document be an object if there will ever only be one instance? Should I give the deleteDocument() method to the document object or the admin object? The document is the one being deleted, but the admin is the one performing the action. So my real question is, coming from a procedural background, how do I figure out what should be objects and what should have what methods?

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  • SQL constructs translated to OOP

    - by python dude
    As someone who comes from the world of Object Orientation, I find it rather difficult to wrap my head around SQL. Recently, however, I realized that the classical SQL construct select X from Y where Z is basically equivalent to the following OOP construct: List<SomeType> results = db.query(new Matcher<SomeType> () { public boolean match(SomeType candidate) { return ...; // checks condition Z on candidate, returns true for match } }; So my question is: What are the OOP equivalents for other SQL constructs, such as joins?

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  • PHP OOP properity constant usage

    - by Misiur
    Hi there. I'm really new to OOP. I'm even not a newbie - I'm noob. So. I want to transfer my pseudo-CMS from "normal" programming, into OOP programming system. And so: private static $dsn = DB_TYPE.':host='.DB_HOST.';dbname='.DB_NAME; What here causes problem? Usage of constraints? I don't know. My editor (aptana studio) shows error after 1 constant. Thanks

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  • C++ Typing and OOP child classes

    - by Zack
    I'm a bit confused: If I have a base class A, and a class B which extends A, can a variable of the type A hold a value of the type B and vice versa? If yes, why? Aren't they completely different even if B is derived from A? How about type-safety? If this is possible, what things do I have to mind when taking use of this? How would this work out in terms of performance? Note: Sorry if I asked too many questions, just ignore them and just look out for those "marked" with the list decoration dot :) Also, this is not my homework. I'm a hobby programmer and have skills in scripting languages with OOP, yet I'm relatively new to OOP typing in C++.

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  • Understanding OOP Principles in passing around objects/values

    - by Hans
    I'm not quite grokking a couple of things in OOP and I'm going to use a fictional understanding of SO to see if I can get help understand. So, on this page we have a question. You can comment on the question. There are also answers. You can comment on the answers. Question - comment - comment - comment Answer -comment Answer -comment -comment -comment Answer -comment -comment So, I'm imagining a very high level understanding of this type of system (in PHP, not .Net as I am not yet familiar with .Net) would be like: $question = new Question; $question->load($this_question_id); // from the URL probably echo $question->getTitle(); To load the answers, I imagine it's something like this ("A"): $answers = new Answers; $answers->loadFromQuestion($question->getID()); // or $answers->loadFromQuestion($this_question_id); while($answer = $answers->getAnswer()) { echo $answer->showFormatted(); } Or, would you do ("B"): $answers->setQuestion($question); // inject the whole obj, so we have access to all the data and public methods in $question $answers->loadFromQuestion(); // the ID would be found via $this->question->getID() instead of from the argument passed in while($answer = $answers->getAnswer()) { echo $answer->showFormatted(); } I guess my problem is, I don't know when or if I should be passing in an entire object, and when I should just be passing in a value. Passing in the entire object gives me a lot of flexibility, but it's more memory and subject to change, I'd guess (like a property or method rename). If "A" style is better, why not just use a function? OOP seems pointless here. Thanks, Hans

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