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  • Java: repetition, overuse -- problem?

    - by HH
    I try to be as minimalist as possible. Repetition is a problem. I hate it. When is it really a problem? what is static-overuse? what is field-method overuse? what is class-overuse? are there more types of overuse? Problem A: when it is too much to use of static? private static class Data { private static String fileContent; private static SizeSequence lineMap; private static File fileThing; private static char type; private static boolean binary; private static String name; private static String path; } private static class Print { //<1st LINE, LEFT_SIDE, 2nd LINE, RIGHT_SIDE> private Integer[] printPositions=new Integer[4]; private static String fingerPrint; private static String formatPrint; } Problem B: when it is too much to get field data with private methods? public Stack<Integer> getPositions(){return positions;} public Integer[] getPrintPositions(){return printPositions;} private Stack<String> getPrintViews(){return printViews;} private Stack<String> getPrintViewsPerFile(){return printViewsPerFile;} public String getPrintView(){return printView;} public String getFingerPrint(){return fingerPrint;} public String getFormatPrint(){return formatPrint;} public String getFileContent(){return fileContent;} public SizeSequence getLineMap(){return lineMap;} public File getFile(){return fileThing;} public boolean getBinary(){return binary;} public char getType(){return type;} public String getPath(){return path;} public FileObject getData(){return fObj;} public String getSearchTerm(){return searchTerm;} Related interface overuse overuse of static in a Game

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  • Java: repetition, overuse -- ?

    - by HH
    I try to be as minimalist as possible. Repetition is a problem. I hate it. When is it really a problem? what is static-overuse? what is field-method overuse? what is class-overuse? are there more types of overuse? Problem A: when it is too much to use of static? private static class Data { private static String fileContent; private static SizeSequence lineMap; private static File fileThing; private static char type; private static boolean binary; private static String name; private static String path; } private static class Print { //<1st LINE, LEFT_SIDE, 2nd LINE, RIGHT_SIDE> private Integer[] printPositions=new Integer[4]; private static String fingerPrint; private static String formatPrint; } Problem B: when it is too much to get field data with private methods? public Stack<Integer> getPositions(){return positions;} public Integer[] getPrintPositions(){return printPositions;} private Stack<String> getPrintViews(){return printViews;} private Stack<String> getPrintViewsPerFile(){return printViewsPerFile;} public String getPrintView(){return printView;} public String getFingerPrint(){return fingerPrint;} public String getFormatPrint(){return formatPrint;} public String getFileContent(){return fileContent;} public SizeSequence getLineMap(){return lineMap;} public File getFile(){return fileThing;} public boolean getBinary(){return binary;} public char getType(){return type;} public String getPath(){return path;} public FileObject getData(){return fObj;} public String getSearchTerm(){return searchTerm;} Related interface overuse

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  • Java: immutability, overuse of stack -- better data structure?

    - by HH
    I overused hashSets but it was slow, then changed to Stacks, speed boost-up. Poly's reply uses Collections.emptyList() as immutable list, cutting out excess null-checkers. No Collections.emptyStack(). Combining the words stack and immutability, from the last experiences, gets "immutable stack" (probably not related to functional prog). Java Api 5 for list interface shows that Stack is an implementing class for list and arraylist, here. The java.coccurrent pkg does not have any immutable Stack data structure. The first hinted of misusing stack. The lack of immutabily in the last and poly's book recommendation leads way to list. Something very primitive, fast, no extra layers, with methods like emptyThing(). Overuse of stack and where I use it DataFile.java: public Stack<DataFile> files; FileObject.java: public Stack<String> printViews = new Stack<String>(); FileObject.java:// private static Stack<Object> getFormat(File f){return (new Format(f)).getFormat();} Format.java: private Stack<Object> getLine(File[] fs,String s){return wF;} Format.java: private Stack<Object> getFormat(){return format;} Positions.java: public static Stack<Integer[]> getPrintPoss(String s,File f,Integer maxViewPerF) Positions.java: Stack<File> possPrint = new Stack<File>(); Positions.java: Stack<Integer> positions=new Stack<Integer>(); Record.java: private String getFormatLine(Stack<Object> st) Record.java: Stack<String> lines=new Stack<String>(); SearchToUser.java: public static final Stack<File> allFiles = findf.getFs(); SearchToUser.java: public static final Stack<File> allDirs = findf.getDs(); SearchToUser.java: private Stack<Integer[]> positionsPrint=new Stack<Integer[]>(); SearchToUser.java: public Stack<String> getSearchResults(String s, Integer countPerFile, Integer resCount) SearchToUser.java: Stack<File> filesToS=Fs2Word.getFs2W(s,50); SearchToUser.java: Stack<String> rs=new Stack<String>(); View.java: public Stack<Integer[]> poss = new Stack<Integer[4]>(); View.java: public static Stack<String> getPrintViewsFileWise(String s,Object[] df,Integer maxViewsPerF) View.java: Stack<String> substrings = new Stack<String>(); View.java: private Stack<String> printViews=new Stack<String>(); View.java: MatchView(Stack<Integer> pss,File f,Integer maxViews) View.java: Stack<String> formatFile; View.java: private Stack<Search> files; View.java: private Stack<File> matchingFiles; View.java: private Stack<String> matchViews; View.java: private Stack<String> searchMatches; View.java: private Stack<String> getSearchResults(Integer numbResults) Easier with List: AllDirs and AllFs, now looping with push, but list has more pow. methods such as addAll [OLD] From Stack to some immutable data structure How to get immutable Stack data structure? Can I box it with list? Should I switch my current implementatios from stacks to Lists to get immutable? Which immutable data structure is Very fast with about similar exec time as Stack? No immutability to Stack with Final import java.io.*; import java.util.*; public class TestStack{ public static void main(String[] args) { final Stack<Integer> test = new Stack<Integer>(); Stack<Integer> test2 = new Stack<Integer>(); test.push(37707); test2.push(80437707); //WHY is there not an error to remove an elment // from FINAL stack? System.out.println(test.pop()); System.out.println(test2.pop()); } }

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  • Do I suffer from encapsulation overuse?

    - by Florenc
    I have noticed something in my code in various projects that seems like code smell to me and something bad to do, but I can't deal with it. While trying to write "clean code" I tend to over-use private methods in order to make my code easier to read. The problem is that the code is indeed cleaner but it's also more difficult to test (yeah I know I can test private methods...) and in general it seems a bad habit to me. Here's an example of a class that reads some data from a .csv file and returns a group of customers (another object with various fields and attributes). public class GroupOfCustomersImporter { //... Call fields .... public GroupOfCustomersImporter(String filePath) { this.filePath = filePath; customers = new HashSet<Customer>(); createCSVReader(); read(); constructTTRP_Instance(); } private void createCSVReader() { //.... } private void read() { //.... Reades the file and initializes the class attributes } private void readFirstLine(String[] inputLine) { //.... Method used by the read() method } private void readSecondLine(String[] inputLine) { //.... Method used by the read() method } private void readCustomerLine(String[] inputLine) { //.... Method used by the read() method } private void constructGroupOfCustomers() { //this.groupOfCustomers = new GroupOfCustomers(**attributes of the class**); } public GroupOfCustomers getConstructedGroupOfCustomers() { return this.GroupOfCustomers; } } As you can see the class has only a constructor which calls some private methods to get the job done, I know that's not a good practice not a good practice in general but I prefer to encapsulate all the functionality in the class instead of making the methods public in which case a client should work this way: GroupOfCustomersImporter importer = new GroupOfCustomersImporter(filepath) importer.createCSVReader(); read(); GroupOfCustomer group = constructGoupOfCustomerInstance(); I prefer this because I don't want to put useless lines of code in the client's side code bothering the client class with implementation details. So, Is this actually a bad habit? If yes, how can I avoid it? Please note that the above is just a simple example. Imagine the same situation happening in something a little bit more complex.

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  • Refactoring Singleton Overuse

    - by drharris
    Today I had an epiphany, and it was that I was doing everything wrong. Some history: I inherited a C# application, which was really just a collection of static methods, a completely procedural mess of C# code. I refactored this the best I knew at the time, bringing in lots of post-college OOP knowledge. To make a long story short, many of the entities in code have turned out to be Singletons. Today I realized I needed 3 new classes, which would each follow the same Singleton pattern to match the rest of the software. If I keep tumbling down this slippery slope, eventually every class in my application will be Singleton, which will really be no logically different from the original group of static methods. I need help on rethinking this. I know about Dependency Injection, and that would generally be the strategy to use in breaking the Singleton curse. However, I have a few specific questions related to this refactoring, and all about best practices for doing so. How acceptable is the use of static variables to encapsulate configuration information? I have a brain block on using static, and I think it is due to an early OO class in college where the professor said static was bad. But, should I have to reconfigure the class every time I access it? When accessing hardware, is it ok to leave a static pointer to the addresses and variables needed, or should I continually perform Open() and Close() operations? Right now I have a single method acting as the controller. Specifically, I continually poll several external instruments (via hardware drivers) for data. Should this type of controller be the way to go, or should I spawn separate threads for each instrument at the program's startup? If the latter, how do I make this object oriented? Should I create classes called InstrumentAListener and InstrumentBListener? Or is there some standard way to approach this? Is there a better way to do global configuration? Right now I simply have Configuration.Instance.Foo sprinkled liberally throughout the code. Almost every class uses it, so perhaps keeping it as a Singleton makes sense. Any thoughts? A lot of my classes are things like SerialPortWriter or DataFileWriter, which must sit around waiting for this data to stream in. Since they are active the entire time, how should I arrange these in order to listen for the events generated when data comes in? Any other resources, books, or comments about how to get away from Singletons and other pattern overuse would be helpful.

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  • Overuse of guards in Erlang?

    - by dagda1
    Hi, I have the following function that takes a number like 5 and creates a list of all the numbers from 1 to that number so create(5). returns [1,2,3,4,5]. I have over used guards I think and was wondering if there is a better way to write the following: create(N) -> create(1, N). create(N,M) when N =:= M -> [N]; create(N,M) when N < M -> [N] ++ create(N + 1, M). Thanks, Paul

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  • Can the overuse of custom taglibs disrupt the outsourcing of html designers?

    - by Renato Gama
    Yesterday me and a friend were talking about the overuse of custom taglibs! We create taglibs for everything! We create taglibs in order to wrap jQuery UI elements (tabs, button, etc), and other plugins elements as well. We often wrap them together in a single component. We use taglibs in a point that we almost have no pure html within the body tag. Our question is: is this a healthy habit??? Imagine two situations: 1) We hire an html designer and have the cost of a month for him to learn all this stuff. 2) We want to outsource the html development but no company would get our taglib library to learn, OR it become more expensive. We love taglibs as its been a lovely shortcut for javascipt development as we write it only once. What would be the best practices in this sense, and what would you suggest? We are looking for a future-proof solution (or an argument that agrees with ours).

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  • Can anyone recommend how to fix sore "sides" from overuse of computers? (some kind of RSI)

    - by MGOwen
    I have to use computers for 9+ hours per day (no suggestions about 'use your computer less!' please). I get various kinds of RSI: a little soreness in the hands and wrists, but that's not a big deal compared my main problem: Pain in the sides of my body, under my arms and down the sides of my torso. Driving worsens it. Exercise doesn't seem to help (maybe I need a special exercise). It could be posture related, but I haven't found a way to fix that. Has anyone else experienced this? I find lots of people complaining about more typical kinds of RSI, but not like mine. I am hoping someone with experience can recommend an exercise, treatment, or adjustment in how I use my computer.

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  • Listing common SQL Code Smells.

    - by Phil Factor
    Once you’ve done a number of SQL Code-reviews, you’ll know those signs in the code that all might not be well. These ’Code Smells’ are coding styles that don’t directly cause a bug, but are indicators that all is not well with the code. . Kent Beck and Massimo Arnoldi seem to have coined the phrase in the "OnceAndOnlyOnce" page of www.C2.com, where Kent also said that code "wants to be simple". Bad Smells in Code was an essay by Kent Beck and Martin Fowler, published as Chapter 3 of the book ‘Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code’ (ISBN 978-0201485677) Although there are generic code-smells, SQL has its own particular coding habits that will alert the programmer to the need to re-factor what has been written. See Exploring Smelly Code   and Code Deodorants for Code Smells by Nick Harrison for a grounding in Code Smells in C# I’ve always been tempted by the idea of automating a preliminary code-review for SQL. It would be so useful to trawl through code and pick up the various problems, much like the classic ‘Lint’ did for C, and how the Code Metrics plug-in for .NET Reflector by Jonathan 'Peli' de Halleux is used for finding Code Smells in .NET code. The problem is that few of the standard procedural code smells are relevant to SQL, and we need an agreed list of code smells. Merrilll Aldrich made a grand start last year in his blog Top 10 T-SQL Code Smells.However, I'd like to make a start by discovering if there is a general opinion amongst Database developers what the most important SQL Smells are. One can be a bit defensive about code smells. I will cheerfully write very long stored procedures, even though they are frowned on. I’ll use dynamic SQL occasionally. You can only use them as an aid for your own judgment and it is fine to ‘sign them off’ as being appropriate in particular circumstances. Also, whole classes of ‘code smells’ may be irrelevant for a particular database. The use of proprietary SQL, for example, is only a ‘code smell’ if there is a chance that the database will have to be ported to another RDBMS. The use of dynamic SQL is a risk only with certain security models. As the saying goes,  a CodeSmell is a hint of possible bad practice to a pragmatist, but a sure sign of bad practice to a purist. Plamen Ratchev’s wonderful article Ten Common SQL Programming Mistakes lists some of these ‘code smells’ along with out-and-out mistakes, but there are more. The use of nested transactions, for example, isn’t entirely incorrect, even though the database engine ignores all but the outermost: but it does flag up the possibility that the programmer thinks that nested transactions are supported. If anything requires some sort of general agreement, the definition of code smells is one. I’m therefore going to make this Blog ‘dynamic, in that, if anyone twitters a suggestion with a #SQLCodeSmells tag (or sends me a twitter) I’ll update the list here. If you add a comment to the blog with a suggestion of what should be added or removed, I’ll do my best to oblige. In other words, I’ll try to keep this blog up to date. The name against each 'smell' is the name of the person who Twittered me, commented about or who has written about the 'smell'. it does not imply that they were the first ever to think of the smell! Use of deprecated syntax such as *= (Dave Howard) Denormalisation that requires the shredding of the contents of columns. (Merrill Aldrich) Contrived interfaces Use of deprecated datatypes such as TEXT/NTEXT (Dave Howard) Datatype mis-matches in predicates that rely on implicit conversion.(Plamen Ratchev) Using Correlated subqueries instead of a join   (Dave_Levy/ Plamen Ratchev) The use of Hints in queries, especially NOLOCK (Dave Howard /Mike Reigler) Few or No comments. Use of functions in a WHERE clause. (Anil Das) Overuse of scalar UDFs (Dave Howard, Plamen Ratchev) Excessive ‘overloading’ of routines. The use of Exec xp_cmdShell (Merrill Aldrich) Excessive use of brackets. (Dave Levy) Lack of the use of a semicolon to terminate statements Use of non-SARGable functions on indexed columns in predicates (Plamen Ratchev) Duplicated code, or strikingly similar code. Misuse of SELECT * (Plamen Ratchev) Overuse of Cursors (Everyone. Special mention to Dave Levy & Adrian Hills) Overuse of CLR routines when not necessary (Sam Stange) Same column name in different tables with different datatypes. (Ian Stirk) Use of ‘broken’ functions such as ‘ISNUMERIC’ without additional checks. Excessive use of the WHILE loop (Merrill Aldrich) INSERT ... EXEC (Merrill Aldrich) The use of stored procedures where a view is sufficient (Merrill Aldrich) Not using two-part object names (Merrill Aldrich) Using INSERT INTO without specifying the columns and their order (Merrill Aldrich) Full outer joins even when they are not needed. (Plamen Ratchev) Huge stored procedures (hundreds/thousands of lines). Stored procedures that can produce different columns, or order of columns in their results, depending on the inputs. Code that is never used. Complex and nested conditionals WHILE (not done) loops without an error exit. Variable name same as the Datatype Vague identifiers. Storing complex data  or list in a character map, bitmap or XML field User procedures with sp_ prefix (Aaron Bertrand)Views that reference views that reference views that reference views (Aaron Bertrand) Inappropriate use of sql_variant (Neil Hambly) Errors with identity scope using SCOPE_IDENTITY @@IDENTITY or IDENT_CURRENT (Neil Hambly, Aaron Bertrand) Schemas that involve multiple dated copies of the same table instead of partitions (Matt Whitfield-Atlantis UK) Scalar UDFs that do data lookups (poor man's join) (Matt Whitfield-Atlantis UK) Code that allows SQL Injection (Mladen Prajdic) Tables without clustered indexes (Matt Whitfield-Atlantis UK) Use of "SELECT DISTINCT" to mask a join problem (Nick Harrison) Multiple stored procedures with nearly identical implementation. (Nick Harrison) Excessive column aliasing may point to a problem or it could be a mapping implementation. (Nick Harrison) Joining "too many" tables in a query. (Nick Harrison) Stored procedure returning more than one record set. (Nick Harrison) A NOT LIKE condition (Nick Harrison) excessive "OR" conditions. (Nick Harrison) User procedures with sp_ prefix (Aaron Bertrand) Views that reference views that reference views that reference views (Aaron Bertrand) sp_OACreate or anything related to it (Bill Fellows) Prefixing names with tbl_, vw_, fn_, and usp_ ('tibbling') (Jeremiah Peschka) Aliases that go a,b,c,d,e... (Dave Levy/Diane McNurlan) Overweight Queries (e.g. 4 inner joins, 8 left joins, 4 derived tables, 10 subqueries, 8 clustered GUIDs, 2 UDFs, 6 case statements = 1 query) (Robert L Davis) Order by 3,2 (Dave Levy) MultiStatement Table functions which are then filtered 'Sel * from Udf() where Udf.Col = Something' (Dave Ballantyne) running a SQL 2008 system in SQL 2000 compatibility mode(John Stafford)

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  • Customizing configuration with Dependency Injection

    - by mathieu
    I'm designing a small application infrastructure library, aiming to simplify development of ASP.NET MVC based applications. Main goal is to enforce convention over configuration. Hovewer, I still want to make some parts "configurable" by developpers. I'm leaning towards the following design: public interface IConfiguration { SomeType SomeValue; } // this one won't get registered in container protected class DefaultConfiguration : IConfiguration { public SomeType SomeValue { get { return SomeType.Default; } } } // declared inside 3rd party library, will get registered in container protected class CustomConfiguration : IConfiguration { public SomeType SomeValue { get { return SomeType.Custom; } } } And the "service" class : public class Service { private IConfiguration conf = new DefaultConfiguration(); // optional dependency, if found, will be set to CustomConfiguration by DI container public IConfiguration Conf { get { return conf; } set { conf = value; } } public void Configure() { DoSomethingWith( Conf ); } } There, the "configuration" part is clearly a dependency of the service class, but it this an "overuse" of DI ?

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  • OSB, Service Callouts and OQL - Part 1

    - by Sabha
    Oracle Fusion Middleware customers use Oracle Service Bus (OSB) for virtualizing Service endpoints and implementing stateless service orchestrations. Behind the performance and speed of OSB, there are a couple of key design implementations that can affect application performance and behavior under heavy load. One of the heavily used feature in OSB is the Service Callout pipeline action for message enrichment and invoking multiple services as part of one single orchestration. Overuse of this feature, without understanding its internal implementation, can lead to serious problems. This post will delve into OSB internals, the problem associated with usage of Service Callout under high loads, diagnosing it via thread dump and heap dump analysis using tools like ThreadLogic and OQL (Object Query Language) and resolving it. The first section in the series will mainly cover the threading model used internally by OSB for implementing Route Vs. Service Callouts. Please refer to the blog post for more details. 

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  • BIT of a Problem

    The BIT data type is an awkward fit for a SQL database. It doesn't have just two values, and it can do unexpected things in expressions. What is worse, it is a flag rather than a predicate, and so its overuse, along with bit masks, is a prime candidate for being listed as a 'SQL Code Smell'. Joe Celko makes the case. Free trial of SQL Backup™“SQL Backup was able to cut down my backup time significantly AND achieved a 90% compression at the same time!” Joe Cheng. Download a free trial now.

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  • Why does Zend discourage "floating functions"?

    - by kojiro
    Zend's Coding Standard Naming Convention says Functions in the global scope (a.k.a "floating functions") are permitted but discouraged in most cases. Consider wrapping these functions in a static class. The common wisdom in Python says practically the opposite: Finally, use staticmethod sparingly! There are very few situations where static-methods are necessary in Python, and I've seen them used many times where a separate "top-level" function would have been clearer. (Not only does the above StackOverflow answer warn against overuse of static methods, but more than one Python linter will warn the same.) Is this something that can be generalized across programming languages, and if so, why does Python differ so from PHP? If it's not something that can be generalized, what is the basis for one approach or the other, and is there a way to immediately recognize in a language whether you should prefer bare functions or static methods?

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  • Best method in PHP for the Error Handling ? Convert all PHP errors (warnings notices etc) to exceptions?

    - by user1179459
    What is the best method in PHP for the Error Handling ? is there a way in PHP to Convert all PHP errors (warnings notices etc) to exceptions ? what the best way/practise to error handling ? again: if we overuse exceptions (i.e. try/catch) in many situations, i think application will be halted unnecessary. for a simple error checking we can use return false; but it may be cluttering the coding with many if else conditions. what do you guys suggest ?

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  • Using the right folder for the right job. Article link, please?

    - by Droogans
    There are specific folders designed for specific tasks. /var/www holds your web sites, /usr/bin contains files to run your applications...yet I still find myself putting nearly all of my work in ~. Is it possible to overuse my home directory? Will it come back to haunt me? Anyone have a good link to an article of best practices for organizing your files so that they are placed in their "correct" place? Is there even such a thing in Linux? I am referring specifically to user-generated content. I do not compile applications from source, I use apt-get for those tasks. This article has a great introduction to what I'm looking for. Table 3-2, "Subdirectories of the root directory" is the sort of thing I'm looking for, but with more details/examples.

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  • What are some good methods to improve personal password management?

    - by danilo
    I want to improve my personal password management. I usually use secure passwords, but overuse them for too many different places. My questions: What methods do you use to create passwords, e.g. for different online sites/logins? What methods do you use to remember those passwords? Memory? Pen&Paper? Software storage? Is there some good way to store my passwords somewhere, so I can always have access to them when I need them (e.g. a webbased solution on my own server) but at the same way keep them away from unwanted access? Edit: Someone on another site mentioned http://passwordmaker.org/. Have you had any good or bad experiences with that software?

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  • OSB, Service Callouts and OQL

    - by Sabha
    Oracle Fusion Middleware customers use Oracle Service Bus (OSB) for virtualizing Service endpoints and implementing stateless service orchestrations. Behind the performance and speed of OSB, there are a couple of key design implementations that can affect application performance and behavior under heavy load. One of the heavily used feature in OSB is the Service Callout pipeline action for message enrichment and invoking multiple services as part of one single orchestration. Overuse of this feature, without understanding its internal implementation, can lead to serious problems. This series will delve into OSB internals, the problem associated with usage of Service Callout under high loads, diagnosing it via thread dump and heap dump analysis using tools like ThreadLogic and OQL (Object Query Language) and resolving it. The first section in the series will mainly cover the threading model used internally by OSB for implementing Route Vs. Service Callouts. The second section of the "OSB, Service Callouts and OQL" blog posting will delve into thread dump analysis of OSB server and detecting threading issues relating to Service Callout and using Heap Dump and OQL to identify the related Proxies and Business services involved. The final section of the series will focus on the corrective action to avoid Service Callout related OSB serer hangs. Before we dive into the solution, we need to briefly discus about Work Managers in WLS. Please refer to the blog posting for more details.

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  • Using the Specification Pattern

    - by Kane
    Like any design pattern the Specification Pattern is a great concept but susceptible to overuse by an eager architect/developer. I am about to commence development on a new application (.NET & C#) and really like the concept of the Specification Pattern and am keen to make full use of it. However before I go in all guns blazing I would be really interested in knowing if anyone could share the pain points that experienced when use the Specification Pattern in developing an application. Ideally I'm looking to see if others have had issues in Writing unit tests against the specification pattern Deciding which layer the specifications should live in (Repository, Service, Domain, etc) Using it everywhere when a simple if statement would have done the job etc? Thanks in advance

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  • Assembly wide multicast attributes. Are they evil?

    - by HeavyWave
    I am working on a project where we have several attributes in AssemblyInfo.cs, that are being multicast to a methods of a particular class. [assembly: Repeatable( AspectPriority = 2, AttributeTargetAssemblies = "MyNamespace", AttributeTargetTypes = "MyNamespace.MyClass", AttributeTargetMemberAttributes = MulticastAttributes.Public, AttributeTargetMembers = "*Impl", Prefix = "Cls")] What I don't like about this, is that it puts a piece of login into AssemblyInfo (Info, mind you!), which for starters should not contain any logic at all. The worst part of it, is that the actual MyClass.cs does not have the attribute anywhere in the file, and it is completely unclear that methods of this class might have them. From my perspective it greatly hurts readability of the code (not to mention that overuse of PostSharp can make debugging a nightmare). Especially when you have multiple multicast attributes. What is the best practice here? Is anyone out there is using PostSharp attributes like this?

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  • Is there a dictionary about common programming vocabulary?

    - by _simon_
    When I need a name for a new class that extends behaviour of an existing class, I usually have hard time to come up with a name for it. For example, if I have a class MyClass, then the new class could be named something like MyClassAdapter, MyClassCalculator, MyClassDispatcher, MyClassParser,... This new name should of course represent the behaviour of the class and would ideally be same as the design pattern in which it is used (Adapter, Decorator, Factory,...). But since we don't overuse design patterns, this is not always the solution :) So, do you know for a dictionary or a list of common words, that we can use to represent the behaviour of the class, containing a short description of the expected behaviour? Some examples: replicator, shadow, token, acceptor, worker, mapper, driver, bucket, socket, validator, wrapper, parser, verifier,... You could also look at this list as a cheat sheet for metaphors, with which you can better understand your problem domain.

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  • What are the software design essentials? [closed]

    - by Craig Schwarze
    I've decided to create a 1 page "cheat sheet" of essential software design principles for my programmers. It doesn't explain the principles in any great depth, but is simply there as a reference and a reminder. Here's what I've come up with - I would welcome your comments. What have I left out? What have I explained poorly? What is there that shouldn't be? Basic Design Principles The Principle of Least Surprise – your solution should be obvious, predictable and consistent. Keep It Simple Stupid (KISS) - the simplest solution is usually the best one. You Ain’t Gonna Need It (YAGNI) - create a solution for the current problem rather than what might happen in the future. Don’t Repeat Yourself (DRY) - rigorously remove duplication from your design and code. Advanced Design Principles Program to an interface, not an implementation – Don’t declare variables to be of a particular concrete class. Rather, declare them to an interface, and instantiate them using a creational pattern. Favour composition over inheritance – Don’t overuse inheritance. In most cases, rich behaviour is best added by instantiating objects, rather than inheriting from classes. Strive for loosely coupled designs – Minimise the interdependencies between objects. They should be able to interact with minimal knowledge of each other via small, tightly defined interfaces. Principle of Least Knowledge – Also called the “Law of Demeter”, and is colloquially summarised as “Only talk to your friends”. Specifically, a method in an object should only invoke methods on the object itself, objects passed as a parameter to the method, any object the method creates, any components of the object. SOLID Design Principles Single Responsibility Principle – Each class should have one well defined purpose, and only one reason to change. This reduces the fragility of your code, and makes it much more maintainable. Open/Close Principle – A class should be open to extension, but closed to modification. In practice, this means extracting the code that is most likely to change to another class, and then injecting it as required via an appropriate pattern. Liskov Substitution Principle – Subtypes must be substitutable for their base types. Essentially, get your inheritance right. In the classic example, type square should not inherit from type rectangle, as they have different properties (you can independently set the sides of a rectangle). Instead, both should inherit from type shape. Interface Segregation Principle – Clients should not be forced to depend upon methods they do not use. Don’t have fat interfaces, rather split them up into smaller, behaviour centric interfaces. Dependency Inversion Principle – There are two parts to this principle: High-level modules should not depend on low-level modules. Both should depend on abstractions. Abstractions should not depend on details. Details should depend on abstractions. In modern development, this is often handled by an IoC (Inversion of Control) container.

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  • Improvements to Joshua Bloch's Builder Design Pattern?

    - by Jason Fotinatos
    Back in 2007, I read an article about Joshua Blochs take on the "builder pattern" and how it could be modified to improve the overuse of constructors and setters, especially when an object has a large number of properties, most of which are optional. A brief summary of this design pattern is articled here [http://rwhansen.blogspot.com/2007/07/theres-builder-pattern-that-joshua.html]. I liked the idea, and have been using it since. The problem with it, while it is very clean and nice to use from the client perspective, implementing it can be a pain in the bum! There are so many different places in the object where a single property is reference, and thus creating the object, and adding a new property takes a lot of time. So...I had an idea. First, an example object in Joshua Bloch's style: Josh Bloch Style: public class OptionsJoshBlochStyle { private final String option1; private final int option2; // ...other options here <<<< public String getOption1() { return option1; } public int getOption2() { return option2; } public static class Builder { private String option1; private int option2; // other options here <<<<< public Builder option1(String option1) { this.option1 = option1; return this; } public Builder option2(int option2) { this.option2 = option2; return this; } public OptionsJoshBlochStyle build() { return new OptionsJoshBlochStyle(this); } } private OptionsJoshBlochStyle(Builder builder) { this.option1 = builder.option1; this.option2 = builder.option2; // other options here <<<<<< } public static void main(String[] args) { OptionsJoshBlochStyle optionsVariation1 = new OptionsJoshBlochStyle.Builder().option1("firefox").option2(1).build(); OptionsJoshBlochStyle optionsVariation2 = new OptionsJoshBlochStyle.Builder().option1("chrome").option2(2).build(); } } Now my "improved" version: public class Options { // note that these are not final private String option1; private int option2; // ...other options here public String getOption1() { return option1; } public int getOption2() { return option2; } public static class Builder { private final Options options = new Options(); public Builder option1(String option1) { this.options.option1 = option1; return this; } public Builder option2(int option2) { this.options.option2 = option2; return this; } public Options build() { return options; } } private Options() { } public static void main(String[] args) { Options optionsVariation1 = new Options.Builder().option1("firefox").option2(1).build(); Options optionsVariation2 = new Options.Builder().option1("chrome").option2(2).build(); } } As you can see in my "improved version", there are 2 less places in which we need to add code about any addition properties (or options, in this case)! The only negative that I can see is that the instance variables of the outer class are not able to be final. But, the class is still immutable without this. Is there really any downside to this improvement in maintainability? There has to be a reason which he repeated the properties within the nested class that I'm not seeing?

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  • When is LINQ (to objects) Overused?

    - by Mystagogue
    My career started as a hard-core functional-paradigm developer (LISP), and now I'm a hard-care .net/C# developer. Of course I'm enamored with LINQ. However, I also believe in (1) using the right tool for the job and (2) preserving the KISS principle: of the 60+ engineers I work with, perhaps only 20% have hours of LINQ / functional paradigm experience, and 5% have 6 to 12 months of such experience. In short, I feel compelled to stay away from LINQ unless I'm hampered in achieving a goal without it (wherein replacing 3 lines of O-O code with one line of LINQ is not a "goal"). But now one of the engineers, having 12 months LINQ / functional-paradigm experience, is using LINQ to objects, or at least lambda expressions anyway, in every conceivable location in production code. My various appeals to the KISS principle have not yielded any results. Therefore... What published studies can I next appeal to? What "coding standard" guideline have others concocted with some success? Are there published LINQ performance issues I could point out? In short, I'm trying to achieve my first goal - KISS - by indirect persuasion. Of course this problem could be extended to countless other areas (such as overuse of extension methods). Perhaps there is an "uber" guide, highly regarded (e.g. published studies, etc), that takes a broader swing at this. Anything?

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  • How to port an Ajax CMS based on metadata in Asp.Net MVC?

    - by Maushu
    I'm maintaining a CMS where I have this feeling it was made in the age of dinosaurs (Asp.net 1.0?) and decided to upgrade it with Asp.Net MVC and jQuery. But I have some problems regarding the design/specifications of the CMS which I cannot change. The CMS The CMS uses JavaScript. Alot. As in "I don't load pages, I request new pages using Ajax and render the information using javascript" alot. Not to mention the animations, the weird horizontal apresentation of structures... anyways, besides the first page (that is the login page) every other "page" is just data requested from a WebService that comes with the website. Would MVC have any problems with this design? The Database The database is in a SQL Server 2k8 and, like the CMS, this part is also... interesting. Basically, the user can create data structures using metadata (and saved on the Structure table). These structures are saved on tables that are created (and regenerated when changed) at runtime using said metadata. I don't know how I would implement this part in MVC. The question is, can and should I convert this project to MVC? Any tips regarding the metadata and overuse of ajax?

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