Search Results

Search found 2031 results on 82 pages for 'jason fitzpatrick'.

Page 12/82 | < Previous Page | 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19  | Next Page >

  • DIY Coffee Table Arcade Hides Retro Gaming Inside

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Last week we showed you a nifty man-cave arcade-in-coffee-table build that was a bit, shall we say, exposed. If you’re looking for a sleek build that conceals its arcade-heart until it’s game time, this clean and concealed build is for you. Courtesy of IKEAHacker reader Sam Wang, the beauty of this build is that other than the rectangle of black glass in the center of the table–which could just as well be a design accent–there is no indication that the coffee table is a gaming machine when not in use. Slide out the drawers and boot it up, however, and you’re in business–full MAME arcade emulation at your finger tips. Hit up the link below to check out his full photo build guide. My DIY Arcade Machine Coffee Table [via IKEAHacker] How To Switch Webmail Providers Without Losing All Your Email How To Force Windows Applications to Use a Specific CPU HTG Explains: Is UPnP a Security Risk?

    Read the article

  • From the Tips Box: Kindle as Raspberry Pi Screen, iPod Control Boxes, and Easy Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Once a week we round up some of the great reader tips that come our way and share them with everyone. Today we’re looking at using the Kindle as a screen for the Raspberry Pi, custom iPod control modules, and an easy way to play the Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon. How to Get Pro Features in Windows Home Versions with Third Party Tools HTG Explains: Is ReadyBoost Worth Using? HTG Explains: What The Windows Event Viewer Is and How You Can Use It

    Read the article

  • Bing Desktop Automatically Downloads Bing Wallpapers to Your Computer

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Windows 7: Bing Desktop is a new and lightweight offering from Microsoft that automatically swaps your desktop background every day and offers quick access to the Bing search engine. In addition to downloading the Bing wallpaper, Bing Desktop also includes a small search box that allows you to search Bing from your desktop–although most users will likely grab the app simply to get the daily wallpaper update. Hit up the link below to download a copy. Bing Desktop is free, Windows 7 only. Bing Desktop [via Quick Online Tips] How to Stress Test the Hard Drives in Your PC or Server How To Customize Your Android Lock Screen with WidgetLocker The Best Free Portable Apps for Your Flash Drive Toolkit

    Read the article

  • The Lord of the Rings Project Charts Middle Earth by the Numbers

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    How many characters from the Lord of the Rings series can you name? 923? That’s the number of entries in the LOTR Project–a collection of data that links family trees, timelines, and statistical curiosities about Middle Earth. In addition to families trees and the above chart mapping out the shift in lifespans over the ages of Middle Earth, you’ll find charts mapping out age distributions, the race and gender composition of Middle Earth, populations, time and distance traveled by the Hobbits in pursuit of their quest, and so more. The site is a veritable almanac of trivia about the Lord of the Rings and related books and media. Hit up the link below to explore the facts and figures of Middle Earth. LOTR Project [via Flowing Data] How Hackers Can Disguise Malicious Programs With Fake File Extensions Can Dust Actually Damage My Computer? What To Do If You Get a Virus on Your Computer

    Read the article

  • Pac-Man Hiding Spot Makes High Scores a Snap

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    This interesting bug (feature?) in the original Pac-Man game makes it easy to hide from the ghosts, ensuring a long-lived and well-fed Pac-Man. Check out the video above to see the black hole you can park Pac-Man in to avoid assault by the ghosts. There’s two big caveats with this trick: first, it only works in the original game (spin offs and modern adaptations won’t necessarily have it but the original machine and MAME implementations of it will). Second, it doesn’t work if the ghosts see you park yourself there; you need to slip into the spot our of their direct line of sight. Still craving more Pac-Man goodness? Check out these cheat maps that map out all the patterns you need to follow to sneak through every level unmolested by ghosts. [via Neatorama] How To Be Your Own Personal Clone Army (With a Little Photoshop) How To Properly Scan a Photograph (And Get An Even Better Image) The HTG Guide to Hiding Your Data in a TrueCrypt Hidden Volume

    Read the article

  • Trulia Adds Commute Time Calculator to Their Neighborhood Heat Maps

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Trulia–a popular real estate site well known for their neighborhood heat maps covering crime, school locations, and property values–now shows commute times in heat map form; see instantly how far away your potential new place is from where you want to work. Accessing the commute heatmap is just like any of Trulia’s other top-down views. Search for your city, hit up the map, and select which heatmap overlay you want to view. Trulia [via Flowing Data] How to Make Your Laptop Choose a Wired Connection Instead of Wireless HTG Explains: What Is Two-Factor Authentication and Should I Be Using It? HTG Explains: What Is Windows RT and What Does It Mean To Me?

    Read the article

  • The Inebriator: A DIY Arduino-powered Cocktail Machine [Video]

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    We’ve seen our fair share of geeky alcohol-related projects over the years but this, this, is something to see. The Inebriator is the slickest automated drink machine we’ve laid eyes on. Before we even start talking specs, check out the video above–don’t forget to first assure your liver that you don’t actually have access to such a magnificent device and it can remain calm. As dazzled as we were? The whole thing is powered by an Arduino Mega 2560, sports a cooler with nitrogen pressurization of drink mix bottles, and relies on a rather ingenious and elegantly simple 12v valve system. It even has an RFID security system to prevent party goers with a few drinks in them from messing up the custom drink menu. Hit up the link below for more information, including photos of the guts and technical specs. The Inebriator [via Hack A Day] Java is Insecure and Awful, It’s Time to Disable It, and Here’s How What Are the Windows A: and B: Drives Used For? HTG Explains: What is DNS?

    Read the article

  • The Legend of Digital Zelda [Video]

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    This clever animation project combines a real-world set, a great soundtrack, and a novel approach to showcasing the adventure Link goes through to rescue Zelda. The Legend of Digital Zelda [via TUAW] Why Does 64-Bit Windows Need a Separate “Program Files (x86)” Folder? Why Your Android Phone Isn’t Getting Operating System Updates and What You Can Do About It How To Delete, Move, or Rename Locked Files in Windows

    Read the article

  • How DNS Works [Video]

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Want an easy and visual way to explain DNS to a curious friend or cubemate? This clean and simple short video does a great job highlighting exactly what goes on during a typical DNS request. Last month we explained what DNS is and showed you why you might want to use alternate DNS servers; this short video serves as an excellent visual companion for our article. How DNS Works [YouTube] 8 Deadly Commands You Should Never Run on Linux 14 Special Google Searches That Show Instant Answers How To Create a Customized Windows 7 Installation Disc With Integrated Updates

    Read the article

  • Tunlr Gives Non-US Residents Access to Hulu, Netflix, and More

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    If you’re outside the US market and looking to enjoy US streaming services like Hulu, Netflix, and more, Tunlr is a free and simple service that will get you connected. Unlike other tools that are more expensive (both in price and in hardware/bandwidth overhead) like VPN services, Tunlr doesn’t set up a full tunnel but instead serves as an alternative DNS server that allows you to access previously blocked content. From the Tunlr FAQ: Tunlr does not provide a virtual private network (VPN). Tunlr is a DNS (domain name system) unblocking service. We’re using sophisticated technologies (a.k.a. the Tunlr Secret Sauce ©) to re-adress certain data envelopes, tricking the receiver into thinking the envelope originated from within the U.S. For these data envelopes, Tunlr is transparently creating a network tunnel from your location to our U.S.-based servers. Any data that’s not directly related to the video or music content providers which Tunlr supports is not only left untouched, it’s also not even routed through Tunlr. Hit up the link below for more information about the service, including how to set it up on various operating systems, portable devices, and gaming consoles. Tunlr [via gHacks] HTG Explains: Why You Only Have to Wipe a Disk Once to Erase It HTG Explains: Learn How Websites Are Tracking You Online Here’s How to Download Windows 8 Release Preview Right Now

    Read the article

  • Undocumented Gmail Search Operator Ferrets Out Large Email Attachments

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    If you’re looking for a way to quickly find large email attachments in your Gmail account, this undocumented search operator makes it simple to zero in on the hulking attachments hiding out in your inbox. To use the search operator simply plug in “size:” and some value to narrow your search to only emails that size or larger. In the screenshot above we searched for “size:20000000″ to search for files roughly 20MB or larger (if you want to be extremely precise, a true 20MB search would be “size:20971520″). If you’re looking to clean up your Gmail account this is a nearly zero-effort way to find the biggest space hogs–in our case, we found an email packed with massive PDF files from a 5 year old project that we were more than happy to purge. Finding Large Attachments in Google Mail/Gmail [via gHacks] 6 Ways Windows 8 Is More Secure Than Windows 7 HTG Explains: Why It’s Good That Your Computer’s RAM Is Full 10 Awesome Improvements For Desktop Users in Windows 8

    Read the article

  • DIY Standing Desk Sports Super Sturdy Galvanized Pipe Legs

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    If you’re looking for a standing desk sturdy enough you can tap dance on it this DIY creation features thick pipe legs and a solid oak desktop. Courtesy of designer Jessica Allen, this standing desk can easily support a bank of monitors, heavy equipment, and even your entire body if need be, thanks to a sturdy galvanized plumbing pipe undercarriage and a 1″ thick oak top. We love the clean lines of the desk but we’d be tempted to clutter them up a little with a tower-rack mounted under the desk or on the inside of the thick pipe legs. Hit up the link below to check out the full build log. Have a cool standing desk (or desk tutorial) to share? Sound off in the comments. Steel Pipe Standing Desk HTG Explains: Why Screen Savers Are No Longer Necessary 6 Ways Windows 8 Is More Secure Than Windows 7 HTG Explains: Why It’s Good That Your Computer’s RAM Is Full

    Read the article

  • Understanding Photography and Color Temperature

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Most digital cameras have the ability to set the “color temperature” based on the condition, but what exactly does that mean? This simple cheat sheet highlights the differences between various lighting situations and what settings you should use. Courtesy of Digital Camera World, the above chart shows where on the scale various color temperatures fall, how the automatic white balance works, and which presets you should use if available. What Is Color Temperature? [via Unpluggd] HTG Explains: Why Linux Doesn’t Need Defragmenting How to Convert News Feeds to Ebooks with Calibre How To Customize Your Wallpaper with Google Image Searches, RSS Feeds, and More

    Read the article

  • DIY Panoramic Head Dirt Cheap Solution for Panoramic Photos [DIY]

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Professional panoramic tripod heads are quite expensive; this DIY solution is put together with scrap wood and a handful of cheap parts from the hardware store and gets the job done just as well. If you’re not looking to impress anyone and willing to sacrifice a little compactness, this simple build can save you a ton of cash. Over at Rasterweb Pete Prodoehl shares photos and video of his DIY panoramic head built out of nothing but scrap wood he had around the work shop plus a hinge, some angle brackets, and screws/nuts/bolts. All very cheap hardware store fare. Hit up the link below to see his build and sample photos. Panoramic Tripod Head [Rasterweb via Make] What is a Histogram, and How Can I Use it to Improve My Photos?How To Easily Access Your Home Network From Anywhere With DDNSHow To Recover After Your Email Password Is Compromised

    Read the article

  • NASA Releases Highest Resolution Photo of Mars Ever Seen

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Whether you’re in the mood for a high-resolution extraterrestrial wallpaper or just want to take a very close peek at the surface of Mars, this 23096 x 7681 resolution image ought to do the trick. Courtesy of NASA and Oppurtunity–the Mars Exploration Rover seen in the photo–the panoramic image was captured during the last Martian winter, between the Earth dates of December 21, 2001 and May 8, 2012. Hit up the link below to grab a full-resolution copy as well as read more about the geologic formations seen in the picture and the activities of the rover. ‘Greeley Panorama’ from Opportunity’s Fifth Martian Winter [Nasa] How to Use an Xbox 360 Controller On Your Windows PC Download the Official How-To Geek Trivia App for Windows 8 How to Banish Duplicate Photos with VisiPic

    Read the article

  • Uploading.to Uploads Files to Multiple File Hosts Simultaneously

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    If you’re looking to quickly share a file across a variety of file hosting services, Uploading.to makes it a cinch to share up to 10 files across 14 hosts. The upload process is simple. Visit Uploading.to, select your files, check the hosts you want to share the file across (by default all 14 are checked), add a description to the collection, and hit the Upload button. Uploading.to will upload your file to the various hosts; during the process you’ll see which hosts are confirmed and which have failed. We had 2 failures among the 14 hosts which still left the file mirrored across a sizable 12 host spread–not bad at all. When you’re ready to share the file hit the Copy Link button at the bottom of the screen and share it with your friends. They’ll be directed to Uploading.to and will be able to select from any of the hosts the file was successfully mirrored across. Uploading.to is a free service and requires no registration. Uploading.to [via Addictive Tips] HTG Explains: Do You Really Need to Defrag Your PC? Use Amazon’s Barcode Scanner to Easily Buy Anything from Your Phone How To Migrate Windows 7 to a Solid State Drive

    Read the article

  • How to Sync Your Media Across Your Entire House with XBMC

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    XBMC is an awesome media center solution but when you’re using it all over your house your library updates and watched-media lists get out of sync. Read on as we show how to keep all your media centers on the same page. Note: This how-to guide was originally published in September of 2011 and detailed how to set up whole-house media syncing for XBMC “Dharma” 10.0. We’ve updated the guide for the newer, more user-friendly MySQL integration included in XBMC “Eden” 11.0.  How to Sync Your Media Across Your Entire House with XBMC How to Own Your Own Website (Even If You Can’t Build One) Pt 2 How to Own Your Own Website (Even If You Can’t Build One) Pt 1

    Read the article

  • Banned Children’s Toys from Christmases Past

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    What could possibly go wrong giving a child a nuclear science kit that includes highly poisonous materials inside? Everything of course, which is why that particular toy only lasted a single holiday. Buzzfeed reports on some of the toys of holidays past that were quickly pulled off the shelves. In regard to the nuclear kit pictured here, they write: Only available from 1951–1952, this science kit for CHILDREN included four types of uranium ore, a Geiger counter, a comic called Dagwood Spits the Atom, and a coupon for ordering MORE radioactive materials. One of the four uranium ores included was Po-210 (Polonium) which, by mass, is 250,000 times more toxic than hydrogen cyanide. “Merry Christmas, Kevin, here’s that giant box of poison you asked for.” Hit up the link below for more entries, including some pulled from the shelves as recently as 2007. 8 Banned Children’s Toys From Yesteryear [BuzzFeed] Our Geek Trivia App for Windows 8 is Now Available Everywhere How To Boot Your Android Phone or Tablet Into Safe Mode HTG Explains: Does Your Android Phone Need an Antivirus?

    Read the article

  • Composite Moon Map Offers Stunning Views of the Lunar Surface [Astronomy]

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Researchers at Arizona State University have stitched together a massive high-resolution map of the moon; seen the moon in astounding detail. Using images fro the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) they carefully stitch a massive map of the moon with a higher resolution than the public has ever seen before: The WAC has a pixel scale of about 75 meters, and with an average altitude of 50 km, a WAC image swath is 70 km wide across the ground-track. Because the equatorial distance between orbits is about 30 km, there is nearly complete orbit-to-orbit stereo overlap all the way around the Moon, every month. Using digital photogrammetric techniques, a terrain model was computed from this stereo overlap. Hit up the link below to check out the images and the process they used. Lunar Topography as Never Seen Before [via NASA] How to Make the Kindle Fire Silk Browser *Actually* Fast! Amazon’s New Kindle Fire Tablet: the How-To Geek Review HTG Explains: How Hackers Take Over Web Sites with SQL Injection / DDoS

    Read the article

  • Fiction to Reality Timeline Charts Introduction of Sci-Fi Concepts to Real Life

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Videophones, voice-controlled computers, heads-up displays, and other technological innovations made their first appearances in Sci-Fi. This dual timeline charts the first appearance in Sci-Fi against the date of commercial success for the product in the real world. Hit up the link below for the full resolution image. The Fiction to Reality Timeline [via Cool Inforgraphics] How to Own Your Own Website (Even If You Can’t Build One) Pt 3 How to Sync Your Media Across Your Entire House with XBMC How to Own Your Own Website (Even If You Can’t Build One) Pt 2

    Read the article

  • Mario Warfare: Live Action Adventures in the Mushroom Kingdom

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    What if the tale of the Mario Bros. and their exploits was told in the form of an action flick? Mario Warfare explores the gritty side of the battle for the Mushroom Kingdom. In the above video we’re treated to a trailer-style peek at a work-in progress film. While there is no set release date, we have our fingers crossed that it’s completed sooner rather than later–a film this awesome demands to be seen. [via Geekosystem] How to Get Pro Features in Windows Home Versions with Third Party Tools HTG Explains: Is ReadyBoost Worth Using? HTG Explains: What The Windows Event Viewer Is and How You Can Use It

    Read the article

  • Hack Your Lights for Remote Control

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    This clever hack combines a modified wall switch with unused buttons on a universal remote to create one-touch wireless control of the lighting in a media room. Andrew, the tinker behind this home theater hack, writes: I really liked the idea of controlling my “Home Theater” lights with a remote (TV or other), this would save me the exhausting task of heaving myself off the couch to turn the lights on or off. I found one of my remotes has a spare power button, its one of those stupid “universal” remotes that comes with DVD players or TVs but only work if you have all the same brand equipment, I don’t so this made a good option for a light switch. Hit up the link below to check out more photos of his project and download the source code. Why Does 64-Bit Windows Need a Separate “Program Files (x86)” Folder? Why Your Android Phone Isn’t Getting Operating System Updates and What You Can Do About It How To Delete, Move, or Rename Locked Files in Windows

    Read the article

  • Explore the Earth at Night with Google Maps

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Last week we shared a high-resolution video of the Earth at night. Now we’re back with a mashup that combines that same high-resolution data and Google Maps for an interactive look at a human-illuminated Earth. Hit up the link below to take the Google Maps mashup, titled City Lights 2012, for a spin. City Lights 2012 [Google Maps via Mashable] How to Fix a Stuck Pixel on an LCD Monitor How to Factory Reset Your Android Phone or Tablet When It Won’t Boot Our Geek Trivia App for Windows 8 is Now Available Everywhere

    Read the article

  • How to Run Low-Cost Minecraft on a Raspberry Pi for Block Building on the Cheap

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    We’ve shown you how to run your own blocktastic personal Minecraft server on a Windows/OSX box, but what if you crave something lighter weight, more energy efficient, and always ready for your friends? Read on as we turn a tiny Raspberry Pi machine into a low-cost Minecraft server you can leave on 24/7 for around a penny a day. Why Do I Want to Do This? There’s two aspects to this tutorial, running your own Minecraft server and specifically running that Minecraft server on a Raspberry Pi. Why would you want to run your own Minecraft server? It’s a really great way to extend and build upon the Minecraft play experience. You can leave the server running when you’re not playing so friends and family can join and continue building your world. You can mess around with game variables and introduce mods in a way that isn’t possible when you’re playing the stand-alone game. It also gives you the kind of control over your multiplayer experience that using public servers doesn’t, without incurring the cost of hosting a private server on a remote host. While running a Minecraft server on its own is appealing enough to a dedicated Minecraft fan, running it on the Raspberry Pi is even more appealing. The tiny little Pi uses so little resources that you can leave your Minecraft server running 24/7 for a couple bucks a year. Aside from the initial cost outlay of the Pi, an SD card, and a little bit of time setting it up, you’ll have an always-on Minecraft server at a monthly cost of around one gumball. What Do I Need? For this tutorial you’ll need a mix of hardware and software tools; aside from the actual Raspberry Pi and SD card, everything is free. 1 Raspberry Pi (preferably a 512MB model) 1 4GB+ SD card This tutorial assumes that you have already familiarized yourself with the Raspberry Pi and have installed a copy of the Debian-derivative Raspbian on the device. If you have not got your Pi up and running yet, don’t worry! Check out our guide, The HTG Guide to Getting Started with Raspberry Pi, to get up to speed. Optimizing Raspbian for the Minecraft Server Unlike other builds we’ve shared where you can layer multiple projects over one another (e.g. the Pi is more than powerful enough to serve as a weather/email indicator and a Google Cloud Print server at the same time) running a Minecraft server is a pretty intense operation for the little Pi and we’d strongly recommend dedicating the entire Pi to the process. Minecraft seems like a simple game, with all its blocky-ness and what not, but it’s actually a pretty complex game beneath the simple skin and required a lot of processing power. As such, we’re going to tweak the configuration file and other settings to optimize Rasbian for the job. The first thing you’ll need to do is dig into the Raspi-Config application to make a few minor changes. If you’re installing Raspbian fresh, wait for the last step (which is the Raspi-Config), if you already installed it, head to the terminal and type in “sudo raspi-config” to launch it again. One of the first and most important things we need to attend to is cranking up the overclock setting. We need all the power we can get to make our Minecraft experience enjoyable. In Raspi-Config, select option number 7 “Overclock”. Be prepared for some stern warnings about overclocking, but rest easy knowing that overclocking is directly supported by the Raspberry Pi foundation and has been included in the configuration options since late 2012. Once you’re in the actual selection screen, select “Turbo 1000MhHz”. Again, you’ll be warned that the degree of overclocking you’ve selected carries risks (specifically, potential corruption of the SD card, but no risk of actual hardware damage). Click OK and wait for the device to reset. Next, make sure you’re set to boot to the command prompt, not the desktop. Select number 3 “Enable Boot to Desktop/Scratch”  and make sure “Console Text console” is selected. Back at the Raspi-Config menu, select number 8 “Advanced Options’. There are two critical changes we need to make in here and one option change. First, the critical changes. Select A3 “Memory Split”: Change the amount of memory available to the GPU to 16MB (down from the default 64MB). Our Minecraft server is going to ruin in a GUI-less environment; there’s no reason to allocate any more than the bare minimum to the GPU. After selecting the GPU memory, you’ll be returned to the main menu. Select “Advanced Options” again and then select A4 “SSH”. Within the sub-menu, enable SSH. There is very little reason to keep this Pi connected to a monitor and keyboard, by enabling SSH we can remotely access the machine from anywhere on the network. Finally (and optionally) return again to the “Advanced Options” menu and select A2 “Hostname”. Here you can change your hostname from “raspberrypi” to a more fitting Minecraft name. We opted for the highly creative hostname “minecraft”, but feel free to spice it up a bit with whatever you feel like: creepertown, minecraft4life, or miner-box are all great minecraft server names. That’s it for the Raspbian configuration tab down to the bottom of the main screen and select “Finish” to reboot. After rebooting you can now SSH into your terminal, or continue working from the keyboard hooked up to your Pi (we strongly recommend switching over to SSH as it allows you to easily cut and paste the commands). If you’ve never used SSH before, check out how to use PuTTY with your Pi here. Installing Java on the Pi The Minecraft server runs on Java, so the first thing we need to do on our freshly configured Pi is install it. Log into your Pi via SSH and then, at the command prompt, enter the following command to make a directory for the installation: sudo mkdir /java/ Now we need to download the newest version of Java. At the time of this publication the newest release is the OCT 2013 update and the link/filename we use will reflect that. Please check for a more current version of the Linux ARMv6/7 Java release on the Java download page and update the link/filename accordingly when following our instructions. At the command prompt, enter the following command: sudo wget --no-check-certificate http://www.java.net/download/jdk8/archive/b111/binaries/jdk-8-ea-b111-linux-arm-vfp-hflt-09_oct_2013.tar.gz Once the download has finished successfully, enter the following command: sudo tar zxvf jdk-8-ea-b111-linux-arm-vfp-hflt-09_oct_2013.tar.gz -C /opt/ Fun fact: the /opt/ directory name scheme is a remnant of early Unix design wherein the /opt/ directory was for “optional” software installed after the main operating system; it was the /Program Files/ of the Unix world. After the file has finished extracting, enter: sudo /opt/jdk1.8.0/bin/java -version This command will return the version number of your new Java installation like so: java version "1.8.0-ea" Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0-ea-b111) Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (build 25.0-b53, mixed mode) If you don’t see the above printout (or a variation thereof if you’re using a newer version of Java), try to extract the archive again. If you do see the readout, enter the following command to tidy up after yourself: sudo rm jdk-8-ea-b111-linux-arm-vfp-hflt-09_oct_2013.tar.gz At this point Java is installed and we’re ready to move onto installing our Minecraft server! Installing and Configuring the Minecraft Server Now that we have a foundation for our Minecraft server, it’s time to install the part that matter. We’ll be using SpigotMC a lightweight and stable Minecraft server build that works wonderfully on the Pi. First, grab a copy of the the code with the following command: sudo wget http://ci.md-5.net/job/Spigot/lastSuccessfulBuild/artifact/Spigot-Server/target/spigot.jar This link should remain stable over time, as it points directly to the most current stable release of Spigot, but if you have any issues you can always reference the SpigotMC download page here. After the download finishes successfully, enter the following command: sudo /opt/jdk1.8.0/bin/java -Xms256M -Xmx496M -jar /home/pi/spigot.jar nogui Note: if you’re running the command on a 256MB Pi change the 256 and 496 in the above command to 128 and 256, respectively. Your server will launch and a flurry of on-screen activity will follow. Be prepared to wait around 3-6 minutes or so for the process of setting up the server and generating the map to finish. Future startups will take much less time, around 20-30 seconds. Note: If at any point during the configuration or play process things get really weird (e.g. your new Minecraft server freaks out and starts spawning you in the Nether and killing you instantly), use the “stop” command at the command prompt to gracefully shutdown the server and let you restart and troubleshoot it. After the process has finished, head over to the computer you normally play Minecraft on, fire it up, and click on Multiplayer. You should see your server: If your world doesn’t popup immediately during the network scan, hit the Add button and manually enter the address of your Pi. Once you connect to the server, you’ll see the status change in the server status window: According to the server, we’re in game. According to the actual Minecraft app, we’re also in game but it’s the middle of the night in survival mode: Boo! Spawning in the dead of night, weaponless and without shelter is no way to start things. No worries though, we need to do some more configuration; no time to sit around and get shot at by skeletons. Besides, if you try and play it without some configuration tweaks first, you’ll likely find it quite unstable. We’re just here to confirm the server is up, running, and accepting incoming connections. Once we’ve confirmed the server is running and connectable (albeit not very playable yet), it’s time to shut down the server. Via the server console, enter the command “stop” to shut everything down. When you’re returned to the command prompt, enter the following command: sudo nano server.properties When the configuration file opens up, make the following changes (or just cut and paste our config file minus the first two lines with the name and date stamp): #Minecraft server properties #Thu Oct 17 22:53:51 UTC 2013 generator-settings= #Default is true, toggle to false allow-nether=false level-name=world enable-query=false allow-flight=false server-port=25565 level-type=DEFAULT enable-rcon=false force-gamemode=false level-seed= server-ip= max-build-height=256 spawn-npcs=true white-list=false spawn-animals=true texture-pack= snooper-enabled=true hardcore=false online-mode=true pvp=true difficulty=1 player-idle-timeout=0 gamemode=0 #Default 20; you only need to lower this if you're running #a public server and worried about loads. max-players=20 spawn-monsters=true #Default is 10, 3-5 ideal for Pi view-distance=5 generate-structures=true spawn-protection=16 motd=A Minecraft Server In the server status window, seen through your SSH connection to the pi, enter the following command to give yourself operator status on your Minecraft server (so that you can use more powerful commands in game, without always returning to the server status window). op [your minecraft nickname] At this point things are looking better but we still have a little tweaking to do before the server is really enjoyable. To that end, let’s install some plugins. The first plugin, and the one you should install above all others, is NoSpawnChunks. To install the plugin, first visit the NoSpawnChunks webpage and grab the download link for the most current version. As of this writing the current release is v0.3. Back at the command prompt (the command prompt of your Pi, not the server console–if your server is still active shut it down) enter the following commands: cd /home/pi/plugins sudo wget http://dev.bukkit.org/media/files/586/974/NoSpawnChunks.jar Next, visit the ClearLag plugin page, and grab the latest link (as of this tutorial, it’s v2.6.0). Enter the following at the command prompt: sudo wget http://dev.bukkit.org/media/files/743/213/Clearlag.jar Because the files aren’t compressed in a .ZIP or similar container, that’s all there is to it: the plugins are parked in the plugin directory. (Remember this for future plugin downloads, the file needs to be whateverplugin.jar, so if it’s compressed you need to uncompress it in the plugin directory.) Resart the server: sudo /opt/jdk1.8.0/bin/java -Xms256M -Xmx496M -jar /home/pi/spigot.jar nogui Be prepared for a slightly longer startup time (closer to the 3-6 minutes and much longer than the 30 seconds you just experienced) as the plugins affect the world map and need a minute to massage everything. After the spawn process finishes, type the following at the server console: plugins This lists all the plugins currently active on the server. You should see something like this: If the plugins aren’t loaded, you may need to stop and restart the server. After confirming your plugins are loaded, go ahead and join the game. You should notice significantly snappier play. In addition, you’ll get occasional messages from the plugins indicating they are active, as seen below: At this point Java is installed, the server is installed, and we’ve tweaked our settings for for the Pi.  It’s time to start building with friends!     

    Read the article

  • Ten Benefits to Video Game Play [Video]

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Want to justify spending the whole weekend playing video games? We’re here to help. Courtesy of AllTime10, this video rounds up ten benefits to playing video games ranging from improved dexterity to pain relief. Want to highlight a benefit not listed in the video? Sound off in the comments. [via Geeks Are Sexy] Why Does 64-Bit Windows Need a Separate “Program Files (x86)” Folder? Why Your Android Phone Isn’t Getting Operating System Updates and What You Can Do About It How To Delete, Move, or Rename Locked Files in Windows

    Read the article

< Previous Page | 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19  | Next Page >