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  • SQL SERVER – Simple Example of Incremental Statistics – Performance improvements in SQL Server 2014 – Part 2

    - by Pinal Dave
    This is the second part of the series Incremental Statistics. Here is the index of the complete series. What is Incremental Statistics? – Performance improvements in SQL Server 2014 – Part 1 Simple Example of Incremental Statistics – Performance improvements in SQL Server 2014 – Part 2 DMV to Identify Incremental Statistics – Performance improvements in SQL Server 2014 – Part 3 In part 1 we have understood what is incremental statistics and now in this second part we will see a simple example of incremental statistics. This blog post is heavily inspired from my friend Balmukund’s must read blog post. If you have partitioned table and lots of data, this feature can be specifically very useful. Prerequisite Here are two things you must know before you start with the demonstrations. AdventureWorks – For the demonstration purpose I have installed AdventureWorks 2012 as an AdventureWorks 2014 in this demonstration. Partitions – You should know how partition works with databases. Setup Script Here is the setup script for creating Partition Function, Scheme, and the Table. We will populate the table based on the SalesOrderDetails table from AdventureWorks. -- Use Database USE AdventureWorks2014 GO -- Create Partition Function CREATE PARTITION FUNCTION IncrStatFn (INT) AS RANGE LEFT FOR VALUES (44000, 54000, 64000, 74000) GO -- Create Partition Scheme CREATE PARTITION SCHEME IncrStatSch AS PARTITION [IncrStatFn] TO ([PRIMARY], [PRIMARY], [PRIMARY], [PRIMARY], [PRIMARY]) GO -- Create Table Incremental_Statistics CREATE TABLE [IncrStatTab]( [SalesOrderID] [int] NOT NULL, [SalesOrderDetailID] [int] NOT NULL, [CarrierTrackingNumber] [nvarchar](25) NULL, [OrderQty] [smallint] NOT NULL, [ProductID] [int] NOT NULL, [SpecialOfferID] [int] NOT NULL, [UnitPrice] [money] NOT NULL, [UnitPriceDiscount] [money] NOT NULL, [ModifiedDate] [datetime] NOT NULL) ON IncrStatSch(SalesOrderID) GO -- Populate Table INSERT INTO [IncrStatTab]([SalesOrderID], [SalesOrderDetailID], [CarrierTrackingNumber], [OrderQty], [ProductID], [SpecialOfferID], [UnitPrice],   [UnitPriceDiscount], [ModifiedDate]) SELECT     [SalesOrderID], [SalesOrderDetailID], [CarrierTrackingNumber], [OrderQty], [ProductID], [SpecialOfferID], [UnitPrice],   [UnitPriceDiscount], [ModifiedDate] FROM       [Sales].[SalesOrderDetail] WHERE      SalesOrderID < 54000 GO Check Details Now we will check details in the partition table IncrStatSch. -- Check the partition SELECT * FROM sys.partitions WHERE OBJECT_ID = OBJECT_ID('IncrStatTab') GO You will notice that only a few of the partition are filled up with data and remaining all the partitions are empty. Now we will create statistics on the Table on the column SalesOrderID. However, here we will keep adding one more keyword which is INCREMENTAL = ON. Please note this is the new keyword and feature added in SQL Server 2014. It did not exist in earlier versions. -- Create Statistics CREATE STATISTICS IncrStat ON [IncrStatTab] (SalesOrderID) WITH FULLSCAN, INCREMENTAL = ON GO Now we have successfully created statistics let us check the statistical histogram of the table. Now let us once again populate the table with more data. This time the data are entered into a different partition than earlier populated partition. -- Populate Table INSERT INTO [IncrStatTab]([SalesOrderID], [SalesOrderDetailID], [CarrierTrackingNumber], [OrderQty], [ProductID], [SpecialOfferID], [UnitPrice],   [UnitPriceDiscount], [ModifiedDate]) SELECT     [SalesOrderID], [SalesOrderDetailID], [CarrierTrackingNumber], [OrderQty], [ProductID], [SpecialOfferID], [UnitPrice],   [UnitPriceDiscount], [ModifiedDate] FROM       [Sales].[SalesOrderDetail] WHERE      SalesOrderID > 54000 GO Let us check the status of the partition once again with following script. -- Check the partition SELECT * FROM sys.partitions WHERE OBJECT_ID = OBJECT_ID('IncrStatTab') GO Statistics Update Now here has the new feature come into action. Previously, if we have to update the statistics, we will have to FULLSCAN the entire table irrespective of which partition got the data. However, in SQL Server 2014 we can just specify which partition we want to update in terms of Statistics. Here is the script for the same. -- Update Statistics Manually UPDATE STATISTICS IncrStatTab (IncrStat) WITH RESAMPLE ON PARTITIONS(3, 4) GO Now let us check the statistics once again. -- Show Statistics DBCC SHOW_STATISTICS('IncrStatTab', IncrStat) WITH HISTOGRAM GO Upon examining statistics histogram, you will notice that now the distribution has changed and there is way more rows in the histogram. Summary The new feature of Incremental Statistics is indeed a boon for the scenario where there are partitions and statistics needs to be updated frequently on the partitions. In earlier version to update statistics one has to do FULLSCAN on the entire table which was wasting too many resources. With the new feature in SQL Server 2014, now only those partitions which are significantly changed can be specified in the script to update statistics. Cleanup You can clean up the database by executing following scripts. -- Clean up DROP TABLE [IncrStatTab] DROP PARTITION SCHEME [IncrStatSch] DROP PARTITION FUNCTION [IncrStatFn] GO Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com)Filed under: PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Performance, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL Tagged: SQL Statistics, Statistics

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  • SQL SERVER – Video – Beginning Performance Tuning with SQL Server Execution Plan

    - by pinaldave
    Traveling can be most interesting or most exhausting experience. However, traveling is always the most enlightening experience one can have. While going to long journey one has to prepare a lot of things. Pack necessary travel gears, clothes and medicines. However, the most essential part of travel is the journey to the destination. There are many variations one prefer but the ultimate goal is to have a delightful experience during the journey. Here is the video available which explains how to begin with SQL Server Execution plans. Performance Tuning is a Journey Performance tuning is just like a long journey. The goal of performance tuning is efficient and least resources consuming query execution with accurate results. Just as maps are the most essential aspect of performance tuning the same way, execution plans are essentially maps for SQL Server to reach to the resultset. The goal of the execution plan is to find the most efficient path which translates the least usage of the resources (CPU, memory, IO etc). Execution Plans are like Maps When online maps were invented (e.g. Bing, Google, Mapquests etc) initially it was not possible to customize them. They were given a single route to reach to the destination. As time evolved now it is possible to give various hints to the maps, for example ‘via public transport’, ‘walking’, ‘fastest route’, ‘shortest route’, ‘avoid highway’. There are places where we manually drag the route and make it appropriate to our needs. The same situation is with SQL Server Execution Plans, if we want to tune the queries, we need to understand the execution plans and execution plans internals. We need to understand the smallest details which relate to execution plan when we our destination is optimal queries. Understanding Execution Plans The biggest challenge with maps are figuring out the optimal path. The same way the  most common challenge with execution plans is where to start from and which precise route to take. Here is a quick list of the frequently asked questions related to execution plans: Should I read the execution plans from bottoms up or top down? Is execution plans are left to right or right to left? What is the relational between actual execution plan and estimated execution plan? When I mouse over operator I see CPU and IO but not memory, why? Sometime I ran the query multiple times and I get different execution plan, why? How to cache the query execution plan and data? I created an optimal index but the query is not using it. What should I change – query, index or provide hints? What are the tools available which helps quickly to debug performance problems? Etc… Honestly the list is quite a big and humanly impossible to write everything in the words. SQL Server Performance:  Introduction to Query Tuning My friend Vinod Kumar and I have created for the same a video learning course for beginning performance tuning. We have covered plethora of the subject in the course. Here is the quick list of the same: Execution Plan Basics Essential Indexing Techniques Query Design for Performance Performance Tuning Tools Tips and Tricks Checklist: Performance Tuning We believe we have covered a lot in this four hour course and we encourage you to go over the video course if you are interested in Beginning SQL Server Performance Tuning and Query Tuning. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Optimization, SQL Performance, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology, Video Tagged: Execution Plan

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  • SQL SERVER – Select the Most Optimal Backup Methods for Server

    - by pinaldave
    Backup and Restore are very interesting concepts and one should be very much with the concept if you are dealing with production database. One never knows when a natural disaster or user error will surface and the first thing everybody wants is to get back on point in time when things were all fine. Well, in this article I have attempted to answer a few of the common questions related to Backup methodology. How to Select a SQL Server Backup Type In order to select a proper SQL Server backup type, a SQL Server administrator needs to understand the difference between the major backup types clearly. Since a picture is worth a thousand words, let me offer it to you below. Select a Recovery Model First The very first question that you should ask yourself is: Can I afford to lose at least a little (15 min, 1 hour, 1 day) worth of data? Resist the temptation to save it all as it comes with the overhead – majority of businesses outside finances can actually afford to lose a bit of data. If your answer is YES, I can afford to lose some data – select a SIMPLE (default) recovery model in the properties of your database, otherwise you need to select a FULL recovery model. The additional advantage of the Full recovery model is that it allows you to restore the data to a specific point in time vs to only last backup time in the Simple recovery model, but it exceeds the scope of this article Backups in SIMPLE Recovery Model In SIMPLE recovery model you can select to do just Full backups or Full + Differential. Full Backup This is the simplest type of backup that contains all information needed to restore the database and should be your first choice. It is often sufficient for small databases, but note that it makes a big impact on the performance of your database Full + Differential Backup After Full, Differential backup picks up all of the changes since the last Full backup. This means if you made Full, Diff, Diff backup – the last Diff backup contains all of the changes and you don’t need the previous Differential backup. Differential backup is obviously smaller and carries less performance overhead Backups in FULL Recovery Model In FULL recovery model you can select Full + Transaction Log or Full + Differential + Transaction Log backup. You have to create Transaction Log backup, because at that time the log is being truncated. Otherwise your Transaction Log will grow uncontrollably. Full + Transaction Log Backup You would always need to perform a Full backup first. Then a series of Transaction log backup. Note that (in contrast to Differential) you need ALL transactions to log since the last Full of Diff backup to properly restore. Transaction log backups have the smallest performance overhead and can be performed often. Full + Differential + Transaction Log Backup If you want to ease the performance overhead on your server, you can replace some of the Full backup in the previous scenario with Differential. You restore scenario would start from Full, then the Last Differential, then all of the remaining transactions log backups Typical backup Scenarios You may say “Well, it is all nice – give me the examples now”. As you may already know, my favorite SQL backup software is SQLBackupAndFTP. If you go to Advanced Backup Schedule form in this program and click “Load a typical backup plan…” link, it will give you these scenarios that I think are quite common – see the image below. The Simplest Way to Schedule SQL Backups I hate to repeat myself, but backup scheduling in SQL agent leaves a lot to be desired. I do not know the simple way to schedule your SQL server backups than in SQLBackupAndFTP – see the image below. The whole backup scheduling with compression, encryption and upload to a Network Folder / HDD / NAS Drive / FTP / Dropbox / Google Drive / Amazon S3 takes just a few minutes – see my previous post for the review. Final Words This post offered an explanation for major backup types only. For more complicated scenarios or to research other options as usually go to MSDN. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Backup and Restore, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL Server – Learning SQL Server Performance: Indexing Basics – Video

    - by pinaldave
    Today I remember one of my older cartoon years ago created for Indexing and Performance. Every single time when Performance is discussed, Indexes are mentioned along with it. In recent times, data and application complexity is continuously growing.  The demand for faster query response, performance, and scalability by organizations is increasing and developers and DBAs need to now write efficient code to achieve this. DBA and Developers A DBA’s role is critical, because a production environment has to run 24×7, hence maintenance, trouble shooting, and quick resolutions are the need of the hour.  The first baby step into any performance tuning exercise in SQL Server involves creating, analysing, and maintaining indexes. Though we have learnt indexing concepts from our college days, indexing implementation inside SQL Server can vary.  Understanding this behaviour and designing our applications appropriately will make sure the application is performed to its highest potential. Video Learning Vinod Kumar and myself we often thought about this and realized that practical understanding of the indexes is very important. One can not master every single aspects of the index. However there are some minimum expertise one should gain if performance is one of the concern. We decided to build a course which just addresses the practical aspects of the performance. In this course, we explored some of these indexing fundamentals and we elaborated on how SQL Server goes about using indexes.  At the end of this course of you will know the basic structure of indexes, practical insights into implementation, and maintenance tips and tricks revolving around indexes.  Finally, we will introduce SQL Server 2012 column store indexes.  We have refrained from discussing internal storage structure of the indexes but have taken a more practical, demo-oriented approach to explain these core concepts. Course Outline Here are salient topics of the course. We have explained every single concept along with a practical demonstration. Additionally shared our personal scripts along with the same. Introduction Fundamentals of Indexing Index Fundamentals Index Fundamentals – Visual Representation Practical Indexing Implementation Techniques Primary Key Over Indexing Duplicate Index Clustered Index Unique Index Included Columns Filtered Index Disabled Index Index Maintenance and Defragmentation Introduction to Columnstore Index Indexing Practical Performance Tips and Tricks Index and Page Types Index and Non Deterministic Columns Index and SET Values Importance of Clustered Index Effect of Compression and Fillfactor Index and Functions Dynamic Management Views (DMV) – Fillfactor Table Scan, Index Scan and Index Seek Index and Order of Columns Final Checklist: Index and Performance Well, we believe we have done our part, now waiting for your comments and feedback. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Index, SQL Performance, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLServer, T SQL, Technology, Video

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  • DiscountASP.NET Launches SQL Server Profiling as a Service

    - by wisecarver
    DiscountASP.NET announces enhancing our SQL Server hosting with the launch of SQL Server Profiling as a service. SQL Profiler is a powerful tool that allows the application and database developer to troubleshoot general SQL locking problems, performance issues, and perform database tuning. With our SQL Profiling as a Service customers can schedule a database trace at a specific time of their choosing and offers a new way to help our customers troubleshoot. For more information, visit: http://www...(read more)

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  • DiscountASP.NET Launches SQL Server Profiling as a Service

    - by wisecarver
    DiscountASP.NET announces enhancing our SQL Server hosting with the launch of SQL Server Profiling as a service. SQL Profiler is a powerful tool that allows the application and database developer to troubleshoot general SQL locking problems, performance issues, and perform database tuning. With our SQL Profiling as a Service customers can schedule a database trace at a specific time of their choosing and offers a new way to help our customers troubleshoot. For more information, visit: http://www...(read more)

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  • SQL Server 2008 R2 Released (RTM)

    - by Aamir Hasan
    Microsoft announced the release of SQL Server 2008 R2 (Release to manufacturing) on (21st April 2010). See the official announcement here. The key enhancements Microsoft emphasized in the release note are: Managed self-service business intelligence (BI) for reporting and analysisEnterprise-class scalability and greater IT efficiencyPlatform integration spanning the data center to the cloud How to Get Started Download a try SQL Server R2 from the official download page.

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  • Can't remotely connect through SQL Server Management Studio

    - by FAtBalloon
    I have setup a SQL Server 2008 Express instance on a dedicated Windows 2008 Server hosted by 1and1.com. I cannot connect remotely to the server through management studio. I have taken the following steps below and am beyond any further ideas. I have researched the site and cannot figure anything else out so please forgive me if I missed something obvious, but I'm going crazy. Here's the lowdown. The SQL Server instance is running and works perfectly when working locally. In SQL Server Management Studio, I have checked the box "Allow Remote Connections to this Server" I have removed any external hardware firewall settings from the 1and1 admin panel Windows firewall on the server has been disabled, but just for kicks I added an inbound rule that allows for all connections on port 1433. In SQL Native Client configuration, TCP/IP is enabled. I also made sure the "IP1" with the server's IP address had a 0 for dynamic port, but I deleted it and added 1433 in the regular TCP Port field. I also set the "IPALL" TCP Port to 1433. In SQL Native Client configuration, SQL Server Browser is also running and I also tried adding an ALIAS in the I restarted SQL server after I set this value. Doing a "netstat -ano" on the server machine returns a TCP 0.0.0.0:1433 LISTENING UDP 0.0.0.0:1434 LISTENING I do a port scan from my local computer and it says that the port is FILTERED instead of LISTENING. I also tried to connect from Management studio on my local machine and it is throwing a connection error. Tried the following server names with SQL Server and Windows Authentication marked in the database security. ipaddress\SQLEXPRESS,1433 ipaddress\SQLEXPRESS ipaddress ipaddress,1433 tcp:ipaddress\SQLEXPRESS tcp:ipaddress\SQLEXPRESS,1433

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  • SQL Server 2008 R2 Cumulative Updates are available

    - by AaronBertrand
    Microsoft has released cumulative updates for SQL Server 2008 R2. SQL Server 2008 R2 SP1 Cumulative Update #8 KB article is http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2723743 Build number is 10.50.2822.0 There are 20 fixes published as of 2012-08-31 This update is relevant for builds between 10.50.2500 and 10.50.2820 Note that the page that lists builds and updates for SP1 seems confused; it currently states that the build is 10.50.2822, while the KB article shows 10.50.2821. The file from the hotfix is 10.50.2822,...(read more)

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  • Feature pack for SQL Server 2005 SP4 - collection of standalone packages

    - by ssqa.net
    With the release of SQL2005Sp4 an additional task is essential for DBAs & Developers to avoid any compatibility issues with existing code agains SP4 instance. Feature pack for SQL Server 2005 SP4 is available to download which contains the standalone packages such as SQLNative Client, ADOMD, OLAPDM etc.... as it states the feature pack are built on latest versions of add-on and backward compatibility contents for SQL Server 2005. The above link provides individual file to download for each environment...(read more)

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  • SQL SERVER – Rename Columnname or Tablename – SQL in Sixty Seconds #032 – Video

    - by pinaldave
    We all make mistakes at some point of time and we all change our opinion. There are quite a lot of people in the world who have changed their name after they have grown up. Some corrected their parent’s mistake and some create new mistake. Well, databases are not protected from such incidents. There are many reasons why developers may want to change the name of the column or table after it was initially created. The goal of this video is not to dwell on the reasons but to learn how we can rename the column and table. Earlier I have written the article on this subject over here: SQL SERVER – How to Rename a Column Name or Table Name. I have revised the same article over here and created this video. There is one very important point to remember that by changing the column name or table name one creates the possibility of errors in the application the columns and tables are used. When any column or table name is changed, the developer should go through every place in the code base, ad-hoc queries, stored procedures, views and any other place where there are possibility of their usage and change them to the new name. If this is one followed up religiously there are quite a lot of changes that application will stop working due to this name change.  One has to remember that changing column name does not change the name of the indexes, constraints etc and they will continue to reference the old name. Though this will not stop the show but will create visual un-comfort as well confusion in many cases. Here is my question back to you – have you changed ever column name or table name in production database (after project going live)? If yes, what was the scenario and need of doing it. After all it is just a name. Let me know what you think of this video. Here is the updated script. USE tempdb GO CREATE TABLE TestTable (ID INT, OldName VARCHAR(20)) GO INSERT INTO TestTable VALUES (1, 'First') GO -- Check the Tabledata SELECT * FROM TestTable GO -- Rename the ColumnName sp_RENAME 'TestTable.OldName', 'NewName', 'Column' GO -- Check the Tabledata SELECT * FROM TestTable GO -- Rename the TableName sp_RENAME 'TestTable', 'NewTable' GO -- Check the Tabledata - Error SELECT * FROM TestTable GO -- Check the Tabledata - New SELECT * FROM NewTable GO -- Cleanup DROP TABLE NewTable GO Related Tips in SQL in Sixty Seconds: SQL SERVER – How to Rename a Column Name or Table Name What would you like to see in the next SQL in Sixty Seconds video? Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: Database, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL in Sixty Seconds, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Server Management Studio, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology, Video Tagged: Excel

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  • Cumulative Update #1 for SQL Server 2005 SP4

    - by AaronBertrand
    Well, much quicker than I would have suspected, the SQL Server Release Services team has incorporated all of the fixes in 2005 SP3's CU #12 into the first CU for SP4. Thanks to Chris Wood for the heads up. You can get the new Cumulative Update here: KB #2464079 : Cumulative update package 1 for SQL Server 2005 Service Pack 4 The nice round number of build 5000 didn't last long either; this CU will update you from 9.00.5000 to 9.00.5254....(read more)

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  • SQL SERVER – Introduction to CUME_DIST – Analytic Functions Introduced in SQL Server 2012

    - by pinaldave
    This blog post is written in response to the T-SQL Tuesday post of Prox ‘n’ Funx. This is a very interesting subject. By the way Brad Schulz is my favorite guy when it is about blogging. I respect him as well learn a lot from him. Everybody is writing something new his subject, I decided to start SQL Server 2012 analytic functions series. SQL Server 2012 introduces new analytical function CUME_DIST(). This function provides cumulative distribution value. It will be very difficult to explain this in words so I will attempt small example to explain you this function. Instead of creating new table, I will be using AdventureWorks sample database as most of the developer uses that for experiment. Let us fun following query. USE AdventureWorks GO SELECT SalesOrderID, OrderQty, CUME_DIST() OVER(ORDER BY SalesOrderID) AS CDist FROM Sales.SalesOrderDetail WHERE SalesOrderID IN (43670, 43669, 43667, 43663) ORDER BY CDist DESC GO Above query will give us following result. Now let us understand what is the formula behind CUME_DIST and why the values in SalesOrderID = 43670 are 1. Let us take more example and be clear about why the values in SalesOrderID = 43667 are 0.5. Now let us enhence the same example and use PARTITION BY into the OVER clause and see the results. Run following query in SQL Server 2012. USE AdventureWorks GO SELECT SalesOrderID, OrderQty, ProductID, CUME_DIST() OVER(PARTITION BY SalesOrderID ORDER BY ProductID ) AS CDist FROM Sales.SalesOrderDetail s WHERE SalesOrderID IN (43670, 43669, 43667, 43663) ORDER BY s.SalesOrderID DESC, CDist DESC GO Now let us see the result of this query. We are have changed the ORDER BY clause as well partitioning by SalesOrderID. You can see that CUME_DIST() function provides us different results. Additionally now we see value 1 multiple times. As we are using partitioning for each group of SalesOrderID we get the CUME_DIST() value. CUME_DIST() was long awaited Analytical function and I am glad to see it in SQL Server 2012. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Function, SQL Query, SQL Scripts, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL Server v.Next (Denali) : More on contained databases and "contained users"

    - by AaronBertrand
    One of the reasons for contained databases (see my previous post ) is to allow for a more seamless transition when moving a database from one server to another. One of the biggest complications in doing so is making sure that all of the logins are in place on the new server. Contained databases help solve this issue by creating a new type of user: a database-level user with a password. I want to stress that this is not the same concept as a user without a login , which serves a completely different...(read more)

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  • SQL Server Windows Auth Login sees Domain as untrusted...

    - by Mr Shoubs
    I've had someone set up a domain controller on windows 2008 on one server, and sql server 2008 on another. The domain seems to be working fine, I'm logged on as a domain user on both servers, nothing seems to be a problem there. However, when I try to add a domain user/group to SQL Server Security (e.g. clicking ok from the create login screen) it says it can't find it (even though I've used the search to find the correct account in the first place), when I try to logon (even though I haven't added it yet) it says something about the account being part of an untrusted domain instead of saying I don't have permission to log on. Anyone have any ideas on what is set up incorrectly?

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  • How can I connect to a Windows server using a Command Line Interface? (CLI)

    - by HopelessN00b
    Especially with the option to install Server Core in Server 2008 and above, connecting to Windows servers over a CLI is increasingly useful ability, if not one that's very widespread amongst Windows administrators. Practically every Windows GUI management tool has an option to connect to a remote computer, but there is no such option present in the built-in Windows CLI (cmd.exe), which gives the initial impression that this might not be possible. Is it possible to remotely management or administer a Windows Server using a CLI? And if so, what options are there to achieve this?

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  • Is SQL Server 2008 R2 a full release of SQL Server?

    - by AaronBertrand
    This has come up in conversations more than once in the past little while - recently on twitter I made the casual comment that later this year, SQL Server 2008 will be "two versions old." Well, not everyone agrees that that is technically true. So, I thought I'd put something out there that isn't limited to 140 characters. There are certainly some valid arguments on both sides, but my opinion - based both on these facts and on my memory that Microsoft has marketed it as such - is that SQL Server...(read more)

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  • SQL SERVER – Template Browser – A Very Important and Useful Feature of SSMS

    - by pinaldave
    Let me start today’s blog post with a direction question. How many of you have ever used Template Browser? Template Browser is a very important and useful feature of SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS). Every time when I am talking about SQL Server there is always someone comes up with the question, why there is no step by step procedure included in SSMS for features. Honestly every time I get this question, the question I ask back is How many of you have ever used Template Browser? I think the answer to this question is most of the time either no or we have not heard of the feature. One of the people asked me back – have you ever written about it on your blog? I have not yet written about it. Basically there is nothing much to write about it. It is pretty straight forward feature, like any other feature and it is indeed difficult to elaborate. However, I will try to give a quick introduction to this feature. Templates are like a quick cheat sheet or quick reference. Templates are available to create objects like databases, tables, views, indexes, stored procedures, triggers, statistics, and functions. Templates are also available for Analysis Services as well. The template scripts contain parameters to help you customize the code. You can Replace Template Parameters dialog box to insert values into the script. Additionally users can create new custom templates as well with folder structure. To open a template from Template Explorer Go to View menu >> Template Explorer or type CTRL+ALT+L. You will find a list of categories click on any category and expand the folder structure. For our sample example let us expand Index Folder. In this folder you will notice the various T-SQL Scripts. These scripts can be opened by double click or can be dragged to editor area and modified as needed. Sample template is now available in the query editor area with all the necessary parameter place folder. You can replace the same parameter by typing either CTRL+SHIFT+M or by going to Query Menu >> Specify Values for Template Parameters. In this screen it will show  Specify Values for Template Parameters dialog box, accept the value or replace it with a new value. This will now get your script ready to go. Check it one more time and change the script to fit your requirement. I personally use template explorer for two things. First one is obviously for templates but the hidden one and an important one is for learning new features and T-SQL commands. There is so much to learn and so little time. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Server Management Studio, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – Where Can YOU Get My Books – SQL Server Interview Question and Answers

    - by pinaldave
    Earlier month I released by third book SQL Server Interview Question and Answers. The focus of this book is ‘master the basics’. If you rate yourself 10 out of 10 in SQL Server – this book is not for you but if you want to learn fundamentals or want to refresh your fundamentals this book is for YOU. Earlier I was overwhelmed by love you all have shown to this book on release date leading our three digit inventory to run out of stock. Read detail blog post about the subject over here A Real Story of Book Getting ‘Out of Stock’ to A 25% Discount Story Available. Well, we learn the lesson from the experience and have made sure that the inventory does not run out any more. Since then we are now available on multiple outlets. Pretty much anywhere in USA and India the book is available. Additionally, where ever Amazon ships internationally. I have created dedicated page where I have listed where one can avail this book from Details of SQL Server Interview Question and Answers. Even though I keep on getting common question like – where one can get this book. You can get this book from: USA: Amazon India: Flipkart | IndiaPlaza | Crossword In India now you can walk into any crossword store and ask this book, if they do not have it, you can ask them get one for you. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.SQLAuthority.com) Filed under: Best Practices, Pinal Dave, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Documentation, SQL Download, SQL Interview Questions and Answers, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, SQLAuthority Author Visit, SQLAuthority Book Review, SQLAuthority News, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – A Puzzle – Fun with SEQUENCE in SQL Server 2012 – Guess the Next Value

    - by pinaldave
    Yesterday my friend Vinod Kumar wrote excellent blog post on SQL Server 2012: Using SEQUENCE. I personally enjoyed reading the content on this subject. While I was reading the blog post, I thought of very simple new puzzle. Let us see if we can try to solve it and learn a bit more about Sequence. Here is the script, which I executed. USE TempDB GO -- Create sequence CREATE SEQUENCE dbo.SequenceID AS BIGINT START WITH 3 INCREMENT BY 1 MINVALUE 1 MAXVALUE 5 CYCLE NO CACHE; GO -- Following will return 3 SELECT next value FOR dbo.SequenceID; -- Following will return 4 SELECT next value FOR dbo.SequenceID; -- Following will return 5 SELECT next value FOR dbo.SequenceID; -- Following will return which number SELECT next value FOR dbo.SequenceID; -- Clean up DROP SEQUENCE dbo.SequenceID; GO Above script gave me following resultset. 3 is the starting value and 5 is the maximum value. Once Sequence reaches to maximum value what happens? and WHY? Bonus question: If you use UNION between 2 SELECT statement which uses UNION, it also throws an error. What is the reason behind it? Can you attempt to answer this question without running this code in SQL Server 2012. I am very confident that irrespective of SQL Server version you are running you will have great learning. I will follow up of the answer in comments below. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com) Filed under: PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Puzzle, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL, Technology

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  • SQL SERVER – SSMS: Database Consistency History Report

    - by Pinal Dave
    Doctor and Database The last place I like to visit is always a hospital. With the monsoon season starting, intermittent rains, it has become sort of a routine to get a cycle of fever every other year (seriously I hate it). So when I visit my doctor, it is always interesting in the way he quizzes me. The routine question of – “How many days have you had this?”, “Is there any pattern?”, “Did you drench in rain?”, “Do you have any other symptom?” and so on. The idea here is that the doctor wants to find any anomaly or a pattern that will guide him to a viral or bacterial type. Most of the time they get it based on experience and sometimes after a battery of tests. So if there is consistent behavior to your problem, there is always a solution out. SQL Server has its way to find if the server data / files are in consistent state using the DBCC commands. Back to SQL Server In real life, Database consistency check is one of the critical operations a DBA generally doesn’t give much priority. Many readers of my blogs have asked many times, how do we know if the database is consistent? How do I read output of DBCC CHECKDB and find if everything is right or not? My common answer to all of them is – look at the bottom of checkdb (or checktable) output and look for below line. CHECKDB found 0 allocation errors and 0 consistency errors in database ‘DatabaseName’. Above is a “good sign” because we are seeing zero allocation and zero consistency error. If you are seeing non-zero errors then there is some problem with the database. Sample output is shown as below: CHECKDB found 0 allocation errors and 2 consistency errors in database ‘DatabaseName’. repair_allow_data_loss is the minimum repair level for the errors found by DBCC CHECKDB (DatabaseName). If we see non-zero error then most of the time (not always) we get repair options depending on the level of corruption. There is risk involved with above option (repair_allow_data_loss), that is – we would lose the data. Sometimes the option would be repair_rebuild which is little safer. Though these options are available, it is important to find the root cause to the problem. In standard report, there is a report which can show the history of checkdb executed for the selected database. Since this is a database level report, we need to right click on database, click Reports, click Standard Reports and then choose “Database Consistency History” report. The information in this report is picked from default trace. If default trace is disabled or there is no checkdb run or information is not there in default trace (because it’s rolled over), we would get report like below. As we can see report says it very clearly: Currently, no execution history of CHECKDB is available or default trace is not enabled. To demonstrate, I have caused corruption in one of the database and did below steps. Run CheckDB so that errors are reported. Fix the corruption by losing the data using repair option Run CheckDB again to check if corruption is cleared. After that I have launched the report and below is what we would see. If you are lazy like me and don’t want to run the report manually for each database then below query would be handy to provide same report for all database. This query is runs behind the scenes by the report. All I have done is remove the filter for database name (at the last – highlighted). DECLARE @curr_tracefilename VARCHAR(500); DECLARE @base_tracefilename VARCHAR(500); DECLARE @indx INT; SELECT @curr_tracefilename = path FROM sys.traces WHERE is_default = 1; SET @curr_tracefilename = REVERSE(@curr_tracefilename); SELECT @indx  = PATINDEX('%\%', @curr_tracefilename) ; SET @curr_tracefilename = REVERSE(@curr_tracefilename); SET @base_tracefilename = LEFT( @curr_tracefilename,LEN(@curr_tracefilename) - @indx) + '\log.trc'; SELECT  SUBSTRING(CONVERT(NVARCHAR(MAX),TEXTData),36, PATINDEX('%executed%',TEXTData)-36) AS command ,       LoginName ,       StartTime ,       CONVERT(INT,SUBSTRING(CONVERT(NVARCHAR(MAX),TEXTData),PATINDEX('%found%',TEXTData) +6,PATINDEX('%errors %',TEXTData)-PATINDEX('%found%',TEXTData)-6)) AS errors ,       CONVERT(INT,SUBSTRING(CONVERT(NVARCHAR(MAX),TEXTData),PATINDEX('%repaired%',TEXTData) +9,PATINDEX('%errors.%',TEXTData)-PATINDEX('%repaired%',TEXTData)-9)) repaired ,       SUBSTRING(CONVERT(NVARCHAR(MAX),TEXTData),PATINDEX('%time:%',TEXTData)+6,PATINDEX('%hours%',TEXTData)-PATINDEX('%time:%',TEXTData)-6)+':'+SUBSTRING(CONVERT(NVARCHAR(MAX),TEXTData),PATINDEX('%hours%',TEXTData) +6,PATINDEX('%minutes%',TEXTData)-PATINDEX('%hours%',TEXTData)-6)+':'+SUBSTRING(CONVERT(NVARCHAR(MAX),TEXTData),PATINDEX('%minutes%',TEXTData) +8,PATINDEX('%seconds.%',TEXTData)-PATINDEX('%minutes%',TEXTData)-8) AS time FROM::fn_trace_gettable( @base_tracefilename, DEFAULT) WHERE EventClass = 22 AND SUBSTRING(TEXTData,36,12) = 'DBCC CHECKDB' -- AND DatabaseName = @DatabaseName; Don’t get worried about the logic above. All it is doing is reading the trace files, parsing below entry and getting out information for underlined words. DBCC CHECKDB (CorruptedDatabase) executed by sa found 2 errors and repaired 0 errors. Elapsed time: 0 hours 0 minutes 0 seconds.  Internal database snapshot has split point LSN = 00000029:00000030:0001 and first LSN = 00000029:00000020:0001. Hopefully now onwards you would run checkdb and understand the importance of it. As responsible DBAs I am sure you are already doing it, let me know how often do you actually run them on you production environment? Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com)Filed under: PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Server Management Studio, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL Tagged: SQL Reports

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  • SQL SERVER – DMV to Identify Incremental Statistics – Performance improvements in SQL Server 2014 – Part 3

    - by Pinal Dave
    This is the third part of the series Incremental Statistics. Here is the index of the complete series. What is Incremental Statistics? – Performance improvements in SQL Server 2014 – Part 1 Simple Example of Incremental Statistics – Performance improvements in SQL Server 2014 – Part 2 DMV to Identify Incremental Statistics – Performance improvements in SQL Server 2014 – Part 3 In earlier two parts we have seen what is incremental statistics and its simple example. In this blog post we will be discussing about DMV, which will list all the statistics which are enabled for Incremental Updates. SELECT  OBJECT_NAME(sys.stats.OBJECT_ID) AS TableName, sys.columns.name AS ColumnName, sys.stats.name AS StatisticsName FROM   sys.stats INNER JOIN sys.stats_columns ON sys.stats.OBJECT_ID = sys.stats_columns.OBJECT_ID AND sys.stats.stats_id = sys.stats_columns.stats_id INNER JOIN sys.columns ON sys.stats.OBJECT_ID = sys.columns.OBJECT_ID AND sys.stats_columns.column_id = sys.columns.column_id WHERE   sys.stats.is_incremental = 1 If you run above script in the example displayed, in part 1 and part 2 you will get resultset as following. When you execute the above script, it will list all the statistics in your database which are enabled for Incremental Update. The script is very simple and effective. If you have any further improved script, I request you to post in the comment section and I will post that on blog with due credit. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com)Filed under: PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Performance, SQL Query, SQL Server, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL Tagged: SQL Statistics, Statistics

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  • SQL Server crashes when remote query fails

    - by Hemanshu Bhojak
    Setup: I have a linked server setup on SQL Server 2005 which is pointing to an Oracle DB. The linked server has RPC enabled. Problem: When a query throws an exception on the remote server (Oracle DB) the SQL Server instance crashes. The logs say that the crash was due to some problem with the RPC call. Is there a way in which I can prevent the entire server to collapse but also use RPC over my linked server. EDIT: Event Log SQL Server is terminating because of fatal exception c0000005. This error may be caused by an unhandled Win32 or C++ exception, or by an access violation encountered during exception handling. Check the SQL error log for any related stack dumps or messages. This exception forces SQL Server to shutdown. To recover from this error, restart the server (unless SQLAgent is configured to auto restart). For more information, see Help and Support Center at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/events.asp.

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  • SQL Server crashes when remote query fails

    - by Hemanshu Bhojak
    Setup: I have a linked server setup on SQL Server 2005 which is pointing to an Oracle DB. The linked server has RPC enabled. Problem: When a query throws an exception on the remote server (Oracle DB) the SQL Server instance crashes. The logs say that the crash was due to some problem with the RPC call. Is there a way in which I can prevent the entire server to collapse but also use RPC over my linked server. EDIT: Event Log SQL Server is terminating because of fatal exception c0000005. This error may be caused by an unhandled Win32 or C++ exception, or by an access violation encountered during exception handling. Check the SQL error log for any related stack dumps or messages. This exception forces SQL Server to shutdown. To recover from this error, restart the server (unless SQLAgent is configured to auto restart). For more information, see Help and Support Center at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/events.asp.

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  • SQL Server 2008 is not accessible from Windows Server 2008 ?

    - by Albert Widjaja
    Hi, I have successfully configured Windows Server 2008 Enterprise SP2 with SQL Server 2008 Enterprise SP2 all 64 bit, however when I tried to access this particular SQL Server 2008 DB instance from another SQL Server 2008 SSMS in another Windows Server 2008 it failed ? what I did is to disabled the IPv6 IP address using the regedit but still the problem hasn't been fixed even after restart ? I have enabled the named piped as well but still no luck ? any help please ? Here's the error message: " A network-related or instance-specific error occurred while establishing a connection to SQL Server. The server was not found or was not accessible. Verify that the instance name is correct and that SQL Server is configured to allow remote connections. (provider: SQL Network Interfaces, error: 26 - Error Locating Server/Instance Specified) (Microsoft SQL Server, Error: -1) "

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