Search Results

Search found 188 results on 8 pages for 'andrea tucci'.

Page 2/8 | < Previous Page | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8  | Next Page >

  • DundeeWealth Selects Oracle CRM On Demand as Core Platform

    - by andrea.mulder
    "Oracle CRM On Demand enhances our existing Oracle platform, providing an integrated solution with incredible flexibility, mobility, agility and lowered total cost of ownership," said To Anh Tran, Senior Vice President of Business Transformation and Technology at DundeeWealth Inc. "Using Oracle as a partner in the expansion of DundeeWealth's CRM processes reinforces our client-centric approach to customer service and we believe it gives us a competitive advantage. As we begin our deployment, we are confident that Oracle is with us every step of the way." Click here to read more about more about DundeeWealth's plans.

    Read the article

  • Oracle Hyperion si conferma leader nel Magic Quadrant Gartner 2012

    - by Andrea Cravero
    L'edizione 2012 del Gartner Magic Quadrant for Corporate Performance Management Suites conferma la leadership Oracle Hyperion, che dura ininterrotta dal 2005. Secondo Gartner, "Oracle is a Leader in CPM suites, with one of the most widely distributed solutions in the market. Oracle Hyperion Enterprise Performance Management is recognized by CFOs worldwide. The vendor has a well-established partner channel, with both large and smaller CPM SI specialists. Hyperion skills are also plentiful among the independent consultant community, given the well-established products." "Oracle continues to innovate, bringing incremental improvements across the portfolio as well as new financial close management, disclosure management and predictive planning additions. Furthermore, Oracle has improved integration of Hyperion with the Oracle BI platform, and has improved planning performance, enabling Hyperion Planning to use Oracle Exalytics In-Memory Machine." Il rapporto completo è disponibile qui: Gartner: Magic Quadrant for Corporate Performance Management Suites, 2012 Buona lettura!

    Read the article

  • Real-world use cases for Smalltalk

    - by Andrea Spadaccini
    Hello, I've been playing a bit with Smalltalk, and I found it interesting. I know that there are some classical examples of Smalltalk: the Smalltalk images themselves and the Seaside web framework, and that there are lots of in-house custom applications built using this language. I'd like to know if: there are computer applications actively used and developed apart from the ones I mentioned. there are software houses that use Smalltalk for doing their job when would you use Smalltalk instead of another language for developing from scratch a new application

    Read the article

  • Free Webcast: Oracle's Data Quality Solutions for Oracle Siebel CRM

    - by andrea.mulder
    Do you want to maximize cross-sell and upsell opportunities? Boost call center productivity? Reduce marketing costs? Improve customer retention? I believe the appropriate answers are "yes", "Yes", "YES", and "YES!!!" Attend this free webcast Oracle's Data Quality Solutions for Siebel CRM on Thursday, March 3rd at 11am PT and learn how to get more value out of your current Siebel CRM investment. Register today!

    Read the article

  • Issue with CSS font color in Webkit in Lion (#444 looks darker than #333)

    - by Andrea
    I have a strange issue with Safari and Chrome Mac (19.0.1084.54) in OS X Lion. Here it is, very simply put: When I display it in a Webkit browser, text set in Helvetica Neue and color Hex #444 looks a little bolder, and therefore darker, than the same text with an Hex color value of #333. This does not happen at all in Snow Leopard with the exact same browsers (same version). Happens on any website I tried, so I know it's not something related to the CSS of my website. I tried to change it live through the Inspector and it really shows up. I made a little screencast to explain it better: http://goo.gl/prQAn (.mov - ~60MB) Anyone has ever experienced something like that?

    Read the article

  • Selling On Demand

    - by andrea.mulder
    In May 2010, eSilicon management began evaluating providers for a new CRM system - vetting a variety of CRM offerings. Using a rating system that scored vendors according to marketing, sales, services, features, usability, implementation time, and cost, the team chose Oracle CRM On Demand for the project. "Overall, Oracle CRM On Demand was the best system that was able to address all our pain points," says Janet Ang, senior applications developer and project manager of the CRM implementation at eSilicon. Read Selling On Demand, a feature article in the February 2011 issue of Profit Magazine, and find out how eSilicon achieved:Easy Implementation and Adoption Sales and Management Benefits High Productivity for Tech

    Read the article

  • Power management issues on an Asus N55

    - by Andrea Borga
    I noticed that with respect to Win7 on my Asus N55 Ubuntu 12.04 tend to overheat the system. After startup the fan controller takes control of the fan, I could here it slowing down, after a few second following a login the fan increases its speed again. Though there are no processor hungry process: top shows only Xorg consuming 4%. Even with the system monitor the CPUs load look ok. Is it a power management related problem? This can cause battery life troubles in general, and electronics is never happy to be overheated. Is there a better tool to root the cause of the issue?

    Read the article

  • Making LISPs manageable

    - by Andrea
    I am trying to learn Clojure, which seems a good candidate for a successful LISP. I have no problem with the concepts, but now I would like to start actually doing something. Here it comes my problem. As I mainly do web stuff, I have been looking into existing frameworks, database libraries, templating libraries and so on. Often these libraries are heavily based on macros. Now, I like very much the possibility of writing macros to get a simpler syntax than it would be possible otherwise. But it definitely adds another layer of complexity. Let me take an example of a migration in Lobos from a blog post: (defmigration add-posts-table (up [] (create clogdb (table :posts (integer :id :primary-key ) (varchar :title 250) (text :content ) (boolean :status (default false)) (timestamp :created (default (now))) (timestamp :published ) (integer :author [:refer :authors :id] :not-null)))) (down [] (drop (table :posts )))) It is very readable indeed. But it is hard to recognize what the structure is. What does the function timestamp return? Or is it a macro? Having all this freedom of writing my own syntax means that I have to learn other people's syntax for every library I want to use. How can I learn to use these components effectively? Am I supposed to learn each small DSL as a black box?

    Read the article

  • SEO indexing with dynamic titles, keywords and description

    - by Andrea Turri
    I'm working on a worldwide website (all in one single domain) so I'm wondering to create dynamic titles, descriptions, keywords and headings for each location. What I'm doing is to get information from the IP of the user and show for example a dynamic title: var userCity = codeToGetCityFromIP; <title>Welcome to userCity</title> // and same for description, keywords and headings... Obviously the code is different... I'd like to know if it is a good solution to create multiple SEO indexing based on cities? I'm also using GeoLocation and I do same using the returned values from it. I'm doing right or there are more effective ways to indexing in different countries and cities without create multiple website for each city of the world? Thanks.

    Read the article

  • Book (or resource) on Java bytecode

    - by Andrea
    I am looking for some resources on the JVM bytecode. Ideally I would for a short book; something more than a blog post but not a 800 pages tome. If it is relevant, I am a Scala developer, not a Java one, although I know Java just fine. I would like something that allowed me to read JVM bytecode and answer questions such as: Why does the bytecode has to know about high level construct such as classes? Are subtyping relations still visible in bytecode? How does type erasure work exactly? How do Oracle and Dalvik bytecode differ, and what consequences does this have for, say, developing Android apps with Scala? How does the JVM manage the stack, and why exactly this creates issues with tail call elimination? and so on.

    Read the article

  • How to design a character animation system?

    - by Andrea Benedetti
    I'm searching for suggestions and resources on the possible ways to design a character animation system. I mean a system built on top of the graphics engine (as graphics engine I use Ogre3D, that provide an animation layer), and in strict contact with the logic of the game. It's for a sports title, so the question is not easy. Edit: What I'm searching for are suggestions and resources about the action state mechines (or animation state machines), that is build on top of the animation pipeline already provided by the graphics engine. So, a state-driver animation interface for use by virtually all higher-level game code.

    Read the article

  • Attachment handling for web application with Jackrabbit

    - by Andrea Girardi
    I need to manage attachments on my Spring web application and I thought to use an open source repository. My app it's a job approval system using J2EE / SPRING 3 Framework and Postgress DB to allow user to tracks the job,right through every step of the approval process. It is a fully managed, collaborative system that operates from a central server and is accessed by a standard internet browser. An user should be able to add an attach to a request or an approval step, so, I though to use Jackrabbit with Postgres database persistence manager. I took a look to this post: http://onjava.com/pub/a/onjava/2006/10/04/what-is-java-content-repository.html?page=1 It's really interesting but, I've some question about this kind of solution :- I seen that Jackrabbit standalone as a Derby database embedded solution for persistence, is it enough for a professional use of the repository with more than 50 request / days (with attachment) ? Is there a reason for which I should use another database manager for persistence instead of the default one ?

    Read the article

  • Getting started with ClojureScript and Google Closure

    - by Andrea
    I would like to investigate whether ClojureScript, with the associated Google Closure library is a reasonable tool to build modern, in-browser, Javascript applications. My current Javascript stack consists of jQuery, Backbone and RequireJS with the possible additions of some widgets libraries like jQueryUI or KendoUI. So it will be quite a big leap (I already know how to work in Clojure, although I have little experience). What is a good roadmap to do so? Should I learn the Google Closure library first, or can I grasp it together with ClojureScript? One thing I am concerned about is the overall application structure. Backbone is rather opinionated on how to organize your application. I am not sure whether Google Closure also includes some components to help with the design of the application. And, if this is the case, I do not know how to tell whether this structure will port to ClojureScript or a ClojureScript application will require a different organization anyway, and only use - say - the widgets and DOM manipulation features of Closure.

    Read the article

  • PPTP VPN connects via NM but goes down during SSH connection

    - by Andrea Olivato
    I setup a VPN PPTP connection via network manager and it connects correctly (I see the lock near the notification icon and the message "Vpn connection has been successfully...") As soon as I try to perform any SSH connection via the established tunnel the connection itself goes down with the message "Vpn connection failed". the SSH connection always fails at debug1: SSH2_MSG_KEXINIT sent I've looked into the system logs and this is the log Dec 12 12:25:00 ushuaia NetworkManager[1155]: <info> Starting VPN service 'pptp'... Dec 12 12:25:00 ushuaia NetworkManager[1155]: <info> VPN service 'pptp' started (org.freedesktop.NetworkManager.pptp), PID 7093 Dec 12 12:25:00 ushuaia NetworkManager[1155]: <info> VPN service 'pptp' appeared; activating connections Dec 12 12:25:00 ushuaia NetworkManager[1155]: <info> VPN plugin state changed: init (1) Dec 12 12:25:00 ushuaia NetworkManager[1155]: <info> VPN plugin state changed: starting (3) Dec 12 12:25:00 ushuaia NetworkManager[1155]: <info> VPN connection 'Redation' (Connect) reply received. Dec 12 12:25:05 ushuaia NetworkManager[1155]: <info> VPN connection 'Redation' (IP4 Config Get) reply received from old-style plugin. Dec 12 12:25:05 ushuaia NetworkManager[1155]: <info> VPN Gateway: 5.98.141.210 Dec 12 12:25:06 ushuaia NetworkManager[1155]: <info> VPN connection 'Redation' (IP Config Get) complete. Dec 12 12:25:06 ushuaia NetworkManager[1155]: <info> VPN plugin state changed: started (4) Dec 12 12:25:14 ushuaia NetworkManager[1155]: <info> VPN plugin state changed: stopping (5) Dec 12 12:25:14 ushuaia NetworkManager[1155]: <info> VPN plugin state changed: stopped (6) Dec 12 12:25:14 ushuaia NetworkManager[1155]: <info> VPN plugin state change reason: 0 Dec 12 12:25:15 ushuaia NetworkManager[1155]: <warn> error disconnecting VPN: Could not process the request because no VPN connection was active. Dec 12 12:25:20 ushuaia NetworkManager[1155]: <info> VPN service 'pptp' disappeared Please note that the same vpn is configured on my colleagues Windows 7 and works without problem when they use putty to connect via SSH

    Read the article

  • can't download music files purchased with ubuntu one from rhythmbox

    - by Andrea
    I used the link to Ubuntu One in Rhythmbox music player to purchase music. On the My Downloads page from Ubuntu One in the Rhythmbox it shows each of the files I purchased with and mp3 button and an AAC button. I should be able to download the files from these buttons but when I click on the button nothing happens - I was expecting a download manager to open up. I also was expecting the files to be transferred to my UbuntuOne account but don't see anything there either. (this is probably a second question) I am using 12.04 beta version of Ubuntu and the version of Rhythmbox that came with it: 2.96. Do I need to install something to be able to download these links? Thanks.

    Read the article

  • LVM volumes don't appear in Nautilus since upgrading to 11.10

    - by andrea rota
    up to Ubuntu 11.04 all my LVM volumes used to show up in the sidebar of Nautilus as devices available to be mounted, alongside software RAID volumes. after upgrading to 11.10 last week, i can only see software RAID volumes (i can mount/umount them) but i can't find a way to make Nautilus show LVM volumes (on both my main desktop systems). i guess this must be a change in gio/gvfs but i can't find any settings for this - anyone has experienced this issue upon upgrading to Gnome 3.0/3.2 and has figured out how to make LVM volumes appear in Nautilus' sidebar? i can mount the volumes manually ok from the command line. none of them is in /etc/fstab.

    Read the article

  • Play or Lift: which one is more explicit?

    - by Andrea
    I am going to investigate web development with Scala, and the choice is between learning Lift or Play: probably I will not have enough time to try both, at least at first. Now, many comparisons between the two are available on the internet, but I would like to know how do they compare with respect to being explicit and involving less magic. Let me explain what I mean by example. I have used, to various degrees, CakePHP, symfony2, Django and Grails. I feel a very clear distinction between Django and symfony2, which are very explicit about what you are doing, and Grails and CakePHP, which try to do their best to guess what you are trying to achieve and often feel "magical". Let me give some examples comparing Django and Grails. In Django, views are functions that take a request as input and return a response. You can instantiate explicitly an instance of HttpResponse and populate its body with a string, or you can use shortcut functions to leverage the template system. In any case the return value from your view always has the same type. In contrast, the render method from Grails is highly polymorphic. You can throw a context at it and it will try to render a template which is found by convention using that context. Or you can pass it a pair of a template path and a context and that will work too. Or a string. Or XML. Grails tries hard to make sense of whatever you return from your controller. In the Django ORM, each model class has a static attribute representing the manager for that class. That manager exposes a fluent interface to build querysets. In Grails, you can have a similar functionality by composing detached criteria. Still, the most common way to query objects seems to be the use of runtime-generated methods like FindUserByEmailNotNull or FindPostByDateGreaterThan. I will not go further, but my point is that in Django-like frameworks you have control over the whole flow of the request/response process, while in Grails-like ones I feel I only have to feel the blanks and the framework will manage the rest of the flow for me. This is not to criticize Grails or CakePHP; which type you prefer is mainly a matter of preference. In fact, I happen to like some aspects of Grails, but I feel more comfortable with a framework which does less for me. Back to the point of the question: which one among Play and Lift is more explicit about what you do and which one tries to simplify more what you have to do with a layer of "magic"?

    Read the article

  • New insights I can learn from the Groovy language

    - by Andrea
    I realize that, for a programmer coming from the Java world, Groovy contains a lot of new ideas and cool tricks. My situation is different, as I am learning Groovy coming from a dynamic background, mainly Python and Javascript. When learning a new language, I find that it helps me if I know beforehand which features are more or less old acquaintances under a new syntax and which ones are really new, so that I can concentrate on the latter. So I would like to know which traits distinguish Groovy among the dynamic languages. What are the ideas and insights that a programmer well-versed in dynamic languages should pay attention to when learning Groovy?

    Read the article

  • Constraints while designing the Java generics

    - by Andrea
    Java generics look quite different from those available in Scala, although both were designed by Martin Odersky. From my point of view, the design of generics in Java is worse, for instance: there is no possibility to specify variance one can get around the previous limitation by using wildcards, but this means the burden of specifying variance goes on the caller instead of the library designer one cannot use a type constructor in generics What were the constraints in Java that forced Odersky to design this mechanism for generics instead of the more flexible one he devised for Scala? Was he just savvier a few years later or there were actual limitations due to Java?

    Read the article

  • Why isn't LISP more widespread?

    - by Andrea
    I am starting to learn Scheme by the SICP videos, and I would like to move to Common Lisp next. The language seems very interesting, and most of the people writings books on it advocate that it has unequalled expressive power. CL seems to have a decent standard library. Why is not Lisp more widespread? If it is really that powerful, people should be using it all over, but instead it is nearly impossible to find, say, Lisp job advertisements. I hope it is not just the parenthesis, as they are not a great problem after a little while.

    Read the article

  • Configuration of the network manager via DBus: how to set the ad hoc mode

    - by Andrea
    I have an hard nut to crack: a nice bottle of italian Chianti wine to the solver! :) To automatically configure Wifi, I first have to kill the network manager and than activate the wifi via the commandline: I do this all automatically in my application and works great. However... it is not the right way to do this. As the user has no network gui anymore to configure some other network access. A much better and transparent way would be to configure wifi directly via network manager over the DBus interface. I was able to configure it, but I wasn't able to set it to ad hoc mode... Searching the web for a while: a lot about configuration in general but nothing related to ad hoc mode. I think the only way to do figure that out is to look into the source code of the network manager...maybe someone already did it and he can answer.

    Read the article

  • Lot of "file not found" when using sudo find / -type s

    - by Andrea Moro
    In the attempt to understand why I keep getting the following error error: 'Can't connect to local MySQL server through socket '/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock' (2)' while using the command sudo find / -type s the terminal prompted something like this find: ‘/proc/31348/task/31348/fd/5’: No such file or directory find: ‘/proc/31348/task/31348/fdinfo/5’: No such file or directory find: ‘/proc/31348/fd/5’: No such file or directory find: ‘/proc/31348/fdinfo/5’: No such file or directory What does this mean?

    Read the article

  • Writing or extending existing emacs packages: is it worth or should I move to Netbeans/Eclipse?

    - by Andrea
    I'm finishing my master degree course in CS and I've almost become addicted to Emacs. I've used it to write in C, Latex, Java, JSP,XML, CommonLisp, Ada and other languages no other editor supported, like AMPL. I'd like to improve the packages I've been using the most or create new ones, but, in practice, I find that the implementation of Emacs leaves a lot to be desired. There are a lot of poorly-featured/poorly-maintained packages with either overlapping functionalities or obscure incompatibilities, and Elisp just seems to foster the situation by lacking the common features modern lisps have. In contrast Eclipse and Netbeans are actively improved and it does seem they can be effective for non-mainstream languages. I tried Hibachi for Ada in Eclipse and it worked well, there's CUPS for Lisp in Eclipse and LambdaBeans built using NetBeans components. On the other hand those plugins seem to be less active than their Emacs' counterparts, for example Hibachi was archived last year. What's your opinion on this? Which editor should I write extension for? EDIT: To answer Larry Coleman (see comment below): I like Emacs as a user because it is efficient both for me and the computer I'm using. It's fast and the textual interface (i.e. minibuffer) allows for quick interaction. It's solid and packages are usually small and easy to manage. If I need to correct or remove something I usually just have to change a row in my .emacs or an elisp file, or delete a directory. Eclipse plugins rely on a more complicated process that screwed my Eclipse configuration a couple of times, forcing me to do a clean reinstall. Emacs works as long as I use the basic packages. If I need something more complicated the situation gets pretty hairy. As a "power user" I think that the best I can hope for is to write a severely crippled version of the extensions I'd actually like to have; in other words, that it's not worth the trouble. I'd like to write extensions for the things I'd like to have automated in Emacs, for example project support with automated tag-table update on file writing. There are a few projects on this that lack integration, documentation, extensibility and so forth. The best one is probably CEDET, for which I believe the Greenspun's 10th rule can be applied. EDIT: To comment Larry Coleman's answer I'm pretty sure I can pick elisp programming but the extensions I have in mind don't exist yet despite their relative simplicity and the effort more knowledgeable people poured into related projects.This makes me wonder whether it is so because of the way emacs is developed, i.e. people tend to write their own little extensions without coordination, or its implementation, its extension language not being able to keep up with the growing complexity.

    Read the article

  • How does font rendering actually work?

    - by Andrea
    I realize that I know essentially nothing about the way fonts get rendered in my computer. From what I can observe, font rendering is generally made in a consistent way throughout the system. For instance, the subpixel font hinting settings that I configure in my DE control panel have influence on text which appears on window borders, in my browser, in my text editor and so on. (I should observe that some Java applications show a noticeable difference, so I guess they are using a different font rendering mechanism). What I get from the above is that probably all applications that need font rendering make use of some OS (or DE)-wide library. On the other hand, browsers usually manage their own rendering through a rendering engine, that takes care of positioning various items - including text - according to specific flow rules. I am not sure how these two facts are compatible. I would assume that the browser would have to ask the OS to draw a glyph at a given position, but how can it manage the flow of text without knowing beforehand how much space the glyph will take? Are there separate calls to determine the glyph sizes, so that the browser can manage the flow as if characters were little boxes that are later filled in by the OS? (Although this does not take care of kerning). Or is the OS responsible for drawing a whole text area, including text flow? Does the OS return the rendered glyph as a bitmap and leaves it to the application to draw that on the screen?

    Read the article

  • How should I evaluate new browser languages?

    - by Andrea
    In these days there are many projects whose aim is to bring new languages to the browser by compiling them to JavaScript. Among the others one can mention ClojureScript, CoffeScript, Dart, haXe, Emscripten, Amber Smalltalk. I'd like to try a few of these out, but I am not sure what I should be looking for when evaluating these languages to see if they are suitable for production. How should I evaluate a new browser language, and what are the pitfalls I should be looking for?

    Read the article

< Previous Page | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8  | Next Page >