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  • How to explicitly select the row in ListView in WPF?

    - by Ashish Ashu
    I have a ListView in which one of the column contains combo box. I have binded the selectedItem of a Listview, so that I get the current object (selected row ) in the listview. When I do any operation in a combo box like selection change then the listview row ( in which that combo box belongs) is not selected be default and hence my selectedItem gives null or previous row selected object. Please Help!!

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  • WPF: How to data bind an object to an element and apply a data template through code?

    - by Boris
    I have created a class LeagueMatch. public class LeagueMatch { public string Home { get { return home; } set { home = value; } } public string Visitor { get { return visitor; } set { visitor = value; } } private string home; private string visitor; public LeagueMatch() { } } Next, I have defined a datatemplate resource for LeagueMatch objects in XAML: <DataTemplate x:Key="MatchTemplate" DataType="{x:Type entities:LeagueMatch}"> <Grid Name="MatchGrid" Width="140" Height="50" Margin="5"> <Grid.RowDefinitions> <RowDefinition Height="*" /> <RowDefinition Height="*" /> <RowDefinition Height="*" /> </Grid.RowDefinitions> <TextBlock Grid.Row="0" Text="{Binding Home}" /> <TextBlock Grid.Row="1" Text="- vs -" /> <TextBlock Grid.Row="2" Text="{Binding Visitor}" /> </Grid> </DataTemplate> In the XAML code-behind, I want to create a ContentPresenter object and to set it's data binding to a previously initialized LeagueMatch object and apply the defined data template. How is that supposed to be done? Thanks.

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  • intercept RelativeSource FindAncestor

    - by Pradeep
    I have a WPF application which runs as a excel plugin, it has its visual tree like so Excel ElementHost WPF UserControl WPF ribbon bar control Now any controls sitting on the WPF ribbon bar control are not enabled when the plugin is loaded within excel. See error below System.Windows.Data Error: 4 : Cannot find source for binding with reference 'RelativeSource FindAncestor, AncestorType='System.Windows.Window', AncestorLevel='1''. BindingExpression:Path=IsActive; DataItem=null; target element is 'Ribbon' (Name=''); target property is 'NoTarget' (type 'Object') If I nest the ribbon bar control in a standalone Window(outside excel) it works fine. Is there a way to intercept the FindAncestor call for a Window and wire it to something else.? Note that I cannot change the above binding as it isn't my control.

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  • UserAppDataPath in WPF

    - by psheriff
    In Windows Forms applications you were able to get to your user's roaming profile directory very easily using the Application.UserAppDataPath property. This folder allows you to store information for your program in a custom folder specifically for your program. The format of this directory looks like this: C:\Users\YOUR NAME\AppData\Roaming\COMPANY NAME\APPLICATION NAME\APPLICATION VERSION For example, on my Windows 7 64-bit system, this folder would look like this for a Windows Forms Application: C:\Users\PSheriff\AppData\Roaming\PDSA, Inc.\WindowsFormsApplication1\1.0.0.0 For some reason Microsoft did not expose this property from the Application object of WPF applications. I guess they think that we don't need this property in WPF? Well, sometimes we still do need to get at this folder. You have two choices on how to retrieve this property. Add a reference to the System.Windows.Forms.dll to your WPF application and use this property directly. Or, you can write your own method to build the same path. If you add a reference to the System.Windows.Forms.dll you will need to use System.Windows.Forms.Application.UserAppDataPath to access this property. Create a GetUserAppDataPath Method in WPF If you want to build this path you can do so with just a few method calls in WPF using Reflection. The code below shows this fairly simple method to retrieve the same folder as shown above. C#using System.Reflection; public string GetUserAppDataPath(){  string path = string.Empty;  Assembly assm;  Type at;  object[] r;   // Get the .EXE assembly  assm = Assembly.GetEntryAssembly();  // Get a 'Type' of the AssemblyCompanyAttribute  at = typeof(AssemblyCompanyAttribute);  // Get a collection of custom attributes from the .EXE assembly  r = assm.GetCustomAttributes(at, false);  // Get the Company Attribute  AssemblyCompanyAttribute ct =                 ((AssemblyCompanyAttribute)(r[0]));  // Build the User App Data Path  path = Environment.GetFolderPath(              Environment.SpecialFolder.ApplicationData);  path += @"\" + ct.Company;  path += @"\" + assm.GetName().Version.ToString();   return path;} Visual BasicPublic Function GetUserAppDataPath() As String  Dim path As String = String.Empty  Dim assm As Assembly  Dim at As Type  Dim r As Object()   ' Get the .EXE assembly  assm = Assembly.GetEntryAssembly()  ' Get a 'Type' of the AssemblyCompanyAttribute  at = GetType(AssemblyCompanyAttribute)  ' Get a collection of custom attributes from the .EXE assembly  r = assm.GetCustomAttributes(at, False)  ' Get the Company Attribute  Dim ct As AssemblyCompanyAttribute = _                 DirectCast(r(0), AssemblyCompanyAttribute)  ' Build the User App Data Path  path = Environment.GetFolderPath( _                 Environment.SpecialFolder.ApplicationData)  path &= "\" & ct.Company  path &= "\" & assm.GetName().Version.ToString()   Return pathEnd Function Summary Getting the User Application Data Path folder in WPF is fairly simple with just a few method calls using Reflection. Of course, there is absolutely no reason you cannot just add a reference to the System.Windows.Forms.dll to your WPF application and use that Application object. After all, System.Windows.Forms.dll is a part of the .NET Framework and can be used from WPF with no issues at all. NOTE: Visit http://www.pdsa.com/downloads to get more tips and tricks like this one. Good Luck with your Coding,Paul Sheriff ** SPECIAL OFFER FOR MY BLOG READERS **We frequently offer a FREE gift for readers of my blog. Visit http://www.pdsa.com/Event/Blog for your FREE gift!

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  • Trying to learn how to use WCF services in a WPF app, using MVVM

    - by Rod
    We're working on a major re-write of a legacy VB6 app, into a WPF app. I've written several WCF services, which are meant to be used with the new WPF app. We want to use the MVVM design pattern to do this, but we don't have experience at that. So, in order to learn MVVM we've watched a video on WindowsClient called How Do I: Build Data-driven WPF Application using the MVVM pattern. This is a great introduction, and we refer to it a lot, but for our situation it doesn't quite give us enough. For example, we're not certain how to use datasets returned by my WCF services in our new WPF app using the ideas that Todd Miranda introduced in the video I referenced. If we did as we think we're supposed to do, then we should design a class that is exactly like the class of data returned in my WCF service. But we're wondering, why do that, when the WCF service already has such a class? And yet, the class in the WPF app has to at least implement the INotifyPropertyChanged interface. So, we're not sure what to do.

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  • WPF more dynamic views and DataAnnotations

    - by Ingó Vals
    Comparing WPF and Asp.Net Razor/HtmlHelper I find WPF/Xaml to be somewhat lacking in creating views. With HtmlHelpers you could define in one place how you wan't to represent specific type of data and include elements set from the DataAnnotations of the property. In WPF you can also define DataTemplates for data but it seems much more limited then EditorTemplates. It doesn't use information from DataAnnotations. Also the layout of elements can be bothersome. I hate having to constantly add RowDefinitions and update the Grid.Row attribute of lot of elements when I add a new property somewhere in line. I understand that GUI programming can be a lot of grunt work like this but as Asp.Net MVC has shown there are ways around that. What solutions are out there to make view creation in WPF a little bit cleaner, maintainable and more dynamic?

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  • Future of WPF and free controls ? [closed]

    - by Justin
    I am willing to work on a personal project that I would like to release publicly. I am working with Silverlight and have experience with XAML, as it is my full-time job. It is enjoyably for me to create UIs in Blend and XAML. I am also a big fan of C# language. I don't know what I would do without LINQ now. Anyways, I was looking at using WPF for my personal project. It seems that a lot of the controls out on the web are pay for items. The only place I have found to have a significant number of free controls is the WPF extended framework on codeplex. I want to make a financial application and need a powerful datagrid type of control that will allow me to enter transaction data. I haven't found such control for free in the net. It doesn't seem like there is much free community libraries/controls out there for Microsoft products. So, I was wondering if WPF would be the right way for me to go. I couldn't find any information on WPF usage in Windows 8, which coming very soon. I don't know Microsoft's plans for this technology. Would it be a better idea to use something different for the UI instead of WPF?

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  • moving from wpf to html5

    - by HighCore
    I don't even know if this is the right StackExchange site to post this question. If it isn't, please excuse me and please let me know which would be the right one. I am an experienced WPF developer, and I seriously love the technology. I feel pretty good when working with XAML, bindings, templates, triggers, MVVM and all the WPF world of goodness. Now I have recieved a job offer which surpasses my current salary by 50%. It a position to work as a C# developer in an ASP.Net MVC4 + HTML5 project. I have never EVER in my whole life worked with ASP.Net, nor HTML and I never ever did a web page or web application before. I certainly find myself worried that I will lose all the comfort and joy I live every day coding in WPF. And in the other hand I understand and have seen in these 3/4 months of job hunting that there's a LOT of ASP.Net and really really little or no WPF in the job market (at least here), so I somehow feel forced towards it. So, my question is: Can anybody who had to go thru this type of change tell me the pros and cons of working with these technologies from a developer's perspective? I don't care about open-source / non-microsoft or non-desktop, I care about REAL development experience in every day working with these techs, and whether ASP.Net MVC 4 + HTML + JS is as crappy as I think it is comparing it to WPF.

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  • WPF properties memory management

    - by mrpyo
    I'm trying to build binding system similar to the one that is used in WPF and I ran into some memory leaking problems, so here comes my question - how is memory managed in WPF property system? From what I know in WPF values of DependencyProperties are stored in external containers - what I wanna know is how are they collected when DependencyObject dies? Simplest solution would be to store them is some weak reference dictionary - but here comes the main problem I ran into - when there is a listener on property that needs reference to its (this property) parent it holds it (the parent) alive (when value of weak reference dictionary points somewhere, even indirectly, to key - it can't be collected). How is it avoided in WPF without the need of using weak references everywhere?

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  • Need themes for the WPF Toolkit controls (espeically DataGrid)

    - by DanM
    I just downloaded the nice themes collection from the Codeplex WPF Themes site. I like the WhisterBlue and BureauBlue themes a lot, but neither contain any styles for the new controls included in the WPF Toolkit (DataGrid, DatePicker, and Calendar). It seems like someone out there must have extended the themes to cover these controls, but I've had no luck finding them. So, if you have any leads, I'd love to hear them. I should also mention that I've been trying to port a Silverlight version of the BureauBlue DataGrid theme to WPF (see: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1611135/how-do-you-port-a-theme-from-silverlight-to-wpf), but that has been quite unsuccessful so far.

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  • Adding WPF Text Writer Trace Listener in an Outlook Add In using wpf window/control

    - by Deepak N
    I'm working on a outlook 2003 AddIn using VSTO SE.We have few customized windows developed in WPF. It looks there are few client machines have problem with WPF rendering due to which there could be an exception due to addin is getting disabled. I added a outlook.exe.config and added trace listeners for wpf Trace sources. I set it up according this link. The console trace listener is working fine for me. But I'm not able get the TextWriterTraceListener working with config <add name="textListener" type="System.Diagnostics.TextWriterTraceListener" initializeData="Trace.log" /> I tried giving absolute path for trace log file as "C:\Trace.log".The TextWriterTraceListener worked for a dummy wpf app with the same config. Am I missing anything here.

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  • Getting Started with Prism (aka Composite Application Guidance for WPF and Silverlight)

    - by dotneteer
    Overview Prism is a framework from the Microsoft Patterns and Practice team that allow you to create WPF and Silverlight in a modular way. It is especially valuable for larger projects in which a large number of developers can develop in parallel. Prism achieves its goal by supplying several services: · Dependency Injection (DI) and Inversion of control (IoC): By using DI, Prism takes away the responsibility of instantiating and managing the life time of dependency objects from individual components to a container. Prism relies on containers to discover, manage and compose large number of objects. By varying the configuration, the container can also inject mock objects for unit testing. Out of the box, Prism supports Unity and MEF as container although it is possible to use other containers by subclassing the Bootstrapper class. · Modularity and Region: Prism supplies the framework to split application into modules from the application shell. Each module is a library project that contains both UI and code and is responsible to initialize itself when loaded by the shell. Each window can be further divided into regions. A region is a user control with associated model. · Model, view and view-model (MVVM) pattern: Prism promotes the user MVVM. The use of DI container makes it much easier to inject model into view. WPF already has excellent data binding and commanding mechanism. To be productive with Prism, it is important to understand WPF data binding and commanding well. · Event-aggregation: Prism promotes loosely coupled components. Prism discourages for components from different modules to communicate each other, thus leading to dependency. Instead, Prism supplies an event-aggregation mechanism that allows components to publish and subscribe events without knowing each other. Architecture In the following, I will go into a little more detail on the services provided by Prism. Bootstrapper In a typical WPF application, application start-up is controls by App.xaml and its code behind. The main window of the application is typically specified in the App.xaml file. In a Prism application, we start a bootstrapper in the App class and delegate the duty of main window to the bootstrapper. The bootstrapper will start a dependency-injection container so all future object instantiations are managed by the container. Out of box, Prism provides the UnityBootstrapper and MefUnityBootstrapper abstract classes. All application needs to either provide a concrete implementation of one of these bootstrappers, or alternatively, subclass the Bootstrapper class with another DI container. A concrete bootstrapper class must implement the CreateShell method. Its responsibility is to resolve and create the Shell object through the DI container to serve as the main window for the application. The other important method to override is ConfigureModuleCatalog. The bootstrapper can register modules for the application. In a more advance scenario, an application does not have to know all its modules at compile time. Modules can be discovered at run time. Readers to refer to one of the Open Modularity Quick Starts for more information. Modules Once modules are registered with or discovered by Prism, they are instantiated by the DI container and their Initialize method is called. The DI container can inject into a module a region registry that implements IRegionViewRegistry interface. The module, in its Initialize method, can then call RegisterViewWithRegion method of the registry to register its regions. Regions Regions, once registered, are managed by the RegionManager. The shell can then load regions either through the RegionManager.RegionName attached property or dynamically through code. When a view is created by the region manager, the DI container can inject view model and other services into the view. The view then has a reference to the view model through which it can interact with backend services. Service locator Although it is possible to inject services into dependent classes through a DI container, an alternative way is to use the ServiceLocator to retrieve a service on demard. Prism supplies a service locator implementation and it is possible to get an instance of the service by calling: ServiceLocator.Current.GetInstance<IServiceType>() Event aggregator Prism supplies an IEventAggregator interface and implementation that can be injected into any class that needs to communicate with each other in a loosely-coupled fashion. The event aggregator uses a publisher/subscriber model. A class can publishes an event by calling eventAggregator.GetEvent<EventType>().Publish(parameter) to raise an event. Other classes can subscribe the event by calling eventAggregator.GetEvent<EventType>().Subscribe(EventHandler, other options). Getting started The easiest way to get started with Prism is to go through the Prism Hands-On labs and look at the Hello World QuickStart. The Hello World QuickStart shows how bootstrapper, modules and region works. Next, I would recommend you to look at the Stock Trader Reference Implementation. It is a more in depth example that resemble we want to set up an application. Several other QuickStarts cover individual Prism services. Some scenarios, such as dynamic module discovery, are more advanced. Apart from the official prism document, you can get an overview by reading Glen Block’s MSDN Magazine article. I have found the best free training material is from the Boise Code Camp. To be effective with Prism, it is important to understands key concepts of WPF well first, such as the DependencyProperty system, data binding, resource, theme and ICommand. It is also important to know your DI container of choice well. I will try to explorer these subjects in depth in the future. Testimony Recently, I worked on a desktop WPF application using Prism. I had a wonderful experience with Prism. The Prism is flexible enough even in the presence of third party controls such as Telerik WPF controls. We have never encountered any significant obstacle.

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  • WPF custom BalloonTips problem with multithreading

    - by Erika
    Hi, I have read other related question but i cant really get them to relate to this so I thought it were best to ask, Im pretty new to WPF and so on so please bear with me. I am using this http://www.codeproject.com/KB/WPF/wpf_notifyicon.aspx api to work with custom WPF Windows (in particular FancyBalloon). However, i'm coming across the following problem, I seem unable to start off BalloonTips in a separate thread ( i need this because i'm parsing emails and hence if there are 3 emails for instance, it displays the first email (that works fine), but when it comes to the second email it crashes with a TargetInvocationException , {"Specified element is already the logical child of another element. Disconnect it first."}. Thing is, im supposedly working with the same instance and i have attempted calling it to close it before, disposing it etc but to no avail. (then again if i dispose it, i cant create another instance as apparently WPF UI components must be called from a static thread so throughout the looping of emails + displaying balloon, i am trying to use the same BalloonTip. Any suggestions please? I am really at a loss here and i've been on it for quite a while now :/ I was wondering if there was anyone

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  • Wpf vs WinForms for a vb programmer? [closed]

    - by Jeroen
    I am asked by a client to develop an application that is basically a screen on which the user can choose several items to pass the time (used in holding cells in mental hospitals for example). The baisc idea is as follows: TV (choosing this will provide the user with a number of TV streams from the interweb) Radio (...) Games (serveral flash games, also from the interweb) Music (play local music or streams) Draw something (not the game) Create an email Choose lighting settings for the room etc. etc. I am torn between WinForms and WPF for this project. It seems that WPF is the way to go since there is quite a bit of rich media involved but I have a 15 year VB background. The project obviously has a dead line and certain budget that I cannot cross and if I can avoid starting from scratch with some thing that will be nice. Is WPF worth it in this particular case or can I use WinForms with the incorperation of WPF controls? I would very much like to hear your thoughts/comments/suggestions!

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  • A WPF Image Button

    - by psheriff
    Instead of a normal button with words, sometimes you want a button that is just graphical. Yes, you can put an Image control in the Content of a normal Button control, but you still have the button outline, and trying to change the style can be rather difficult. Instead I like creating a user control that simulates a button, but just accepts an image. Figure 1 shows an example of three of these custom user controls to represent minimize, maximize and close buttons for a borderless window. Notice the highlighted image button has a gray rectangle around it. You will learn how to highlight using the VisualStateManager in this blog post.Figure 1: Creating a custom user control for things like image buttons gives you complete control over the look and feel.I would suggest you read my previous blog post on creating a custom Button user control as that is a good primer for what I am going to expand upon in this blog post. You can find this blog post at http://weblogs.asp.net/psheriff/archive/2012/08/10/create-your-own-wpf-button-user-controls.aspx.The User ControlThe XAML for this image button user control contains just a few controls, plus a Visual State Manager. The basic outline of the user control is shown below:<Border Grid.Row="0"        Name="borMain"        Style="{StaticResource pdsaButtonImageBorderStyle}"        MouseEnter="borMain_MouseEnter"        MouseLeave="borMain_MouseLeave"        MouseLeftButtonDown="borMain_MouseLeftButtonDown">  <VisualStateManager.VisualStateGroups>  ... MORE XAML HERE ...  </VisualStateManager.VisualStateGroups>  <Image Style="{StaticResource pdsaButtonImageImageStyle}"         Visibility="{Binding Path=Visibility}"         Source="{Binding Path=ImageUri}"         ToolTip="{Binding Path=ToolTip}" /></Border>There is a Border control named borMain and a single Image control in this user control. That is all that is needed to display the buttons shown in Figure 1. The definition for this user control is in a DLL named PDSA.WPF. The Style definitions for both the Border and the Image controls are contained in a resource dictionary names PDSAButtonStyles.xaml. Using a resource dictionary allows you to create a few different resource dictionaries, each with a different theme for the buttons.The Visual State ManagerTo display the highlight around the button as your mouse moves over the control, you will need to add a Visual State Manager group. Two different states are needed; MouseEnter and MouseLeave. In the MouseEnter you create a ColorAnimation to modify the BorderBrush color of the Border control. You specify the color to animate as “DarkGray”. You set the duration to less than a second. The TargetName of this storyboard is the name of the Border control “borMain” and since we are specifying a single color, you need to set the TargetProperty to “BorderBrush.Color”. You do not need any storyboard for the MouseLeave state. Leaving this VisualState empty tells the Visual State Manager to put everything back the way it was before the MouseEnter event.<VisualStateManager.VisualStateGroups>  <VisualStateGroup Name="MouseStates">    <VisualState Name="MouseEnter">      <Storyboard>        <ColorAnimation             To="DarkGray"            Duration="0:0:00.1"            Storyboard.TargetName="borMain"            Storyboard.TargetProperty="BorderBrush.Color" />      </Storyboard>    </VisualState>    <VisualState Name="MouseLeave" />  </VisualStateGroup></VisualStateManager.VisualStateGroups>Writing the Mouse EventsTo trigger the Visual State Manager to run its storyboard in response to the specified event, you need to respond to the MouseEnter event on the Border control. In the code behind for this event call the GoToElementState() method of the VisualStateManager class exposed by the user control. To this method you will pass in the target element (“borMain”) and the state (“MouseEnter”). The VisualStateManager will then run the storyboard contained within the defined state in the XAML.private void borMain_MouseEnter(object sender,  MouseEventArgs e){  VisualStateManager.GoToElementState(borMain,    "MouseEnter", true);}You also need to respond to the MouseLeave event. In this event you call the VisualStateManager as well, but specify “MouseLeave” as the state to go to.private void borMain_MouseLeave(object sender, MouseEventArgs e){  VisualStateManager.GoToElementState(borMain,     "MouseLeave", true);}The Resource DictionaryBelow is the definition of the PDSAButtonStyles.xaml resource dictionary file contained in the PDSA.WPF DLL. This dictionary can be used as the default look and feel for any image button control you add to a window. <ResourceDictionary  ... >  <!-- ************************* -->  <!-- ** Image Button Styles ** -->  <!-- ************************* -->  <!-- Image/Text Button Border -->  <Style TargetType="Border"         x:Key="pdsaButtonImageBorderStyle">    <Setter Property="Margin"            Value="4" />    <Setter Property="Padding"            Value="2" />    <Setter Property="BorderBrush"            Value="Transparent" />    <Setter Property="BorderThickness"            Value="1" />    <Setter Property="VerticalAlignment"            Value="Top" />    <Setter Property="HorizontalAlignment"            Value="Left" />    <Setter Property="Background"            Value="Transparent" />  </Style>  <!-- Image Button -->  <Style TargetType="Image"         x:Key="pdsaButtonImageImageStyle">    <Setter Property="Width"            Value="40" />    <Setter Property="Margin"            Value="6" />    <Setter Property="VerticalAlignment"            Value="Top" />    <Setter Property="HorizontalAlignment"            Value="Left" />  </Style></ResourceDictionary>Using the Button ControlOnce you make a reference to the PDSA.WPF DLL from your WPF application you will see the “PDSAucButtonImage” control appear in your Toolbox. Drag and drop the button onto a Window or User Control in your application. I have not referenced the PDSAButtonStyles.xaml file within the control itself so you do need to add a reference to this resource dictionary somewhere in your application such as in the App.xaml.<Application.Resources>  <ResourceDictionary>    <ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>      <ResourceDictionary         Source="/PDSA.WPF;component/PDSAButtonStyles.xaml" />    </ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>  </ResourceDictionary></Application.Resources>This will give your buttons a default look and feel unless you override that dictionary on a specific Window or User Control or on an individual button. After you have given a global style to your application and you drag your image button onto a window, the following will appear in your XAML window.<my:PDSAucButtonImage ... />There will be some other attributes set on the above XAML, but you simply need to set the x:Name, the ToolTip and ImageUri properties. You will also want to respond to the Click event procedure in order to associate an action with clicking on this button. In the sample code you download for this blog post you will find the declaration of the Minimize button to be the following:<my:PDSAucButtonImage       x:Name="btnMinimize"       Click="btnMinimize_Click"       ToolTip="Minimize Application"       ImageUri="/PDSA.WPF;component/Images/Minus.png" />The ImageUri property is a dependency property in the PDSAucButtonImage user control. The x:Name and the ToolTip we get for free. You have to create the Click event procedure yourself. This is also created in the PDSAucButtonImage user control as follows:private void borMain_MouseLeftButtonDown(object sender,  MouseButtonEventArgs e){  RaiseClick(e);}public delegate void ClickEventHandler(object sender,  RoutedEventArgs e);public event ClickEventHandler Click;protected void RaiseClick(RoutedEventArgs e){  if (null != Click)    Click(this, e);}Since a Border control does not have a Click event you will create one by using the MouseLeftButtonDown on the border to fire an event you create called “Click”.SummaryCreating your own image button control can be done in a variety of ways. In this blog post I showed you how to create a custom user control and simulate a button using a Border and Image control. With just a little bit of code to respond to the MouseLeftButtonDown event on the border you can raise your own Click event. Dependency properties, such as ImageUri, allow you to set attributes on your custom user control. Feel free to expand on this button by adding additional dependency properties, change the resource dictionary, and even the animation to make this button look and act like you want.NOTE: You can download the sample code for this article by visiting my website at http://www.pdsa.com/downloads. Select “Tips & Tricks”, then select “A WPF Image  Button” from the drop down list.

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  • .NET WPF Charting Control

    - by Randy Minder
    We're very close to wrapping up a WPF dashboarding application using SSRS (.RDLC files) and the Microsoft Report Viewer. For a number of reasons, this combination has turned out to be less than what we had hoped. One of the biggest problems is that the Microsoft Report Viewer is not a WPF control. We've had other problems as well. Our app consists of at least 5 tabs and each tab has at least 4-5 charts on it. All the charts update on their own timed schedules (like every 15-30 minutes). For the next version I'd like to explore other .NET charting tools for WPF. Performance is absolutely critical. As is resource usage. The tool must support WPF and as many chart types as possible. Can anyone recommend (or not recommend) charting tools they have experience with? We own Telerik and I've dabbled with their charting control. At the 30K foot level, it seems quite nice.

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  • WPF Binding to DataRow Columns

    - by Trindaz
    Hi, I've taken some sample code from http://sweux.com/blogs/smoura/index.php/wpf/2009/06/15/wpf-toolkit-datagrid-part-iv-templatecolumns-and-row-grouping/ that provides grouping of data in a WPF DataGrid. I'm modifying the example to use a DataTable instead of a Collection of entities. My problem is in translating a binding declaration {Binding Parent.IsExpanded}, which works fine where Parent is a reference to an entity that has the IsExpanded attribute, to something that will work for my weakly typed DataTable, where Parent is the name of a column and references another DataRow in the same DataTable. I've tried declarations like {Binding Parent.Items[IsExpanded]} and {Binding Parent("IsExpanded")} but none of these seem to work. How can I create a binding to the IsExpanded column of the DataRow Parent in my DataTable? Thanks in advance, Dave

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  • WPF DataGrid issue with db40

    - by Rich Blumer
    I am using the following code to populate a wpf datagrid with items in my db4o OODB: IObjectContainer db = Db4oEmbedded.OpenFile(Db4oEmbedded.NewConfiguration(), "C:\Dev\ContractKeeper\Database\ContractKeeper.yap"); var contractTypes = db.Query(typeof(ContractType)); this.dataGrid1.ItemsSource = contractTypes.ToList(); Here is the XAML: <Window x:Class="ContractKeeper.Window1" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" xmlns:dg="http://schemas.microsoft.com/wpf/2008/toolkit" Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="300"> <Grid> <dg:DataGrid AutoGenerateColumns="True" Margin="12,102,12,24" Name="dataGrid1" /> </Grid> </Window> When the items get bound to the datagrid, the gridlines appear like there are records but no data is displayed. Has anyone had this issue with db4o and the wpf datagrid?

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  • User Control inherit from ListBox in Wpf?

    - by Rev
    Hi. I want to make a user Control in WPf with same properties and events like ListBox.(can add items , remove them , selecting ,...) on way in windows App is use a user control which is inherit form ListBox. but in WPF I don't know how make User Control inherit from ListBox (or other WPF Control)!!! I write this code but it had an exception public partial class InboxListItem : ListBox { public InboxListItem() { InitializeComponent(); } and It's Xaml file <UserControl x:Class="ListBoxControl.InboxListItem" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" xmlns:myTypes="clr-namespace:ListBoxControl" />

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  • What is Silverlight's relationship -- if any -- to WPF?

    - by xarzu
    I was working with a WPF application and I decided that the controls and graphics I wanted to display on the grid might look better if it was a silverlight component. I thought this way because of all the cool silverlight controls that look very flash-like. But now that I have gottem my Visual Studio 2010 set up with SIlverlight, it seems that every silverlight app I can make are ASP.NET in nature. It seems that instead of a cool GUI control to make, Silverlight is telling me that it is primarely a dataflow sort of application for the web. What is the relationship, if any, between WPF and Silverlight. Can I or can I not put a silverlight control into my existing WPF application?

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  • MEF CompositionInitializer for WPF

    - by Reed
    The Managed Extensibility Framework is an amazingly useful addition to the .NET Framework.  I was very excited to see System.ComponentModel.Composition added to the core framework.  Personally, I feel that MEF is one tool I’ve always been missing in my .NET development. Unfortunately, one perfect scenario for MEF tends to fall short of it’s full potential is in Windows Presentation Foundation development.  In particular, there are many times when the XAML parser constructs objects in WPF development, which makes composition of those parts difficult.  The current release of MEF (Preview Release 9) addresses this for Silverlight developers via System.ComponentModel.Composition.CompositionInitializer.  However, there is no equivalent class for WPF developers. The CompositionInitializer class provides the means for an object to compose itself.  This is very useful with WPF and Silverlight development, since it allows a View, such as a UserControl, to be generated via the standard XAML parser, and still automatically pull in the appropriate ViewModel in an extensible manner.  Glenn Block has demonstrated the usage for Silverlight in detail, but the same issues apply in WPF. As an example, let’s take a look at a very simple case.  Take the following XAML for a Window: <Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.MainView" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" Title="MainWindow" Height="220" Width="300"> <Grid> <TextBlock Text="{Binding TheText}" /> </Grid> </Window> This does nothing but create a Window, add a simple TextBlock control, and use it to display the value of our “TheText” property in our DataContext class.  Since this is our main window, WPF will automatically construct and display this Window, so we need to handle constructing the DataContext and setting it ourselves. We could do this in code or in XAML, but in order to do it directly, we would need to hard code the ViewModel type directly into our XAML code, or we would need to construct the ViewModel class and set it in the code behind.  Both have disadvantages, and the disadvantages grow if we’re using MEF to compose our ViewModel. Ideally, we’d like to be able to have MEF construct our ViewModel for us.  This way, it can provide any construction requirements for our ViewModel via [ImportingConstructor], and it can handle fully composing the imported properties on our ViewModel.  CompositionInitializer allows this to occur. We use CompositionInitializer within our View’s constructor, and use it for self-composition of our View.  Using CompositionInitializer, we can modify our code behind to: public partial class MainView : Window { public MainView() { InitializeComponent(); CompositionInitializer.SatisfyImports(this); } [Import("MainViewModel")] public object ViewModel { get { return this.DataContext; } set { this.DataContext = value; } } } We then can add an Export on our ViewModel class like so: [Export("MainViewModel")] public class MainViewModel { public string TheText { get { return "Hello World!"; } } } MEF will automatically compose our application, decoupling our ViewModel injection to the DataContext of our View until runtime.  When we run this, we’ll see: There are many other approaches for using MEF to wire up the extensible parts within your application, of course.  However, any time an object is going to be constructed by code outside of your control, CompositionInitializer allows us to continue to use MEF to satisfy the import requirements of that object. In order to use this from WPF, I’ve ported the code from MEF Preview 9 and Glenn Block’s (now obsolete) PartInitializer port to Windows Presentation Foundation.  There are some subtle changes from the Silverlight port, mainly to handle running in a desktop application context.  The default behavior of my port is to construct an AggregateCatalog containing a DirectoryCatalog set to the location of the entry assembly of the application.  In addition, if an “Extensions” folder exists under the entry assembly’s directory, a second DirectoryCatalog for that folder will be included.  This behavior can be overridden by specifying a CompositionContainer or one or more ComposablePartCatalogs to the System.ComponentModel.Composition.Hosting.CompositionHost static class prior to the first use of CompositionInitializer. Please download CompositionInitializer and CompositionHost for VS 2010 RC, and contact me with any feedback. Composition.Initialization.Desktop.zip Edit on 3/29: Glenn Block has since updated his version of CompositionInitializer (and ExportFactory<T>!), and made it available here: http://cid-f8b2fd72406fb218.skydrive.live.com/self.aspx/blog/Composition.Initialization.Desktop.zip This is a .NET 3.5 solution, and should soon be pushed to CodePlex, and made available on the main MEF site.

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  • WPF TextBox SpellChecking Problem

    - by Alex
    How can I change the spellchecking language of a WPF textbox to french using XAML? I tried this but it doesn't work. <TextBox AcceptsReturn="true" SpellCheck.IsEnabled="true" FontSize="12" BorderBrush="Blue" Height="100" Language="fr-fr" /> French is supposed to be one of the 4 supported languages for spellchecking in WPF so I don't understand why it doesn't work. I also tried fr-CA but it still won't work.

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  • WPF: Drag/Drop to re-order grid and jiggle

    - by Echilon
    I need to implement a grid in WPF which has squares that can be dragged/dropped to be re-ordered, but I'm not sure the best way to do it. I was thinking using an ObservableCollection of squares and a UniFormGrid but although I have experience with both WPF and drag/drop, ideally I'd like to do a kind of 'jiggle' when before the user releases the mouse. Any suggestions on a good starting point?

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