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  • C# XNA: Effecient mesh building algorithm for voxel based terrain ("top" outside layer only, non-destructible)

    - by Tim Hatch
    To put this bluntly, for non-destructible/non-constructible voxel style terrain, are generated meshes handled much better than instancing? Is there another method to achieve millions of visible quad faces per scene with ease? If generated meshes per chunk is the way to go, what kind of algorithm might I want to use based on only EVER needing the outer layer rendered? I'm using 3D Perlin Noise for terrain generation (for overhangs/caves/etc). The layout is fantastic, but even for around 20k visible faces, it's quite slow using instancing (whether it's one big draw call or multiple smaller chunks). I've simplified it to the point of removing non-visible cubes and only having the top faces of my cube-like terrain be rendered, but with 20k quad instances, it's still pretty sluggish (30fps on my machine). My goal is for the world to be made using quite small cubes. Where multiple games (IE: Minecraft) have the player 1x1 cube in width/length and 2 high, I'm shooting for 6x6 width/length and 9 high. With a lot of advantages as far as gameplay goes, it also means I could quite easily have a single scene with millions of truly visible quads. So, I have been trying to look into changing my method from instancing to mesh generation on a chunk by chunk basis. Do video cards handle this type of processing better than separate quads/cubes through instancing? What kind of existing algorithms should I be looking into? I've seen references to marching cubes a few times now, but I haven't spent much time investigating it since I don't know if it's the better route for my situation or not. I'm also starting to doubt my need of using 3D Perlin noise for terrain generation since I won't want the kind of depth it would seem best at. I just like the idea of overhangs and occasional cave-like structures, but could find no better 'surface only' algorithms to cover that. If anyone has any better suggestions there, feel free to throw them at me too. Thanks, Mythics

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  • Which algorithm used in Advance Wars type turn based games

    - by Jan de Lange
    Has anyone tried to develop, or know of an algorithm such as used in a typical turn based game like Advance Wars, where the number of objects and the number of moves per object may be too large to search through up to a reasonable depth like one would do in a game with a smaller search base like chess? There is some path-finding needed to to engage into combat, harvest, or move to an object, so that in the next move such actions are possible. With this you can build a search tree for each item, resulting in a large tree for all items. With a cost function one can determine the best moves. Then the board flips over to the player role (min/max) and the computer searches the best player move, and flips back etc. upto a number of cycles deep. Finally it has found the best move and now it's the players turn. But he may be asleep by now... So how is this done in practice? I have found several good sources on A*, DFS, BFS, evaluation / cost functions etc. But as of yet I do not see how I can put it all together.

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  • Flood fill algorithm for Game of Go

    - by Jackson Borghi
    I'm having a hell of a time trying to figure out how to make captured stones disappear. I've read everywhere that I should use the flood fill algorithm, but I haven't had any luck with that so far. Any help would be amazing! Here is my code: package Go; import static java.lang.Math.*; import static stdlib.StdDraw.*; import java.awt.Color; public class Go2 { public static Color opposite(Color player) { if (player == WHITE) { return BLACK; } return WHITE; } public static void drawGame(Color[][] board) { Color[][][] unit = new Color[400][19][19]; for (int h = 0; h < 400; h++) { for (int x = 0; x < 19; x++) { for (int y = 0; y < 19; y++) { unit[h][x][y] = YELLOW; } } } setXscale(0, 19); setYscale(0, 19); clear(YELLOW); setPenColor(BLACK); line(0, 0, 0, 19); line(19, 19, 19, 0); line(0, 19, 19, 19); line(0, 0, 19, 0); for (double i = 0; i < 19; i++) { line(0.0, i, 19, i); line(i, 0.0, i, 19); } for (int x = 0; x < 19; x++) { for (int y = 0; y < 19; y++) { if (board[x][y] != YELLOW) { setPenColor(board[x][y]); filledCircle(x, y, 0.47); setPenColor(GRAY); circle(x, y, 0.47); } } } int h = 0; } public static void main(String[] args) { int px; int py; Color[][] temp = new Color[19][19]; Color[][] board = new Color[19][19]; Color player = WHITE; for (int i = 0; i < 19; i++) { for (int h = 0; h < 19; h++) { board[i][h] = YELLOW; temp[i][h] = YELLOW; } } while (true) { drawGame(board); while (!mousePressed()) { } px = (int) round(mouseX()); py = (int) round(mouseY()); board[px][py] = player; while (mousePressed()) { } floodFill(px, py, player, board, temp); System.out.print("XXXXX = "+ temp[px][py]); if (checkTemp(temp, board, px, py)) { for (int x = 0; x < 19; x++) { for (int y = 0; y < 19; y++) { if (temp[x][y] == GRAY) { board[x][y] = YELLOW; } } } } player = opposite(player); } } private static boolean checkTemp(Color[][] temp, Color[][] board, int x, int y) { if (x < 19 && x > -1 && y < 19 && y > -1) { if (temp[x + 1][y] == YELLOW || temp[x - 1][y] == YELLOW || temp[x][y - 1] == YELLOW || temp[x][y + 1] == YELLOW) { return false; } } if (x == 18) { if (temp[x - 1][y] == YELLOW || temp[x][y - 1] == YELLOW || temp[x][y + 1] == YELLOW) { return false; } } if (y == 18) { if (temp[x + 1][y] == YELLOW || temp[x - 1][y] == YELLOW || temp[x][y - 1] == YELLOW) { return false; } } if (y == 0) { if (temp[x + 1][y] == YELLOW || temp[x - 1][y] == YELLOW || temp[x][y + 1] == YELLOW) { return false; } } if (x == 0) { if (temp[x + 1][y] == YELLOW || temp[x][y - 1] == YELLOW || temp[x][y + 1] == YELLOW) { return false; } } else { if (x < 19) { if (temp[x + 1][y] == GRAY) { checkTemp(temp, board, x + 1, y); } } if (x >= 0) { if (temp[x - 1][y] == GRAY) { checkTemp(temp, board, x - 1, y); } } if (y < 19) { if (temp[x][y + 1] == GRAY) { checkTemp(temp, board, x, y + 1); } } if (y >= 0) { if (temp[x][y - 1] == GRAY) { checkTemp(temp, board, x, y - 1); } } } return true; } private static void floodFill(int x, int y, Color player, Color[][] board, Color[][] temp) { if (board[x][y] != player) { return; } else { temp[x][y] = GRAY; System.out.println("x = " + x + " y = " + y); if (x < 19) { floodFill(x + 1, y, player, board, temp); } if (x >= 0) { floodFill(x - 1, y, player, board, temp); } if (y < 19) { floodFill(x, y + 1, player, board, temp); } if (y >= 0) { floodFill(x, y - 1, player, board, temp); } } } }

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  • FloodFill Algorithm for Game of Go

    - by Jackson Borghi
    I'm having a hell of a time trying to figure out how to make captured stones disappear. I've read everywhere that I should use the FloodFill algorithm, but I havent had any luck with that so far. Any help would be amazing! Here is my code: package Go; import static java.lang.Math.; import static stdlib.StdDraw.; import java.awt.Color; public class Go2 { public static Color opposite(Color player) { if (player == WHITE) { return BLACK; } return WHITE; } public static void drawGame(Color[][] board) { Color[][][] unit = new Color[400][19][19]; for (int h = 0; h < 400; h++) { for (int x = 0; x < 19; x++) { for (int y = 0; y < 19; y++) { unit[h][x][y] = YELLOW; } } } setXscale(0, 19); setYscale(0, 19); clear(YELLOW); setPenColor(BLACK); line(0, 0, 0, 19); line(19, 19, 19, 0); line(0, 19, 19, 19); line(0, 0, 19, 0); for (double i = 0; i < 19; i++) { line(0.0, i, 19, i); line(i, 0.0, i, 19); } for (int x = 0; x < 19; x++) { for (int y = 0; y < 19; y++) { if (board[x][y] != YELLOW) { setPenColor(board[x][y]); filledCircle(x, y, 0.47); setPenColor(GRAY); circle(x, y, 0.47); } } } int h = 0; } public static void main(String[] args) { int px; int py; Color[][] temp = new Color[19][19]; Color[][] board = new Color[19][19]; Color player = WHITE; for (int i = 0; i < 19; i++) { for (int h = 0; h < 19; h++) { board[i][h] = YELLOW; temp[i][h] = YELLOW; } } while (true) { drawGame(board); while (!mousePressed()) { } px = (int) round(mouseX()); py = (int) round(mouseY()); board[px][py] = player; while (mousePressed()) { } floodFill(px, py, player, board, temp); System.out.print("XXXXX = "+ temp[px][py]); if (checkTemp(temp, board, px, py)) { for (int x = 0; x < 19; x++) { for (int y = 0; y < 19; y++) { if (temp[x][y] == GRAY) { board[x][y] = YELLOW; } } } } player = opposite(player); } } private static boolean checkTemp(Color[][] temp, Color[][] board, int x, int y) { if (x < 19 && x > -1 && y < 19 && y > -1) { if (temp[x + 1][y] == YELLOW || temp[x - 1][y] == YELLOW || temp[x][y - 1] == YELLOW || temp[x][y + 1] == YELLOW) { return false; } } if (x == 18) { if (temp[x - 1][y] == YELLOW || temp[x][y - 1] == YELLOW || temp[x][y + 1] == YELLOW) { return false; } } if (y == 18) { if (temp[x + 1][y] == YELLOW || temp[x - 1][y] == YELLOW || temp[x][y - 1] == YELLOW) { return false; } } if (y == 0) { if (temp[x + 1][y] == YELLOW || temp[x - 1][y] == YELLOW || temp[x][y + 1] == YELLOW) { return false; } } if (x == 0) { if (temp[x + 1][y] == YELLOW || temp[x][y - 1] == YELLOW || temp[x][y + 1] == YELLOW) { return false; } } else { if (x < 19) { if (temp[x + 1][y] == GRAY) { checkTemp(temp, board, x + 1, y); } } if (x >= 0) { if (temp[x - 1][y] == GRAY) { checkTemp(temp, board, x - 1, y); } } if (y < 19) { if (temp[x][y + 1] == GRAY) { checkTemp(temp, board, x, y + 1); } } if (y >= 0) { if (temp[x][y - 1] == GRAY) { checkTemp(temp, board, x, y - 1); } } } return true; } private static void floodFill(int x, int y, Color player, Color[][] board, Color[][] temp) { if (board[x][y] != player) { return; } else { temp[x][y] = GRAY; System.out.println("x = " + x + " y = " + y); if (x < 19) { floodFill(x + 1, y, player, board, temp); } if (x >= 0) { floodFill(x - 1, y, player, board, temp); } if (y < 19) { floodFill(x, y + 1, player, board, temp); } if (y >= 0) { floodFill(x, y - 1, player, board, temp); } } } }

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  • Algorithm for spreading labels in a visually appealing and intuitive way

    - by mac
    Short version Is there a design pattern for distributing vehicle labels in a non-overlapping fashion, placing them as close as possible to the vehicle they refer to? If not, is any of the method I suggest viable? How would you implement this yourself? Extended version In the game I'm writing I have a bird-eye vision of my airborne vehicles. I also have next to each of the vehicles a small label with key-data about the vehicle. This is an actual screenshot: Now, since the vehicles could be flying at different altitudes, their icons could overlap. However I would like to never have their labels overlapping (or a label from vehicle 'A' overlap the icon of vehicle 'B'). Currently, I can detect collisions between sprites and I simply push away the offending label in a direction opposite to the otherwise-overlapped sprite. This works in most situations, but when the airspace get crowded, the label can get pushed very far away from its vehicle, even if there was an alternate "smarter" alternative. For example I get: B - label A -----------label C - label where it would be better (= label closer to the vehicle) to get: B - label label - A C - label EDIT: It also has to be considered that beside the overlapping vehicles case, there might be other configurations in which vehicles'labels could overlap (the ASCII-art examples show for example three very close vehicles in which the label of A would overlap the icon of B and C). I have two ideas on how to improve the present situation, but before spending time implementing them, I thought to turn to the community for advice (after all it seems like a "common enough problem" that a design pattern for it could exist). For what it's worth, here's the two ideas I was thinking to: Slot-isation of label space In this scenario I would divide all the screen into "slots" for the labels. Then, each vehicle would always have its label placed in the closest empty one (empty = no other sprites at that location. Spiralling search From the location of the vehicle on the screen, I would try to place the label at increasing angles and then at increasing radiuses, until a non-overlapping location is found. Something down the line of: try 0°, 10px try 10°, 10px try 20°, 10px ... try 350°, 10px try 0°, 20px try 10°, 20px ...

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  • AABB Sweeping, algorithm to solve "stacking box" problem

    - by Ivo Wetzel
    I'm currently working on a simple AABB collision system and after some fiddling the sweeping of a single box vs. another and the calculation of the response velocity needed to push them apart works flawlessly. Now on to the new problem, imagine I'm having a stack of boxes which are falling towards a ground box which isn't moving: Each of these boxes has a vertical velocity for the "gravity" value, let's say this velocity is 5. Now, the result is that they all fall into each other: The reason is obvious, since all the boxes have a downward velocity of 5, this results in no collisions when calculating the relative velocity between the boxes during sweeping. Note: The red ground box here is static (always 0 velocity, can utilize spatial partitioning ), and all dynamic static collisions are resolved first, thus the fact that the boxes stop correctly at this ground box. So, this seems to be simply an issue with the order the boxes are sweept against each other. I imagine that sorting the boxes based on their x and y velocities and then sweeping these groups correctly against each other may resolve this issues. So, I'm looking for algorithms / examples on how to implement such a system. The code can be found here: https://github.com/BonsaiDen/aabb The two files which are of interest are [box/Dynamic.lua][3] and [box/Manager.lua][4]. The project is using Love2D in case you want to run it.

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  • Derive a algorithm to match best position

    - by Farooq Arshed
    I have pieces in my game which have stats and cost assigned to them and they can only be placed at a certain location. Lets say I have 50 pieces. e.g. Piece1 = 100 stats, 10 cost, Position A. Piece2 = 120 stats, 5 cost, Position B. Piece3 = 500 stats, 50 cost, Position C. Piece4 = 200 stats, 25 cost, Position A. and so on.. I have a board on which 12 pieces have to be allocated and have to remain inside the board cost. e.g. A board has A,B,C ... J,K,L positions and X Cost assigned to it. I have to figure out a way to place best possible piece in the correct position and should remain within the cost specified by the board. Any help would be appreciated.

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  • Algorithm for approximating sihlouette image as polygon

    - by jack
    I want to be able to analyze a texture in real time and approximate a polygon to represent a silhouette. Imagine a person standing in front of a green screen and I want to approximately trace around their outline and get a 2D polygon as the result. Are there algorithms to do this and are they fast enough to work frame-to-frame in a game? (I have found algorithms to triangulate polygons, but I am having trouble knowing what to search for that describes my goal.)

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  • Best algorithm for recursive adjacent tiles?

    - by OhMrBigshot
    In my game I have a set of tiles placed in a 2D array marked by their Xs and Zs ([1,1],[1,2], etc). Now, I want a sort of "Paint Bucket" mechanism: Selecting a tile will destroy all adjacent tiles until a condition stops it, let's say, if it hits an object with hasFlag. Here's what I have so far, I'm sure it's pretty bad, it also freezes everything sometimes: void destroyAdjacentTiles(int x, int z) { int GridSize = Cubes.GetLength(0); int minX = x == 0 ? x : x-1; int maxX = x == GridSize - 1 ? x : x+1; int minZ = z == 0 ? z : z-1; int maxZ = z == GridSize - 1 ? z : z+1; Debug.Log(string.Format("Cube: {0}, {1}; X {2}-{3}; Z {4}-{5}", x, z, minX, maxX, minZ, maxZ)); for (int curX = minX; curX <= maxX; curX++) { for (int curZ = minZ; curZ <= maxZ; curZ++) { if (Cubes[curX, curZ] != Cubes[x, z]) { Debug.Log(string.Format(" Checking: {0}, {1}", curX, curZ)); if (Cubes[curX,curZ] && Cubes[curX,curZ].GetComponent<CubeBehavior>().hasFlag) { Destroy(Cubes[curX,curZ]); destroyAdjacentTiles(curX, curZ); } } } } }

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  • Algorithm to find average position

    - by Simran kaur
    In the given diagram, I have the extreme left and right points, that is -2 and 4 in this case. So, obviously, I can calculate the width which is 6 in this case. What we know: The number of partitions:3 in this case The partition number at at any point i.e which one is 1st,second or third partition (numbered starting from left) What I want: The position of the purple line drawn which is positio of average of a particular partition So, basically I just want a generalized formula to calculate position of the average at any point.

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  • 2D/Isometric map algorithm

    - by Icarus Cocksson
    First of all, I don't have much experience on game development but I do have experience on development. I do know how to make a map, but I don't know if my solution is a normal or a hacky solution. I don't want to waste my time coding things, and realise they're utterly crap and lose my motivation. Let's imagine the following map. (2D - top view - A square) X: 0 to 500 Y: 0 to 500 My character currently stands at X:250,Y:400, somewhere near center of 100px above bottom and I can control him with my keyboard buttons. LEFT button does X--, UP button does Y-- etc. This one is kid's play. I'm asking this because I know there are some engines that automate this task. For example, games like Diablo 3 uses an engine. You can pretty much drag drop a rock to map, and it is automatically being placed here - making player unable to pass through/detect the collision. But what the engine exactly does in the background? Generates a map like mine, places a rock at the center, and checks it like: unmovableObjects = array('50,50'); //we placed a rock at 50,50 location if(Map.hasUnmovableObject(CurrentPlayerX, CurrentPlayerY)) { //unable to move } else { //able to move } My question is: Is this how 2D/Isometric maps are being generated or there is a different and more complex logic behind them?

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  • Need ideas for an algorithm to draw irregular blotchy shapes

    - by Yttermayn
    I'm looking to draw irregular shapes on an x,y grid, and I'd like to come up with a simple, fast method if possible. My only idea so far is to draw a bunch of circles of random sizes very near each other, but at a random distance apart from a more or less central coordinate, then fill in any blank spaces. I realize this is a clunky, inelegant method, hopefully it will give you a rough idea of the kinds of rounded, random blotchy shapesI'm shooting for. Please suggest methods to accomplish this, I'm not so much interested in code. I can noodle that part out myself. Thanks!

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  • Pixel alignment algorithm

    - by user42325
    I have a set of square blocks, I want to draw them in a window. I am sure the coordinates calculation is correct. But on the screen, some squares' edge overlap with other, some are not. I remember the problem is caused by accuracy of pixels. I remember there's a specific topic related to this kind of problem in 2D image rendering. But I don't remember what exactly it is, and how to solve it. Look at this screenshot. Each block should have a fixed width margin. But in the image, the vertical white line have different width.Though, the horizontal lines looks fine.

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  • What's wrong with this turn to face algorithm?

    - by Chan
    I implement a torpedo object that chases a rotating planet. Specifically, it will turn toward the planet each update. Initially my implement was: void move() { vector3<float> to_target = target - get_position(); to_target.normalize(); position += (to_target * speed); } which works perfectly for torpedo that is a solid sphere. Now my torpedo is actually a model, which has a forward vector, so using this method looks odd because it doesn't actually turn toward but jump toward. So I revised it a bit to get, double get_rotation_angle(vector3<float> u, vector3<float> v) const { u.normalize(); v.normalize(); double cosine_theta = u.dot(v); // domain of arccosine is [-1, 1] if (cosine_theta > 1) { cosine_theta = 1; } if (cosine_theta < -1) { cosine_theta = -1; } return math3d::to_degree(acos(cosine_theta)); } vector3<float> get_rotation_axis(vector3<float> u, vector3<float> v) const { u.normalize(); v.normalize(); // fix linear case if (u == v || u == -v) { v[0] += 0.05; v[1] += 0.0; v[2] += 0.05; v.normalize(); } vector3<float> axis = u.cross(v); return axis.normal(); } void turn_to_face() { vector3<float> to_target = (target - position); vector3<float> axis = get_rotation_axis(get_forward(), to_target); double angle = get_rotation_angle(get_forward(), to_target); double distance = math3d::distance(position, target); gl_matrix_mode(GL_MODELVIEW); gl_push_matrix(); { gl_load_identity(); gl_translate_f(position.get_x(), position.get_y(), position.get_z()); gl_rotate_f(angle, axis.get_x(), axis.get_y(), axis.get_z()); gl_get_float_v(GL_MODELVIEW_MATRIX, OM); } gl_pop_matrix(); move(); } void move() { vector3<float> to_target = target - get_position(); to_target.normalize(); position += (get_forward() * speed); } The logic is simple, I find the rotation axis by cross product, the angle to rotate by dot product, then turn toward the target position each update. Unfortunately, it looks extremely odds since the rotation happens too fast that it always turns back and forth. The forward vector for torpedo is from the ModelView matrix, the third column A: MODELVIEW MATRIX -------------------------------------------------- R U A T -------------------------------------------------- 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 -------------------------------------------------- Any suggestion or idea would be greatly appreciated.

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  • Algorithm to shift the car

    - by Simran kaur
    I have a track that can be divided into n number of tracks and a car as GamObject. The track has transforms such that some part of the track's width lies in negative x axis and other in positive. Requirement: One move should cross one track. On every move(left or right), I want the car to reach exact centre of the next track on either sides i.e left or right. My code: Problem: : Because of negative values , somewhere I am missing out something that is making car move not in desirable positions and that's because of negative values only. variable tracks is the number of tracks the whole track is divided in. variable dist is the total width of the complete track. On left movement: if (Input.GetKeyDown (KeyCode.LeftArrow)) { if (this.transform.position.x < r.renderer.bounds.min.x + box.size.x) { this.transform.position = new Vector3 (r.renderer.bounds.min.x + Mathf.FloorToInt(box.size.x), this.transform.position.y, this.transform.position.z); } else { int tracknumber = Mathf.RoundToInt(dist - transform.position.x)/tracks; float averagedistance = (tracknumber*(dist/tracks) + (tracknumber-1)*(dist/tracks))/2; if(transform.position.x > averagedistoftracks) { amountofmovement = amountofmovement + (transform.position.x - averagedistance); } else { amountofmovement = amountofmovement - (averagedistance - transform.position.x); } this.transform.position = new Vector3 (this.transform.position.x - amountofmovement, this.transform.position.y, this.transform.position.z); } }

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  • Efficient algorithm for creating an ideal distribution of groups into containers?

    - by Inshim
    I have groups of students that need to be allocated into classrooms of a fixed capacity (say, 100 chairs in each). Each group must only be allocated to a single classroom, even if it is larger than the capacity (ie there can be an overflow, with students standing up) I need an algorithm to make the allocations with minimum overflows and under-capacity classrooms. A naive algorithm to do this allocation is horrendously slow when having ~200 groups, with a distribution of about half of them being under 20% of the classroom size. Any ideas where I can find at least some good starting point for making this algorithm lightning fast? Thanks!

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  • Can I use a plaintext diff algorithm for tracking XML changes?

    - by rinogo
    Hi all! Interesting question for you here. I'm working in Flex/AS3 on (for simplicity) an XML editor. I need to provide undo/redo functionality. Of course, one solution is to store the entire source text with each edit. However, to conserve memory, I'd like to store the diffs instead (these diffs will also be used to transmit updates to the server for auto-saving). My question is - can I use a plaintext diff algorithm for tracking these XML changes? My research on the internet indicates that I cannot do so. However, I'm obviously missing something. Plaintext diff provides functionality that is purportedly: diff(text, text') - diffs patch(text, diffs) - text' XML is simply text, so why can't I just use diff() and patch() to transform the text reliably? For example: Let's say that I'm a poet. When I write poetry, I use lots of funky punctuation... You know, like <, /, and . (You might see where I'm going with this...) If I'm writing my poetry in an application that uses diffs to provide undo/redo functionality, does my poetry become garbled when I undo/redo my edits? It's just text! Why does it make a difference to the algorithm? I obviously don't get something here...Thanks for explaining! :) -Rich

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  • O(log n) algorithm for computing rank of union of two sorted lists?

    - by Eternal Learner
    Given two sorted lists, each containing n real numbers, is there a O(log?n) time algorithm to compute the element of rank i (where i coresponds to index in increasing order) in the union of the two lists, assuming the elements of the two lists are distinct? I can think of using a Merge procedure to merge the 2 lists and then find the A[i] element in constant time. But the Merge would take O(n) time. How do we solve it in O(log n) time?

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  • O(log n) algorithm to find the element having rank i in union of pre-sorted lists

    - by Eternal Learner
    Given two sorted lists, each containing n real numbers, is there a O(log?n) time algorithm to compute the element of rank i (where i coresponds to index in increasing order) in the union of the two lists, assuming the elements of the two lists are distinct? I can think of using a Merge procedure to merge the 2 lists and then find the A[i] element in constant time. But the Merge would take O(n) time. How do we solve it in O(log n) time?

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  • How to investigate if opencl is possible for an algorithm

    - by Marnix
    I have a heavy-duty algorithm in C# that takes two large Bitmaps of about 10000x5000 and performs photo and ray collision operations on a 3D model to map photos on the 3D model. I would like to know if it is possible to convert such an algorithm to OpenCL to optimize parallel operations during the algorithm. But before asking you to go into the details of the algorithm, I would like to know how I can investigate if my algorithm is convertible to OpenCL. I am not experienced in OpenCL and I would like to know if it is worth it to get into it and learn how it works. Are there things I have to look for that will definitely not work on the graphics card? (for-loops, recursion) Update: My algorithm goes something like: foreach photo split the photo in 64x64 blocks foreach block cast a ray from the camera to the 3D model foreach triangle in 3D model perform raycheck

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  • GRAPH PROBLEM: find an algorithm to determine the shortest path from one point to another in a recta

    - by newba
    I'm getting such an headache trying to elaborate an appropriate algorithm to go from a START position to a EXIT position in a maze. For what is worth, the maze is rectangular, maxsize 500x500 and, in theory, is resolvable by DFS with some branch and bound techniques ... 10 3 4 7 6 3 3 1 2 2 1 0 2 2 2 4 2 2 5 2 2 1 3 0 2 2 2 2 1 3 3 4 2 3 4 4 3 1 1 3 1 2 2 4 2 2 1 Output: 5 1 4 2 Explanation: Our agent looses energy every time he gives a step and he can only move UP, DOWN, LEFT and RIGHT. Also, if the agent arrives with a remaining energy of zero or less, he dies, so we print something like "Impossible". So, in the input 10 is the initial agent's energy, 3 4 is the START position (i.e. column 3, line 4) and we have a maze 7x6. Think this as a kind of labyrinth, in which I want to find the exit that gives the agent a better remaining energy (shortest path). In case there are paths which lead to the same remaining energy, we choose the one which has the small number of steps, of course. I need to know if a DFS to a maze 500x500 in the worst case is feasible with these limitations and how to do it, storing the remaining energy in each step and the number of steps taken so far. The output means the agent arrived with remaining energy= 5 to the exit pos 1 4 in 2 steps. If we look carefully, in this maze it's also possible to exit at pos 3 1 (column 3, row 1) with the same energy but with 3 steps, so we choose the better one. With these in mind, can someone help me some code or pseudo-code? I have troubles working this around with a 2D array and how to store the remaining energy, the path (or number of steps taken)....

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  • Fast block placement algorithm, advice needed?

    - by James Morris
    I need to emulate the window placement strategy of the Fluxbox window manager. As a rough guide, visualize randomly sized windows filling up the screen one at a time, where the rough size of each results in an average of 80 windows on screen without any window overlapping another. It is important to note that windows will close and the space that closed windows previously occupied becomes available once more for the placement of new windows. The window placement strategy has three binary options: Windows build horizontal rows or vertical columns (potentially) Windows are placed from left to right or right to left Windows are placed from top to bottom or bottom to top Why is the algorithm a problem? It needs to operate to the deadlines of a real time thread in an audio application. At this moment I am only concerned with getting a fast algorithm, don't concern yourself over the implications of real time threads and all the hurdles in programming that that brings. So far I have two choices which I have built loose prototypes for: 1) A port of the Fluxbox placement algorithm into my code. The problem with this is, the client (my program) gets kicked out of the audio server (JACK) when I try placing the worst case scenario of 256 blocks using the algorithm. This algorithm performs over 14000 full (linear) scans of the list of blocks already placed when placing the 256th window. 2) My alternative approach. Only partially implemented, this approach uses a data structure for each area of rectangular free unused space (the list of windows can be entirely separate, and is not required for testing of this algorithm). The data structure acts as a node in a doubly linked list (with sorted insertion), as well as containing the coordinates of the top-left corner, and the width and height. Furthermore, each block data structure also contains four links which connect to each immediately adjacent (touching) block on each of the four sides. IMPORTANT RULE: Each block may only touch with one block per side. The problem with this approach is, it's very complex. I have implemented the straightforward cases where 1) space is removed from one corner of a block, 2) splitting neighbouring blocks so that the IMPORTANT RULE is adhered to. The less straightforward case, where the space to be removed can only be found within a column or row of boxes, is only partially implemented - if one of the blocks to be removed is an exact fit for width (ie column) or height (ie row) then problems occur. And don't even mention the fact this only checks columns one box wide, and rows one box tall. I've implemented this algorithm in C - the language I am using for this project (I've not used C++ for a few years and am uncomfortable using it after having focused all my attention to C development, it's a hobby). The implementation is 700+ lines of code (including plenty of blank lines, brace lines, comments etc). The implementation only works for the horizontal-rows + left-right + top-bottom placement strategy. So I've either got to add some way of making this +700 lines of code work for the other 7 placement strategy options, or I'm going to have to duplicate those +700 lines of code for the other seven options. Neither of these is attractive, the first, because the existing code is complex enough, the second, because of bloat. The algorithm is not even at a stage where I can use it in the real time worst case scenario, because of missing functionality, so I still don't know if it actually performs better or worse than the first approach. What else is there? I've skimmed over and discounted: Bin Packing algorithms: their emphasis on optimal fit does not match the requirements of this algorithm. Recursive Bisection Placement algorithms: sounds promising, but these are for circuit design. Their emphasis is optimal wire length. Both of these, especially the latter, all elements to be placed/packs are known before the algorithm begins. I need an algorithm which works accumulatively with what it is given to do when it is told to do it. What are your thoughts on this? How would you approach it? What other algorithms should I look at? Or even what concepts should I research seeing as I've not studied computer science/software engineering? Please ask questions in comments if further information is needed. [edit] If it makes any difference, the units for the coordinates will not be pixels. The units are unimportant, but the grid where windows/blocks/whatever can be placed will be 127 x 127 units.

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  • Algorithm design, "randomising" timetable schedule in Python although open to other languages.

    - by S1syphus
    Before I start I should add I am a musician and not a native programmer, this was undertook to make my life easier. Here is the situation, at work I'm given a new csv file each which contains a list of sound files, their length, and the minimum total amount of time they must be played. I create a playlist of exactly 60 minutes, from this excel file. Each sample played the by the minimum number of instances, but spread out from each other; so there will never be a period where for where one sound is played twice in a row or in close proximity to itself. Secondly, if the minimum instances of each song has been used, and there is still time with in the 60 min, it needs to fill the remaining time using sounds till 60 minutes is reached, while adhering to above. The smallest duration possible is 15 seconds, and then multiples of 15 seconds. Here is what I came up with in python and the problems I'm having with it, and as one user said its buggy due to the random library used in it. So I'm guessing a total rethink is on the table, here is where I need your help. Whats is the best way to solve the issue, I have had a brief look at things like knapsack and bin packing algorithms, while both are relevant neither are appropriate and maybe a bit beyond me.

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  • Diff Algorithm

    - by Daniel Magliola
    I've been looking like crazy for an explanation of a diff algorithm that works and is efficient. The closest I got is this link to RFC 3284 (from several Eric Sink blog posts), which describes in perfectly understandable terms the data format in which the diff results are stored. However, it has no mention whatsoever as to how a program would reach these results while doing a diff. I'm trying to research this out of personal curiosity, because I'm sure there must be tradeoffs when implementing a diff algorithm, which are pretty clear sometimes when you look at diffs and wonder "why did the diff program chose this as a change instead of that?"... Does anyone know where I can find a description of an efficient algorithm that'd end up outputting VCDIFF? By the way, if you happen to find a description of the actual algorithm used by SourceGear's DiffMerge, that'd be even better. NOTE: longest common subsequence doesn't seem to be the algorithm used by VCDIFF, it looks like they're doing something smarter, given the data format they use. Thanks!

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