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  • Does this have anything to do with endian-ness?

    - by eSKay
    This piece of code: #include<stdio.h> void hello() { printf("hello\n"); } void bye() { printf("bye\n"); } int main() { printf("%p\n", hello); printf("%p\n", bye); return 0; } output on my machine: 0x80483f4 0x8048408 [second address is bigger in value] on Codepad 0x8048541 0x8048511 [second address is smaller in value] Does this have anything to do with endian-ness of the machines? If not, Why the difference in the ordering of the addresses? Also, Why the difference in the difference? 0x8048541 - 0x8048511 = 0x30 0x8048408 - 0x80483f4 = 0x14 Btw, I just checked. This code (taken from here) says that both the machines are Little-Endian #include<stdio.h> int main() { int num = 1; if(*(char *)&num == 1) printf("Little-Endian\n"); else printf("Big-Endian\n"); return 0; }

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  • How to use parallel execution in a shell script?

    - by eSKay
    I have a C shell script that does something like this: #!/bin/csh gcc example.c -o ex gcc combine.c -o combine ex file1 r1 <-- 1 ex file2 r2 <-- 2 ex file3 r3 <-- 3 #... many more like the above combine r1 r2 r3 final \rm r1 r2 r3 Is there some way I can make lines 1, 2 and 3 run in parallel instead of one after the another?

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  • Microsoft C++ Language Reference

    - by eSKay
    Whenever any question is asked, and a reference text is needed, I never see MSDN C++ Language Reference being referred. I was browsing through it and I personally feel that it is extremely well written. Is there some specific reason it is not used as often as a standard? Is it because it contains some VC++ specific features?

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  • What are the advantages of a rebase over a merge in git?

    - by eSKay
    In this article, the author explains rebasing with this diagram: Rebase: If you have not yet published your branch, or have clearly communicated that others should not base their work on it, you have an alternative. You can rebase your branch, where instead of merging, your commit is replaced by another commit with a different parent, and your branch is moved there. while a normal merge would have looked like this: So, if you rebase, you are just losing a history state (which would be garbage collected sometime in the future). So, why would someone want to do a rebase at all? What am I missing here?

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  • Can a pointer ever point to itself?

    - by eSKay
    This question was mentioned here. My doubt is: If a pointer variable has the same address as its value, is it really pointing to itself? For example - in the following piece of code, is a a pointer to itself? #include<stdio.h> int main(){ int* a; int b = (int)&a; a = b; printf("address of a = %d\n", &a); printf(" value of a = %d\n", a); } If a is not a pointer to itself, then the same question poses again: Can a pointer point to itself? Also, how is a self pointing pointer useful?

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  • Is return an operator or a function?

    - by eSKay
    This is too basic I think, but how do both of these work? return true; // 1 and return (true); // 2 Similar: sizeof, exit My guess: If return was a function, 1 would be erroneous. So, return should be a unary operator that can also take in brackets... pretty much like unary minus: -5 and -(5), both are okay. Is that what it is - a unary operator?

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  • How to bundle shell script and C code?

    - by eSKay
    I have a C shell script that calls two C programs - one after the another with some file handling before, in-between and afterwards. Now, as such I have three different files - one C shell script and 2 .c files. I need to give this script to other users. The problem is that I have to distribute three files - which the users must keep in the same folder and then execute the script. Is there some better way to do this? [I know I can make one C code file out of those two... but I will still be left with a shell script and a C code. Actually, the two C codes do entirely different things... so I want them to be separate]

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  • C++ deleting a pointer

    - by eSKay
    On this page, its written that One reason is that the operand of delete need not be an lvalue. Consider: delete p+1; delete f(x); Here, the implementation of delete does not have a pointer to which it can assign zero. Adding a number to a pointer shifts it forward in memory by those many number of sizeof(*p) units. So, what is the difference between delete p and delete p+1, and why would making the pointer 0 only be a problem with delete p+1?

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  • How to create custom filenames in C?

    - by eSKay
    Please see this piece of code: #include<stdio.h> #include<string.h> #include<stdlib.h> int main() { int i = 0; FILE *fp; for(i = 0; i < 100; i++) { fp = fopen("/*what should go here??*/","w"); //I need to create files with names: file0.txt, file1.txt, file2.txt etc //i.e. file{i}.txt } }

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  • migrating C++ code from structures to classes

    - by eSKay
    I am migrating some C++ code from structures to classes. I was using structures mainly for bit-field optimizations which I do not need any more (I am more worried about speed than saving space now). What are the general guidelines for doing this migration? I am still in the planning stage as this is a very big move affecting a major part of the code. I want to plan everything first before doing it. What are all the essential things I should keep in mind?

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  • standard C++ grammar

    - by eSKay
    Does the standard specify the official C++ grammar? I searched, but did not find it anywhere. Also, I wish to read a bit about C++ grammar in detail, like which category of grammars it falls in, etc. Any links pointing me in the right direction would be helpful. By category, I meant

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  • Why does C++ behave this way?

    - by eSKay
    #include<stdio.h> int b = 0; class A { public: int a;}; class B: public A { int c; int d; public: B(){ b++; a = b; printf("B:%d\n",b); } }; int main() { A* a = new B[10]; B* b = new B[10]; printf("\n%d", a->a); a++; printf("\n%d", a->a); // prints junk value printf("\n\n%d", b->a); b++; printf("\n%d", b->a); return 0; } The second printf prints a junk value. It should figure that it is pointing to an object of type B and increment by the sizof(B). Why does that not happen?

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  • How to bundle C code in C shell script?

    - by eSKay
    I have a C shell script that calls two C programs - one after the another with some file handling before, in-between and afterwards. Now, as such I have three different files - one C shell script and 2 .c files. I need to give this script to other users. The problem is that I have to distribute three files - which the users must keep in the same folder and then execute the script. Is there some better way to do this? [I know I can make one C code file out of those two... but I will still be left with a shell script and a C code. Actually, the two C codes do entirely different things... so I want them to be separate]

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  • How to bundle C/C++ code with C-shell-script?

    - by eSKay
    I have a C shell script that calls two C programs - one after the another with some file handling before, in-between and afterwards. Now, as such I have three different files - one C shell script and 2 .c files. I need to give this script to other users. The problem is that I have to distribute three files - which the users must keep in the same folder and then execute the script. Is there some better way to do this? [I know I can make one C code file out of those two... but I will still be left with a shell script and a C code. Actually, the two C codes do entirely different things... so I want them to be separate]

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  • What is the problem with this code?

    - by eSKay
    #include<stdio.h> class A { public: int a;}; class B: public A { public: static int b; B(){ b++; printf("B:%d\n",b); } }; int main() { A* a1 = new B[100]; A* a2 = new B(); return 0; } Error: In function `main': undefined reference to `B::b' undefined reference to `B::b' undefined reference to `B::b' undefined reference to `B::b'

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