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  • Validating a linked item&rsquo;s data template in Sitecore

    - by Kyle Burns
    I’ve been doing quite a bit of work in Sitecore recently and last week I encountered a situation that it appears many others have hit.  I was working with a field that had been configured originally as a grouped droplink, but now needed to be updated to support additional levels of hierarchy in the folder structure.  If you’ve done any work in Sitecore that statement makes sense, but if not it may seem a bit cryptic.  Sitecore offers a number of different field types and a subset of these field types focus on providing links either to other items on the content tree or to content that is not stored in Sitecore.  In the case of the grouped droplink, the field is configured with a “root” folder and each direct descendant of this folder is considered to be a header for a grouping of other items and displayed in a dropdown.  A picture is worth a thousand words, so consider the following piece of a content tree: If I configure a grouped droplink field to use the “Current” folder as its datasource, the control that gets to my content author looks like this: This presents a nicely organized display and limits the user to selecting only the direct grandchildren of the folder root.  It also presents the limitation that struck as we were thinking through the content architecture and how it would hold up over time – the authors cannot further organize content under the root folder because of the structure required for the dropdown to work.  Over time, not allowing the hierarchy to go any deeper would prevent out authors from being able to organize their content in a way that it would be found when needed, so the grouped droplink data type was not going to fit the bill. I needed to look for an alternative data type that allowed for selection of a single item and limited my choices to descendants of a specific node on the content tree.  After looking at the options available for links in Sitecore and considering them against each other, one option stood out as nearly perfect – the droptree.  This field type stores its data identically to the droplink and allows for the selection of zero or one items under a specific node in the content tree.  By changing my data template to use droptree instead of grouped droplink, the author is now presented with the following when selecting a linked item: Sounds great, but a did say almost perfect – there’s still one flaw.  The code intended to display the linked item is expecting the selection to use a specific data template (or more precisely it makes certain assumptions about the fields that will be present), but the droptree does nothing to prevent the author from selecting a folder (since folders are items too) instead of one of the items contained within a folder.  I looked to see if anyone had already solved this problem.  I found many people discussing the problem, but the closest that I found to a solution was the statement “the best thing would probably be to create a custom validator” with no further discussion in regards to what this validator might look like.  I needed to create my own validator to ensure that the user had not selected a folder.  Since so many people had the same issue, I decided to make the validator as reusable as possible and share it here. The validator that I created inherits from StandardValidator.  In order to make the validator more intuitive to developers that are familiar with the TreeList controls in Sitecore, I chose to implement the following parameters: ExcludeTemplatesForSelection – serves as a “deny list”.  If the data template of the selected item is in this list it will not validate IncludeTemplatesForSelection – this can either be empty to indicate that any template not contained in the exclusion list is acceptable or it can contain the list of acceptable templates Now that I’ve explained the parameters and the purpose of the validator, I’ll let the code do the rest of the talking: 1: /// <summary> 2: /// Validates that a link field value meets template requirements 3: /// specified using the following parameters: 4: /// - ExcludeTemplatesForSelection: If present, the item being 5: /// based on an excluded template will cause validation to fail. 6: /// - IncludeTemplatesForSelection: If present, the item not being 7: /// based on an included template will cause validation to fail 8: /// 9: /// ExcludeTemplatesForSelection trumps IncludeTemplatesForSelection 10: /// if the same value appears in both lists. Lists are comma seperated 11: /// </summary> 12: [Serializable] 13: public class LinkItemTemplateValidator : StandardValidator 14: { 15: public LinkItemTemplateValidator() 16: { 17: } 18:   19: /// <summary> 20: /// Serialization constructor is required by the runtime 21: /// </summary> 22: /// <param name="info"></param> 23: /// <param name="context"></param> 24: public LinkItemTemplateValidator(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context) : base(info, context) { } 25:   26: /// <summary> 27: /// Returns whether the linked item meets the template 28: /// constraints specified in the parameters 29: /// </summary> 30: /// <returns> 31: /// The result of the evaluation. 32: /// </returns> 33: protected override ValidatorResult Evaluate() 34: { 35: if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(ControlValidationValue)) 36: { 37: return ValidatorResult.Valid; // let "required" validation handle 38: } 39:   40: var excludeString = Parameters["ExcludeTemplatesForSelection"]; 41: var includeString = Parameters["IncludeTemplatesForSelection"]; 42: if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(excludeString) && string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(includeString)) 43: { 44: return ValidatorResult.Valid; // "allow anything" if no params 45: } 46:   47: Guid linkedItemGuid; 48: if (!Guid.TryParse(ControlValidationValue, out linkedItemGuid)) 49: { 50: return ValidatorResult.Valid; // probably put validator on wrong field 51: } 52:   53: var item = GetItem(); 54: var linkedItem = item.Database.GetItem(new ID(linkedItemGuid)); 55:   56: if (linkedItem == null) 57: { 58: return ValidatorResult.Valid; // this validator isn't for broken links 59: } 60:   61: var exclusionList = (excludeString ?? string.Empty).Split(','); 62: var inclusionList = (includeString ?? string.Empty).Split(','); 63:   64: if ((inclusionList.Length == 0 || inclusionList.Contains(linkedItem.TemplateName)) 65: && !exclusionList.Contains(linkedItem.TemplateName)) 66: { 67: return ValidatorResult.Valid; 68: } 69:   70: Text = GetText("The field \"{0}\" specifies an item which is based on template \"{1}\". This template is not valid for selection", GetFieldDisplayName(), linkedItem.TemplateName); 71:   72: return GetFailedResult(ValidatorResult.FatalError); 73: } 74:   75: protected override ValidatorResult GetMaxValidatorResult() 76: { 77: return ValidatorResult.FatalError; 78: } 79:   80: public override string Name 81: { 82: get { return @"LinkItemTemplateValidator"; } 83: } 84: }   In this blog entry, I have shared some code that I found useful in solving a problem that seemed fairly common.  Hopefully the next person that is looking for this answer finds it useful as well.

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  • New security options in UCM Patch Set 3

    - by kyle.hatlestad
    While the Patch Set 3 (PS3) release was mostly focused on bug fixes and such, some new features sneaked in there. One of those new features is to the security options. In 10gR3 and prior versions, UCM had a component called Collaboration Manager which allowed for project folders to be created and groups of users assigned as members to collaborate on documents. With this component came access control lists (ACL) for content and folders. Users could assign specific security rights on each and every document and folder within a project. And it was even possible to enable these ACL's without having the Collaboration Manager component enabled (see technote# 603148.1). When 11g came out, Collaboration Manager was no longer available. But the configuration settings to turn on ACLs were still there. Well, in PS3 they're implemented slightly differently. And there is a new component available which adds an additional dimension to define security on the object, Roles. So now instead of selecting individual users or groups of users (defined as an Alias in User Admin), you can select a particular role. And if a user has that role, they are granted that level of access. This can allow for a much more flexible and manageable security model instead of trying to manage with just user and group access as people come and go in the organization. The way that it is enabled is still through configuration entries. First log in as an administrator and go to Administration -> Admin Server. On the Component Manager page, click the 'advanced component manager' link in the description paragraph at the top. In the list of Disabled Components, enable the RoleEntityACL component. Then click the General Configuration link on the left. In the Additional Configuration Variables text area, enter the new configuration values: UseEntitySecurity=true SpecialAuthGroups=<comma separated list of Security Groups to honor ACLs> The SpecialAuthGroups should be a list of Security Groups that honor the ACL fields. If an ACL is applied to a content item with a Security Group outside this list, it will be ignored. Save the settings and restart the instance. Upon restart, three new metadata fields will be created: xClbraUserList, xClbraAliasList, xClbraRoleList. If you are using OracleTextSearch as the search indexer, be sure to run a Fast Rebuild on the collection. On the Check In, Search, and Update pages, values are added by simply typing in the value and getting a type-ahead list of possible values. Select the value, click Add and then set the level of access (Read, Write, Delete, or Admin). If all of the fields are blank, then it simply falls back to just Security Group and Account access. For Users and Groups, these values are automatically picked up from the corresponding database tables. In the case of Roles, this is an explicitly defined list of choices that are made available. These values must match the role that is being defined from WebLogic Server or you LDAP/AD repository. To add these values, go to Administration -> Admin Applets -> Configuration Manager. On the Views tab, edit the values for the ExternalRolesView. By default, 'guest' and 'authenticated' are added. Once added to through the view, they will be available to select from for the Roles Access List. As for how they are stored in the metadata fields, each entry starts with it's identifier: ampersand (&) symbol for users, "at" (@) symbol for groups, and colon (:) for roles. Following that is the entity name. And at the end is the level of access in paranthesis. e.g. (RWDA). And each entry is separated by a comma. So if you were populating values through batch loader or an external source, the values would be defined this way. Detailed information on Access Control Lists can be found in the Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Content Server.

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  • How can a web developer contribute to Ubuntu?

    - by Kyle Macey
    I've done web development for the past ten years, and have used Ubuntu for my operating system for the past five. I feel like my design and development skills could be useful, but don't know how I can help with experience in web development. I'm currently versed in Ruby, PHP, ColdFusion, and Javascript, and I took a Java class in college. I'm also willing to learn a new language, but don't even know where to start as far as what would be most helpful to the Ubuntu community. Are there projects that a web developer could help with in Ubuntu? Or what language should I learn to best help contribute?

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  • Full-text indexing? You must read this

    - by Kyle Hatlestad
    For those of you who may have missed it, Peter Flies, Principal Technical Support Engineer for WebCenter Content, gave an excellent webcast on database searching and indexing in WebCenter Content.  It's available for replay along with a download of the slidedeck.  Look for the one titled 'WebCenter Content: Database Searching and Indexing'. One of the items he led with...and concluded with...was a recommendation on optimizing your search collection if you are using full-text searching with the Oracle database.  This can greatly improve your search performance.  And this would apply to both Oracle Text Search and DATABASE.FULLTEXT search methods.  Peter describes how a collection can become fragmented over time as content is added, updated, and deleted.  Just like you should defragment your hard drive from time to time to get your files placed on the disk in the most optimal way, you should do the same for the search collection. And optimizing the collection is just a simple procedure call that can be scheduled to be run automatically.   [Read more] 

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  • Full-text indexing? You must read this

    - by Kyle Hatlestad
    For those of you who may have missed it, Peter Flies, Principal Technical Support Engineer for WebCenter Content, gave an excellent webcast on database searching and indexing in WebCenter Content.  It's available for replay along with a download of the slidedeck.  Look for the one titled 'WebCenter Content: Database Searching and Indexing'. One of the items he led with...and concluded with...was a recommendation on optimizing your search collection if you are using full-text searching with the Oracle database.  This can greatly improve your search performance.  And this would apply to both Oracle Text Search and DATABASE.FULLTEXT search methods.  Peter describes how a collection can become fragmented over time as content is added, updated, and deleted.  Just like you should defragment your hard drive from time to time to get your files placed on the disk in the most optimal way, you should do the same for the search collection. And optimizing the collection is just a simple procedure call that can be scheduled to be run automatically.   beginctx_ddl.optimize_index('FT_IDCTEXT1','FULL', parallel_degree =>'1');end; When I checked my own test instance, I found my collection had a row fragmentation of about 80% After running the optimization procedure, it went down to 0% The knowledgebase article On Index Fragmentation and Optimization When Using OracleTextSearch or DATABASE.FULLTEXT [ID 1087777.1] goes into detail on how to check your current index fragmentation, how to run the procedure, and then how to schedule the procedure to run automatically.  While the article mentions scheduling the job weekly, Peter says he now is recommending this be run daily, especially on more active systems. And just as a reminder, be sure to involve your DBA with your WebCenter Content implementation as you go to production and over time.  We recently had a customer complain of slow performance of the application when it was discovered the database was starving for memory.  So it's always helpful to keep a watchful eye on your database.

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  • Adding UCM as a search source in Windows Explorer

    - by kyle.hatlestad
    A customer recently pointed out to me that Windows 7 supports federated search within Windows Explorer. This means you can perform searches to external sources such as Google, Flickr, YouTube, etc right from within Explorer. While we do have the Desktop Integration Suite which offers searching within Explorer, I thought it would be interesting to look into this method which would not require any client software to implement. Basically, federated searching hooks up in Windows Explorer through the OpenSearch protocol. A Search Connector Descriptor file is run and it installs the search provider. The file is a .osdx file which is an OpenSearch Description document. It describes the search provider you are hooking up to along with the URL for the query. If those results can come back as an RSS or ATOM feed, then you're all set. So the first step is to install the RSS Feeds component from the UCM Samples page on OTN. If you're on 11g, I've found the RSS Feeds works just fine on that version too. Next, you want to perform a Quick Search with a particular search term and then copy the RSS link address for that search result. Here is what an example URL might looks like: http://server:16200/cs/idcplg?IdcService=GET_SCS_FEED&feedName=search_results&QueryText=%28+%3cqsch%3eoracle%3c%2fqsch %3e+%29&SortField=dInDate&SortOrder=Desc&ResultCount=20&SearchQueryFormat= Universal&SearchProviders=server& Now you want to create a new text file and start out with this information: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?><OpenSearchDescription xmlns:ms-ose="http://schemas.microsoft.com/opensearchext/2009/"> <ShortName></ShortName> <Description></Description> <Url type="application/rss+xml" template=""/> <Url type="text/html" template=""/> </OpenSearchDescription> Enter a ShortName and Description. The ShortName will be the value used when displaying the search provider in Explorer. In the template attribute for the first Url element, enter the URL copied previously. You will then need to convert the ampersand symbols to '&' to make them XML compliant. Finally, you'll want to switch out the search term with '{searchTerms}'. For the second Url element, you can do the same thing except you want to copy the UCM search results URL from the page of results. That URL will look something like: http://server:16200/cs/idcplg?IdcService=GET_SEARCH_RESULTS&SortField=dInDate&SortOrder=Desc&ResultCount=20&QueryText=%3Cqsch%3Eoracle%3C%2Fqsch%3E&listTemplateId= &ftx=1&SearchQueryFormat=Universal&TargetedQuickSearchSelection= &MiniSearchText=oracle Again, convert the ampersand symbols and replace the search term with '{searchTerms}'. When complete, save the file with the .osdx extension. The completed file should look like: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <OpenSearchDescription xmlns="http://a9.com/-/spec/opensearch/1.1/" xmlns:ms-ose="http://schemas.microsoft.com/opensearchext/2009/"> <ShortName>Universal Content Management</ShortName> <Description>OpenSearch for UCM via Windows 7 Search Federation.</Description> <Url type="application/rss+xml" template="http://server:16200/cs/idcplg?IdcService=GET_SCS_FEED&amp;feedName=search_results&amp;QueryText=%28+%3Cqsch%3E{searchTerms}%3C%2fqsch%3E+%29&amp;SortField=dInDate&amp;SortOrder=Desc&amp;ResultCount=200&amp;SearchQueryFormat=Universal"/> <Url type="text/html" template="http://server:16200/cs/idcplg?IdcService=GET_SEARCH_RESULTS&amp;SortField=dInDate&amp;SortOrder=Desc&amp;ResultCount=20&amp;QueryText=%3Cqsch%3E{searchTerms}%3C%2Fqsch%3E&amp;listTemplateId=&amp;ftx=1&amp;SearchQueryFormat=Universal&amp;TargetedQuickSearchSelection=&amp;MiniSearchText={searchTerms}"/> </OpenSearchDescription> After you save the file, simply double-click it to create the provider. It will ask if you want to add the search connector to Windows. Click Add and it will add it to the Searches folder in your user folder as well as your Favorites. Now just click on the search icon and in the upper right search box, enter your term. As you are typing, it begins executing searches and the results will come back in Explorer. Now when you double-click on an item, it will try and download the web viewable for viewing. You also have the ability to save the search, just as you would in UCM. And there is a link to Search On Website which will launch your browser and go directly to the search results page there. And with some tweaks to the RSS component, you can make the results a bit more interesting. It supports the Media RSS standard, so you can pass along the thumbnail of the documents in the results. To enable this, edit the rss_resources.htm file in the RSS Feeds component. In the std_rss_feed_begin resource include, add the namespace 'xmlns:media="http://search.yahoo.com/mrss/' to the rss definition: <rss version="2.0" xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/" xmlns:sy="http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/syndication/" xmlns:media="http://search.yahoo.com/mrss/"> Next, in the rss_channel_item_with_thumb include, below the closing image element, add this element: </images> <media:thumbnail url="<$if strIndexOf(thumbnailUrl, "@t") > 0 or strIndexOf(thumbnailUrl, "@g") > 0 or strIndexOf(thumbnailUrl, "@p") > 0$><$rssHttpHost$><$thumbnailUrl$><$elseif dGif$><$HttpWebRoot$>images/docgifs/<$dGif$><$endif$>" /> <description> This and lots of other tweaks can be done to the RSS component to help extend it for optimum use in Explorer. Hopefully this can get you started. *Note: This post also applies to Universal Records Management (URM).

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  • Maintaining Revision Levels

    - by kyle.hatlestad
    A question that came up on an earlier blog post was how to limit the number of revisions on a piece of content. UCM does not inherently enforce any sort of limit on how many revisions you can have. It's unlimited. In some cases, there may be content that goes through lots of changes, but there just simply isn't a need to keep all of its revisions around. Deleting those revisions through the content information screen can be very cumbersome. And going through the Repository Manager applet can take time as well to filter and find the revisions to get rid of. But there is an easier way through the Archiver. The Export Query criteria in Archiver includes a very handy field called 'Revision Rank'. With revision labels, they typically go up as new revisions come in (e.g. 1, 2, 3, 4, etc...). But you can't really use this field to tell it to keep the top 5 revisions. Those top 5 revision numbers are always going up. But revision rank goes the opposite direction. The very latest revision is always 0. The previous revision to that is 1. Previous revision to that is 2. And so on and so forth. With revision rank, you can set your query to look for any Revision Rank greater or equal to 5. Now as older revisions move down the line, their revision rank gets higher and higher until they reach that threshold. Then when you run that archive export, you can choose to delete and remove those revisions. Running that export in Archiver is normally a manual process. But with Idc Command, you can script the process and have it run automatically from the server. Idc Command is a utility that allows you to run any of the content server services via the command line. You basically feed it a text file with the services and parameters defined along with the user to run it as. The Idc Command executable is located within the \bin\ directory: $ ./IdcCommand -f DeleteOlderRevisions.txt -u sysadmin -l delete_revisions.log In this example, our IdcCommand file to run the export and do the deletions would look like: IdcService=EXPORT_ARCHIVE aArchiveName=DeleteOlderRevisions aDoDelete=1 IDC_Name=idc dataSource=RevisionIDs <<EOD>> You can then use automated scheduling routines in the OS to run the command and command file at the frequency needed. Remember that you are deleting the revisions from within UCM, but they are still getting placed within the archive. So you will need to delete those batches to have them fully removed (or re-import if you need to recover them). For more information about Idc Command, you can find that in the Idc Command Reference Guide.

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  • Screen shots and documentation on the cheap

    - by Kyle Burns
    Occasionally I am surprised to open up my toolbox and find a great tool that I've had for years and never noticed.  The other day I had just such an experience with Windows Server 2008.  A co-worker of mine was squinting to read to screenshots that he had taken using the "Print Screen, paste" method in WordPad and asked me if there was a better tool available at a reasonable cost.  My first instinct was to take a look at CamStudio for him, but I also knew that he had an immediate need to take some more screenshots, so I decided to check and see if the Snipping Tool found in Windows 7 is also available in Windows Server 2008.  I clicked the Start button and typed “snip” into the search bar and while the Snipping Tool did not come up, a Control Panel item labeled “Record steps to reproduce a problem” did. The application behind the Control Panel entry was “Problem Steps Recorder” (PSR.exe) and I have confirmed that it is available in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 but have not checked other platforms.  It presents a pretty minimal and intuitive interface in providing a “Start Record”, “Stop Record”, and “Add Comment” button.  The “Start Record” button shockingly starts recording and, sure enough, the “Stop Record” button stops recording.  The “Add Comment” button prompts for a comment and for you to highlight the area of the screen to which your comment is related.  Once you’re done recording, the tool outputs an MHT file packaged in a ZIP archive.  This file contains a series of screen shots depicting the user’s interactions and giving timestamps and descriptive text (such as “User left click on “Test” in “My Page – Windows Internet Explorer”) as well as the comments they made along the way and some diagnostics about the applications captured. The Problem Steps Recorder looks like a simple solution to the most common of my needs for documentation that can turn “I can’t understand how to make it do what you’re reporting” to “Oh, I see what you’re talking about and will fix it right away”.  I you’re like me and haven’t yet discovered this tool give it a whirl and see for yourself.

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  • What Agile Model do you use at Work?

    - by Kyle Rozendo
    I am looking to start pushing for more Agile processes to be brought into play in the work place and do my best to outlaw cowboy coding as much as possible. I understand many of the different models and am just looking to see which model has the higher uptake (or which parts of the model as well), and in what industry it is being used. Extreme Programming (XP) Adaptive Software Development (ASD) Scrum Dynamic Systems Development Model (DSDM) Crystal Feature Driven Development (FDD) Lean Software Development (LSD) Agile Modelling (AM) Agile Unified Process (AUP) Kanban If you care to add to your answer with comments about what you don't like, do like or have tried and it hadn't worked, that would also be appreciated.

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  • Creating metadata value relationships

    - by kyle.hatlestad
    I was recently asked an question about an interesting use case. They wanted content to be submitted into UCM with a particular ID in a custom metadata field. But they wanted that ID to be translated during submission into an employee name in another metadata field upon submission. My initial thought was that this could be done with a dependent choice list (DCL). One option list field driving the choices in another. But this didn't work in this case for a couple of reasons. First, the number of IDs could potentially be very large. So making that into a drop-down list would not be practical. The preference would be for that field to simply be a text field to type in the ID. Secondly, data could be submitted through different methods other then the web-based check-in form. And without an interface to select the DCL choices, the system needed a way to determine and populate the name field. So instead I went the approach of having the value of the ID field drive the value of the Name field using the derived field approach in my rule. In looking at it though, it was easy to simply copy the value of the ID field into the Name field...but to have it look up and translate the value proved to be the tricky part. So here is the approach I took... First I created my two metadata fields as standard text fields in the Configuration Manager applet. Next I create a table that stores the relationship between the IDs and Names. I then create a View into that table and set the column to the EmployeeID. I now create a new Application Field and set it as an option list using the View I created in the previous step. The reason I create it as an Application field is because I don't need to display the field or store a value in it. I simply need to make use of the option list in the next step... Finally, I create a Rule in which I select the Employee Name field and turn on the 'Is derived field' checkbox. I edit the derived value and add a new condition. Because the option list is a Application field and not an Information field, I can't use the Compute button. Instead, I insert this line directly in the Value field: @getFieldViewValue("EmployeeMapping",#active.xEmployeeID, "EmployeeName") The "EmployeeMapping" parameter designates that the value should be pulled from the EmployeeMapping Application field that I had created in the previous step. The #active.xEmployeeID field is the ID value that should be pulled from what the user entered. "EmployeeName" is the column name in the table which has the value which corresponds to the ID. The extracted name then becomes the value within our Employee Name field. That's it. You can then add additional Rules to make the Name field read-only/hidden on the check-in page and such.

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  • Intellectual Property for in house development

    - by Kyle Rogers
    My company is a sub contractor on a major government contract. Over the past 5 years we've been developing in house applications to help support our company and streamline our work. Apparently in 2008 our president of the company at that time signed a continuation of services contract with the company we subcontract with on this project. In the contract amendment various things were discussed such as intellectual property and the creation of new and existing tools. The contract states that all the subcontractor's tools/scripts/etc... become the intellectual property of the main contractor holder. Basically all tools that were created in support of the project which we work on are no longer ours exclusively and they have rights to them. My company really doesn't do software development specifically but because of this contract these tools helped tremendously with our daily tasking. Does my company have any sort of recourse or actions to help keep our tools? My team of developers were completely unaware of any of these negotiations and until recently were kept in the dark about the agreements that were made. Do we as developers have any rights to the software? Since our company is not a software development shop, we have created all these tools without any sort of agreements or contracts within the company stating that we give our company full rights to our creations? I was reading an article by Joel Spolsky on this topic and was just wonder if there is any advice out there to help assist us? Thank you Joel Spolsky's Article

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  • Overriding GetHashCode in a mutable struct - What NOT to do?

    - by Kyle Baran
    I am using the XNA Framework to make a learning project. It has a Point struct which exposes an X and Y value; for the purpose of optimization, it breaks the rules for proper struct design, since its a mutable struct. As Marc Gravell, John Skeet, and Eric Lippert point out in their respective posts about GetHashCode() (which Point overrides), this is a rather bad thing, since if an object's values change while its contained in a hashmap (ie, LINQ queries), it can become "lost". However, I am making my own Point3D struct, following the design of Point as a guideline. Thus, it too is a mutable struct which overrides GetHashCode(). The only difference is that mine exposes and int for X, Y, and Z values, but is fundamentally the same. The signatures are below: public struct Point3D : IEquatable<Point3D> { public int X; public int Y; public int Z; public static bool operator !=(Point3D a, Point3D b) { } public static bool operator ==(Point3D a, Point3D b) { } public Point3D Zero { get; } public override int GetHashCode() { } public override bool Equals(object obj) { } public bool Equals(Point3D other) { } public override string ToString() { } } I have tried to break my struct in the way they describe, namely by storing it in a List<Point3D>, as well as changing the value via a method using ref, but I did not encounter they behavior they warn about (maybe a pointer might allow me to break it?). Am I being too cautious in my approach, or should I be okay to use it as is?

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  • Hancon / Hanwang Graphics Tablet not recognised

    - by Martin Kyle
    I'm totally lost. I've just built a new system and installed Ubuntu 12.04. It's my first time with Linux and getting into the terminal / command line for the first time since IBMDOS 5 and Windows 3.1 has been a steep learning curve. However, the interface works beautifully apart from it doesn't recognize my Hanvon Artmaster AM1209. I have sent diagnostics to Digimend and Favux was kind enough to advise that the tablet should be using the Wacom X driver as the Hanvon is actually a Hanwang and these should be supported. lsusb reports: ID 0b57:8501 Beijing HanwangTechnology Co., Ltd xinput list reports: ? Virtual core pointer id=2 [master pointer (3)] ? ? Virtual core XTEST pointer id=4 [slave pointer (2)] ? ? PS/2+USB Mouse id=8 [slave pointer (2)] ? Virtual core keyboard id=3 [master keyboard (2)] ? Virtual core XTEST keyboard id=5 [slave keyboard (3)] ? Power Button id=6 [slave keyboard (3)] ? Power Button id=7 [slave keyboard (3)] ? Eee PC WMI hotkeys id=9 [slave keyboard (3)] ? AT Translated Set 2 keyboard id=10 [slave keyboard (3)] Favux suggested inspecting /var/log/Xorg.0.log for the tablet but I cannot see any mention of it, and that is as far as I have got. I've tried researching the problem but I am struggling with all the new terminology and the fact that I want the PC to be a means to an end and not the end in itself where I spend the rest of my days tweaking and testing rather than just using it. Hope there is some help out there.

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  • Correct way to drive Main Loop in Cocoa

    - by Kyle
    I'm writing a game that currently runs in both Windows and Mac OS X. My main game loop looks like this: while(running) { ProcessOSMessages(); // Using Peek/Translate message in Win32 // and nextEventMatchingMask in Cocoa GameUpdate(); GameRender(); } Thats obviously simplified a bit, but thats the gist of it. In Windows where I have full control over the application, it works great. Unfortunately Apple has their own way of doing things in Cocoa apps. When I first tried to implement my main loop in Cocoa, I couldn't figure out where to put it so I created my own NSApplication per this post. I threw my GameFrame() right in my run function and everything worked correctly. However, I don't feel like its the "right" way to do it. I would like to play nicely within Apple's ecosystem rather than trying to hack a solution that works. This article from apple describes the old way to do it, with an NSTimer, and the "new" way to do it using CVDisplayLink. I've hooked up the CVDisplayLink version, but it just feels....odd. I don't like the idea of my game being driven by the display rather than the other way around. Are my only two options to use a CVDisplayLink or overwrite my own NSApplication? Neither one of those solutions feels quite right.

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  • New security configuration flag in UCM PS3

    - by kyle.hatlestad
    While the recent Patch Set 3 (PS3) release was mostly focused on bug fixes and such, a new configuration flag was added for security. In 10gR3 and prior versions, UCM had a component called Collaboration Manager which allowed for project folders to be created and groups of users assigned as members to collaborate on documents. With this component came access control lists (ACL) for content and folders. Users could assign specific security rights on each and every document and folder within a project. And it was possible to enable these ACL's without having the Collaboration Manager component enabled. But it took some special instructions (see technote# 603148.1) and added some extraneous pieces still related to Collaboration Manager. When 11g came out, Collaboration Manager was no longer available. But the configuration settings to turn on ACLs were still there. Well, in PS3 they've been cleaned up a bit and a new configuration flag has been added to simply turn on the ACL fields and none of the other collaboration bits. To enable ACLs: UseEntitySecurity=true Along with this configuration flag to turn ACLs on, you also need to define which Security Groups will honor the ACL fields. If an ACL is applied to a content item with a Security Group outside this list, it will be ignored. SpecialAuthGroups=HumanResources,Legal,Marketing Save the settings and restart the instance. Upon restart, two new metadata fields will be created: xClbraUserList, xClbraAliasList. If you are using OracleTextSearch as the search indexer, be sure to run a Fast Rebuild on the collection. On the Check In, Search, and Update pages, values are added by simply typing in the value and getting a type-ahead list of possible values. Select the value, click Add and then set the level of access (Read, Write, Delete, or Admin). If all of the fields are blank, then it simply falls back to just Security Group and Account access. As for how they are stored in the metadata fields, each entry starts with it's identifier: ampersand (&) symbol for users, "at" (@) symbol for groups, and colon (:) for roles. Following that is the entity name. And at the end is the level of access in paranthesis. e.g. (RWDA). And each entry is separated by a comma. So if you were populating values through batch loader or an external source, the values would be defined this way. Detailed information on Access Control Lists can be found in the Oracle Fusion Middleware System Administrator's Guide for Oracle Content Server.

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  • Using Sitecore RenderingContext Parameters as MVC controller action arguments

    - by Kyle Burns
    I have been working with the Technical Preview of Sitecore 6.6 on a project and have been for the most part happy with the way that Sitecore (which truly is an MVC implementation unto itself) has been expanded to support ASP.NET MVC. That said, getting up to speed with the combined platform has not been entirely without stumbles and today I want to share one area where Sitecore could have really made things shine from the "it just works" perspective. A couple days ago I was asked by a colleague about the usage of the "Parameters" field that is defined on Sitecore's Controller Rendering data template. Based on the standard way that Sitecore handles a field named Parameters, I was able to deduce that the field expected key/value pairs separated by the "&" character, but beyond that I wasn't sure and didn't see anything from a documentation perspective to guide me, so it was time to dig and find out where the data in the field was made available. My first thought was that it would be really nice if Sitecore handled the parameters in this field consistently with the way that ASP.NET MVC handles the various parameter collections on the HttpRequest object and automatically maps them to parameters of the action method executing. Being the hopeful sort, I configured a name/value pair on one of my renderings, added a parameter with matching name to the controller action and fired up the bugger to see... that the parameter was not populated. Having established that the field's value was not going to be presented to me the way that I had hoped it would, the next assumption that I would work on was that Sitecore would handle this field similar to how they handle other similar data and would plug it into some ambient object that I could reference from within the controller method. After a considerable amount of guessing, testing, and cracking code open with Redgate's Reflector (a must-have companion to Sitecore documentation), I found that the most direct way to access the parameter was through the ambient RenderingContext object using code similar to: string myArgument = string.Empty; var rc = Sitecore.Mvc.Presentation.RenderingContext.CurrentOrNull; if (rc != null) {     var parms = rc.Rendering.Parameters;     myArgument = parms["myArgument"]; } At this point, we know how this field is used out of the box from Sitecore and can provide information from Sitecore's Content Editor that will be available when the controller action is executing, but it feels a little dirty. In order to properly test the action method I would have to do a lot of setup work and possible use an isolation framework such as Pex and Moles to get at a value that my action method is dependent upon. Notice I said that my method is dependent upon the value but in order to meet that dependency I've accepted another dependency upon Sitecore's RenderingContext.  I'm a big believer in, when possible, ensuring that any piece of code explicitly advertises dependencies using the method signature, so I found myself still wanting this to work the same as if the parameters were in the request route, querystring, or form by being able to add a myArgument parameter to the action method and have this parameter populated by the framework. Lucky for us, the ASP.NET MVC framework is extremely flexible and provides some easy to grok and use extensibility points. ASP.NET MVC is able to provide information from the request as input parameters to controller actions because it uses objects which implement an interface called IValueProvider and have been registered to service the application. The most basic statement of responsibility for an IValueProvider implementation is "I know about some data which is indexed by key. If you hand me the key for a piece of data that I know about I give you that data". When preparing to invoke a controller action, the framework queries registered IValueProvider implementations with the name of each method argument to see if the ValueProvider can supply a value for the parameter. (the rest of this post will assume you're working along and make a lot more sense if you do) Let's pull Sitecore out of the equation for a second to simplify things and create an extremely simple IValueProvider implementation. For this example, I first create a new ASP.NET MVC3 project in Visual Studio, selecting "Internet Application" and otherwise taking defaults (I'm assuming that anyone reading this far in the post either already knows how to do this or will need to take a quick run through one of the many available basic MVC tutorials such as the MVC Music Store). Once the new project is created, go to the Index action of HomeController.  This action sets a Message property on the ViewBag to "Welcome to ASP.NET MVC!" and invokes the View, which has been coded to display the Message. For our example, we will remove the hard coded message from this controller (although we'll leave it just as hard coded somewhere else - this is sample code). For the first step in our exercise, add a string parameter to the Index action method called welcomeMessage and use the value of this argument to set the ViewBag.Message property. The updated Index action should look like: public ActionResult Index(string welcomeMessage) {     ViewBag.Message = welcomeMessage;     return View(); } This represents the entirety of the change that you will make to either the controller or view.  If you run the application now, the home page will display and no message will be presented to the user because no value was supplied to the Action method. Let's now write a ValueProvider to ensure this parameter gets populated. We'll start by creating a new class called StaticValueProvider. When the class is created, we'll update the using statements to ensure that they include the following: using System.Collections.Specialized; using System.Globalization; using System.Web.Mvc; With the appropriate using statements in place, we'll update the StaticValueProvider class to implement the IValueProvider interface. The System.Web.Mvc library already contains a pretty flexible dictionary-like implementation called NameValueCollectionValueProvider, so we'll just wrap that and let it do most of the real work for us. The completed class looks like: public class StaticValueProvider : IValueProvider {     private NameValueCollectionValueProvider _wrappedProvider;     public StaticValueProvider(ControllerContext controllerContext)     {         var parameters = new NameValueCollection();         parameters.Add("welcomeMessage", "Hello from the value provider!");         _wrappedProvider = new NameValueCollectionValueProvider(parameters, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);     }     public bool ContainsPrefix(string prefix)     {         return _wrappedProvider.ContainsPrefix(prefix);     }     public ValueProviderResult GetValue(string key)     {         return _wrappedProvider.GetValue(key);     } } Notice that the only entry in the collection matches the name of the argument to our HomeController's Index action.  This is the important "secret sauce" that will make things work. We've got our new value provider now, but that's not quite enough to be finished. Mvc obtains IValueProvider instances using factories that are registered when the application starts up. These factories extend the abstract ValueProviderFactory class by initializing and returning the appropriate implementation of IValueProvider from the GetValueProvider method. While I wouldn't do so in production code, for the sake of this example, I'm going to add the following class definition within the StaticValueProvider.cs source file: public class StaticValueProviderFactory : ValueProviderFactory {     public override IValueProvider GetValueProvider(ControllerContext controllerContext)     {         return new StaticValueProvider(controllerContext);     } } Now that we have a factory, we can register it by adding the following line to the end of the Application_Start method in Global.asax.cs: ValueProviderFactories.Factories.Add(new StaticValueProviderFactory()); If you've done everything right to this point, you should be able to run the application and be presented with the home page reading "Hello from the value provider!". Now that you have the basics of the IValueProvider down, you have everything you need to enhance your Sitecore MVC implementation by adding an IValueProvider that exposes values from the ambient RenderingContext's Parameters property. I'll provide the code for the IValueProvider implementation (which should look VERY familiar) and you can use the work we've already done as a reference to create and register the factory: public class RenderingContextValueProvider : IValueProvider {     private NameValueCollectionValueProvider _wrappedProvider = null;     public RenderingContextValueProvider(ControllerContext controllerContext)     {         var collection = new NameValueCollection();         var rc = RenderingContext.CurrentOrNull;         if (rc != null && rc.Rendering != null)         {             foreach(var parameter in rc.Rendering.Parameters)             {                 collection.Add(parameter.Key, parameter.Value);             }         }         _wrappedProvider = new NameValueCollectionValueProvider(collection, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);         }     public bool ContainsPrefix(string prefix)     {         return _wrappedProvider.ContainsPrefix(prefix);     }     public ValueProviderResult GetValue(string key)     {         return _wrappedProvider.GetValue(key);     } } In this post I've discussed the MVC IValueProvider used to map data to controller action method arguments and how this can be integrated into your Sitecore 6.6 MVC solution.

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  • WebCenter Content shared folders for clustering

    - by Kyle Hatlestad
    When configuring a WebCenter Content (WCC) cluster, one of the things which makes it unique from some other WebLogic Server applications is its requirement for a shared file system.  This is actually not any different then 10g and previous versions of UCM when it ran directly on a JVM.  And while it is simple enough to say it needs a shared file system, there are some crucial details in how those directories are configured. And if they aren't followed, you may result in some unwanted behavior. This blog post will go into the details on how exactly the file systems should be split and what options are required. [Read More]

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  • WebCenter Content shared folders for clustering

    - by Kyle Hatlestad
    When configuring a WebCenter Content (WCC) cluster, one of the things which makes it unique from some other WebLogic Server applications is its requirement for a shared file system.  This is actually not any different then 10g and previous versions of UCM when it ran directly on a JVM.  And while it is simple enough to say it needs a shared file system, there are some crucial details in how those directories are configured. And if they aren't followed, you may result in some unwanted behavior. This blog post will go into the details on how exactly the file systems should be split and what options are required. Beyond documents being stored on the file system and/or database and metadata being stored in the database along with other structured data, there is other information being read and written to on the file system.  Information such as user profile preferences, workflow item state information, metadata profiles, and other details are stored in files.  In addition, for certain processes within WCC, each of the nodes needs to know what the other nodes are doing so they don’t step on each other.  WCC keeps track of this through the use of lock files on the file system.  Because of this, each node of the WCC must have access to the same file system just as they have access to the same database. WCC uses its own locking mechanism using files, so it also needs to have access to those files without file attribute caching and without locking being done by the client (node).  If one of the nodes accesses a certain status file and it happens to be cached, that node might attempt to run a process which another node is already working on.  Or if a particular file is locked by one of the node clients, this could interfere with access by another node.  Unfortunately, when disabling file attribute caching on the file share, this can impact performance.  So it is important to only disable caching and locking on the particular folders which require it.  When configuring WebCenter Content after deploying the domain, it asks for 3 different directories: Content Server Instance Folder, Native File Repository Location, and Weblayout Folder.  And starting in PS5, it now asks for the User Profile Folder. Even if you plan on storing the content in the database, you still need to establish a Native File (Vault) and Weblayout directories.  These will be used for handling temporary files, cached files, and files used to deliver the UI. For these directories, the only folder which needs to have the file attribute caching and locking disabled is the ‘Content Server Instance Folder’.  So when establishing this share through NFS or a clustered file system, be sure to specify those options. For instance, if creating the share through NFS, use the ‘noac’ and ‘nolock’ options for the mount options. For the other directories, caching and locking should be enabled to provide best performance to those locations.   These directory path configurations are contained within the <domain dir>\ucm\cs\bin\intradoc.cfg file: #Server System PropertiesIDC_Id=UCM_server1 #Server Directory Variables IdcHomeDir=/u01/fmw/Oracle_ECM1/ucm/idc/ FmwDomainConfigDir=/u01/fmw/user_projects/domains/base_domain/config/fmwconfig/ AppServerJavaHome=/u01/jdk/jdk1.6.0_22/jre/ AppServerJavaUse64Bit=true IntradocDir=/mnt/share_no_cache/base_domain/ucm/cs/ VaultDir=/mnt/share_with_cache/ucm/cs/vault/ WeblayoutDir=/mnt/share_with_cache/ucm/cs/weblayout/ #Server Classpath variables #Additional Variables #NOTE: UserProfilesDir is only available in PS5 – 11.1.1.6.0UserProfilesDir=/mnt/share_with_cache/ucm/cs/data/users/profiles/ In addition to these folder configurations, it’s also recommended to move node-specific folders to local disk to avoid unnecessary traffic to the shared directory.  So on each node, go to <domain dir>\ucm\cs\bin\intradoc.cfg and add these additional configuration entries: VaultTempDir=<domain dir>/ucm/<cs>/vault/~temp/ TraceDirectory=<domain dir>/servers/<UCM_serverN>/logs/EventDirectory=<domain dir>/servers/<UCM_serverN>/logs/event/ And of course, don’t forget the cluster-specific configuration values to add as well.  These can be added through Admin Server -> General Configuration -> Additional Configuration Variables or directly in the <IntradocDir>/config/config.cfg file: ArchiverDoLocks=true DisableSharedCacheChecking=true ServiceAllowRetry=true    (use only with Oracle RAC Database)PublishLockTimeout=300000  (time can vary depending on publishing time and number of nodes) For additional information and details on clustering configuration, I highly recommend reviewing document [1209496.1] on the support site.  In addition, there is a great step-by-step guide on setting up a WebCenter Content cluster [1359930.1].

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  • Downloading specific video renditions in WebCenter Content

    - by Kyle Hatlestad
    I recently had a question come up on one of my previous blog articles about downloading a specific video rendition.  When accessing image renditions, you simply need to pass in the 'Rendition=<rendition name>' parameter on the GET_FILE service and it will be returned.  But when you try that with videos, you get the error message, "Unable to download '<Content ID>'. The rendition or attachment '<Rendition Name>' could not be found in the list manifest of the revision with internal revision ID '<dID>'. [Read More] 

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  • Downloading specific video renditions in WebCenter Content

    - by Kyle Hatlestad
    I recently had a question come up on one of my previous blog articles about downloading a specific video rendition.  When accessing image renditions, you simply need to pass in the 'Rendition=<rendition name>' parameter on the GET_FILE service and it will be returned.  But when you try that with videos, you get the error message, "Unable to download '<Content ID>'. The rendition or attachment '<Rendition Name>' could not be found in the list manifest of the revision with internal revision ID '<dID>'. Through the interface, it exposes the ability to download, but utilizes the Content Basket to bundle one or more videos and download them as a zip.   I had never tried this with videos, but thought they had worked the same way.  Well, it turns out you need to pass in an extra parameter in the case of videos.  So if you pass in parameter of 'AuxRenditionType=media', that will allow the GET_FILE service to download the video (e.g. http://server/cs/idcplg?IdcService=GET_FILE&dID=11012&dDocName=WCCBASE9010812&allowInterrupt=1 &Rendition=QuickTime&AuxRenditionType=media).  And if you haven't seen the David After Dentist video, I'd highly recommend it! 

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  • As a person getting into mobile development, what's the best mobile platform in terms of profitability? [closed]

    - by Kyle Loman
    I realize this question can range very far so would love to hear any and all opinions on this. However, I'll be honest and say that I have been thinking of this in terms of most profitable. I know how this may sound either way but this is one of my main sticking points. I realize that I'm not guaranteed a single cent and success is never guaranteed but I'm going into this with the thought of making something out of it both financially and also for my own interest. I know that iOS gets a lot of attention on this front but Android commands a lot more market share. However, I know there are drawbacks to Android too, whether it's in the actual development process and programming (though I've heard conflicting reports on this, such as how easy/difficult it is for to address screen res in different devices) or the app ecosystem being flooded. But iOS's app ecosystem has been described as too saturated and harder to compete in for that reason. Since Windows Phone has fewer apps than both of those two, that might be the best place to start in order to be closer to the ground floor of the store and be noticed more? Less saturation = better chances of sales or differentiating? Something like the gold rush during the first years of the iOS App Store (not exactly but at least in concept)? Would it be that despite fewer users on the platform, there's more exposure due to less competition so that may translate to better success at sales? Plus, I know MS is in it for the long haul so I'm not too fearful of something like WebOS going away. Obviously RIM isn't very popular nowadays but I read a recent article that says Blackberry actually has the apps that make the most money, any thoughts on that: http://gigaom.com/mobile/which-mobile-oss-apps-make-most-money-surprise-its-blackberry/ Again, this is all I've heard or known about so if there's anything to add or correct here, please do. In addition, this has actually affected my next personal phone upgrade. I'm eligible for a carrier discount now and I've had my eye on the iPhone 5. However, the Lumia 920 is the one I'm holding out for and I'm open to trying an Android but I'm not sure I can wait that long for any new Nexus or even the Razr HD. Even the new Lumia in November is making me antsy, I'm so close to just getting an iPhone 5. But when I say this has affected my phone choice, I'd want to be able to carry the apps I write with me so that I'm able to pull my phone out to show people without having to carry around a second device to do so. So that's why I'd like to make my personal phone match the main platform I'm developing for. Of course, I will likely expand to other platforms if I gain any decent success but the one I target now would serve well as my personal phone I carry around so that I can use it as a marketing tool, in a sense, showing people my apps if the opportunity presents itself. So what's the best mobile platform to choose, and especially in regards to most lucrative? As said previously, this would influence my personal phone choice greatly. Thanks in advance and I hope this isn't taken the wrong way - I understand there are trade-offs and other factors that may balance this out but making some revenue is key among that. For some background, I have done software development and know programming language concepts so I'm not entirely new to it and I do get the notion of being familiar with these things so that I can translate this skill among a variety of languages but I'm currently just having difficulty choosing my first main mobile platform based on the criteria I've outlined above.

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  • Filtering option list values based on security in UCM

    - by kyle.hatlestad
    Fellow UCM blog writer John Sim recently posted a comment asking about filtering values based on the user's security. I had never dug into that detail before, but thought I would take a look. It ended up being tricker then I originally thought and required a bit of insider knowledge, so I thought I would share. The first step is to create the option list table in Configuration Manager. You want to define the column for the option list value and any other columns desired. You then want to have a column which will store the security attribute to apply to the option list value. In this example, we'll name the column 'dGroupName'. Next step is to create a View based on the new table. For the Internal and Visible column, you can select the option list column name. Then click on the Security tab, uncheck the 'Publish view data' checkbox and select the 'Use standard document security' radio button. Click on the 'Edit Values...' button and add the values for the option list. In the dGroupName field, enter the Security Group (or Account if you use Accounts for security) to apply to that value. Create the custom metadata field and apply the View just created. The next step requires file system access to the server. Open the file [ucm directory]\data\schema\views\[view name].hda in a text editor. Below the line '@Properties LocalData', add the line: schSecurityImplementorColumnMap=dGroupName:dSecurityGroup The 'dGroupName' value designates the column in the table which stores the security value. 'dSecurityGroup' indicates the type of security to check against. It would be 'dDocAccount' if using Accounts. Save the file and restart UCM. Now when a user goes to the check-in page, they will only see the options for which they have read and write privileges to the associated Security Group. And on the Search page, they will see the options for which they have just read access. One thing to note is if a value that a user normally can't view on Check-in or Search is applied to a document, but the document is viewable by the user, the user will be able to see the value on the Content Information screen.

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  • Crawling a Content Folio

    - by Kyle Hatlestad
    Content Folios in WebCenter Content allow you to assemble, track, and access a logical group of documents and/or links.  It allows you to manage them as just a list of items (simple folio) or organized as a hierarchy (advanced folio).  The built-in UI in content server allows you to work with these folios, but publishing them or consuming them externally can be a bit of a challenge.   [Read More]

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  • Crawling a Content Folio

    - by Kyle Hatlestad
    Content Folios in WebCenter Content allow you to assemble, track, and access a logical group of documents and/or links.  It allows you to manage them as just a list of items (simple folio) or organized as a hierarchy (advanced folio).  The built-in UI in content server allows you to work with these folios, but publishing them or consuming them externally can be a bit of a challenge.   The folios themselves are actually XML files that contain the structure, attributes, and pointers to the content items.  So to publish this somewhere, such as a Site Studio page, you could perhaps use an XML parser to traverse the structure and create your output.  But XML parsers are not always the easiest or most efficient to use.  In order to more easily crawl and consume a Content Folio, Ed Bryant - Principal Sales Consultant, wrote a component to do just that.  His component adds a service which does all the work for you and returns the folio structure as a simple resultset.  So consuming and publishing that folio on a Site Studio page or in your portal using RIDC is a breeze!  For example, let's take an advanced Content Folio example like this: If we look at the native file, the XML looks like this: But if we access the folio using the new service - http://server/cs/idcplg?IdcService=FOLIO_CRAWL&dDocName=ecm008003&IsPageDebug=1 - this is what the result set looks like (using the IsPageDebug parameter). Given this as the result set, it makes it very easy to consume and repurpose that folio. You can download a copy of the sample component here. Special thanks to Ed for letting me share this component!

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  • Trouble installing Ubuntu 12.04 from USB

    - by Kyle J
    I want to dual-boot Ubuntu Desktop 12.04 on my new ultrabook which has an Intel i7 3517U processor 6GB RAM Windows 7, 64-bit no CD/DVD drive I created my bootable USB stick using pendrivelinux.com with the "ubuntu-12.04.1-desktop-i386.iso". I am following these directions because they include nice screenshots; however, I do not get very far in the process. I am able to boot into the Live Desktop, and then I try to install onto my hard disk. Here are the series of actions that I take next: First, I see this ( http://i.imgur.com/vucYH ) window, and click 'continue' Then I get this ( http://imgur.com/2wESc ) window, and click 'continue' again This appears: and I get worried because it seems like there is no recognition that I have Windows installed. According to the directions I am following, I should see /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2 partitions. In the drop-down menu at the bottom the only "Device for boot loader installation" is /dev/sdb and no information is shown. I am hesitant to click 'Install Now' for fear of what it might do to Windows. 4. I click 'Quit' and cancel the installation, but then about 5 seconds later this ( http://imgur.com/a/yXi0C ) window pops up (I have expanded it to full screen to scroll and show all the details). 5. Another second later this ( http://imgur.com/vxcrN ) comes up. I'm not sure how relevant this is. Does anyone have any insight into this issue?? Why does it not show my current Windows partition? What would happen if I tried to continue with the installation process? Thanks! PS - sorry, it would only let me post 2 hyperlinks as a new user

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