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  • Distributed and/or Parallel SSIS processing

    - by Jeff
    Background: Our company hosts SaaS DSS applications, where clients provide us data Daily and/or Weekly, which we process & merge into their existing database. During business hours, load in the servers are pretty minimal as it's mostly users running simple pre-defined queries via the website, or running drill-through reports that mostly hit the SSAS OLAP cube. I manage the IT Operations Team, and so far this has presented an interesting "scaling" issue for us. For our daily-refreshed clients, the server is only "busy" for about 4-6 hrs at night. For our weekly-refresh clients, the server is only "busy" for maybe 8-10 hrs per week! We've done our best to use some simple methods of distributing the load by spreading the daily clients evenly among the servers such that we're not trying to process daily clients back-to-back over night. But long-term this scaling strategy creates two notable issues. First, it's going to consume a pretty immense amount of hardware that sits idle for large periods of time. Second, it takes significant Production Support over-head to basically "schedule" the ETL such that they don't over-lap, and move clients/schedules around if they out-grow the resources on a particular server or allocated time-slot. As the title would imply, one option we've tried is running multiple SSIS packages in parallel, but in most cases this has yielded VERY inconsistent results. The most common failures are DTExec, SQL, and SSAS fighting for physical memory and throwing out-of-memory errors, and ETLs running 3,4,5x longer than expected. So from my practical experience thus far, it seems like running multiple ETL packages on the same hardware isn't a good idea, but I can't be the first person that doesn't want to scale multiple ETLs around manual scheduling, and sequential processing. One option we've considered is virtualizing the servers, which obviously doesn't give you any additional resources, but moves the resource contention onto the hypervisor, which (from my experience) seems to manage simultaneous CPU/RAM/Disk I/O a little more gracefully than letting DTExec, SQL, and SSAS battle it out within Windows. Question to the forum: So my question to the forum is, are we missing something obvious here? Are there tools out there that can help manage running multiple SSIS packages on the same hardware? Would it be more "efficient" in terms of parallel execution if instead of running DTExec, SQL, and SSAS same machine (with every machine running that configuration), we run in pairs of three machines with SSIS running on one machine, SQL on another, and SSAS on a third? Obviously that would only make sense if we could process more than the three ETL we were able to process on the machine independently. Another option we've considered is completely re-architecting our SSIS package to have one "master" package for all clients that attempts to intelligently chose a server based off how "busy" it already is in terms of CPU/Memory/Disk utilization, but that would be a herculean effort, and seems like we're trying to reinvent something that you would think someone would sell (although I haven't had any luck finding it). So in summary, are we missing an obvious solution for this, and does anyone know if any tools (for free or for purchase, doesn't matter) that facilitate running multiple SSIS ETL packages in parallel and on multiple servers? (What I would call a "queue & node based" system, but that's not an official term). Ultimately VMWare's Distributed Resource Scheduler addresses this as you simply run a consistent number of clients per VM that you know will never conflict scheduleing-wise, then leave it up to VMWare to move the VMs around to balance out hardware usage. I'm definitely not against using VMWare to do this, but since we're a 100% Microsoft app stack, it seems like -someone- out there would have solved this problem at the application layer instead of the hypervisor layer by checking on resource utilization at the OS, SQL, SSAS levels. I'm open to ANY discussion on this, and remember no suggestion is too crazy or radical! :-) Right now, VMWare is the only option we've found to get away from "manually" balancing our resources, so any suggestions that leave us on a pure Microsoft stack would be great. Thanks guys, Jeff

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  • How do I prevent a website being misclassified by Websense?

    - by Jeff Atwood
    I received the following email from a user of one of our websites: This morning I tried to log into example.com and I was blocked by Websense at work because it is considered a "social networking" site or something. I assume the websense filter is maintained by a central location, so I'm hoping that by letting you guys know you can get it unblocked. per Wikipedia, Websense is web filtering or Internet content-control software. This means one (or more) of our sites is being miscategorized by Websense as "social networking" and thus disallowed for access at any workplace that uses Websense to control what websites their users can and cannot access during work hours. (I know, they are monsters!) How do we dispute this Websense classification error, as our websites should generally be considered "information technology" and never "social networking"? How do we know what category Websense has put our sites in, so we can pro-actively make sure they're not wrong?

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  • Difference between 12.04 and 12.04.1

    - by Jeff
    I recently did a fresh install of Ubuntu 12.04 two days ago. Or at least I thought it was 12.04, but actually 12.04.1. Now I'm having errors popping up from the grub loader. Error: no video mode activated which was apparently resolved in this bug# 699802. However these workarounds are for 11.xx and not working for me. I never had these errors before with 12.04 and now I'm getting them. What's the difference between 12.04 and 12.04.1? Off the bat I notice that the kernels are different 12.04 uses 3.2.0-26-generic-pae 12.04.1 uses 3.2.0-29-generic after an immediate sudo apt-get update upgrade 12.04.1 uses 3.2.0-30-generic I have two other computers running 12.04 (not 12.04.1) and they're working fine. The computer that I'm currently was working fine (with 12.04) previously too. Should I roll back my kernel to 3.2.0-26?

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  • Blogging: MacJournal & Windows Live Writer

    - by Jeff Julian
    One thing I have learned about using a Mac is that Apple does not produce very many free applications. The ones they do are typically not full featured and to get the full feature you need to buy their upgraded version. For example, when it comes to Photo editing and cataloging, iPhoto is not a solution for large files or RAW processing, you need Aperture which is a couple hundred dollars. I am not complaining because I like it when an application has a product team who generates revenue with it, because the chance of them being around longer seems to be higher. What is my point in all of this? Apple does not produce a product for blogging/journaling like Microsoft does with Windows Live Writer. I love Windows Live Writer. If you are on a Windows box, it is a required tool in your toolbox if you publish to a blog. The cleanness of the interface, integration with most blog APIs and ability to Save Local or Publish as a Draft make capturing your thoughts for publishing now or later a very easy task. My hope is that Microsoft will port it to the Mac, but I don’t believe that will ever happen as it is not a revenue generating product and Microsoft doesn’t often port to a Mac besides Remote Desktop Connection and MSN Messenger. For my configuration I used to use only Boot Camp on my two MacBook Pros I have owned in the past three years because I’m a PC, but after four different rebuilds (not typically due to Windows, but Boot Camp or Parallels) I decided to move off the Boot Camp platform and to VMWare Fusion. This is a complete separate blog post that I should spec out in MacJournal, but I now always boot into the Mac OS and use Fusion for my AJI Software VM or my client’s VMs. It just seems to work better for me and I have a very nice way to backup my Windows environments with VMWare.Needless to say, there was need in my new laptop configuration for a blogging tool that worked natively on a Mac. I don’t like to power up my machine for writing a document or working on an image and need to boot up a VM just so I can use Windows. Some would say why not just use a Windows laptop and put the MBP on eBay? It is just a preference and right now, I like the Mac OS for day to day work. So in comes MacJournal, part of the current MacHeist package for $19.95 (MacJournal is normally $39.95). This product is definitely not WLW, but WLW is missing some features I like in MacJournal. I hope the price point comes down on MacJournal cause I could see paying $19.95 for it, but it is always hard for me to buy a piece of software for $39.95 when I can use something else. But I am a cheapskate when it comes to software packages. I suggest if you are using a Mac to drop what you are doing pick up the MacHeist bundle today before it is over, but if you are reading this later, than download the trial and see if MacJournal is a solution for you. If you have any other suggestions that are as nice or cheaper, please comment.Product LinksMacJournal by Mariners Software $39.95 (part of MacHeist bundle for $19.95 with only one day left)Windows Live Writer by MicrosoftThis post was created using MacJournal.[Update: The joys of formatting. Make sure if you are a Geekswithblogs.net member that you use this configuration to setup the Metablog formatting of paragraphs correctly]

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  • How to configure XRDP to start cinnamon as default desktop session

    - by Jeff
    I was wondering if there is a way to make Cinnamon 1.4 the default environment upon logging in to Ubuntu 12.04. I can install Cinnamon 1.4 without any problems, but I am trying to run XRDP to log in from a Windows machine and would like it to start "Cinnamon session" instead of a Unity session by default. The question is, How can I tell XRDP to use Cinnamon instead of Unity upon logging in? XRDP seems to work much better than any VNC based servers.

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  • Redaction in AutoVue

    - by [email protected]
    As the trend to digitize all paper assets continues, so does the push to digitize all the processes around these assets. One such process is redaction - removing sensitive or classified information from documents. While for some this may conjure up thoughts of old CIA documents filled with nothing but blacked out pages, there are actually many uses for redaction today beyond military and government. Many companies have a need to remove names, phone numbers, social security numbers, credit card numbers, etc. from documents that are being scanned in and/or released to the public or less privileged users - insurance companies, banks and legal firms are a few examples. The process of digital redaction actually isn't that far from the old paper method: Step 1. Find a folder with a big red stamp on it labeled "TOP SECRET" Step 2. Make a copy of that document, since some folks still need to access the original contents Step 3. Black out the text or pages you want to hide Step 4. Release or distribute this new 'redacted' copy So where does a solution like AutoVue come in? Well, we've really been doing all of these things for years! 1. With AutoVue's VueLink integration and iSDK, we can integrate to virtually any content management system and view documents of almost any format with a single click. Finding the document and opening it in AutoVue: CHECK! 2. With AutoVue's markup capabilities, adding filled boxes (or other shapes) around certain text is a no-brainer. You can even leverage AutoVue's powerful APIs to automate the addition of markups over certain text or pre-defined regions using our APIs. Black out the text you want to hide: CHECK! 3. With AutoVue's conversion capabilities, you can 'burn-in' the comments into a new file, either as a TIFF, JPEG or PDF document. Burning-in the redactions avoids slip-ups like the recent (well-publicized) TSA one. Through our tight integrations, the newly created copies can be directly checked into the content management system with no manual intervention. Make a copy of that document: CHECK! 4. Again, leveraging AutoVue's integrations, we can now define rules in the system based on a user's privileges. An 'authorized' user wishing to view the document from the repository will get exactly that - no redactions. An 'unauthorized' user, when requesting to view that same document, can get redirected to open the redacted copy of the same document. Release or distribute the new 'redacted' copy: CHECK! See this movie (WMV format, 2mins, 20secs, no audio) for a quick illustration of AutoVue's redaction capabilities. It shows how redactions can be added based on text searches, manual input or pre-defined templates/regions. Let us know what you think in the comments. And remember - this is all in our flagship AutoVue product - no additional software required!

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  • Resolving TFS_SCHEMA_VERSION Errors In Team Foundation Server 2010 Collection Databases

    - by Jeff Ferguson
    I recently backed up a Team Foundation Server 2010 project collection database and restored it onto another server. All of that went well, until I tried to use the restored database on the new server. As it turns out, the old server was running the Release Candidate of TFS 2010 and the new server is running the RTM version of TFS 2010. I ended up with an error message shown on the new server's Team Web Access site about the project collection's TFS_SCHEMA_VERSION property not containing the appropriate value. As it turns out, TFS_SCHEMA_VERSION is an extended property on the project collection database. I ran the following SQL script against the project collection database restored onto the new server: EXEC [Tfs_DefaultCollection].sys.sp_dropextendedproperty @name=N'TFS_PRODUCT_VERSION' GO EXEC [Tfs_DefaultCollection].sys.sp_addextendedproperty @name=N'TFS_PRODUCT_VERSION', @value=N'10.0.30319.1' GO EXEC [Tfs_DefaultCollection].sys.sp_dropextendedproperty @name=N'TFS_SCHEMA_VERSION' GO EXEC [Tfs_DefaultCollection].sys.sp_addextendedproperty @name=N'TFS_SCHEMA_VERSION', @value=N'Microsoft Team Foundation Server 2010 (RTM)' GO Now, all is well. I can now navigate to http://newserver:8080/tfs/ and see the restored project collection and its contents.

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  • Windows Phone 7 review

    - by Jeff
    I finally got around to composing some thoughts on what I think about Windows Phone 7, and I posted those impressions on my personal blog. I'll save a few bytes and not repost it here.It should be obvious that my general impression is overwhelmingly positive. What I don't go into very deeply is how much I enjoy developing stuff for it. Baby Stopwatch was not even remotely hard to build, because it wasn't complex, but also because the platform itself is so easy to deal with. I've been messing around and building something a little more involved, and it too has been fun to work with. Sure, you have the quirks of Silverlight to work out, and then the phone-specific quirks after that, but it really is a lot of fun. If you haven't come up with a science project for the phone, I would encourage you to do so.Now if only I could find a gig here at Microsoft where people just build phone apps all day! (But not games... I know we already do that quite a bit.)

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  • Silverlight Cream for April 03, 2010 -- #829

    - by Dave Campbell
    In this Issue: Scott Marlowe, Nokola, SilverLaw, Brad Abrams, Jeff Wilcox, Jesse Liberty, Alexey Zakharov, ondrejsv, Ward Bell, and David Anson. Shoutouts: Bart Czernicki has a post up about the latest with HTML5: HTML 5 is Born Old - Quake in HTML 5 I was sent a link to shoebox360 a while back and had to sign up to see the Silverlight use, but it does work very nice. I like the panoramic carousel in the viewer: shoebox360 Jeff Handley has a post up on RIA Services - Documentation Guidance and Community Samples... the team is looking for feedback from all of us Shawn Wildermuth posted his My MIX Talks' Source Code Laurent Bugnion posted his Sample code and slides for my TechDays10 (Belgium) talks From SilverlightCream.com: Silverlight to WCF Cross Domain SecurityException Scott Marlowe wrote an article about an often-encountered security exception having to do with cross-domain policies. He details the problem, the response, the solution, and yet another problem/solution associated... good stuff, Scott! Simple Functions for HTML Interop You've seen Nokola's graphic work... how about some HTML Interop from him? He's exposing the code he uses in his work. New Video: ChildWindow Styling - Silverlight 3 SilverLaw has a new video tutorial on Silerlight 3 ChildWindow Styling up - in German - but the video is language-agnostic :) Silverlight 4 + RIA Services - Ready for Business: Exposing WCF (SOAP\WSDL) Services Brad Abrams' continuation in his RIA series is this one demonstrating exposing RIA Services as a Soap\WSDL service Silverlight 4: New parser implementation. New parser features. Jeff Wilcox has a post up highlighting some of the new features in Silverlight 4 such as a new parser implementation with new XAML features. New Video Series – Getting Started With Silverlight Jesse Liberty is starting a new video tutorial series that's going to build out to be a "complete survey of Silverlight programming". The first two are in this post and are Getting Started and Adding Controls to a Silverlight App... looks like good material, Jesse, and all the source is there for the taking as well. Silverlight layout hack: Centered content with fixed maxwidth Alexey Zakharov has a quick tip up on creating centered content with fixed maxwidth. He calls it a dirty trick... looks like code to me :) Silverlight DataForm’s autogenerated fields send empty strings to database ondrejsv points up a problem he had with the Toolkit's DataForm, and his solution to it... with code for all of us following along behind :) DevForce Extensibility With MEF InheritedExport Ward Bell has a post up describing how they got DevForce MEF'd up, and looks like a good post to get you all excited about MEF as well... lots of external links and good info. Tip: Read-only custom DependencyProperties don't exist in Silverlight, but can be closely approximated David Anson's latest Tip is about Read-only custom DependencyProperties in Silverlight -- which strictly is not possible, but he has a code example up that gets close. Stay in the 'Light! Twitter SilverlightNews | Twitter WynApse | WynApse.com | Tagged Posts | SilverlightCream Join me @ SilverlightCream | Phoenix Silverlight User Group Technorati Tags: Silverlight    Silverlight 3    Silverlight 4    Windows Phone MIX10

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  • Enhanced REST Support in Oracle Service Bus 11gR1

    - by jeff.x.davies
    In a previous entry on REST and Oracle Service Bus (see http://blogs.oracle.com/jeffdavies/2009/06/restful_services_with_oracle_s_1.html) I encoded the REST query string really as part of the relative URL. For example, consider the following URI: http://localhost:7001/SimpleREST/Products/id=1234 Now, technically there is nothing wrong with this approach. However, it is generally more common to encode the search parameters into the query string. Take a look at the following URI that shows this principle http://localhost:7001/SimpleREST/Products?id=1234 At first blush this appears to be a trivial change. However, this approach is more intuitive, especially if you are passing in multiple parameters. For example: http://localhost:7001/SimpleREST/Products?cat=electronics&subcat=television&mfg=sony The above URI is obviously used to retrieve a list of televisions made by Sony. In prior versions of OSB (before 11gR1PS3), parsing the query string of a URI was more difficult than in the current release. In 11gR1PS3 it is now much easier to parse the query strings, which in turn makes developing REST services in OSB even easier. In this blog entry, we will re-implement the REST-ful Products services using query strings for passing parameter information. Lets begin with the implementation of the Products REST service. This service is implemented in the Products.proxy file of the project. Lets begin with the overall structure of the service, as shown in the following screenshot. This is a common pattern for REST services in the Oracle Service Bus. You implement different flows for each of the HTTP verbs that you want your service to support. Lets take a look at how the GET verb is implemented. This is the path that is taken of you were to point your browser to: http://localhost:7001/SimpleREST/Products/id=1234 There is an Assign action in the request pipeline that shows how to extract a query parameter. Here is the expression that is used to extract the id parameter: $inbound/ctx:transport/ctx:request/http:query-parameters/http:parameter[@name="id"]/@value The Assign action that stores the value into an OSB variable named id. Using this type of XPath statement you can query for any variables by name, without regard to their order in the parameter list. The Log statement is there simply to provided some debugging info in the OSB server console. The response pipeline contains a Replace action that constructs the response document for our rest service. Most of the response data is static, but the ID field that is returned is set based upon the query-parameter that was passed into the REST proxy. Testing the REST service with a browser is very simple. Just point it to the URL I showed you earlier. However, the browser is really only good for testing simple GET services. The OSB Test Console provides a much more robust environment for testing REST services, no matter which HTTP verb is used. Lets see how to use the Test Console to test this GET service. Open the OSB we console (http://localhost:7001/sbconsole) and log in as the administrator. Click on the Test Console icon (the little "bug") next to the Products proxy service in the SimpleREST project. This will bring up the Test Console browser window. Unlike SOAP services, we don't need to do much work in the request document because all of our request information will be encoded into the URI of the service itself. Belore the Request Document section of the Test Console is the Transport section. Expand that section and modify the query-parameters and http-method fields as shown in the next screenshot. By default, the query-parameters field will have the tags already defined. You just need to add a tag for each parameter you want to pass into the service. For out purposes with this particular call, you'd set the quer-parameters field as follows: <tp:parameter name="id" value="1234" /> </tp:query-parameters> Now you are ready to push the Execute button to see the results of the call. That covers the process for parsing query parameters using OSB. However, what if you have an OSB proxy service that needs to consume a REST-ful service? How do you tell OSB to pass the query parameters to the external service? In the sample code you will see a 2nd proxy service called CallREST. It invokes the Products proxy service in exactly the same way it would invoke any REST service. Our CallREST proxy service is defined as a SOAP service. This help to demonstrate OSBs ability to mediate between service consumers and service providers, decreasing the level of coupling between them. If you examine the message flow for the CallREST proxy service, you'll see that it uses an Operational branch to isolate processing logic for each operation that is defined by the SOAP service. We will focus on the getProductDetail branch, that calls the Products REST service using the HTTP GET verb. Expand the getProduct pipeline and the stage node that it contains. There is a single Assign statement that simply extracts the productID from the SOA request and stores it in a local OSB variable. Nothing suprising here. The real work (and the real learning) occurs in the Route node below the pipeline. The first thing to learn is that you need to use a route node when calling REST services, not a Service Callout or a Publish action. That's because only the Routing action has access to the $oubound variable, especially when invoking a business service. The Routing action contains 3 Insert actions. The first Insert action shows how to specify the HTTP verb as a GET. The second insert action simply inserts the XML node into the request. This element does not exist in the request by default, so we need to add it manually. Now that we have the element defined in our outbound request, we can fill it with the parameters that we want to send to the REST service. In the following screenshot you can see how we define the id parameter based on the productID value we extracted earlier from the SOAP request document. That expression will look for the parameter that has the name id and extract its value. That's all there is to it. You now know how to take full advantage of the query parameter parsing capability of the Oracle Service Bus 11gR1PS2. Download the sample source code here: rest2_sbconfig.jar Ubuntu and the OSB Test Console You will get an error when you try to use the Test Console with the Oracle Service Bus, using Ubuntu (or likely a number of other Linux distros also). The error (shown below) will state that the Test Console service is not running. The fix for this problem is quite simple. Open up the WebLogic Server administrator console (usually running at http://localhost:7001/console). In the Domain Structure window on the left side of the console, select the Servers entry under the Environment heading. The select the Admin Server entry in the main window of the console. By default, you should be viewing the Configuration tabe and the General sub tab in the main window. Look for the Listen Address field. By default it is blank, which means it is listening on all interfaces. For some reason Ubuntu doesn't like this. So enter a value like localhost or the specific IP address or DNS name for your server (usually its just localhost in development envirionments). Save your changes and restart the server. Your Test Console will now work correctly.

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  • POP Forums v9 Beta 1 for ASP.NET MVC 3 posted to CodePlex!

    - by Jeff
    As promised, I posted a beta build of my forum app for ASP.NET MVC 3. Get the new goodies here: http://popforums.codeplex.com/releases/view/58228 This is the first beta for the ASP.NET MVC 3 version of POP Forums. It is nearly feature complete, and ready for testing and feedback. For previous release notes, look here, here and here.Check out the live preview: http://preview.popforums.com/ForumsSetup instructions are on the home page of this project. The new hotness in the beta, or what has been done since the last preview: All views converted to use Razor E-mail subscription/notification of new posts New post indicators/mark read buttons Permalinks to posts Jump to newest post (from new post indicators) Recent topics Favorite topics Moderator functions for topics (pin/close/delete, plus move and rename) Search, ported from v8. Not a ton of optimization here, or new unit testing, but the old version worked pretty well User posts (topics the user posted in) Forgot password Vanity items (signatures and avatars) Hide vanity items per user preference Some minor data caching where appropriate A little bit of UI refinement Lots-o-bug fixes Lots-o-unit tests What's next? The plan between now and the next beta is as follows: Continue working through features/tasks, and fix bugs as they're reported Integrate the forum into a real, production site Refine the UI Refactor as much as possible... the code organization is not entirely logical in some places After the second beta, a release candidate will follow, with a real "final" release after that. Subsequent releases should come relatively frequently and without a lot of risk. The trick in building this thing has been that it mostly tossed the previous WebForms version, which was all full of crusties. The time table for this is a little harder to pin down, as day jobs and families will have their effect. Other notes Refactoring will be a priority. As the features of MVC have evolved, so have my desires to use it in a fashion that makes things clear and easy to follow. I don't even know if anyone will ever start mucking around in the code, but on the off chance they do, I'd like what they find to not suck. Other nice-to-haves are builds to target Windows Azure and SQL CE. A nice setup UI would be super too. I think the ASP.NET MVC world has gone long enough without a decent forum.The biggest challenge that I've found is making the forum something that can be dropped in any app. While it does rope its views into an area, areas are mostly just routing details. I haven't thought of a clever way yet to limit dependency injection, for example, to just the forum bits. I mean, everyone should be using Ninject, but how realistic is that? ;)How much time and effort should you spend on POP Forums in its current state? Change is inevitable, but at this point I'm reasonably committed to not changing the database schema. I really think it will stay as-is. All bets are off for the various interfaces throughout the app, but the data should generally resist change. It's not even that different from v8, which was one of the original goals because I didn't want to rewrite SQL or introduce a new ORM or whatever. My point is that if you wanted to build a site around this today, even though it's not entirely functional, I think it's low risk in terms of data loss. I can't vouch for whether or not you know what you're doing.I've been having some chats with people lately about quoting posts, and honestly there has to be something better and straight forward. That continues to be a holy grail of mine, and some day, I hope to find it.Enjoy... it's starting to feel more real every day!

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  • TechEd 2012 Closing Party at Universal&rsquo;s Island of Adventure

    - by Jeff Julian
    Awesome news!  The TechEd 2012 Closing Party is at Universal’s Island of Adventure theme park this year.  The party is on Thursday, which give you a reason not to leave the conference early and actually catch some of the repeat sessions that you missed from crowds.  I am really excited to check out the Harry Potter area of the park, I have heard great things.  John and I will be making a presence again at TechEd, stay tuned for more details.   Links: Universal’s Official Site Brandy Pepper’s Announcement Post TechEd 2012 Session Catalog TechEd 2012 Website

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  • The Sitemap Paradox

    - by Jeff Atwood
    We use a sitemap on Stack Overflow, but I have mixed feelings about it. Web crawlers usually discover pages from links within the site and from other sites. Sitemaps supplement this data to allow crawlers that support Sitemaps to pick up all URLs in the Sitemap and learn about those URLs using the associated metadata. Using the Sitemap protocol does not guarantee that web pages are included in search engines, but provides hints for web crawlers to do a better job of crawling your site. Based on our two years' experience with sitemaps, there's something fundamentally paradoxical about the sitemap: Sitemaps are intended for sites that are hard to crawl properly. If Google can't successfully crawl your site to find a link, but is able to find it in the sitemap it gives the sitemap link no weight and will not index it! That's the sitemap paradox -- if your site isn't being properly crawled (for whatever reason), using a sitemap will not help you! Google goes out of their way to make no sitemap guarantees: "We cannot make any predictions or guarantees about when or if your URLs will be crawled or added to our index" citation "We don't guarantee that we'll crawl or index all of your URLs. For example, we won't crawl or index image URLs contained in your Sitemap." citation "submitting a Sitemap doesn't guarantee that all pages of your site will be crawled or included in our search results" citation Given that links found in sitemaps are merely recommendations, whereas links found on your own website proper are considered canonical ... it seems the only logical thing to do is avoid having a sitemap and make damn sure that Google and any other search engine can properly spider your site using the plain old standard web pages everyone else sees. By the time you have done that, and are getting spidered nice and thoroughly so Google can see that your own site links to these pages, and would be willing to crawl the links -- uh, why do we need a sitemap, again? The sitemap can be actively harmful, because it distracts you from ensuring that search engine spiders are able to successfully crawl your whole site. "Oh, it doesn't matter if the crawler can see it, we'll just slap those links in the sitemap!" Reality is quite the opposite in our experience. That seems more than a little ironic considering sitemaps were intended for sites that have a very deep collection of links or complex UI that may be hard to spider. In our experience, the sitemap does not help, because if Google can't find the link on your site proper, it won't index it from the sitemap anyway. We've seen this proven time and time again with Stack Overflow questions. Am I wrong? Do sitemaps make sense, and we're somehow just using them incorrectly?

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  • AJI Report Talks With Matt Watson About Stackify

    - by Jeff Julian
    Matt Watson of Stackify sits down with us at HDC to talk about what Stackify offers for developers who need the ability to get access to their production systems for diagnostics. Matt discusses why it is important to have good tools to gain visibility into their applications and some great examples of why he started Stackify after selling his first software company. Matt has been a blogger on Geekswithblogs.net since day one and we were excited to sit down with him to talk about what his new company will be offering developers who interact with production systems.   Listen to the Show   Site: http://stackify.com Twitter: @MattWatson81 Blog: http://geekswithblogs.net/mwatson/

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  • links for 2010-04-02

    - by Bob Rhubart
    Jeff Victor: Solaris Virtualization Book Jeff Victor with an update on the status of the book, "Oracle Solaris 10 System Virtualization Essentials." (tags: sun solaris virtualization) Mitch Denny: Architecture vs. Design It's an old post but it still resonates: "In the consumer electronics business, some people are actually hired to go through a system and remove components until it stops working – they do this to remove the cost before they go into mass production. We need more of this in the software business." -- Mitch Denny (tags: architecture design development) @vambenepe: Enterprise application integration patterns for IT management: a blast from the past or from the future? "In a recent blog post, Don Ferguson (CTO at CA) describes CA Catalyst, a major architectural overall which “applies enterprise application integration patterns to the problem of integrating IT management systems”. Reading this was fascinating to me. Not because the content was some kind of revelation, but exactly for the opposite reason. Because it is so familiar." -- William Vambenepe (tags: otn oracle eai)

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  • How do you uninstall wine 1.5?

    - by jeff
    I installed Wine through the terminal using these commands: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-wine/ppa sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install wine1.5 I know that I've removed at least part of wine. I removed the .wine folder in my home folder and I managed to remove the repository via this command: sudo apt-add-repository --remove ppa:ubuntu-wine/ppa Now when I try to install wine 1.4 via Ubuntu software center, it tells me I must remove these items to install wine: Microsoft windows compatibility layer (binary emulator and library) wine1.5 Microsoft windows compatibility layer (64-bit support) wine1.5-amd64 Microsoft windows compatibility layer (32-bit support) wine1.5-i386:i386 I've already tried this command: sudo apt-get --purge remove wine but it said that wine wasn't installed. Some assistance would be appreciated.

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  • Silverlight Cream for March 27, 2010 -- #822

    - by Dave Campbell
    In this Issue: MSDN, Bill Reiss, Charlie Kindel(-2-), SilverLaw, Scott Marlowe, Kenny Young, Andrea Boschin, Mike Taulty, Damon Payne, and Jeff Handley(-2-). Shoutouts: Scott Morrison has his material up for his talk at MIX 10: Silverlight 4 Business Applications Matthias Shapiro posted his MIX10 “Information Visualization in Silverlight” Slides and Code for MIX10 Information Visualization Talk Demos Dan Wahlin has his MIX10 material all posted as well: Syncing Audio, Video and Animations in Silverlight Timmy Kokke has an interesting MEF post up: Building extensions for Expression Blend 4 using MEF From SilverlightCream.com: How to: Add an Application Bar to Your Application In case you missed this MSDN post on adding an Application Bar to your WP7 app Simulating accelerometer data in the Windows Phone 7 emulator Got a Wii? How about a Wii remote? Bill Reiss shows how to use the Wii remote to simulate accelerometer data on the WP7 emulator ... really! Windows Phone 7 Series Icon Pack Charlie Kindel announced the release of a WP7 Icon pack ... great external MSDN link on using them as well. Windows Phone Developer Documentation Charlie Kindel also posted WP7 Documentation, and a quick overview of what you'll find ... samples, references, all good stuff to check out and download. GlossyTextblock Custom Control - Silverlight 3 SilverLaw has his GlossyTextblock rebuilt as a Custom Control and in the Expresseion Gallery. Check the blog for a screenshot. A Windows Phone 7 Silverlight TagList Scott Marlowe has a great post up for WP7 accessing his blog tag list via WCF and displaying the data on the emulator... wow! Dynamic Layout and Transitions in Expression Blend 4 Kenny Young has a great companion blog post to a demo app on Expression Gallery. There's also a link on the page to Kenny's MIX10 session Using XmlDefinition and XmlPrefix to better organize namespaces Andrea Boschin comes to our rescue about the maze of namespaces in XAML by using a solution from the RC: XmlDefinition and XmlPrefix Silverlight 4 RC – Socket Security Changes Mike Taulty is discussing changes in the RC with regard to sockets that have come about since he did his series of posts. Lots of good code. Cascading ItemsSource Bindings in Silverlight Damon Payne addresses an issue he came acros with multiple DataGrids on the same screen. He demonstrates the problem, and then demonstrates his solution. ContosoSales Application for RIA Services RC Jeff Handley posted about the refresh to the ContosoSales application shown in the PDC keynote, and details the changes. Lots of good code and links. DomainDataSource Filters and Parameters Jeff Handley has another post up about RIA Services and the fact that ControlParameter is gone... and he shows how to use ElementName binding instead. Stay in the 'Light! Twitter SilverlightNews | Twitter WynApse | WynApse.com | Tagged Posts | SilverlightCream Join me @ SilverlightCream | Phoenix Silverlight User Group Technorati Tags: Silverlight    Silverlight 3    Silverlight 4    Windows Phone MIX10

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  • Podcast Show Notes: Architecture in a Post-SOA World

    - by Bob Rhubart
    All three segments of my conversation with Oracle ACE Director Hajo Normann, SOA author Jeff Davies, and enterprise architect Pat Shepherd are now available. This conversation was recorded on March 9, 2010, and covered a lot of territory, from the lingering fear of SOA among many in IT, to the misinformation behind that fear, to a discussion of the future of enterprise architecture. Listen to Part 1 Listen to Part 2 Listen to Part 3 If you’d like to engage any of the panelists in your own conversation, the links below will help: Hajo Normann is a SOA architect and consultant at EDS in Frankfurt Blog | LinkedIn | Oracle Mix | Oracle ACE Profile | Books Jeff Davies is a Senior Product Manager at Oracle, and is the primary author of The Definitive Guide to SOA: Oracle Service Bus Homepage | Blog | LinkedIn | Oracle Mix Pat Shepherd is an enterprise architect with the Oracle Enterprise Solutions Group. Oracle Mix | LinkedIn | Blog New panelists and new topics coming next week, so stay tuned: RSS   Technorati Tags: oracle,otn,arch2arch,architect,communiity,enterprise architecture,podcast,soa,service-oriented architecture del.icio.us Tags: oracle,otn,arch2arch,architect,communiity,enterprise architecture,podcast,soa,service-oriented architecture

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  • Silverlight Cream for December 28, 2010 -- #1017

    - by Dave Campbell
    In this Issue: Davide Zordan, Alex Golesh, Michael S. Scherotter, Andrej Tozon, Alex Knight, Jeff Blankenburg(-2-), Jeremy Likness, and Laurent Bugnion. Above the Fold: Silverlight: "My “What’s new in Silverlight 4 demo” app" Andrej Tozon WP7: "Taking a screenshot from within a Silverlight #WP7 application" Laurent Bugnion Expression Blend: "PathListBox: getting started" Alex Knight Shoutouts: If you haven't seen this SurfCube app demo on YouTube yet... check it out now: SurfCube V1.0 Windows Phone 7 Browser Want to get a free WP7 class from Shawn Wildermuth? Check this out: Webinar: Writing your first Windows Phone 7 Application Koen Zwikstra announed the next preview of his great tool: Silverlight Spy Preview 2 From SilverlightCream.com: Using the Multi-Touch Behavior in a Windows Phone 7 Multi-Page application Davide Zordan has a post up responding to questions he receives about multi-touch on WP7 in applications spanning more than one page. Silverlight for Windows Phone 7 Quick Tip: Fix missing icons while using DatePicker/TimePicker controls Alex Golesh discusses the use of the DatePicker control from the WP7 toolkit and found an unpleasant surprise associated with the Done/Cancel icons in the ApplicationBar, and has a solution for us. Updated SMF Thumbnail Scrubbing Sample Code Michael S. Scherotter has a post up about an update he's done to Silverlight 4 of code that allows thumbnail views of a video while 'scrubbing' ... don't know what that is? read the post :) My “What’s new in Silverlight 4 demo” app Andrej Tozon admits he's a little behind with this post, but as he points out, it might be a good time to review Silverlight 4 features, on the eve of 5. PathListBox: getting started One half the Knight team -- Alex Knight this time, has the first post of a series on the PathListBox up ... some real Expression Blend goodness. What I Learned in WP7 – Issue #9 Two more from Jeff Blankenburg today, in his number 9, he starts off demonstrating passing data between pages when navigating and fnishes up with some excellent info for submitting apps to the marketplace. What I Learned in WP7 – #Issue 10 Jeff Blankenburg's number 10 elaborates on the query string data he discussed in number 9. Using Sterling in Windows Phone 7 Applications Who better than the author?? Jeremy Likness has an end-to-end WP7/Sterling app up on his blog... begin with downloading Sterling, discuss what's needed to support Tombstoning, even custom serialization. Taking a screenshot from within a Silverlight #WP7 application Laurent Bugnion has a post up describing something people have been looking for: getting a screenshot of a WP7 application's page. Stay in the 'Light! Twitter SilverlightNews | Twitter WynApse | WynApse.com | Tagged Posts | SilverlightCream Join me @ SilverlightCream | Phoenix Silverlight User Group Technorati Tags: Silverlight    Silverlight 3    Silverlight 4    Windows Phone MIX10

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  • Is 4-5 years the “Midlife Crisis” for a programming career?

    - by Jeff
    I’ve been programming C# professionally for a bit over 4 years now. For the past 4 years I’ve worked for a few small/medium companies ranging from “web/ads agencies”, small industry specific software shops to a small startup. I've been mainly doing "business apps" that involves using high-level programming languages (garbage collected) and my overall experience was that all of the works I’ve done could have been more professional. A lot of the things were done incorrectly (in a rush) mainly due to cost factor that people always wanted something “now” and with the smallest amount of spendable money. I kept on thinking maybe if I could work for a bigger companies or a company that’s better suited for programmers, or somewhere that's got the money and time to really build something longer term and more maintainable I may have enjoyed more in my career. I’ve never had a “mentor” that guided me through my 4 years career. I am pretty much blog / google / self taught programmer other than my bachelor IT degree. I’ve also observed another issue that most so called “senior” programmer in “my working environment” are really not that senior skill wise. They are “senior” only because they’ve been a long time programmer, but the code they write or the decisions they make are absolutely rubbish! They don't want to learn, they don't want to be better they just want to get paid and do what they've told to do which make sense and most of us are like that. Maybe that’s why they are where they are now. But I don’t want to become like them I want to be better. I’ve run into a mental state that I no longer intend to be a programmer for my future career. I started to think maybe there are better things out there to work on. The more blogs I read, the more “best practices” I’ve tried the more I feel I am drifting away from “my reality”. But I am not a great programmer otherwise I don't think I am where I am now. I think 4-5 years is a stage that can be a step forward career wise or a step out of where you are. I just wanted to hear what other have to say about what I’ve mentioned above and whether you’ve experienced similar situation in your past programming career and how you dealt with it. Thanks.

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  • Dude, what’s up with POP Forums vNext?

    - by Jeff
    Yeah, it has been awhile. I posted v9.2 back in January, about five months ago. That’s a real change from the release pace I had there for awhile. Let me explain what’s going on. First off, in the interim, I re-launched CoasterBuzz, which required a lot of my attention for about two of those months. That’s a good thing though, because that site is just about the best test bed I could ask for. The other thing is that I committed to make the next version use ASP.NET MVC 4, which is now at the RC stage. I didn’t think much about when they’d hit their RTW point, but RC is good enough for me. To that end, there is enough change in the next version that I recently decided to make it a major version upgrade, and finish up the loose ends and science projects to make it whole. Here’s what’s in store… Mobile views: I sat on this or a long time. Originally, I was going to use jQuery Mobile, and waited and waited for a new release, but in the end, decided against using it. Sometimes buttons would unexplainably not work, I felt like I was fighting it at times, and the CSS just felt too heavy. I rolled my own mobile sugar at a fraction of the size, and I think you’ll find it easy to modify. And it’s Metro-y, of course! Re-do of background services: A number of things run in the background, and I did quite a bit of “reimagining” of that code. It’s the weirdness of running services in a Web site context, because so many folks can’t run a bona fide service on their host’s box. The biggest change here is that these service no longer start up by default. You’ll need to call a new method from global.asax called PopForumsActivation.StartServices(). This is also a precursor to running the app in a Web farm (new data layer and caching is the second part of that). I learned about this the hard way when I had three apps using the forum library code but only one was actually the forum. The services were all running three times as often with race conditions and hits on the same data. That was particularly bad for e-mail. CSS clean up: It’s still not ideal, but it’s getting better. That’s one of those things that comes with integrating to a real site… you discover all of the dumb things you did. The mobile CSS is particularly easier to live with. Bug fixes: There are a whole lot of them. Most were minor, but it’s feeling pretty solid now. So that’s where I am. I’m going to call it v10.0, and I’m going to really put forth some effort toward finishing the mobile experience and getting through the remaining bugs. The roadmap beyond that will likely not be feature oriented, but rather work on some other things, like making it run in Azure, perhaps using SQL CE, a better install experience, etc. As usual, I’ll post the latest here. Stay tuned!

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  • Wine , macbook pro 5.5, nvidia 9400 and Diablo 3

    - by Jeff Labonte
    I'm using a Macbook pro 5.5 to play Diablo 3 on Ubuntu 12.04LTS 64bit! On Mac OS X it works like a charm but on Ubuntu I'm having some trouble! I have made my research to see what's going wrong! On wine or a VM my graphic has 128mb and on Linux it has 512mb and on Mac OS X 256mb.... well I guess that the graphic card is sharing his memory with the ram! but I've got lags when I play the game! what can I do to have better performances!

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  • Personal | Going For A Long Drive

    - by Jeff Julian
    This weekend, we were planning on going to Mt. Rushmore, but with the weather the way it is, we decided to head south instead. So what are we going to do? A tour of different restaurants on the show Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives. Not very original I know since there are web sites and iPhone apps dedicated to locating the establishments, but it definitely sounds like it could be some fun. We are going to leave KC tonight and go through St. Louis, Memphis, Little Rock, Dallas, Oklahoma City, and back to KC. The kiddos are excited and we have plenty of movies, coloring books, etc in the car for the trip. This will be the first time we will get to use our turn around seats in the mini-van with our pull out table. I will have my laptop and phone if anything goes wrong with the site while I am gone and John will be back in KC as well. I hope to pushing some photos and reviews of the restaurants as we travel. Related Tags: blogging, Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives, Vacation

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  • #AJIReport 16 | Jason Bock on Windows Runtime and Metaprogramming

    - by Jeff Julian
    This episode we sit down with Jason Bock to talk about Windows Runtime and his upcoming book on Metaprogramming. Jason has been a consultant at Magenic for the past 11 years. In this show, Jason walks us through how to get started with Windows RT and talks about what the experience is like deploying to the Windows Store. We get into the new frontier of device development and the restrictions that are in place to protect the users and other applications. Towards the end of the show we start talking about Jason's book on Metaprogramming that he is co-authoring with Kevin Hazard. Listen to the Show Site: http://www.jasonbock.net/ Book: Metaprogramming in .NET Twitter: @JasonBock

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  • A debugging experience with "highly compatible" ASP.NET 4.5

    - by Jeff
    I have to admit that I will pretty much upgrade software for no reason other than being on the latest version. I won't do it if it's super expensive (Adobe gets money from me about once every three or four years at best), but particularly with frameworks and stuff generally available as part of my MSDN subscription, I'll be bleeding edge. CoasterBuzz was running on the MVC 4 framework pretty much as soon as they did a "go live" license for it. I didn't really jump in head-first with Windows 8 and Visual Studio 2012, in part because I just wasn't interested in doing the reinstalls for each new version. Turns out there weren't that many revisions anyway. But when the final versions were released a week and a half ago, I jumped in. I saw on one of the Microsoft sites that .Net 4.5 was a "highly compatible in-place update" to the framework. Good enough for me. I was obviously running it by default in Windows 8, and installed it on my production server. I suppose it's "highly compatible," except when it isn't. Three of my sites are running with various flavors of the MVC version of POP Forums. All of them stopped working under ASP.NET 4.5. It was not immediately obvious what the problem might be beyond an exception indicating that there were no repository classes registered with Ninject, which I use for dependency injection in the forums. This was made all the more weird by the fact that it ran fine locally in the dev Web host. My first instinct was to spin up a Windows Server VM on my local box and put the remote debugger on it. (Side note: running multiple VM's on a Retina MacBook Pro with 16 gigs of RAM is pretty much the most awesome thing ever. I can't believe this computer is for real, and not a 50-pound tower under my desk.) What might have been going on in IIS that doesn't happen in Visual Studio? In the debugging process, I realized that I might be looking in the wrong place. POP Forums creates a Ninject container using a method called from a PreApplicationStartMethod attribute, and at that time registers a module (what Ninject uses to map interfaces to implementations) that maps all of the core dependencies. It also creates an instance of an HttpModule that originally hosted the "services" (search indexing, mailer, etc.), but now just records errors. That's all well and good, but the actual repository mapping, where data is actually read or persisted, happens in Application_Start() in global.asax. The idea there is that you can swap out the SqlSingleWebServer repos for something tuned for multiple servers, Oracle or something else. Of course, if I used something like StructureMap, which does convention-based mapping for dependency injection (a class implementing ISettingsRepository called SettingsRepository is automagically mapped), I wouldn't have to worry about it. In any case, the HttpModule, being instantiated before Application_Start() gets to run, would throw because there was no repo mapped where it could get settings from the database. This makes total sense. The fix is sort of a hack, where I don't setup the innards of the HttpModule until a call to its BeginRequest is made. I say it's a hack, because its primary function, logging exceptions, won't work until the app has warmed up. Still, this brings up an interesting question about the race condition, and what changed in 4.5 when it's running in IIS. In ASP.NET 4, it would appear that the code called via the PreApplicationStartMethod was either failing silently, and running again later, or it was getting to that code after Application_Start was called. In any case, weird thing. The real pain point I'm experiencing now is a bug in MVC 4 that is extremely serious because it renders the mobile/alternate view functionality very much broken.

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