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  • XNA Sprite Rotation Matrix - Moving Origin

    - by Jon
    I am currently grouping sprites together, then applying a rotation transformation on draw: private void UpdateMatrix(ref Vector2 origin, float radians) { Vector3 matrixorigin = new Vector3(origin, 0); _rotationMatrix = Matrix.CreateTranslation(-matrixorigin) * Matrix.CreateRotationZ(radians) * Matrix.CreateTranslation(matrixorigin); } Where the origin is the Centermost point of my group of sprites. I apply this transformation to each sprite in the group. My problem is that when I adjust the point of origin, my entire sprite group will re-position itself on screen. How could I differentiate the point of rotation used in the transformation, from the position of the sprite group? Is there a better way of creating this transformation matrix?

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  • Has programming ruined your perception of round numbers?

    - by Jon Purdy
    Most of the world works in base 10 nowadays, but as programmers working on binary systems, we constantly find ourselves working with powers of 2. While most people consider integer multiples of powers of 10 "nice and round" and somehow aesthetically superior, I found early on in my programming adventures that multiples of powers of 2 feel much more intuitively round to me: fewer factors, of course. I'm much more likely to lay out a Web site using, say, 8- or 16-pixel margins rather than 10 or 20, and when someone remarks that 128 is an insanely arbitrary number of ounces to be in a gallon, I have to smile a little inside at how, just perhaps, the U.S. system might be superior to metric in one small way. I'm just curious: has programming ruined (read: altered) your perception of the roundness of a number?

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  • How can I identify unknown query string fragments that are coming to my site?

    - by Jon
    In the Google Analytics content overview for a site that I work on, the home page is getting many pageviews with some unfamiliar query string fragments, example: /?jkId=1234567890abcdef1234567890abcdef&jt=1&jadid=1234567890&js=1&jk=key words&jsid=12345&jmt=1 (potentially identifiable IDs have been changed) It clearly looks like some kind of ad tracking info, but noone who works on the site knows where it comes from, and I haven't been able to find any useful information from searching. Is there some listing of common query string keys available anywhere? Alternatively, does anyone happen to know where these keys (jkId, jt, jadid, js, jk, jsid and jmt) might come from?

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  • Is what someone publishes on the Internet fair game when considering them for employment as a programmer?

    - by Jon Hopkins
    (Originally posted on Stack Overflow but closed there and more relevant for here) So we first interviewed a guy for a technical role and he was pretty good. Before the second interview we googled him and found his MySpace page which could, to put it mildly, be regarded as inappropriate. Just to be clear there was no doubt that it was his page (name, photos, matching biographical information and so on). The content was entirely personal and in no way related to his professional abilities or attitude. Is it fair to consider this when thinking about whether to offer them a job? In most situations my response would be what goes on in someone's private life is their own doing. However for anyone technical who professes (implicitly or explicitly) to understand the Internet and the possibilities it offers, is posting things in a way which can so obviously be discovered a significant error of judgement? EDIT: Clarification - essentially it was a fairly graphic commentary on porn (but of, shall we say, a non-academic nature). I'm actually more interested in the general concept than the specific incident as it's something we're likely to see more in the future as people put more and more of themselves on-line. My concerns are not primarily about him and how he feels about such things (he's white, straight, male and about the last possible victim of discrimination on the planet in that sense), more how it reflects on the company that a very simple search (basically his name) returns these things and that clients may also do it. We work in a relatively conservative industry.

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  • What do you do about content when someone asks you to build a website

    - by Jon
    I am an experienced asp.net developer and asp.net mvc and I have my own CMS that I have written but starting to think there should be another approach. When someone asks you to develop them a website how do you develop it so that they can add pictures,slideshows, content, news items, diary events. On a side note do you give them a design for the home page and inner page and thats it. I'm just thinking if they turn around and say 6 months down the line I want a jquery slideshow on the right hand side of this page how do you or CMS's handle it?

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  • Redgate ANTS Performance Profiler

    - by Jon Canning
    Seemingly forever I've been working on a business idea, it's a REST API delivering content to mobiles, and I've never really had much idea about its performance. Yes, I have a suite of unit tests and integration tests, but these only tell me that it works, not how well it works. I was also about to embark on a major refactor, swapping the database from MongoDB to RavenDB, and was curious to see if that impacted performance at all, so I needed a profiler that supported IIS Express that I can run my integration tests against, and Google gave me:   http://www.red-gate.com/supportcenter/content/ANTS_Performance_Profiler/help/7.4/app_iise   Excellent. Following the above guide an instance of IIS Express and is launched, as is Internet Explorer. The latter eventually becomes annoying, I would like to decide whether I want a browser opened, but thankfully the guide is wrong in that it can be closed and profiling will continue. So I ran my tests, stopped profiling, and was presented with a call tree listing the endpoints called and allowing me to drill down to the source code beneath.     Although useful and fascinating this wasn't what I was expecting to see, I was after the method timings from the entire test suite. Switching Show to Methods Grid presented me with a list of my methods, with the slowest lit up in red at the top. Marvellous.     I did find that if you switch to Methods Grid before Call tree has loaded, you do not get the red warnings.   StructureMap was very busy, and next on the list was a request filter that I didn't expect to be so overworked. Highlighting it, the source code was presented to me in the bottom window with timings and a nice red indicator to show me where to look. Oh horror, that reflection hack I put in months ago, I'd forgotten all about it. It was calling Validate<T>() which in turn was resolving a validator from StructureMap. Note to self, use //TODO: when leaving smelly code lying around.     Before refactoring, remember to Save Profile Results from the File menu. Annoyingly you are not prompted to save your results when exiting, and using Save Project will only leave you thankful that you have version control and can go back in time to run your tests again.   Having implemented StructureMap’s ForGenericType, I ran my tests again and:     Win, thankyou ANTS (What does ANTS stand for BTW?)   There's definitely room in my toolbox for a profiler; what started out as idle curiosity actually solved a potential problem. When presented with a new codebase I can see enormous benefit from getting an overview of the pipeline from the call tree before drilling into the code, and as a sanity check before release it gives a little more reassurance that you've done your best, and shows you exactly where to look if you haven’t.   Next I’m going to profile a load test.

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  • Introducing a (new) test method to a team

    - by Jon List
    A couple of months ago i was hired in a new job. (I'm fresh out of my Masters in software engineering) The company mainly consists of ERP consultants, but I was hired in their fairly small web department (6 developers), our main task is ERP/ecom integration (ERP-integrated web shops). The department is growing, and recently my manager asked me to start thinking about introducing tests to the team, i love a challenge, but frankly I'm a bit scared (I'm the least experience member of the team). Currently the method of testing is clicking around in the web shop and asking the customer if the products are there, if they look okay, and if orders are posted correctly to the ERP. We are getting a lot of support cases on previous projects, where a customer or a customer's customer have run into errors, which - i suppose - is why my manager wants more structured testing. Off the top of my head, I though of some (obvious?) improvements, like looking at the requirement specification, having an issue tracker, enabling team members to register their time on a "tests"-line on the budget, and to circulate tasks amongst members of the team. But as i see it we have three main challenges: general website testing. (javascript, C#, ASP.NET and CMS integration tests) (live) ERP integration testing (customers rarely want to pay for test environments). adopting a method in the team I like the responsibility, but I am afraid that I'm in a little bit over my head. I expect that my manager expects me to set up some kind of workshop for the team where I present some techniques and ideas and where we(the team) can find some solutions together. What I learned in school was mostly unit testing and program verification, not so much testing across multiple systems and applications. What I'm looking for here, is references/advice/pointers/anecdotes; anything that might help me to get smarter and to improve the current method of my team. Thanks!! (TL;DR: read the bold parts)

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  • What's your most controversial programming opinion?

    - by Jon Skeet
    This is definitely subjective, but I'd like to try to avoid it becoming argumentative. I think it could be an interesting question if people treat it appropriately. The idea for this question came from the comment thread from my answer to the "What are five things you hate about your favorite language?" question. I contended that classes in C# should be sealed by default - I won't put my reasoning in the question, but I might write a fuller explanation as an answer to this question. I was surprised at the heat of the discussion in the comments (25 comments currently). So, what contentious opinions do you hold? I'd rather avoid the kind of thing which ends up being pretty religious with relatively little basis (e.g. brace placing) but examples might include things like "unit testing isn't actually terribly helpful" or "public fields are okay really". The important thing (to me, anyway) is that you've got reasons behind your opinions. Please present your opinion and reasoning - I would encourage people to vote for opinions which are well-argued and interesting, whether or not you happen to agree with them.

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  • Is a university education really worth it for a good programmer?

    - by Jon Purdy
    The title says it all, but here's the personal side of it: I've been doing design and programming for about as long as I can remember. If there's a programming problem, I can figure it out. (Though admittedly StackOverflow has allowed me to skip the figuring out and get straight to the doing in many instances.) I've made games, esoteric programming languages, and widgets and gizmos galore. I'm currently working on a general-purpose programming language. There's nothing I do better than programming. However, I'm just as passionate about design. Thus when I felt leaving high school that my design skills were lacking, I decided to attend university for New Media Design and Imaging, a digital design-related major. For a year, I diligently studied art and programmed in my free time. As the next year progressed, however, I was obligated to take fewer art and design classes and more technical classes. The trouble was of course that these classes were geared toward non-technical students, and were far beneath my skill level at the time. No amount of petitioning could overcome the institution's reluctance to allow me to test out of such classes, and the major offered no promise for any greater challenge in the future, so I took the extreme route: I switched into the technical equivalent of the major, New Media Interactive Development. A lot of my credits moved over into the new major, but many didn't. It would have been infeasible to switch to a more rigorous technical major such as Computer Science, and having tutored Computer Science students at every level here, I doubt I would be exposed to anything that I haven't already or won't eventually find out on my own, since I'm so involved in the field. I'm now on track to graduate perhaps a year later than I had planned, which puts a significant financial strain on my family and my future self. My schedule continues to be bogged down with classes that are wholly unnecessary for me to take. I'm being re-introduced to subjects that I've covered a thousand times over, simply because I've always been interested in it all. And though I succeed in avoiding the cynical and immature tactic of failing to complete work out of some undeserved sense of superiority, I'm becoming increasingly disillusioned by the lack of intellectual stimulation. Further, my school requires students to complete a number of quarters of co-op work experience proportional to their major. My original major required two quarters, but my current requires three, delaying my graduation even more. To top it all off, college is putting a severe strain on my relationship with my very close partner of a few years, so I've searched diligently for co-op jobs in my area, alas to no avail. I'm now in my third year, and approaching that point past which I can no longer handle this. Either I keep my head down, get a degree no matter what it takes, and try to get a job with a company that will pay me enough to do what I love that I can eventually pay off my loans; or I cut my losses now, move wherever there is work, and in six months start paying off what debt I've accumulated thus far. So the real question is: is a university education really more than just a formality? It's a big decision, and one I can't make lightly. I think this is the appropriate venue for this kind of question, and I hope it sticks around for the sake of others who might someday find themselves in similar situations. My heartfelt thanks for reading, and in advance for your help.

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  • Continuous integration never results in build errors

    - by Jon
    Hi, I'm working with a variety of Java EE websites which use internal libraries we've developed. For each website, we only upgrade to new versions of our internal libraries as needed, and before committing we make sure that the site compiles fine. What this means is that when TeamCity does a build of one of our sites, the site compiles fine, but later when the site is updated to the latest version of internal libraries, there might be a compile error. Is there a good way to handle this? We're not using Maven yet; would using Maven mean that our websites could automatically use the latest version of internal libraries? Thanks. Clarification: What we sometimes run into is this: Project A depends on a library, and is currently using library version 1.0 Project B also depends on that library. I make changes to the library so that it is now version 1.5. Project B now uses 1.5. Project A and project B have both been built just fine by the CI server (TeamCity) Working on project A again, I update to 1.5 and discover that 1.5 has breaking changes in it. Is there a way for the CI server to discover these kinds of breaking changes?

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  • Having troubles with LibNoise.XNA and generating tileable maps

    - by Jon
    Following up on my previous post, I found a wonderful port of LibNoise for XNA. I've been working with it for about 8 hours straight and I'm tearing my hair out - I just can not get maps to tile, I can't figure out how to do this. Here's my attempt: Perlin perlin = new Perlin(1.2, 1.95, 0.56, 12, 2353, QualityMode.Medium); RiggedMultifractal rigged = new RiggedMultifractal(); Add add = new Add(perlin, rigged); // Initialize the noise map int mapSize = 64; this.m_noiseMap = new Noise2D(mapSize, perlin); //this.m_noiseMap.GeneratePlanar(0, 1, -1, 1); // Generate the textures this.m_noiseMap.GeneratePlanar(-1,1,-1,1); this.m_textures[0] = this.m_noiseMap.GetTexture(this.graphics.GraphicsDevice, Gradient.Grayscale); this.m_noiseMap.GeneratePlanar(mapSize, mapSize * 2, mapSize, mapSize * 2); this.m_textures[1] = this.m_noiseMap.GetTexture(this.graphics.GraphicsDevice, Gradient.Grayscale); this.m_noiseMap.GeneratePlanar(-1, 1, -1, 1); this.m_textures[2] = this.m_noiseMap.GetTexture(this.graphics.GraphicsDevice, Gradient.Grayscale); The first and third ones generate fine, they create a perlin noise map - however the middle one, which I wanted to be a continuation of the first (As per my original post), is just a bunch of static. How exactly do I get this to generate maps that connect to each other, by entering in the mapsize * tile, using the same seed, settings, etc.?

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  • Nvidia 740M still not working after Bumblebee installation

    - by Jon
    first of all, I have checked a lot of similar topics, but I still can't get my laptop to use Nvidia 740M. So first things first. I have a laptop Asus X550V(i5-3230, 4gb RAM, Nvidia 740M + Intel HD4000). I installed Ubuntu 13.10 alongside Win8(preinstalled) and both systems are running without problems. However, I have problem with second graphic card(Nvidia 740M), as Ubuntu doesn't recognize it. I installed bumblebee with this tutorial https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Bumblebee#Installation, but I still get error "Cannot access secondary GPU" error when trying to run ''optirun Steam'' in terminal. Then I tried to do this: [ERROR]Cannot access secondary GPU - error: [XORG] (EE) No devices detected. you need to edit the /etc/bumblebee/xorg.conf.nvidia (or /etc/bumblebee/xorg.conf.nouveau if using the noveau driver) and specify the correct BusID by following the instructions therein. But with lspci / VGA i get only info about Intel 4000, but no Nvidia. When I type only lspci, I get the line for Nvidia 740M,but after I edit the config file I still get second card error. Also, in /etc/bumblebee/xorg.conf.nvidia there wasn't BusID or anything similar, so I just added the whole line in device section. As I sad, I tried a lot of things to get it working, avoiding this forum(as I din't want to bother people with some solutions possible), but alas!, I had to bother you. If there is a need for some additional info, just say, no problem at all. Thank you very much in advance. :)

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  • Compare Two NameValueCollections Extension Method

    - by Jon Canning
    public static class NameValueCollectionExtension     {         public static bool CollectionEquals(this NameValueCollection nameValueCollection1, NameValueCollection nameValueCollection2)         {             return nameValueCollection1.ToKeyValue().SequenceEqual(nameValueCollection2.ToKeyValue());         }         private static IEnumerable<object> ToKeyValue(this NameValueCollection nameValueCollection)         {             return nameValueCollection.AllKeys.OrderBy(x => x).Select(x => new {Key = x, Value = nameValueCollection[x]});         }     }

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  • Best language or tool for automating tedious manual tasks

    - by Jon Hopkins
    We all have tasks that come up from time to time that we think we'd be better off scripting or automating than doing manually. Obviously some tools or languages are better for this than others - no-one (in their right mind) is doing a one off job of cross referencing a bunch of text lists their PM has just given them in assembler for instance. What one tool or language would you recommend for the sort of general quick and dirty jobs you get asked to do where time (rather than elegance) is of the essence? Background: I'm a former programmer, now development manager PM, looking to learn a new language for fun. If I'm going to learn something for fun I'd like it to be useful and this sort of use case is the most likely to come up.

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  • Some files not copied when moving an encrypted home to a different partition

    - by Jon Herrin
    I have "successfully" moved my encrypted home to a separate partition using the instructions here: How can i move an encrypted home directory to another partition? However, some files are not being copied over. Most notably, I have a directory in my old home that contains the themes I use. This directory and it's contents are not copied over to the new home and therefore I come up with the default theme. Permissions on the directory that was not moved are identical to the other directories in home. Another discrepancy is that my Dropbox folder came over empty and had to resync itself. My concern is what else might be missing from the copied home. At this point, I've flipped back to the old home by re-editing /etc/fstab, but I'd really like to get /home cleanly and completely off of root without having to core the system.

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  • What do you do when your naming convention clashes with your language?

    - by Jon Purdy
    Okay, this is one of those little things that always bugged me. I typically don't abbreviate identifiers, and the only time I use a short identifier (e.g., i) is for a tight loop. So it irritates me when I'm working in C++ and I have a variable that needs to be named operator or class and I have to work around it or use an abbreviation, because it ends up sticking out. Caveat: this may happen to me disproportionately often because I work a lot in programming language design, where domain objects may mirror concepts in the host language and inadvertently cause clashes. How would you deal with this? Abbreviate? (op) Misspell? (klass) Something else? (operator_)

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  • Appropriate level of granularity for component-based architecture

    - by Jon Purdy
    I'm working on a game with a component-based architecture. An Entity owns a set of Component instances, each of which has a set of Slot instances with which to store, send, and receive values. Factory functions such as Player produce entities with the required components and slot connections. I'm trying to determine the best level of granularity for components. For example, right now Position, Velocity, and Acceleration are all separate components, connected in series. Velocity and Acceleration could easily be rewritten into a uniform Delta component, or Position, Velocity, and Acceleration could be combined alongside such components as Friction and Gravity into a monolithic Physics component. Should a component have the smallest responsibility possible (at the cost of lots of interconnectivity) or should related components be combined into monolithic ones (at the cost of flexibility)? I'm leaning toward the former, but I could use a second opinion.

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  • How should I manage a team with different skill levels?

    - by Jon Purdy
    I'll be working on a software project with some friends of mine, and I've been appointed technical lead. None of these guys is a bad programmer at all, but I do have significantly more experience than them. I need to be able to distribute the work among everyone on the team, while also making sure that we don't tread on one another's toes; that they meet the relatively high standards of quality and scalability that we need to make this project successful, without requiring me to review everything they commit. How should I maintain standards while avoiding micromanagement? Is it enough to make some diagrams, schedule some code reviews, and trust that I'll be able to fix anything that they might break, or should I go the TDD route and write explicit tests for the team to satisfy?

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  • List of eCommerce sites that use end-to-end SSL?

    - by Jon Schneider
    My development team is considering implementing an eCommerce site using end-to-end SSL -- that is, every page on the site is accessed via an https:// URL -- rather than the more traditional "mixed mode" where most pages are accessed via http:// and only "secure" pages such as login and credit card entry are redirected to https://. Pros of doing such a "pure SSL" approach include avoidance of some session-hijacking attacks such as Firesheep; cons include performance considerations. My question is: Is anyone aware of a list of eCommerce websites (especially USA-based sites), or even specific websites, that use this end-to-end SSL approach? I'm especially interested in "regular" eCommerce sites rather than banks or other "financial" sites.

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  • IE8 HTTPs Download Issue

    - by Jon Egerton
    I have a problem with a system I develop related to IE8 downloading over SSL (ie on sites using https://...) and is described on this MS kb article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/323308 We use the HTTPCacheability.NoCache option as the data being downloaded is sensitive, and is downloaded from a secured site. I don't want that data to be cached on any of the proxies etc that the response passes through back to the client. The article describing the issue details a fix to the client side registry changing a BypassSSLNoCacheCheck setting. I don't want to loosen the system security just for IE8, as the system works fine on anything more upto date. Getting all the clients to apply the hotfix is difficult at best, and impossible at worst. We need to support IE8 in the system, at least for now. So: 1: Does the detailed hotfix have any implications for the security at the browser end in IE8 - does it mean the file will be cached? (in a place other than where the user saves the file). 2: Is there some way I can get these files downloadable with a change at the server end that doesn't break the security side of things?

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  • What's the best way to explain branching (of source code) to a client?

    - by Jon Hopkins
    The situation is that a client requested a number of changes about 9 months ago which they then put on hold with them half done. They've now requested more changes without having made up their mind to proceed with the first set of changes. The two sets of changes will require alterations to the same code modules. I've been tasked with explaining why them not making a decision about the first set of changes (either finish them or bin them) may incur additional costs (essentially because the changes would need to be made to a branch then if they proceed with the first set of changes we'd have to merge them to the trunk - which will be messy - and retest them). The question I have is this: How best to explain branching of code to a non-technical client?

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  • How do I access the system tray?

    - by Jon
    So I'm messing around with Natty a little, and I noticed that all the apps that would normally use the system tray (or "notification area"?) aren't displaying there. Is that a bug, or is that the way it's going to be? I heard something about Ubuntu getting rid of that feature entirely. Is there a way to add it back? I mean, I didn't really like it, either, especially when there were apps that used it unnecessarily, but I can't use CryptKeeper at all now, or easycrypt, and I don't know whether Dropbox has synced without opening Nautilus.

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  • How do I adjust the origin of rotation for a group of sprites?

    - by Jon
    I am currently grouping sprites together, then applying a rotation transformation on draw: private void UpdateMatrix(ref Vector2 origin, float radians) { Vector3 matrixorigin = new Vector3(origin, 0); _rotationMatrix = Matrix.CreateTranslation(-matrixorigin) * Matrix.CreateRotationZ(radians) * Matrix.CreateTranslation(matrixorigin); } Where the origin is the Centermost point of my group of sprites. I apply this transformation to each sprite in the group. My problem is that when I adjust the point of origin, my entire sprite group will re-position itself on screen. How could I differentiate the point of rotation used in the transformation, from the position of the sprite group? Is there a better way of creating this transformation matrix? EDIT Here is the relevant part of the Draw() function: Matrix allTransforms = _rotationMatrix * camera.GetTransformation(); spriteBatch.Begin(SpriteSortMode.BackToFront, null, null, null, null, null, allTransforms); for (int i = 0; i < _map.AllParts.Count; i++) { for (int j = 0; j < _map.AllParts[0].Count; j++) { spriteBatch.Draw(_map.AllParts[i][j].Texture, _map.AllParts[i][j].Position, null, Color.White, 0, _map.AllParts[i][j].Origin, 1.0f, SpriteEffects.None, 0f); } } This all works fine, again, the problem is that when a rotation is set and the point of origin is changed, the sprite group's position is offset on screen. I am trying to figure out a way to adjust the point of origin without causing a shift in position. EDIT 2 At this point, I'm looking for workarounds as this is not working. Does anyone know of a better way to rotate a group of sprites in XNA? I need a method that will allow me to modify the point of rotation (origin) without affecting the position of the sprite group on screen.

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  • Opening / using WUBI after downloading

    - by Jon
    I have no problem downloading WUBI either using Firefox or IE. Either way, however, when I try to run or open it, I get a message to the effect that the file cannot run because the configuration is incorrect and "re-installing the file may help" (which it doesn't - I've tried several times). What am doing wrong ? I am running XP Pro. (Note: my Ubuntu CD works just fine but I want to install Ubuntu inside Windows).

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  • Can I install Natty alongside Maverick and retain my encrypted /home partition?

    - by Jon
    This is my partitioning scheme: 10GB partition empty -- will be installing Natty here 10GB partition containing Maverick 2GB swap partition 300GB encrypted /home partition I've had few problems in the past with having two ubuntu installs on two separate partitions, giving /home it's own partition, but I'm a little concerned since I'm now using an encrypted /home partition. Install won't try to wipe my /home if I click " encrypt home directory," will it?

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