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  • Dude, what’s up with POP Forums vNext?

    - by Jeff
    Yeah, it has been awhile. I posted v9.2 back in January, about five months ago. That’s a real change from the release pace I had there for awhile. Let me explain what’s going on. First off, in the interim, I re-launched CoasterBuzz, which required a lot of my attention for about two of those months. That’s a good thing though, because that site is just about the best test bed I could ask for. The other thing is that I committed to make the next version use ASP.NET MVC 4, which is now at the RC stage. I didn’t think much about when they’d hit their RTW point, but RC is good enough for me. To that end, there is enough change in the next version that I recently decided to make it a major version upgrade, and finish up the loose ends and science projects to make it whole. Here’s what’s in store… Mobile views: I sat on this or a long time. Originally, I was going to use jQuery Mobile, and waited and waited for a new release, but in the end, decided against using it. Sometimes buttons would unexplainably not work, I felt like I was fighting it at times, and the CSS just felt too heavy. I rolled my own mobile sugar at a fraction of the size, and I think you’ll find it easy to modify. And it’s Metro-y, of course! Re-do of background services: A number of things run in the background, and I did quite a bit of “reimagining” of that code. It’s the weirdness of running services in a Web site context, because so many folks can’t run a bona fide service on their host’s box. The biggest change here is that these service no longer start up by default. You’ll need to call a new method from global.asax called PopForumsActivation.StartServices(). This is also a precursor to running the app in a Web farm (new data layer and caching is the second part of that). I learned about this the hard way when I had three apps using the forum library code but only one was actually the forum. The services were all running three times as often with race conditions and hits on the same data. That was particularly bad for e-mail. CSS clean up: It’s still not ideal, but it’s getting better. That’s one of those things that comes with integrating to a real site… you discover all of the dumb things you did. The mobile CSS is particularly easier to live with. Bug fixes: There are a whole lot of them. Most were minor, but it’s feeling pretty solid now. So that’s where I am. I’m going to call it v10.0, and I’m going to really put forth some effort toward finishing the mobile experience and getting through the remaining bugs. The roadmap beyond that will likely not be feature oriented, but rather work on some other things, like making it run in Azure, perhaps using SQL CE, a better install experience, etc. As usual, I’ll post the latest here. Stay tuned!

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  • Silverlight Cream for December 28, 2010 -- #1017

    - by Dave Campbell
    In this Issue: Davide Zordan, Alex Golesh, Michael S. Scherotter, Andrej Tozon, Alex Knight, Jeff Blankenburg(-2-), Jeremy Likness, and Laurent Bugnion. Above the Fold: Silverlight: "My “What’s new in Silverlight 4 demo” app" Andrej Tozon WP7: "Taking a screenshot from within a Silverlight #WP7 application" Laurent Bugnion Expression Blend: "PathListBox: getting started" Alex Knight Shoutouts: If you haven't seen this SurfCube app demo on YouTube yet... check it out now: SurfCube V1.0 Windows Phone 7 Browser Want to get a free WP7 class from Shawn Wildermuth? Check this out: Webinar: Writing your first Windows Phone 7 Application Koen Zwikstra announed the next preview of his great tool: Silverlight Spy Preview 2 From SilverlightCream.com: Using the Multi-Touch Behavior in a Windows Phone 7 Multi-Page application Davide Zordan has a post up responding to questions he receives about multi-touch on WP7 in applications spanning more than one page. Silverlight for Windows Phone 7 Quick Tip: Fix missing icons while using DatePicker/TimePicker controls Alex Golesh discusses the use of the DatePicker control from the WP7 toolkit and found an unpleasant surprise associated with the Done/Cancel icons in the ApplicationBar, and has a solution for us. Updated SMF Thumbnail Scrubbing Sample Code Michael S. Scherotter has a post up about an update he's done to Silverlight 4 of code that allows thumbnail views of a video while 'scrubbing' ... don't know what that is? read the post :) My “What’s new in Silverlight 4 demo” app Andrej Tozon admits he's a little behind with this post, but as he points out, it might be a good time to review Silverlight 4 features, on the eve of 5. PathListBox: getting started One half the Knight team -- Alex Knight this time, has the first post of a series on the PathListBox up ... some real Expression Blend goodness. What I Learned in WP7 – Issue #9 Two more from Jeff Blankenburg today, in his number 9, he starts off demonstrating passing data between pages when navigating and fnishes up with some excellent info for submitting apps to the marketplace. What I Learned in WP7 – #Issue 10 Jeff Blankenburg's number 10 elaborates on the query string data he discussed in number 9. Using Sterling in Windows Phone 7 Applications Who better than the author?? Jeremy Likness has an end-to-end WP7/Sterling app up on his blog... begin with downloading Sterling, discuss what's needed to support Tombstoning, even custom serialization. Taking a screenshot from within a Silverlight #WP7 application Laurent Bugnion has a post up describing something people have been looking for: getting a screenshot of a WP7 application's page. Stay in the 'Light! Twitter SilverlightNews | Twitter WynApse | WynApse.com | Tagged Posts | SilverlightCream Join me @ SilverlightCream | Phoenix Silverlight User Group Technorati Tags: Silverlight    Silverlight 3    Silverlight 4    Windows Phone MIX10

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  • Visual Studio confused when there are multiple system.web sections in your web.config

    - by Jeff Widmer
    I am trying to start debugging in Visual Studio for the website I am currently working on but Visual Studio is telling me that I have to enable debugging in the web.config to continue: But I clearly have debugging enabled: At first I chose the option to Modify the Web.config file to enable debugging but then I started receiving the following exception on my site: HTTP Error 500.19 - Internal Server Error The requested page cannot be accessed because the related configuration data for the page is invalid. Config section 'system.web/compilation' already defined. Sections must only appear once per config file. See the help topic <location> for exceptions   So what is going on here?  I already have debug=”true”, Visual Studio tells me I do not, and then when I give Visual Studio permission to fix the problem, I get a configuration error. Eventually I tracked it down to having two <system.web> sections. I had defined customErrors higher in the web.config: And then had a second system.web section with compilation debug=”true” further down in the web.config.  This is valid in the web.config and my site was not complaining but I guess Visual Studio does not know how to handle it and sees the first system.web, does not see the debug=”true” and thinks your site is not set up for debugging. To fix this so that Visual Studio was not going to complain, I removed the duplicate system.web declaration and moved the customErrors statement down.

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  • Personal | Going For A Long Drive

    - by Jeff Julian
    This weekend, we were planning on going to Mt. Rushmore, but with the weather the way it is, we decided to head south instead. So what are we going to do? A tour of different restaurants on the show Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives. Not very original I know since there are web sites and iPhone apps dedicated to locating the establishments, but it definitely sounds like it could be some fun. We are going to leave KC tonight and go through St. Louis, Memphis, Little Rock, Dallas, Oklahoma City, and back to KC. The kiddos are excited and we have plenty of movies, coloring books, etc in the car for the trip. This will be the first time we will get to use our turn around seats in the mini-van with our pull out table. I will have my laptop and phone if anything goes wrong with the site while I am gone and John will be back in KC as well. I hope to pushing some photos and reviews of the restaurants as we travel. Related Tags: blogging, Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives, Vacation

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  • Wine , macbook pro 5.5, nvidia 9400 and Diablo 3

    - by Jeff Labonte
    I'm using a Macbook pro 5.5 to play Diablo 3 on Ubuntu 12.04LTS 64bit! On Mac OS X it works like a charm but on Ubuntu I'm having some trouble! I have made my research to see what's going wrong! On wine or a VM my graphic has 128mb and on Linux it has 512mb and on Mac OS X 256mb.... well I guess that the graphic card is sharing his memory with the ram! but I've got lags when I play the game! what can I do to have better performances!

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  • Local Events | Azure Bootcamp

    - by Jeff Julian
    Coming to Kansas City April 8th and 9th is the Microsoft Azure Bootcamp. This event looks very promising for those developers who are looking into Azure for themselves or their companies. It covers the wide range of topics required to understand what Azure really is and is not. Space is limited so if you are considering Azure, register for this event today.Agenda:Module 1: Introduction to cloud computer and AzureHow it worksKey ScenariosThe development environment and SDKModule 2: Using Web RolesBasic ASP.NETBasic configurationModule 3: Blobs: File Storage in the cloudModule 4: Tables: Scalable hierarchical storageModule 5: Queues: Decoupling your systemsModule 6: Basic Worker RolesExecuting backend processesConsuming a queueLeveraging local storageModule 7: Advanced Worker RolesExternal EndpointsInter-role communicationModule 8: Building a business with AzureUsing Azure as an ISV or a partnerAdvantages to delivering valueBPOSPricingModule 9: SQL AzureSetting it upSQL Azure firewallRemote managementMigrating dataModule 10: AppFabricService BusAccess Control SystemIdentity in the cloudModule 11: Cloud ScenariosApp migration strategiesDisposable computingDynamic scaleShuntingPrototypingMultitenant applications (This is my second attempt at this post after MacJournal decided to crash and not save my work. Authoring tools all need auto-save features by now, that is a requirement set in stone by Microsoft Word 97) Related Tags: Azure, Microsoft, Kansas City

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  • Can't get wireless on macbook pro 8,2

    - by Jeff
    I'm a linux Newb, and I have tried several of the fixes listed to try and get my wifi drivers to work, but to no avail. Does anyone here know why this isn't working for me, or better yet, how to fix it? Under lspci -vvv I get the following output: 03:00.0 Network controller: Broadcom Corporation BCM4331 802.11a/b/g/n (rev 02) Subsystem: Apple Inc. AirPort Extreme Control: I/O- Mem+ BusMaster+ SpecCycle- MemWINV- VGASnoop- ParErr- Stepping- SERR- FastB2B- DisINTx- Status: Cap+ 66MHz- UDF- FastB2B- ParErr- DEVSEL=fast TAbort- SERR- Kernel modules: bcma With sudo lshw -class network I get this output: *-network UNCLAIMED description: Network controller product: BCM4331 802.11a/b/g/n vendor: Broadcom Corporation physical id: 0 bus info: [email protected]:03:00.0 version: 02 width: 64 bits clock: 33MHz capabilities: pm msi pciexpress bus_master cap_list configuration: latency=0 resources: memory:b0600000-b0603fff Any help would be greatly appreciated!

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  • #AJIReport 16 | Jason Bock on Windows Runtime and Metaprogramming

    - by Jeff Julian
    This episode we sit down with Jason Bock to talk about Windows Runtime and his upcoming book on Metaprogramming. Jason has been a consultant at Magenic for the past 11 years. In this show, Jason walks us through how to get started with Windows RT and talks about what the experience is like deploying to the Windows Store. We get into the new frontier of device development and the restrictions that are in place to protect the users and other applications. Towards the end of the show we start talking about Jason's book on Metaprogramming that he is co-authoring with Kevin Hazard. Listen to the Show Site: http://www.jasonbock.net/ Book: Metaprogramming in .NET Twitter: @JasonBock

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  • A debugging experience with "highly compatible" ASP.NET 4.5

    - by Jeff
    I have to admit that I will pretty much upgrade software for no reason other than being on the latest version. I won't do it if it's super expensive (Adobe gets money from me about once every three or four years at best), but particularly with frameworks and stuff generally available as part of my MSDN subscription, I'll be bleeding edge. CoasterBuzz was running on the MVC 4 framework pretty much as soon as they did a "go live" license for it. I didn't really jump in head-first with Windows 8 and Visual Studio 2012, in part because I just wasn't interested in doing the reinstalls for each new version. Turns out there weren't that many revisions anyway. But when the final versions were released a week and a half ago, I jumped in. I saw on one of the Microsoft sites that .Net 4.5 was a "highly compatible in-place update" to the framework. Good enough for me. I was obviously running it by default in Windows 8, and installed it on my production server. I suppose it's "highly compatible," except when it isn't. Three of my sites are running with various flavors of the MVC version of POP Forums. All of them stopped working under ASP.NET 4.5. It was not immediately obvious what the problem might be beyond an exception indicating that there were no repository classes registered with Ninject, which I use for dependency injection in the forums. This was made all the more weird by the fact that it ran fine locally in the dev Web host. My first instinct was to spin up a Windows Server VM on my local box and put the remote debugger on it. (Side note: running multiple VM's on a Retina MacBook Pro with 16 gigs of RAM is pretty much the most awesome thing ever. I can't believe this computer is for real, and not a 50-pound tower under my desk.) What might have been going on in IIS that doesn't happen in Visual Studio? In the debugging process, I realized that I might be looking in the wrong place. POP Forums creates a Ninject container using a method called from a PreApplicationStartMethod attribute, and at that time registers a module (what Ninject uses to map interfaces to implementations) that maps all of the core dependencies. It also creates an instance of an HttpModule that originally hosted the "services" (search indexing, mailer, etc.), but now just records errors. That's all well and good, but the actual repository mapping, where data is actually read or persisted, happens in Application_Start() in global.asax. The idea there is that you can swap out the SqlSingleWebServer repos for something tuned for multiple servers, Oracle or something else. Of course, if I used something like StructureMap, which does convention-based mapping for dependency injection (a class implementing ISettingsRepository called SettingsRepository is automagically mapped), I wouldn't have to worry about it. In any case, the HttpModule, being instantiated before Application_Start() gets to run, would throw because there was no repo mapped where it could get settings from the database. This makes total sense. The fix is sort of a hack, where I don't setup the innards of the HttpModule until a call to its BeginRequest is made. I say it's a hack, because its primary function, logging exceptions, won't work until the app has warmed up. Still, this brings up an interesting question about the race condition, and what changed in 4.5 when it's running in IIS. In ASP.NET 4, it would appear that the code called via the PreApplicationStartMethod was either failing silently, and running again later, or it was getting to that code after Application_Start was called. In any case, weird thing. The real pain point I'm experiencing now is a bug in MVC 4 that is extremely serious because it renders the mobile/alternate view functionality very much broken.

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  • Visual Studio Shortcut: Surround With

    - by Jeff Widmer
    I learned a new Visual Studio keyboard shortcut today that is really awesome; the “Surround With” shortcut.  You can trigger the Surround With context menu by pressing the Ctrl-K, Ctrl-S key combination when on a line of code. Ctrl-K, Ctrl-S means to hold down the Control key and then press K and then while still holding down the Control key press S. Here is where this comes in handy: You type a line of code and then realize you need to put it within an if statement block. So you type “if” and hit tab twice to insert the if statement code snippet.  Then you highlight the previous line of code that you typed, and then either drag and drop it into the if-then block or cut and paste it.  That is not too bad but it is a lot of extra key clicks and mouse moves. Now try the same with the Surround With keyboard shortcut.  Just highlight that line of code that you just typed and press Ctrl-K, Ctrl-S and choose the if statement code snippet, hit tab, and POW!... you are done!  No more code moving/indenting required. Here is what the Surround With context menu looks like: Just up or down arrow inside the drop down list to the code snippet that you want to surround your currently selected text with.  Did I mention this is AWESOME! Now it is so simple to surround lines of code with an if-then block or a try-catch-finally block... things that usually took several key clicks and maybe one or two mouse moves. And this works in both Visual Studio 2008 and Visual Studio 2010 which means it has been around for a long time and I never knew about it.   Technorati Tags: Visual Studio Keyboard Shortcut

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  • Personal | First Stop on our trip, St. Louis

    - by Jeff Julian
    St. Louis is definitely a cool city. I have always looked at it as Kansas City’s big brother. I love to Arch, wonder what is would be like to have pro hockey, really like the downtown area, and have some great friends who live there. The reason we left for St. Louis on Thursday evening was to get us a head start on our journey. Since we were doing a Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives tour, it made since to have the journey start there. We picked the Hyatt Downtown as our hotel because they had an Arch Package which was suppose to get you tickets to the arch so you didn’t need to arrive early and wait in line. That ended up not working cause the arch had been selling out every day and they were no longer accepting the hotels tickets. No biggie and the hotel did try very hard to get us tickets, but we just took our chances in the line and waited. We walked over to the park and had to wait for about 20 minutes for the doors to open and had tickets after another 20 minutes of waiting in line and at that point walked right up and were able to get to the elevators.I want to stop here to have a little aside. I don’t know who started the rumor that the arch ride is scary but it is not. You do sit in a small pod, but it like the accent on a roller coaster to the top of the first drop and an elevator with no windows outside. Nothing to be afraid of here if you aren’t claustrophobic. If you are afraid of small spaces, stay clear of this ride. Once you get to the top, you walk up 10 to 30 stairs depending on which car you were in (lower the number the less stairs you climb) and you are then at the top in a decent sized room where you look out the windows. Beautiful view of the city. I don’t typically like heights, but this felt like being inside a building and not hang out on a roof. Here is the view from the arch: Related Tags: Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives, St. Louis, Vacation

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  • Lessons from rewriting POP Forums for MVC, open source-like

    - by Jeff
    It has been a ton of work, interrupted over the last two years by unemployment, moving, a baby, failing to sell houses and other life events, but it's really exciting to see POP Forums v9 coming together. I'm not even sure when I decided to really commit to it as an open source project, but working on the same team as the CodePlex folks probably had something to do with it. Moving along the roadmap I set for myself, the app is now running on a quasi-production site... we launched MouseZoom last weekend. (That's a post-beta 1 build of the forum. There's also some nifty Silverlight DeepZoom goodness on that site.)I have to make a point to illustrate just how important starting over was for me. I started this forum thing for my sites in old ASP more than ten years ago. What a mess that stuff was, including SQL injection vulnerabilities and all kinds of crap. It went to ASP.NET in 2002, but even then, it felt a little too much like script. More than a year later, in 2003, I did an honest to goodness rewrite. If you've been in this business of writing code for any amount of time, you know how much you hate what you wrote a month ago, so just imagine that with seven years in between. The subsequent versions still carried a fair amount of crap, and that's why I had to start over, to make a clean break. Mind you, much of that crap is still running on some of my production sites in a stable manner, but it's a pain in the ass to maintain.So with that clean break, there is much that I have learned. These are a few of those lessons, in no particular order...Avoid shiny object syndromeOver the years, I've embraced new things without bothering to ask myself why. I remember spending the better part of a year trying to adapt this app to use the membership and profile API's in ASP.NET, just because they were there. They didn't solve any known problem. Early on in this version, I dabbled in exotic ORM's, even though I already had the fundamental SQL that I knew worked. I bloated up the client side code with all kinds of jQuery UI and plugins just because, and it got in the way. All the new shiny can be distracting, and I've come to realize that I've allowed it to be a distraction most of my professional life.Just query what you needI've spent a lot of time over-thinking how to query data. In the SQL world, this means exotic joins, special caches, the read-update-commit loop of ORM's, etc. There are times when you have to remind yourself that you aren't Facebook, you'll never be Facebook, and that databases are in fact intended to serve data. In a lot of projects, back in the day, I used to have these big, rich data objects and pass them all over the place, through various application tiers, when in reality, all I needed was some ID from the entity. I try to be mindful of how many queries hit the database on a given request, but I don't obsess over it. I just get what I need.Don't spend too much time worrying about your unit testsIf you've looked at any of the tests for POP Forums, you might offer an audible WTF. That's OK. There's a whole lot of mocking going on. In some cases, it points out where you're doing too much, and that's good for improving your design. In other cases it shows where your design sucks. But the biggest trap of unit testing is that you worry it should be prettier. That's a waste of time. When you write a test, in many cases before the production code, the important part is that you're testing the right thing. If you have to mock up a bunch of stuff to test the outcome, so be it, but it's not wasted time. You're still doing up the typical arrange-action-assert deal, and you'll be able to read that later if you need to.Get back to your HTTP rootsASP.NET Webforms did a reasonably decent job at abstracting us away from the stateless nature of the Web. A lot of people criticize it, but I think it all worked pretty well. These days, with MVC, jQuery, REST services, and what not, we've gone back to thinking about the wire. The nuts and bolts passing between our Web browser and server matters. This doesn't make things harder, in my opinion, it makes them easier. There is something incredibly freeing about how we approach development of Web apps now. HTTP is a really simple protocol, and the stuff we push through it, in particular HTML and JSON, are pretty simple too. The debugging points are really easy to trap and trace.Premature optimization is prematureI'll go back to the data thing for a moment. I've been known to look at a particular action or use case and stress about the number of calls that are made to the database. I'm not suggesting that it's a bad thing to keep these in mind, but if you worry about it outside of the context of the actual impact, you're wasting time. For example, I query the database for last read times in a forum separately of the user and the list of forums. The impact on performance barely exists. If I put it under load, exceeding the kind of load I expect, it still barely has an impact. Then consider it only counts for logged in users. The context of this "inefficient" action is that it doesn't matter. Did I mention I won't be Facebook?Solve your own problems firstThis is another trap I've fallen into. I've often thought about what other people might need for some feature or aspect of the app. In other words, I was willing to make design decisions based on non-existent data. How stupid is that? When I decided to truly open source this thing, building for myself first was a stated design goal. This app has to server the audiences of CoasterBuzz, MouseZoom and other sites first. In this development scenario, you don't have access to mountains of usability studies or user focus groups. You have to start with what you know.I'm sure there are other points I could make too. It has been a lot of fun to work on, and I look forward to evolving the UI as time goes on. That's where I hope to see more magic in the future.

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  • Ryan Weber On KCNext | #AJIReport

    - by Jeff Julian
    We sit down with Ryan Weber of KCNext in our office to talk about the Kansas City market for technology. The Technology Council of Greater Kansas City is committed to growing the existing base of technology firms, recruiting and attracting technology companies, aggregating and promoting our regional IT assets and providing peer interaction and industry news. During this show we talk about why KCNext is great for Kansas City. They offer some great networking and educational events, but also focus on connecting companies together to help build relationships on a business level. Make sure you visit their website to see what events are coming up and link up with them on Twitter to stay on top of news from the KC technology community. Listen to the Show Site: http://www.kcnext.com/ Twitter: @KCNext LinkedIn: KCNext - The Technology Council of Greater Kansas City

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  • Unleash AutoVue on Your Unmanaged Data

    - by [email protected]
    Over the years, I've spoken to hundreds of customers who use AutoVue to collaborate on their "managed" data stored in content management systems, product lifecycle management systems, etc. via our many integrations. Through these conversations I've also learned a harsh reality - we will never fully move away from unmanaged data (desktops, file servers, emails, etc). If you use AutoVue today you already know that even if your primary use is viewing content stored in a content management system, you can still open files stored locally on your computer. But did you know that AutoVue actually has - built-in - a great solution for viewing, printing and redlining your data stored on file servers? Using the 'Server protocol' you can point AutoVue directly to a top-level location on any networked file server and provide your users with a link or shortcut to access an interface similar to the sample page shown below. Many customers link to pages just like this one from their internal company intranets. Through this webpage, users can easily search and browse through file server data with a 'click-and-view' interface to find the specific image, document, drawing or model they're looking for. Any markups created on a document will be accessible to everyone else viewing that document and of course real-time collaboration is supported as well. Customers on maintenance can consult the AutoVue Admin guide or My Oracle Support Doc ID 753018.1 for an introduction to the server protocol. Contact your local AutoVue Solutions Consultant for help setting up the sample shown above.

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  • AJI Report 14 &ndash; Brian Lagunas on XAML and Windows 8

    - by Jeff Julian
    We sat down with Brian at the Iowa Code Camp to talk about his sessions, WPF, Application Design, and what Infragistics has to offer developers. Infragistics is a huge supporter of regional events like Iowa Code Camp and we want to thank them for their support of the Midwest region. Brian is a sharp guy and it was great to meet him and learn more about what makes him tick. Brian Lagunas is an INETA Community Speaker, co-leader of the Boise .Net Developers User Group (NETDUG), and original author of the Extended WPF Toolkit. He is a multi-recipient of the Microsoft Community Contributor Award and can be found speaking at a variety of user groups and code camps around the nation. Brian currently works at Infragistics as a Product Manager for the award winning NetAdvantage for WPF and Silverlight components. Before geeking out, Brian served his country in the United States Army as an infantryman and later served his local community as a deputy sheriff.   Listen to the Show   Site: http://brianlagunas.com Twitter: @BrianLagunas

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  • Demantra 7.3.1 Upgrade Path (Doc ID 1286000.1)

    - by Jeff Goulette
    Applies to: Oracle Demantra Demand Management - Version: 6.2.6 to 7.3.1 - Release: 6 to 7.3.0Information in this document applies to any platform. What is being announced?Customers that are on v7.3.0 and v7.3.0.1 and go directly to 7.3.1 with no further steps.Customers on v7.1.0, v7.1.1 and v7.2 branch, you can upgrade to v7.3.1 but there is an issue with the workflow.   You will need to apply patch <11068174>.Customers on older versions like 6.2.6 and 7.0.2, should upgrade to v7.1.1 and then upgrade to v7.3.1.  You must apply patch <11068174> for this upgrade path. Who to contact for more information?Please contact [email protected] for additional information.

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  • Site too large to officially use Google Analytics?

    - by Jeff Atwood
    We just got this email from the Google Analytics team: We love that you love our product and use it as much as you do. We have observed however, that a website you are tracking with Google Analytics is sending over 1 million hits per day to Google Analytics servers. This is well above the "5 million pageviews per month per account" limit specified in the Google Analytics Terms of Service. Processing this amount of data multiple times a day takes up valuable resources that enable us to continue to develop the product for all Google Analytics users. Processing this amount of data multiple times a day takes up valuable resources that enable us to continue to develop the product for all Google Analytics users. As such, starting August 23rd, 2010, the metrics in your reports will be updated once a day, as opposed to multiple times during the course of the day. You will continue to receive all the reports and features in Google Analytics as usual. The only change will be that data for a given day will appear the following day. We trust you understand the reasons for this change. I totally respect this decision, and I think it's very generous to not kick us out. But how do we do this the right way -- what's the official, blessed Google way to use Google Analytics if you're a "whale" website with lots of hits per day? Or, are there other analytics services that would be more appropriate for very large websites?

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  • XSLT is not the solution you're looking for

    - by Jeff
    I was very relieved to see that Umbraco is ditching XSLT as a rendering mechanism in the forthcoming v5. Thank God for that. After working in this business for a very long time, I can't think of any other technology that has been inappropriately used, time after time, and without any compelling reason.The place I remember seeing it the most was during my time at Insurance.com. We used it, mostly, for two reasons. The first and justifiable reason was that it tweaked data for messaging to the various insurance carriers. While they all shared a "standard" for insurance quoting, they all had their little nuances we had to accommodate, so XSLT made sense. The other thing we used it for was rendering in the interview app. In other words, when we showed you some fancy UI, we'd often ditch the control rendering and straight HTML and use XSLT. I hated it.There just hasn't been a technology hammer that made every problem look like a nail (or however that metaphor goes) the way XSLT has. Imagine my horror the first week at Microsoft, when my team assumed control of the MSDN/TechNet forums, and we saw a mess of XSLT for some parts of it. I don't have to tell you that we ripped that stuff out pretty quickly. I can't even tell you how many performance problems went away as we started to rip it out.XSLT is not your friend. It has a place in the world, but that place is tweaking XML, not rendering UI.

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  • .NET development on a “Retina” MacBook Pro

    - by Jeff
    The rumor that Apple would release a super high resolution version of its 15” laptop has been around for quite awhile, and one I watched closely. After more than three years with a 17” MacBook Pro, and all of the screen real estate it offered, I was ready to replace it with something much lighter. It was a fantastic machine, still doing 6 or 7 hours after 460 charge cycles, but I wanted lighter and faster. With the SSD I put in it, I was able to sell it for $750. The appeal of higher resolution goes way back, when I would plug into a projector and scale up. Consolas, as it turns out, is a nice looking font for code when it’s bigger. While I have mostly indifference for iOS, I have to admit that a higher dot pitch on the iPhone and iPad is pretty to look at. So I ordered the new 15” “Retina” model as soon as the Apple Store went live with it, and got it seven days later. I’ve been primarily using Parallels as my VM of choice from OS X for about five years. They recently put out an update for compatibility with the display, though I’m not entirely sure what that means. I figured there would have to be some messing around to get the VM to look right. The combination that seems to work best is this: Set the display in OS X to “more room,” which is roughly the equivalent of the 1920x1200 that my 17” did. It’s not as stunning as the text at the default 1440x900 equivalent (in OS X), but it’s still quite readable. Parallels still doesn’t entirely know what to do with the high resolution, though what it should do is somehow treat it as native. That flaw aside, I set the Windows 7 scaling to 125%, and it generally looks pretty good. It’s not really taking advantage of the display for sharpness, but hopefully that’s something that Parallels will figure out. Screen tweaking aside, I got the base model with 16 gigs of RAM, so I give the VM 8. I can boot a Windows 7 VM in 9 seconds. Nine seconds! The Windows Experience Index scores are all 7 and above, except for graphics, which are both at 6. Again, that’s in a VM. It’s hard to believe there’s something so fast in a little slim package like that. Hopefully this one gets me at least three years, like the last one.

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  • Resource Graphs in top panel?

    - by Jeff Welling
    I'm running Gnome Classic in Ubuntu 11.10 and in previous versions of Ubuntu it was fairly easy to get resource graphs to appear in the top menu, but now the regular way of getting said graphs in the top menu bar don't work (right clicking on the top menu produces no result unless you click on an icon, eg sound, wifi, or battery indicators). Is it not possible to get resource graphs in the top menu bar in Gnome Classic on Ubuntu 11.10? If not Gnome Classic, is it possible in KDE? I've tried googling but the only results I'm getting are related to adding the panel, which I can't do because I can't right click on the top menu. Thanks in advance.

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  • Learning Objective-C for iPad/iPhone/iPod Development

    - by Jeff Julian
    I am learning how to write apps for the iPad/iPhone/iPod!  Why, well several reasons.  One reason, I have 5 devices in my house on the platform.  I had an iPad and iPhone, Michelle has an iPhone, and each of the kids have iPod Touches.  They are excellent devices for life management, entertainment, and learning.  I am amazed at how well the kids pick up on it and how much it effects the way they learn.  My two year old knows how to use it better than any other device we own and she is learning new words and letters so quickly. Because of this saturation at home, it would be fun to write some apps my family could use.  Some games to bring the hobby of development back into my life.  Second reason is we want to have a Geekswithblogs app for the iPhone and iPad.  We are not sure if it is purely informational (blog posts and tweets) or if members want to be able to publish from the app.  Creating a blog editor would be tough stuff, but could be just the right challenge. There are so many more reasons, but the last one that really makes me excited is that it is a new domain of development where I get excited when I think about writing apps.  That excitement level where I want to see if there are User Groups and if we are just watching TV, to break out the MBP and start working on it.  That excitement level where I could really read a development book cover to cover and not just use as a reference.  I really do like this feeling. Who knows how long this will last and I am definitely not leaving .NET.  Microsoft software will always be my main focus, but for the time, my hobby is changing and I am getting excited about development again.   Technorati Tags: Apple,iPad Development,Objective-C,New Frontiers Image: Courtesy of Apple

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  • Solving Euler Project Problem Number 1 with Microsoft Axum

    - by Jeff Ferguson
    Note: The code below applies to version 0.3 of Microsoft Axum. If you are not using this version of Axum, then your code may differ from that shown here. I have just solved Problem 1 of Project Euler using Microsoft Axum. The problem statement is as follows: If we list all the natural numbers below 10 that are multiples of 3 or 5, we get 3, 5, 6 and 9. The sum of these multiples is 23. Find the sum of all the multiples of 3 or 5 below 1000. My Axum-based solution is as follows: namespace EulerProjectProblem1{ // http://projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=1 // // If we list all the natural numbers below 10 that are multiples of 3 or 5, we get 3, 5, 6 and 9. // The sum of these multiples is 23. // Find the sum of all the multiples of 3 or 5 below 1000. channel SumOfMultiples { input int Multiple1; input int Multiple2; input int UpperBound; output int Sum; } agent SumOfMultiplesAgent : channel SumOfMultiples { public SumOfMultiplesAgent() { int Multiple1 = receive(PrimaryChannel::Multiple1); int Multiple2 = receive(PrimaryChannel::Multiple2); int UpperBound = receive(PrimaryChannel::UpperBound); int Sum = 0; for(int Index = 1; Index < UpperBound; Index++) { if((Index % Multiple1 == 0) || (Index % Multiple2 == 0)) Sum += Index; } PrimaryChannel::Sum <-- Sum; } } agent MainAgent : channel Microsoft.Axum.Application { public MainAgent() { var SumOfMultiples = SumOfMultiplesAgent.CreateInNewDomain(); SumOfMultiples::Multiple1 <-- 3; SumOfMultiples::Multiple2 <-- 5; SumOfMultiples::UpperBound <-- 1000; var Sum = receive(SumOfMultiples::Sum); System.Console.WriteLine(Sum); System.Console.ReadLine(); PrimaryChannel::ExitCode <-- 0; } }} Let’s take a look at the various parts of the code. I begin by setting up a channel called SumOfMultiples that accepts three inputs and one output. The first two of the three inputs will represent the two possible multiples, which are three and five in this case. The third input will represent the upper bound of the problem scope, which is 1000 in this case. The lone output of the channel represents the sum of all of the matching multiples: channel SumOfMultiples{ input int Multiple1; input int Multiple2; input int UpperBound; output int Sum;} I then set up an agent that uses the channel. The agent, called SumOfMultiplesAgent, received the three inputs from the channel sent to the agent, stores the results in local variables, and performs the for loop that iterates from 1 to the received upper bound. The agent keeps track of the sum in a local variable and stores the sum in the output portion of the channel: agent SumOfMultiplesAgent : channel SumOfMultiples{ public SumOfMultiplesAgent() { int Multiple1 = receive(PrimaryChannel::Multiple1); int Multiple2 = receive(PrimaryChannel::Multiple2); int UpperBound = receive(PrimaryChannel::UpperBound); int Sum = 0; for(int Index = 1; Index < UpperBound; Index++) { if((Index % Multiple1 == 0) || (Index % Multiple2 == 0)) Sum += Index; } PrimaryChannel::Sum <-- Sum; }} The application’s main agent, therefore, simply creates a new SumOfMultiplesAgent in a new domain, prepares the channel with the inputs that we need, and then receives the Sum from the output portion of the channel: agent MainAgent : channel Microsoft.Axum.Application{ public MainAgent() { var SumOfMultiples = SumOfMultiplesAgent.CreateInNewDomain(); SumOfMultiples::Multiple1 <-- 3; SumOfMultiples::Multiple2 <-- 5; SumOfMultiples::UpperBound <-- 1000; var Sum = receive(SumOfMultiples::Sum); System.Console.WriteLine(Sum); System.Console.ReadLine(); PrimaryChannel::ExitCode <-- 0; }} The result of the calculation (which, by the way, is 233,168) is sent to the console using good ol’ Console.WriteLine().

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  • AJI Report with Nat Ryan&ndash;Discussion about Game Development with Corona Labs SDK

    - by Jeff Julian
    We sat down with Nat Ryan of Fully Croisened to talk about Game Development and the Corona Labs framework. The Corona SDK is a platform that allows you to write mobile games or applications using the Lua language and deploy to the iOS and Android platforms. One of the great features of Corona is the compilation output is a native application and not a hybrid application. Corona is very centered around their developer community and there are quite a few local meetups focused on the helping other developers use the platform. The community and Corona site offers a great number of resources and samples that will help you get started in a matter of a few days. If you are into Game Development and want to move towards mobile, or a business developer looking to turn your craft back into a hobby, check out this recording and Corona Labs to get started.   Download the Podcast   Site: AJI Report – @AJISoftware Site: Fully Croisened Twitter: @FullyCroisened Site: Corona Labs

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  • GWB | Administrator Blog Is Back To Life

    - by Jeff Julian
    We are bringing back the administrator’s blog for Geekswithblogs.net as a place to get information for what is going on with GWB. Couple reasons we are doing this. One, I post a lot of information on my blog that is not Geekswithblogs.net related. Most the time it isn’t even developer related and I know I need to work on that too, but in an effort to keep the signal much higher than the noise, we are moving the information over there. The blog URL is http://geekswithblogs.net/administrator. The other reason we are doing it is I am not the only member of the GWB staff. So please subscribe to that blog and let us know what you think about Geekswithblogs.net and how we can make the site better.http://geekswithblogs.net/administrator

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  • Calculating Screen Resolutions Using WPF

    - by Jeff Ferguson
    WPF measures all elements in device independent pixels (DIPs). These DIPs equate to device pixels if the current display monitor is set to the default of 96 DPI. However, for monitors set to a DPI setting that is different than 96 DPI, then WPF DIPs will not correspond directly to monitor pixels. Consider, for example, the WPF properties SystemParameters.PrimaryScreenHeight and SystemParameters.PrimaryScreenWidth. If your monitor resolution is set to 1024 pixels wide by 768 pixels high, and your monitor is set to 96 DPI, then WPF will report the value of SystemParameters.PrimaryScreenHeight as 768 and the value of SystemParameters.PrimaryScreenWidth as 1024. No problem. This aligns nicely because the WPF device independent pixel value (96) matches your monitor's DPI setting (96). However, if your monitor is not set to display pixels at 96 DPI, then SystemParameters.PrimaryScreenHeight and SystemParameters.PrimaryScreenWidth will not return what you expect. The values returned by these properties may be greater than or less than what you expect, depending on whether or not your monitor's DPI value is less than or greater than 96. Since the SystemParameters.PrimaryScreenHeight and SystemParameters.PrimaryScreenWidth properties are WPF properties, their values are measured in WPF DIPs, rather than taking monitor DPI into effect. Once again: WPF measures all elements in device independent pixels (DIPs). To combat this issue, you must take your monitor's DPI settings into effect if you're looking for the monitor's width and height using the monitor's DPI settings. The handy code block below will help you calculate these values regardless of the DPI setting on your monitor: Window MainWindow = Application.Current.MainWindow; PresentationSource MainWindowPresentationSource = PresentationSource.FromVisual(MainWindow); Matrix m = MainWindowPresentationSource.CompositionTarget.TransformToDevice; DpiWidthFactor = m.M11; DpiHeightFactor = m.M22; double ScreenHeight = SystemParameters.PrimaryScreenHeight * DpiHeightFactor; double ScreenWidth = SystemParameters.PrimaryScreenWidth * DpiWidthFactor; The values of ScreenHeight and ScreenWidth should, after this code is executed, match the resolution that you see in the display's Properties window.

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