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  • Installing/configuring mysql server nightmare

    - by allenskd
    I've never had problems installing and configuring mysql server in kubuntu but now it's just being stubborn, here's my issue: I installed the packages mysql-server, mysql-client (both 5.1), the server package asked me to put a root password, which I did, it then started saying "access denied", on anything Later on, I decided to purge the packages and re-install and gave a tweak to the my.cnf and not it says ERROR 2002 (HY000): Can't connect to local MySQL server through socket '/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock' (2) Please, is there a way to do a fresh start on this and do it right this time? I don't know if I'm missing something but the /var/lib/mysql is not empty but there is no .pid, now the mysql service won't start, there is no mysql.sock either Any help appreciated

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  • Redehost Transforms Cloud & Hosting Services with MySQL Enterprise Edition

    - by Mat Keep
    RedeHost are one of Brazil's largest cloud computing and web hosting providers, with more than 60,000 customers and 52,000 web sites running on its infrastructure. As the company grew, Redehost needed to automate operations, such as system monitoring, making the operations team more proactive in solving problems. Redehost also sought to improve server uptime, robustness, and availability, especially during backup windows, when performance would often dip. To address the needs of the business, Redehost migrated from the community edition of MySQL to MySQL Enterprise Edition, which has delivered a host of benefits: - Pro-active database management and monitoring using MySQL Enterprise Monitor, enabling Redehost to fulfil customer SLAs. Using the Query Analyzer, Redehost were able to more rapidly identify slow queries, improving customer support - Quadrupled backup speed with MySQL Enterprise Backup, leading to faster data recovery and improved system availability - Reduced DBA overhead by 50% due to the improved support capabilities offered by MySQL Enterprise Edition. - Enabled infrastructure consolidation, avoiding unnecessary energy costs and premature hardware acquisition You can learn more from the full Redehost Case Study Also, take a look at the recently updated MySQL in the Cloud whitepaper for the latest developments that are making it even simpler and more efficient to develop and deploy new services with MySQL in the cloud

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  • NoSQL Java API for MySQL Cluster: Questions & Answers

    - by Mat Keep
    The MySQL Cluster engineering team recently ran a live webinar, available now on-demand demonstrating the ClusterJ and ClusterJPA NoSQL APIs for MySQL Cluster, and how these can be used in building real-time, high scale Java-based services that require continuous availability. Attendees asked a number of great questions during the webinar, and I thought it would be useful to share those here, so others are also able to learn more about the Java NoSQL APIs. First, a little bit about why we developed these APIs and why they are interesting to Java developers. ClusterJ and Cluster JPA ClusterJ is a Java interface to MySQL Cluster that provides either a static or dynamic domain object model, similar to the data model used by JDO, JPA, and Hibernate. A simple API gives users extremely high performance for common operations: insert, delete, update, and query. ClusterJPA works with ClusterJ to extend functionality, including - Persistent classes - Relationships - Joins in queries - Lazy loading - Table and index creation from object model By eliminating data transformations via SQL, users get lower data access latency and higher throughput. In addition, Java developers have a more natural programming method to directly manage their data, with a complete, feature-rich solution for Object/Relational Mapping. As a result, the development of Java applications is simplified with faster development cycles resulting in accelerated time to market for new services. MySQL Cluster offers multiple NoSQL APIs alongside Java: - Memcached for a persistent, high performance, write-scalable Key/Value store, - HTTP/REST via an Apache module - C++ via the NDB API for the lowest absolute latency. Developers can use SQL as well as NoSQL APIs for access to the same data set via multiple query patterns – from simple Primary Key lookups or inserts to complex cross-shard JOINs using Adaptive Query Localization Marrying NoSQL and SQL access to an ACID-compliant database offers developers a number of benefits. MySQL Cluster’s distributed, shared-nothing architecture with auto-sharding and real time performance makes it a great fit for workloads requiring high volume OLTP. Users also get the added flexibility of being able to run real-time analytics across the same OLTP data set for real-time business insight. OK – hopefully you now have a better idea of why ClusterJ and JPA are available. Now, for the Q&A. Q & A Q. Why would I use Connector/J vs. ClusterJ? A. Partly it's a question of whether you prefer to work with SQL (Connector/J) or objects (ClusterJ). Performance of ClusterJ will be better as there is no need to pass through the MySQL Server. A ClusterJ operation can only act on a single table (e.g. no joins) - ClusterJPA extends that capability Q. Can I mix different APIs (ie ClusterJ, Connector/J) in our application for different query types? A. Yes. You can mix and match all of the API types, SQL, JDBC, ODBC, ClusterJ, Memcached, REST, C++. They all access the exact same data in the data nodes. Update through one API and new data is instantly visible to all of the others. Q. How many TCP connections would a SessionFactory instance create for a cluster of 8 data nodes? A. SessionFactory has a connection to the mgmd (management node) but otherwise is just a vehicle to create Sessions. Without using connection pooling, a SessionFactory will have one connection open with each data node. Using optional connection pooling allows multiple connections from the SessionFactory to increase throughput. Q. Can you give details of how Cluster J optimizes sharding to enhance performance of distributed query processing? A. Each data node in a cluster runs a Transaction Coordinator (TC), which begins and ends the transaction, but also serves as a resource to operate on the result rows. While an API node (such as a ClusterJ process) can send queries to any TC/data node, there are performance gains if the TC is where most of the result data is stored. ClusterJ computes the shard (partition) key to choose the data node where the row resides as the TC. Q. What happens if we perform two primary key lookups within the same transaction? Are they sent to the data node in one transaction? A. ClusterJ will send identical PK lookups to the same data node. Q. How is distributed query processing handled by MySQL Cluster ? A. If the data is split between data nodes then all of the information will be transparently combined and passed back to the application. The session will connect to a data node - typically by hashing the primary key - which then interacts with its neighboring nodes to collect the data needed to fulfil the query. Q. Can I use Foreign Keys with MySQL Cluster A. Support for Foreign Keys is included in the MySQL Cluster 7.3 Early Access release Summary The NoSQL Java APIs are packaged with MySQL Cluster, available for download here so feel free to take them for a spin today! Key Resources MySQL Cluster on-line demo  MySQL ClusterJ and JPA On-demand webinar  MySQL ClusterJ and JPA documentation MySQL ClusterJ and JPA whitepaper and tutorial

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  • MySQL equivalent to .pgpass, or automatic authentication in a cron job for mySQL

    - by Ibrahim
    I'm writing a bash script to back up my databases. Most are postgresql, and in postgres there's a way to avoid having to authenticate by creating a ~/.pgpass file which contains the postgres password. I put this in root's home directory and made it chmod 0600, so that root could dump the postgres databases without having to authenticate. Now I want to do something similar for mysql, although I only have one mysql database. How can I do this? I don't want to specify the password on the command line for mysqldump because this is part of a script that might be somewhat visible to other users. Is there a better way (i.e. built in to mysql) to do this than make a file that only root can read and then read that to get the mysql password, and then use that in the bash script as a variable?

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  • MySQL equivalent to .pgpass, or automatic authentication in a cron job for mySQL

    - by Ibrahim
    I'm writing a bash script to back up my databases. Most are postgresql, and in postgres there's a way to avoid having to authenticate by creating a ~/.pgpass file which contains the postgres password. I put this in root's home directory and made it chmod 0600, so that root could dump the postgres databases without having to authenticate. Now I want to do something similar for mysql, although I only have one mysql database. How can I do this? I don't want to specify the password on the command line for mysqldump because this is part of a script that might be somewhat visible to other users. Is there a better way (i.e. built in to mysql) to do this than make a file that only root can read and then read that to get the mysql password, and then use that in the bash script as a variable?

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  • Can't ssh tunnel to access a remote mysql server

    - by hobbes3
    I can't seem to figure out why I can't use ssh tunnel to connect to my remote MySQL server. I do ssh tunnel with [[email protected]] ~ $ ssh linode -L 3307:localhost:3306 Then on another terminal, I try [[email protected]] ~ $ mysql -h localhost -P 3307 -u root --protocol=tcp -p Enter password: ERROR 2013 (HY000): Lost connection to MySQL server at 'reading initial communication packet', system error: 2 On the server, it shows this: [email protected] ~ # channel 4: open failed: connect failed: Connection refused Here is my my.cnf on the server: [mysqld] # Settings user and group are ignored when systemd is used (fedora >= 15). # If you need to run mysqld under different user or group, # customize your systemd unit file for mysqld according to the # instructions in http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Systemd user=mysql datadir=/var/lib/mysql socket=/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock # Disabling symbolic-links is recommended to prevent assorted security risks symbolic-links=0 # Semisynchronous Replication # http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/replication-semisync.html # uncomment next line on MASTER ;plugin-load=rpl_semi_sync_master=semisync_master.so # uncomment next line on SLAVE ;plugin-load=rpl_semi_sync_slave=semisync_slave.so # Others options for Semisynchronous Replication ;rpl_semi_sync_master_enabled=1 ;rpl_semi_sync_master_timeout=10 ;rpl_semi_sync_slave_enabled=1 # http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/performance-schema.html ;performance_schema [mysqld_safe] log-error=/var/log/mysqld.log pid-file=/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid [mysqld] port = 3306 socket=/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock skip-external-locking key_buffer_size = 64M max_allowed_packet = 128M sort_buffer_size = 512K net_buffer_length = 8K read_buffer_size = 256K read_rnd_buffer_size = 512K myisam_sort_buffer_size = 8M thread_cache = 8 max_connections = 25 query_cache_size = 16M table_open_cache = 1024 table_definition_cache = 1024 tmp_table_size = 32M max_heap_table_size = 32M bind-address = 0.0.0.0 Now sure if this helps but here is the MySQL user list: mysql> select * from mysql.user; +-----------+------+-------------------------------------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+---------------+--------------+-----------+------------+-----------------+------------+------------+--------------+------------+-----------------------+------------------+--------------+-----------------+------------------+------------------+----------------+---------------------+--------------------+------------------+------------+--------------+------------------------+----------+------------+-------------+--------------+---------------+-------------+-----------------+----------------------+--------+-----------------------+ | Host | User | Password | Select_priv | Insert_priv | Update_priv | Delete_priv | Create_priv | Drop_priv | Reload_priv | Shutdown_priv | Process_priv | File_priv | Grant_priv | References_priv | Index_priv | Alter_priv | Show_db_priv | Super_priv | Create_tmp_table_priv | Lock_tables_priv | Execute_priv | Repl_slave_priv | Repl_client_priv | Create_view_priv | Show_view_priv | Create_routine_priv | Alter_routine_priv | Create_user_priv | Event_priv | Trigger_priv | Create_tablespace_priv | ssl_type | ssl_cipher | x509_issuer | x509_subject | max_questions | max_updates | max_connections | max_user_connections | plugin | authentication_string | +-----------+------+-------------------------------------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+---------------+--------------+-----------+------------+-----------------+------------+------------+--------------+------------+-----------------------+------------------+--------------+-----------------+------------------+------------------+----------------+---------------------+--------------------+------------------+------------+--------------+------------------------+----------+------------+-------------+--------------+---------------+-------------+-----------------+----------------------+--------+-----------------------+ | localhost | root | *664328D3C5E263F4FB25185681AAE7E92B01B2B0 | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | | | | | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | | | | 127.0.0.1 | root | *664328D3C5E263F4FB25185681AAE7E92B01B2B0 | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | | | | | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | | | | ::1 | root | *664328D3C5E263F4FB25185681AAE7E92B01B2B0 | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | Y | | | | | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | | | +-----------+------+-------------------------------------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+---------------+--------------+-----------+------------+-----------------+------------+------------+--------------+------------+-----------------------+------------------+--------------+-----------------+------------------+------------------+----------------+---------------------+--------------------+------------------+------------+--------------+------------------------+----------+------------+-------------+--------------+---------------+-------------+-----------------+----------------------+--------+-----------------------+ 3 rows in set (0.00 sec) I read about how MySQL treats localhost vs 127.0.0.1 as connecting via a socket or TCP, respectively. But I'm starting to get confused on what's really going on or if socket vs TCP is even the issue. Thanks in advance and I'm open for any tips and suggestions! Some more info: My MySQL client, running OS X 10.8.4, is mysql Ver 14.14 Distrib 5.6.10, for osx10.8 (x86_64) using EditLine wrapper My MySQL server, running on CentOS 6.4 32-bit, is mysql> SHOW VARIABLES LIKE "%version%"; +-------------------------+--------------------------------------+ | Variable_name | Value | +-------------------------+--------------------------------------+ | innodb_version | 1.1.8 | | protocol_version | 10 | | slave_type_conversions | | | version | 5.5.28 | | version_comment | MySQL Community Server (GPL) by Remi | | version_compile_machine | i686 | | version_compile_os | Linux | +-------------------------+--------------------------------------+ 7 rows in set (0.00 sec)

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  • Mysql server fails to start

    - by Nicolas Thery
    Googling since two hours, I require your assistance. I'm on a Debian virtual machine and I cloned it. The only change is the new IP adress it has. Mysql doesn't start any more: Starting MySQL database server: mysqld . . . . . . . . . . . . . . failed! There is no process called mysql. All the mysql log files in /var/log are empty. here is my.cnf file : [client] port = 3306 socket = /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock [mysqld_safe] socket = /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock nice = 0 [mysqld] user = mysql pid-file = /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid socket = /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock port = 3306 basedir = /usr datadir = /var/lib/mysql tmpdir = /tmp language = /usr/share/mysql/english skip-external-locking bind-address = 127.0.0.1 key_buffer = 16M max_allowed_packet = 16M thread_stack = 192K thread_cache_size = 8 myisam-recover = BACKUP query_cache_limit = 1M query_cache_size = 16M general_log_file = /var/log/mysql/mysql.log log_bin = /var/log/mysql/mysql-bin.log expire_logs_days = 10 max_binlog_size = 100M [mysqldump] quick quote-names max_allowed_packet = 16M [mysql] [isamchk] key_buffer = 16M [mysqld_safe] syslog Here is the result of ifconfig : eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:0c:29:12:98:9a inet adr:192.168.1.138 Bcast:192.168.1.255 Masque:255.255.255.0 UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1 RX packets:754 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:106 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 lg file transmission:1000 RX bytes:101177 (98.8 KiB) TX bytes:17719 (17.3 KiB) lo Link encap:Boucle locale inet adr:127.0.0.1 Masque:255.0.0.0 adr inet6: ::1/128 Scope:Hôte UP LOOPBACK RUNNING MTU:16436 Metric:1 RX packets:8 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:8 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 lg file transmission:0 RX bytes:560 (560.0 B) TX bytes:560 (560.0 B) As requested, here is the result of : sudo -u mysql mysqld, here is the result : [email protected]:/home/nicolas/Bureau# sudo -u mysql mysqld 121004 14:26:57 [Note] Plugin 'FEDERATED' is disabled. mysqld: Can't find file: './mysql/plugin.frm' (errno: 13) 121004 14:26:57 [ERROR] Can't open the mysql.plugin table. Please run mysql_upgrade to create it. 121004 14:26:57 InnoDB: Initializing buffer pool, size = 8.0M 121004 14:26:57 InnoDB: Completed initialization of buffer pool 121004 14:26:57 InnoDB: Started; log sequence number 0 70822697 121004 14:26:57 [Note] Recovering after a crash using /var/log/mysql/mysql-bin 121004 14:26:57 [Note] Starting crash recovery... 121004 14:26:57 [Note] Crash recovery finished. 121004 14:26:57 [ERROR] mysqld: Can't find file: './mysql/host.frm' (errno: 13) 121004 14:26:57 [ERROR] Fatal error: Can't open and lock privilege tables: Can't find file: './mysql/host.frm' (errno: 13)

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  • Restart mysql keeping the data

    - by sitonico
    I'm quite new using mysql, so let me know if I'm missing something. I took some holidays, and when I got back to work and I tried to log in phpmyadmin I got a ERROR 2002 (HY000): Can't connect to local MySQL server through socket '/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock' (2). I never had this problem, so I was browsing to look for a solution. I tried some things, and I'm afraid I touched too much. I couldn't solve the problem, and the I realized that I had some actualizations to be done, and I thought that they may be helpful for mysql. Then I also realized that when I was doing this actualizations first day, they stopped because I had a lack of space, so I restarted then. Then,when the system was configuring mysql, it didn't advance. I waited for a long time and then I just stopped it and restarted the computer. After it, I just tried to uninstall mysql with sudo apt-get remove mysql-server-5.1, and install it again, but it didn't work. Now I have 2 questions: What do you think it is happening? Should I remove mysql completely? What should I do? I'm afraid of losing my databases, is there anyway to recover the data? Thank you very much in advance. -----------EDIT------- These are the messages: [email protected]:/$ tail -F /var/log/syslog | grep Feb 15 15:08:01 alfonso-laptop init: mysql post-start process (15192) terminated with status Feb 15 15:08:01 alfonso-laptop init: mysql main process (15263) terminated with status Feb 15 15:08:01 alfonso-laptop init: mysql main process ended, Feb 15 15:08:31 alfonso-laptop init: mysql post-start process (15264) terminated with status Feb 15 15:08:31 alfonso-laptop init: mysql main process (15358) terminated with status Feb 15 15:08:31 alfonso-laptop init: mysql main process ended, Feb 15 15:09:01 alfonso-laptop init: mysql post-start process (15359) terminated with status Feb 15 15:09:01 alfonso-laptop init: mysql main process (15447) terminated with status Feb 15 15:09:01 alfonso-laptop init: mysql main process ended, Feb 15 15:09:32 alfonso-laptop init: mysql post-start process (15448) terminated with status 1 This is the content of error.log-old 110128 13:17:20 [Note] /usr/sbin/mysqld: Normal shutdown 110128 13:17:20 [Note] Event Scheduler: Purging the queue. 0 events 110128 13:17:20 InnoDB: Starting shutdown... 110128 13:17:22 InnoDB: Shutdown completed; log sequence number 0 590872 110128 13:17:22 [Note] /usr/sbin/mysqld: Shutdown complete 110214 2:08:18 [Note] Plugin 'FEDERATED' is disabled. 110214 2:08:19 InnoDB: Started; log sequence number 0 590872 110214 2:08:19 [Note] Event Scheduler: Loaded 0 events 110214 2:08:19 [Note] /usr/sbin/mysqld: ready for connections. Version: '5.1.41-3ubuntu12.8' socket: '/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock' port: 3306 (Ubuntu) -- Some links of similar problems https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/mysql-dfsg-5.1/+bug/573318 http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/lamp-install-on-lucid-mysqld-sock-missing-mysql-terminating-status%3D1-853152/ It seems it's a permissions problem... But I don't know which permissions I should change... SOLVED -- mysql error 2002 "cannot connect to socket"

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  • How to recover MySQL database from .mysql file?

    - by Brayn
    We had some problems with our MySQL server and somehow all I've got is a database.mysql file for the database I want to restore. I've done a bit of googleing but I didn't find anything about how should I handle this type of file. It's worth mentioning that the server was running Plesk and the database wasn't using InnoDB. Edit: I've forgot to mention that I don't know what application created the .mysql file and that it's in binary format. Thanks,

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  • Starting MySQL after installing MySQL 5.5 from .rpm

    - by user593294
    I m using Ubuntu 11.04. I have installed MySQL server and client ver 5.5.13. The problem i have is actually to start MySQL after installing it from the .rpm package obtained from the oracle site. I m not able to find any guide for configuring MySQL after completing its installation. I installed it using alien. I found some guides for older version of ubuntu which i find irrelevant. So Please help me in configuring and starting MySQL successfully.

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  • MySQL – How to Find mysqld.exe with Command Prompt – Fix: ‘mysql’ is not recognized as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file

    - by Pinal Dave
    One of the most popular question I get after watching my MySQL courses on Pluralsight is that beginning users are not able to find where they have installed MySQL Server. The error they receive is as follows when they type mysqld command on their default command line. ‘mysql‘ is not recognized as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file. This error comes up if user try to execute mysqld command on default command prompt. The user should execute this command where mysql.exe file exists.  If you are using Windows Explorer you can easily search on your drive mysqld.exe and find the location of the file and execute the above command there. However, if you want to find out with command prompt the location of mysqld.exe file you can follow the direction here. Step 1: Open a command prompt Open command prompt from Start >> Run >> cmd >> enter Step 2: Change directory You need to change the default directory to root directory, hence type cd\ command on the prompt to change the default directory to c:\ . Here we are assuming that you have installed MySQL on your c: drive. If you have installed it on any other drive change the drive to that letter. Step 3: Search Drive Type the command dir mysqld.exe /s /p on the command prompt. It will search your directories and will list the directory where mysqld.exe is located. Step 4: Change Directory Now once again change your command prompt file location to the folder where your mysqld.exe is located. In my case it is located here in folder C:\Program Files\MySQL\MySQL Server 5.6\bin hence I will run following command: cd C:\Program Files\MySQL\MySQL Server 5.6\bin . Step 5: Execute mysqld.exe Now you can once again mysqld.exe on your command prompt. You can use this method to search pretty much any file with the help of command prompt. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com)Filed under: MySQL, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL

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  • MySQL on Windows - Why, Where and How

    - by bertrand.matthelie(at)oracle.com
    @font-face { font-family: "Arial"; }@font-face { font-family: "Courier New"; }@font-face { font-family: "Wingdings"; }@font-face { font-family: "Cambria"; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }a:link, span.MsoHyperlink { color: blue; text-decoration: underline; }a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed { color: purple; text-decoration: underline; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }ol { margin-bottom: 0cm; }ul { margin-bottom: 0cm; } Over the years Windows has become a major development and deployment platform for MySQL. As a matter of fact, Windows consistently ranks as the #1 development platform in our surveys, and now also ranks higher than any Linux distribution as a deployment platform among MySQL Community Edition users.   We've made various technical resources available in our MySQL on Windows Resource Center including articles, whitepapers and archived webinars. MySQL users are also sharing their experiences and writing how-to articles, and it's great to see former MySQL/Sun/Oracle employees still contributing! Thanks Anders for a recent step-by-step part 1 article on working with MySQL on Windows.   We also got feedback from customers wishing to get higher-level information about MySQL on Windows, to help them and others in their organizations better understand:   ·       Why is the world's most popular open source database so popular on Windows?   ·       What are the applications for which one should consider MySQL on Microsoft's platform?   ·       How should Windows shops relying on Microsoft databases get going with MySQL?   Those are the questions we aim to answer in our guide "MySQL on Windows - Why, Where and How", that you can download here.

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  • Display particular data into a file

    - by Avinash K G
    I'm new to Ubuntu and have been using it for a couple of weeks now. Recently I encountered a problem where in I had to display a particular data on to a file. Here is the output displayed on the terminal. Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2009-4028) CVSS Score is 6.8 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2009-4030) CVSS Score is 4.4 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2009-5026) CVSS Score is 6.8 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0075) CVSS Score is 1.7 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0087) CVSS Score is 4.0 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0101) CVSS Score is 4.0 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0102) CVSS Score is 4.0 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0112) CVSS Score is 3.5 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0113) CVSS Score is 5.5 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0114) CVSS Score is 3.0 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0115) CVSS Score is 4.0 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0116) CVSS Score is 4.9 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0118) CVSS Score is 4.9 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0119) CVSS Score is 4.0 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0120) CVSS Score is 4.0 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0484) CVSS Score is 4.0 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0485) CVSS Score is 4.0 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0490) CVSS Score is 4.0 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0492) CVSS Score is 2.1 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0540) CVSS Score is 4.0 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0553) CVSS Score is 7.5 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0574) CVSS Score is 4.0 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2012-0583) CVSS Score is 4.0 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2013-1492) CVSS Score is 7.5 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2013-1506) CVSS Score is 2.8 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) Potential vulnerability found (CVE-2013-1521) CVSS Score is 6.5 Full vulnerability match (incl. edition/language) File "/usr/sbin/mysqld" (CPE = cpe:/a:mysql:mysql:5.1:::) on host glynis-desktop (key glynis-desktop) I intend to display the Potential vulnerability found field and the corresponding score alone. There seems to be about 9995 entries and I would like to display all of them. I have been using this command as of now awk '/CVSS Score is/ < /Potential vulnerability found/' output.txt but this seems to display only the name of the vulnerability or the score. How do I display this in file(text,excel) such that all the vulnerability and the corresponding score willbe displayed. Any help would be appreciated Thank you.

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  • Log & monitor mysql databases on servers

    - by user3215
    How MySQL databases logged and monitored on ubuntu servers in real time?. I checked /var/log/mysql.log and found it empty. EDIT 1: The log was not enabled in the mysql configuration file. Now it logs and I could see the logs in the file /var/log/mysql/mysql.log But this could not be sufficient to gather additional information about the database logs. Is there any other way or any popular open source tool?

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  • Develop DBA skills with MySQL for Database Administrators course

    - by Antoinette O'Sullivan
    MySQL is the world's number one open source database and the number one database for the Web. Join top companies by developing your MySQL Database Administrator skills. The MySQL for Database Administrators course is for DBAs and other database professionals who want to install the MySQL Server, set up replication and security, perform database backups and performance tuning, and protect MySQL databases. You can take this 5 day course as Training on Demand: Start training within 24 hours of registration. You will follow the lecture material via streaming video and perform hands-on activities at a date and time that suits you. Live-Virtual Event:  Take this instructor-led course from your own desk. Choose from the 19 events currently on the schedule and find an event that suits you in terms of timezone and date. In-Class Event: Travel to an education center. Here is a sample of events on the schedule:    Location  Date  Delivery Language  Mechelen, Belgium  25 February 2013  English  London, England  26 November 2012  English  Nice, France  3 December 2012  French  Paris, France  11 February 2013  French  Budapest, Hungary  26 November 2012  Hungarian  Belfast, Ireland  24 June 2013  English  Milan, Italy  14 January 2013  Japanese  Rome, Italy  18 February 2013  Japanese  Amsterdam, Netherlands  24 June 2013  Dutch  Nieuwegein, Netherlands  8 April 2013  Dutch  Warsaw, Poland  10 December 2012  Polish  Lisbon, Portugal  21 January 2013  European Portugese  Porto, Portugal  21 January 2013  European Portugese  Barcelona, Spain  4 February 2013  Spanish  Madrid, Spain  21 January 2013  Spanish  Nairobi, Kenya  26 November 2012  English  Johannesburg, South Africa  9 December 2013  English  Tokyo, Japan  10 December 2012  Japanese  Singapore  28 January 2013  English  Brisbane, Australia  10 December 2012  English  Edmonton, Canada  7 January 2013  English  Montreal, Canada  28 January 2013  English  Ottawa, Canada  28 January 2013  English  Toronto, Canada  28 January 2013  English  Vancouver, Canada  7 January 2013  English  Mexico City, Mexico  10 December 2012  Spanish  Sao Paolo, Brazil  10 December 2012  Brazilian Portugese For more information on this course or on other courses on the authentic MySQL Curriculum, go to http://oracle.com/education/mysql. Note, many organizations deploy both Oracle Database and MySQL side by side to serve different needs, and as a database professional you can find training courses on both topics at Oracle University! Check out the upcoming Oracle Database training courses and MySQL training courses. Even if you're only managing Oracle Databases at this point of time, getting familiar with MySQL will broaden your career path with growing job demand.

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  • Log & monitor mysql databases on servers

    - by user3215
    How MySQL databases logged and monitored on ubuntu servers in real time?. I checked /var/log/mysql.log and found it empty. EDIT 1: The log was not enabled in the mysql configuration file. Now it logs and I could see the logs in the file /var/log/mysql/mysql.log But this could not be sufficient to gather additional information about the database logs. Is there any other way or any popular open source tool?

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  • MySQL and Hadoop Integration - Unlocking New Insight

    - by Mat Keep
    “Big Data” offers the potential for organizations to revolutionize their operations. With the volume of business data doubling every 1.2 years, analysts and business users are discovering very real benefits when integrating and analyzing data from multiple sources, enabling deeper insight into their customers, partners, and business processes. As the world’s most popular open source database, and the most deployed database in the web and cloud, MySQL is a key component of many big data platforms, with Hadoop vendors estimating 80% of deployments are integrated with MySQL. The new Guide to MySQL and Hadoop presents the tools enabling integration between the two data platforms, supporting the data lifecycle from acquisition and organisation to analysis and visualisation / decision, as shown in the figure below The Guide details each of these stages and the technologies supporting them: Acquire: Through new NoSQL APIs, MySQL is able to ingest high volume, high velocity data, without sacrificing ACID guarantees, thereby ensuring data quality. Real-time analytics can also be run against newly acquired data, enabling immediate business insight, before data is loaded into Hadoop. In addition, sensitive data can be pre-processed, for example healthcare or financial services records can be anonymized, before transfer to Hadoop. Organize: Data is transferred from MySQL tables to Hadoop using Apache Sqoop. With the MySQL Binlog (Binary Log) API, users can also invoke real-time change data capture processes to stream updates to HDFS. Analyze: Multi-structured data ingested from multiple sources is consolidated and processed within the Hadoop platform. Decide: The results of the analysis are loaded back to MySQL via Apache Sqoop where they inform real-time operational processes or provide source data for BI analytics tools. So how are companies taking advantage of this today? As an example, on-line retailers can use big data from their web properties to better understand site visitors’ activities, such as paths through the site, pages viewed, and comments posted. This knowledge can be combined with user profiles and purchasing history to gain a better understanding of customers, and the delivery of highly targeted offers. Of course, it is not just in the web that big data can make a difference. Every business activity can benefit, with other common use cases including: - Sentiment analysis; - Marketing campaign analysis; - Customer churn modeling; - Fraud detection; - Research and Development; - Risk Modeling; - And more. As the guide discusses, Big Data is promising a significant transformation of the way organizations leverage data to run their businesses. MySQL can be seamlessly integrated within a Big Data lifecycle, enabling the unification of multi-structured data into common data platforms, taking advantage of all new data sources and yielding more insight than was ever previously imaginable. Download the guide to MySQL and Hadoop integration to learn more. I'd also be interested in hearing about how you are integrating MySQL with Hadoop today, and your requirements for the future, so please use the comments on this blog to share your insights.

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  • MySQL Syslog Audit Plugin

    - by jonathonc
    This post shows the construction process of the Syslog Audit plugin that was presented at MySQL Connect 2012. It is based on an environment that has the appropriate development tools enabled including gcc,g++ and cmake. It also assumes you have downloaded the MySQL source code (5.5.16 or higher) and have compiled and installed the system into the /usr/local/mysql directory ready for use.  The information provided below is designed to show the different components that make up a plugin, and specifically an audit type plugin, and how it comes together to be used within the MySQL service. The MySQL Reference Manual contains information regarding the plugin API and how it can be used, so please refer there for more detailed information. The code in this post is designed to give the simplest information necessary, so handling every return code, managing race conditions etc is not part of this example code. Let's start by looking at the most basic implementation of our plugin code as seen below: /*    Copyright (c) 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.    Author:  Jonathon Coombes    Licence: GPL    Description: An auditing plugin that logs to syslog and                 can adjust the loglevel via the system variables. */ #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> #include <mysql/plugin_audit.h> #include <syslog.h> There is a commented header detailing copyright/licencing and meta-data information and then the include headers. The two important include statements for our plugin are the syslog.h plugin, which gives us the structures for syslog, and the plugin_audit.h include which has details regarding the audit specific plugin api. Note that we do not need to include the general plugin header plugin.h, as this is done within the plugin_audit.h file already. To implement our plugin within the current implementation we need to add it into our source code and compile. > cd /usr/local/src/mysql-5.5.28/plugin > mkdir audit_syslog > cd audit_syslog A simple CMakeLists.txt file is created to manage the plugin compilation: MYSQL_ADD_PLUGIN(audit_syslog audit_syslog.cc MODULE_ONLY) Run the cmake  command at the top level of the source and then you can compile the plugin using the 'make' command. This results in a compiled audit_syslog.so library, but currently it is not much use to MySQL as there is no level of api defined to communicate with the MySQL service. Now we need to define the general plugin structure that enables MySQL to recognise the library as a plugin and be able to install/uninstall it and have it show up in the system. The structure is defined in the plugin.h file in the MySQL source code.  /*   Plugin library descriptor */ mysql_declare_plugin(audit_syslog) {   MYSQL_AUDIT_PLUGIN,           /* plugin type                    */   &audit_syslog_descriptor,     /* descriptor handle               */   "audit_syslog",               /* plugin name                     */   "Author Name",                /* author                          */   "Simple Syslog Audit",        /* description                     */   PLUGIN_LICENSE_GPL,           /* licence                         */   audit_syslog_init,            /* init function     */   audit_syslog_deinit,          /* deinit function */   0x0001,                       /* plugin version                  */   NULL,                         /* status variables        */   NULL,                         /* system variables                */   NULL,                         /* no reserves                     */   0,                            /* no flags                        */ } mysql_declare_plugin_end; The general plugin descriptor above is standard for all plugin types in MySQL. The plugin type is defined along with the init/deinit functions and interface methods into the system for sharing information, and various other metadata information. The descriptors have an internally recognised version number so that plugins can be matched against the api on the running server. The other details are usually related to the type-specific methods and structures to implement the plugin. Each plugin has a type-specific descriptor as well which details how the plugin is implemented for the specific purpose of that plugin type. /*   Plugin type-specific descriptor */ static struct st_mysql_audit audit_syslog_descriptor= {   MYSQL_AUDIT_INTERFACE_VERSION,                        /* interface version    */   NULL,                                                 /* release_thd function */   audit_syslog_notify,                                  /* notify function      */   { (unsigned long) MYSQL_AUDIT_GENERAL_CLASSMASK |                     MYSQL_AUDIT_CONNECTION_CLASSMASK }  /* class mask           */ }; In this particular case, the release_thd function has not been defined as it is not required. The important method for auditing is the notify function which is activated when an event occurs on the system. The notify function is designed to activate on an event and the implementation will determine how it is handled. For the audit_syslog plugin, the use of the syslog feature sends all events to the syslog for recording. The class mask allows us to determine what type of events are being seen by the notify function. There are currently two major types of event: 1. General Events: This includes general logging, errors, status and result type events. This is the main one for tracking the queries and operations on the database. 2. Connection Events: This group is based around user logins. It monitors connections and disconnections, but also if somebody changes user while connected. With most audit plugins, the principle behind the plugin is to track changes to the system over time and counters can be an important part of this process. The next step is to define and initialise the counters that are used to track the events in the service. There are 3 counters defined in total for our plugin - the # of general events, the # of connection events and the total number of events.  static volatile int total_number_of_calls; /* Count MYSQL_AUDIT_GENERAL_CLASS event instances */ static volatile int number_of_calls_general; /* Count MYSQL_AUDIT_CONNECTION_CLASS event instances */ static volatile int number_of_calls_connection; The init and deinit functions for the plugin are there to be called when the plugin is activated and when it is terminated. These offer the best option to initialise the counters for our plugin: /*  Initialize the plugin at server start or plugin installation. */ static int audit_syslog_init(void *arg __attribute__((unused))) {     openlog("mysql_audit:",LOG_PID|LOG_PERROR|LOG_CONS,LOG_USER);     total_number_of_calls= 0;     number_of_calls_general= 0;     number_of_calls_connection= 0;     return(0); } The init function does a call to openlog to initialise the syslog functionality. The parameters are the service to log under ("mysql_audit" in this case), the syslog flags and the facility for the logging. Then each of the counters are initialised to zero and a success is returned. If the init function is not defined, it will return success by default. /*  Terminate the plugin at server shutdown or plugin deinstallation. */ static int audit_syslog_deinit(void *arg __attribute__((unused))) {     closelog();     return(0); } The deinit function will simply close our syslog connection and return success. Note that the syslog functionality is part of the glibc libraries and does not require any external factors.  The function names are what we define in the general plugin structure, so these have to match otherwise there will be errors. The next step is to implement the event notifier function that was defined in the type specific descriptor (audit_syslog_descriptor) which is audit_syslog_notify. /* Event notifier function */ static void audit_syslog_notify(MYSQL_THD thd __attribute__((unused)), unsigned int event_class, const void *event) { total_number_of_calls++; if (event_class == MYSQL_AUDIT_GENERAL_CLASS) { const struct mysql_event_general *event_general= (const struct mysql_event_general *) event; number_of_calls_general++; syslog(audit_loglevel,"%lu: User: %s Command: %s Query: %s\n", event_general->general_thread_id, event_general->general_user, event_general->general_command, event_general->general_query ); } else if (event_class == MYSQL_AUDIT_CONNECTION_CLASS) { const struct mysql_event_connection *event_connection= (const struct mysql_event_connection *) event; number_of_calls_connection++; syslog(audit_loglevel,"%lu: User: %[email protected]%s[%s] Event: %d Status: %d\n", event_connection->thread_id, event_connection->user, event_connection->host, event_connection->ip, event_connection->event_subclass, event_connection->status ); } }   In the case of an event, the notifier function is called. The first step is to increment the total number of events that have occurred in our database.The event argument is then cast into the appropriate event structure depending on the class type, of general event or connection event. The event type counters are incremented and details are sent via the syslog() function out to the system log. There are going to be different line formats and information returned since the general events have different data compared to the connection events, even though some of the details overlap, for example, user, thread id, host etc. On compiling the code now, there should be no errors and the resulting audit_syslog.so can be loaded into the server and ready to use. Log into the server and type: mysql> INSTALL PLUGIN audit_syslog SONAME 'audit_syslog.so'; This will install the plugin and will start updating the syslog immediately. Note that the audit plugin attaches to the immediate thread and cannot be uninstalled while that thread is active. This means that you cannot run the UNISTALL command until you log into a different connection (thread) on the server. Once the plugin is loaded, the system log will show output such as the following: Oct  8 15:33:21 machine mysql_audit:[8337]: 87: User: root[root] @ localhost []  Command: (null)  Query: INSTALL PLUGIN audit_syslog SONAME 'audit_syslog.so' Oct  8 15:33:21 machine mysql_audit:[8337]: 87: User: root[root] @ localhost []  Command: Query  Query: INSTALL PLUGIN audit_syslog SONAME 'audit_syslog.so' Oct  8 15:33:40 machine mysql_audit:[8337]: 87: User: root[root] @ localhost []  Command: (null)  Query: show tables Oct  8 15:33:40 machine mysql_audit:[8337]: 87: User: root[root] @ localhost []  Command: Query  Query: show tables Oct  8 15:33:43 machine mysql_audit:[8337]: 87: User: root[root] @ localhost []  Command: (null)  Query: select * from t1 Oct  8 15:33:43 machine mysql_audit:[8337]: 87: User: root[root] @ localhost []  Command: Query  Query: select * from t1 It appears that two of each event is being shown, but in actuality, these are two separate event types - the result event and the status event. This could be refined further by changing the audit_syslog_notify function to handle the different event sub-types in a different manner.  So far, it seems that the logging is working with events showing up in the syslog output. The issue now is that the counters created earlier to track the number of events by type are not accessible when the plugin is being run. Instead there needs to be a way to expose the plugin specific information to the service and vice versa. This could be done via the information_schema plugin api, but for something as simple as counters, the obvious choice is the system status variables. This is done using the standard structure and the declaration: /*  Plugin status variables for SHOW STATUS */ static struct st_mysql_show_var audit_syslog_status[]= {   { "Audit_syslog_total_calls",     (char *) &total_number_of_calls,     SHOW_INT },   { "Audit_syslog_general_events",     (char *) &number_of_calls_general,     SHOW_INT },   { "Audit_syslog_connection_events",     (char *) &number_of_calls_connection,     SHOW_INT },   { 0, 0, SHOW_INT } };   The structure is simply the name that will be displaying in the mysql service, the address of the associated variables, and the data type being used for the counter. It is finished with a blank structure to show that there are no more variables. Remember that status variables may have the same name for variables from other plugin, so it is considered appropriate to add the plugin name at the start of the status variable name to avoid confusion. Looking at the status variables in the mysql client shows something like the following: mysql> show global status like "audit%"; +--------------------------------+-------+ | Variable_name                  | Value | +--------------------------------+-------+ | Audit_syslog_connection_events | 1     | | Audit_syslog_general_events    | 2     | | Audit_syslog_total_calls       | 3     | +--------------------------------+-------+ 3 rows in set (0.00 sec) The final connectivity piece for the plugin is to allow the interactive change of the logging level between the plugin and the system. This requires the ability to send changes via the mysql service through to the plugin. This is done using the system variables interface and defining a single variable to keep track of the active logging level for the facility. /* Plugin system variables for SHOW VARIABLES */ static MYSQL_SYSVAR_STR(loglevel, audit_loglevel,                         PLUGIN_VAR_RQCMDARG,                         "User can specify the log level for auditing",                         audit_loglevel_check, audit_loglevel_update, "LOG_NOTICE"); static struct st_mysql_sys_var* audit_syslog_sysvars[] = {     MYSQL_SYSVAR(loglevel),     NULL }; So now the system variable 'loglevel' is defined for the plugin and associated to the global variable 'audit_loglevel'. The check or validation function is defined to make sure that no garbage values are attempted in the update of the variable. The update function is used to save the new value to the variable. Note that the audit_syslog_sysvars structure is defined in the general plugin descriptor to associate the link between the plugin and the system and how much they interact. Next comes the implementation of the validation function and the update function for the system variable. It is worth noting that if you have a simple numeric such as integers for the variable types, the validate function is often not required as MySQL will handle the automatic check and validation of simple types. /* longest valid value */ #define MAX_LOGLEVEL_SIZE 100 /* hold the valid values */ static const char *possible_modes[]= { "LOG_ERROR", "LOG_WARNING", "LOG_NOTICE", NULL };  static int audit_loglevel_check(     THD*                        thd,    /*!< in: thread handle */     struct st_mysql_sys_var*    var,    /*!< in: pointer to system                                         variable */     void*                       save,   /*!< out: immediate result                                         for update function */     struct st_mysql_value*      value)  /*!< in: incoming string */ {     char buff[MAX_LOGLEVEL_SIZE];     const char *str;     const char **found;     int length;     length= sizeof(buff);     if (!(str= value->val_str(value, buff, &length)))         return 1;     /*         We need to return a pointer to a locally allocated value in "save".         Here we pick to search for the supplied value in an global array of         constant strings and return a pointer to one of them.         The other possiblity is to use the thd_alloc() function to allocate         a thread local buffer instead of the global constants.     */     for (found= possible_modes; *found; found++)     {         if (!strcmp(*found, str))         {             *(const char**)save= *found;             return 0;         }     }     return 1; } The validation function is simply to take the value being passed in via the SET GLOBAL VARIABLE command and check if it is one of the pre-defined values allowed  in our possible_values array. If it is found to be valid, then the value is assigned to the save variable ready for passing through to the update function. static void audit_loglevel_update(     THD*                        thd,        /*!< in: thread handle */     struct st_mysql_sys_var*    var,        /*!< in: system variable                                             being altered */     void*                       var_ptr,    /*!< out: pointer to                                             dynamic variable */     const void*                 save)       /*!< in: pointer to                                             temporary storage */ {     /* assign the new value so that the server can read it */     *(char **) var_ptr= *(char **) save;     /* assign the new value to the internal variable */     audit_loglevel= *(char **) save; } Since all the validation has been done already, the update function is quite simple for this plugin. The first part is to update the system variable pointer so that the server can read the value. The second part is to update our own global plugin variable for tracking the value. Notice that the save variable is passed in as a void type to allow handling of various data types, so it must be cast to the appropriate data type when assigning it to the variables. Looking at how the latest changes affect the usage of the plugin and the interaction within the server shows: mysql> show global variables like "audit%"; +-----------------------+------------+ | Variable_name         | Value      | +-----------------------+------------+ | audit_syslog_loglevel | LOG_NOTICE | +-----------------------+------------+ 1 row in set (0.00 sec) mysql> set global audit_syslog_loglevel="LOG_ERROR"; Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec) mysql> show global status like "audit%"; +--------------------------------+-------+ | Variable_name                  | Value | +--------------------------------+-------+ | Audit_syslog_connection_events | 1     | | Audit_syslog_general_events    | 11    | | Audit_syslog_total_calls       | 12    | +--------------------------------+-------+ 3 rows in set (0.00 sec) mysql> show global variables like "audit%"; +-----------------------+-----------+ | Variable_name         | Value     | +-----------------------+-----------+ | audit_syslog_loglevel | LOG_ERROR | +-----------------------+-----------+ 1 row in set (0.00 sec)   So now we have a plugin that will audit the events on the system and log the details to the system log. It allows for interaction to see the number of different events within the server details and provides a mechanism to change the logging level interactively via the standard system methods of the SET command. A more complex auditing plugin may have more detailed code, but each of the above areas is what will be involved and simply expanded on to add more functionality. With the above skeleton code, it is now possible to create your own audit plugins to implement your own auditing requirements. If, however, you are not of the coding persuasion, then you could always consider the option of the MySQL Enterprise Audit plugin that is available to purchase.

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  • Can't connect to MySQL server on '127.0.0.1' + Postfix

    - by Andrew Dakin
    I just installed Postfix and configured it to use MySQL. It wasn't sending any emails out after I did that so I checked /var/log/mail.log and it came back with this: postfix/trivial-rewrite[5283]: fatal: proxy:mysql:/etc/postfix/mysql-domains.cf(0,lock|fold_fix): table lookup problem postfix/cleanup[5258]: warning: AFCDC30437: virtual_alias_maps map lookup problem for [email protected] postfix/master[4761]: warning: process /usr/lib/postfix/trivial-rewrite pid 5282 exit status 1 postfix/proxymap[4126]: warning: connect to mysql server 127.0.0.1: Can't connect to MySQL server on '127.0.0.1' (110) In mysql-domains.cf I'm using: Hosts 127.0.0.1 I can connect to MySQL with this: mysql -u postfixuser -p But I can't connect this way: mysql -u postfixuser -h 127.0.0.1 -p maildbname Also when I run netstat -l it comes back with: tcp 0 0 localhost:mysql *:* LISTEN I've tried changing my hosts to: Hosts localhost But then I just get a socket error: postfix/cleanup[4870]: warning: connect to mysql server localhost: Can't connect to local MySQL server through socket '/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock' I also have this set up in the MySQL config file: bind-address = 127.0.0.1 I'm sure I'm missing something obvious, but I am pretty new to all this. Thanks! Andy

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  • Mysql install and remove issues

    - by Matt
    I installed mysql on ubuntu server and i dont know what went wrong...it didnt install a mysql root user so i tried to uninstall and start over and now i cant unistall i tried this apt-get remove php5-mysql apt-get remove mysql-server mysql-client apt-get autoremove but when i do ps aux | grep mysql root 6066 0.0 0.0 1772 540 pts/1 S 03:21 0:00 /bin/sh /usr/bin/mysqld_safe mysql 7065 0.0 0.6 58936 11900 pts/1 Sl 03:33 0:00 /usr/sbin/mysqld -- basedir=/usr --datadir=/var/lib/mysql --user=mysql --pid-file=/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid -- socket=/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock --port=3306 root 7066 0.0 0.0 2956 688 pts/1 S 03:33 0:00 logger -t mysqld -p daemon.error root 22804 0.0 0.0 3056 780 pts/1 R+ 04:14 0:00 grep mysql so i killed the processes and then tried to reinstall like this apt-get -f install sudo apt-get install mysql-server mysql-client sudo mysqladmin -u root -h localhost password 'root' but i get this mysqladmin: connect to server at 'localhost' failed error: 'Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using password: NO)' im confused..i keep installing and uninstalling mysql and the same result..any ideas

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  • Problems starting MySQL on Mac OS X

    - by Jon
    I am not able to start MySQL server on Mac OS X 10.4.11. MySQL was installed using Macports. MySQL was running fine until it suddenly died without any obvious reason. When running "mysql", I get the error message: ERROR 2002 (HY000): Can't connect to local MySQL server through socket '/opt/local/var/run/mysql5/mysqld.sock' (2) If I try to start MySQL manually, I get the following error message: sudo /opt/local/share/mysql5/mysql/mysql.server start Starting MySQL/opt/local/share/mysql5/mysql/mysql.server: line 159: kill: (636) - No such process ERROR! In /etc/mysql/my.cnf I have: socket = __PREFIX/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock But the path "opt/local/var/run/mysqld/" does not exist on my system. I tried to change the socket path to "__PREFIX/var/run/mysql5/ mysqld.sock" (which is where the socket is located). Unfortunately, this did not help either. Owner and Permissions for /opt/local/var/run/mysql5/ are correctly set. Any suggestions on how to start MySQL again? Thanks for your advice.

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  • why use mixed-based replication for mysql

    - by Alistair Prestidge
    I am in the process of configuring MySQL replication and am intending to use row-based-replication but I was also reading up about mixed-based replication. This is where statement-based is the default and then for certain circumstances (http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/binary-log-mixed.html) MySQL will switch to row-based. The list is quit vast on when it will switch to row-based. My questions are: Does any one use mixed? If yes why did you chose this over just using one or the other? Thanks in advance

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  • MySQL – Introduction to User Defined Variables

    - by Pinal Dave
    MySQL supports user defined variables to have some data that can be used later part of your query. You can save a value to a variable using a SELECT statement and later you can access its value. Unlike other RDBMSs, you do not need to declare the data type for a variable. The data type is automatically assumed when you assign a value. A value can be assigned to a variable using a SET command as shown below SET @server_type:='MySQL'; When you above command is executed, the value, MySQL is assigned to the variable called @server_type. Now you can use this variable in the later part of the code. Suppose if you want to display the value, you can use SELECT statement. SELECT @server_type; The result is MySQL. Once the value is assigned it remains for the entire session until changed by the later statements. So unlike SQL Server, you do not need to have this as part the execution code every time. (Because in SQL Server, the variables are execution scoped and dropped after the execution). You can give column name as below SELECT @server_type AS server_type; You can also SELECT statement to DECLARE and SELECT the values for a variable. SELECT @message:='Welcome to MySQL' AS MESSAGE; The result is Message -------- Welcome to MySQL You can make use of variables to effectively apply many logics. One of the useful method is to generate the row number as shown in this post MySQL – Generating Row Number for Each Row using Variable. Reference: Pinal Dave (http://blog.sqlauthority.com)Filed under: MySQL, PostADay, SQL, SQL Authority, SQL Query, SQL Tips and Tricks, T SQL

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  • Power Dynamic Database-Driven Websites with MySQL & PHP

    - by Antoinette O'Sullivan
    Join major names among MySQL customers by learning to power dynamic database-driven websites with MySQL & PHP. With the MySQL and PHP: Developing Dynamic Web Applications course, in 4 days, you learn how to develop applications in PHP and how to use MySQL efficiently for those applications! Through a hands-on approach, this instructor-led course helps you improve your PHP skills and combine them with time-proven database management techniques to create best-of-breed web applications that are efficient, solid and secure. You can currently take this course as a: Live Virtual Class (LVC): There are a number events on the schedule to suit different timezones in January 2013 and March 2013. With an LVC, you get to follow this live instructor-led class from your own desk - so no travel expense or inconvenience. In-Class Event: Travel to an education center to attend this class. Here are some events already on the scheduled:  Where  When  Delivery Language  Lisbon, Portugal  15 April 2013  European Portugese  Porto, Portugal 15 April 2013   European Portugese  Barcelona, Spain 28 February 2013  Spanish  Madrid, Spain 4 March 2013   Spanish If you do not see an event that suits you, register your interest in an additional date/location/delivery language. If you want more indepth knowledge on developing with MySQL and PHP, consider the MySQL for Developers course. For full details on these and all courses on the authentic MySQL curriculum, go to http://oracle.com/education/mysql.

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  • MySQL Workbench on Ubuntu 12.04 doesn't starts after latest (Jun12) updates

    - by Atul Kakrana
    MySQL workbench was working fine till today. I installed the regular updates and now its just doesnt starts. When started its just shows the 'opening screen' and nothing happens. I tried re-installing it from synaptic but no luck. I use it all the time and now suffering a lot. Any help will be appreciated. When run from terminal with: mysql-workbench --log-level=debug3 --verbose It gives a long log. Please see at: http://pastebin.com/Z2t8pdZF I see these error in the log but don't know what they mean and how it stopped working automatically, /home/atul/.mysql/workbench/wb_state.xml:1: parser error : Document is empty ^ /home/atul/.mysql/workbench/wb_state.xml:1: parser error : Start tag expected, '<' not found ^ /home/atul/.mysql/workbench/user_starters.xml:1: parser error : Document is empty ^ /home/atul/.mysql/workbench/user_starters.xml:1: parser error : Start tag expected, '<' not found ^ /home/atul/.mysql/workbench/starters_settings.xml:1: parser error : Document is empty ^ /home/atul/.mysql/workbench/starters_settings.xml:1: parser error : Start tag expected, '<' not found Atul

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