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  • Slides and Samples for My TechEd / Microsoft BI Conference Talks

    - by plitwin
    I posted the slides and samples for my talks I delivered in New Orleans on June 8th at Microsoft TechEd and Business Intelligence Conference. They can be downloaded from Paul Litwin's Conference Downloads. #1 Creating Report Subscriptions with SQL Server 2008 Reporting Services at 8 AM on Tuesday. Room 241In this session, learn how to set up standard and data-driven subscriptions using Report Manager. We discuss creating file-share, email, and null subscriptions; and how to deal with potential issues with parameters and security. We also demonstrate a sophisticated Microsoft ASP.NET-based application that creates subscriptions by calling the SSRS Web Services API.  #2 ASP.NET MVC for Web Forms Programmers at 3:15 PM Tuesday. Room 391Are you comfortable creating ASP.NET Web Form applications but even a little curious about what all the fuss is about MVC and test-driven development? In this session, Web Form junkie Paul Litwin takes a critical look at the world of ASP.NET MVC, but not from any expert point of view. Instead, Paul shares his experience as a Web Form developer who decided to take a closer look at this radical new approach to ASP.NET development. Come hear what Paul learned and if he plans to employ ASP.NET MVC in his future ASP.NET applications.

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  • Visual Studio 2013, ASP.NET MVC 5 Scaffolded Controls, and Bootstrap

    - by plitwin
    A few days ago, I created an ASP.NET MVC 5 project in the brand new Visual Studio 2013. I added some model classes and then proceeded to scaffold a controller class and views using the Entity Framework. Scaffolding Some Views Visual Studio 2013, by default, uses the Bootstrap 3 responsive CSS framework. Great; after all, we all want our web sites to be responsive and work well on mobile devices. Here’s an example of a scaffolded Create view as shown in Google Chrome browser   Looks pretty good. Okay, so let’s increase the width of the Title, Description, Address, and Date/Time textboxes. And decrease the width of the  State and MaxActors textbox controls. Can’t be that hard… Digging Into the Code Let’s take a look at the scaffolded Create.cshtml file. Here’s a snippet of code behind the Create view. Pretty simple stuff. @using (Html.BeginForm()) { @Html.AntiForgeryToken() <div class="form-horizontal"> <h4>RandomAct</h4> <hr /> @Html.ValidationSummary(true) <div class="form-group"> @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Title, new { @class = "control-label col-md-2" }) <div class="col-md-10"> @Html.EditorFor(model => model.Title) @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Title) </div> </div> <div class="form-group"> @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Description, new { @class = "control-label col-md-2" }) <div class="col-md-10"> @Html.EditorFor(model => model.Description) @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Description) </div> </div> .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } A little more digging and I discover that there are three CSS files of importance in how the page is rendered: boostrap.css (and its minimized cohort) and site.css as shown below.   The Root of the Problem And here’s the root of the problem which you’ll find the following CSS in Site.css: /* Set width on the form input elements since they're 100% wide by default */ input, select, textarea { max-width: 280px; } .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } Yes, Microsoft is for some reason setting the maximum width of all input, select, and textarea controls to 280 pixels. Not sure the motivation behind this, but until you change this or overrride this by assigning the form controls to some other CSS class, your controls will never be able to be wider than 280px. The Fix Okay, so here’s the deal: I hope to become very competent in all things Bootstrap in the near future, but I don’t think you should have to become a Bootstrap guru in order to modify some scaffolded control widths. And you don’t. Here is the solution I came up with: Find the aforementioned CSS code in SIte.css and change it to something more tenable. Such as: /* Set width on the form input elements since they're 100% wide by default */ input, select, textarea { max-width: 600px; } Because the @Html.EditorFor html helper doesn’t support the passing of HTML attributes, you will need to repalce any @Html.EditorFor() helpers with @Html.TextboxFor(), @Html.TextAreaFor, @Html.CheckBoxFor, etc. helpers, and then add a custom width attribute to each control you wish to modify. Thus, the earlier stretch of code might end up looking like this: @using (Html.BeginForm()) { @Html.AntiForgeryToken() <div class="form-horizontal"> <h4>Random Act</h4> <hr /> @Html.ValidationSummary(true) <div class="form-group"> @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Title, new { @class = "control-label col-md-2" }) <div class="col-md-10"> @Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.Title, new { style = "width: 400px" }) @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Title) </div> </div> <div class="form-group"> @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Description, new { @class = "control-label col-md-2" }) <div class="col-md-10"> @Html.TextAreaFor(model => model.Description, new { style = "width: 400px" }) @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Description) </div> </div> .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } Resulting Form Here’s what the page looks like after the fix: Technorati Tags: ASP.NET MVC,ASP.NET MVC 5,Bootstrap

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  • Getting Current with Visual Studio 2010 for Web Developers

    - by plitwin
    I don't know about you, but I find it kind of crazy at times figuring out if I have the latest of everything there is for the Visual Studio 2010 developer from Microsoft. (This does not include any third-party components, just recommended updates from Microsoft.) And the be honest, the msn.microsoft.com and asp.net sites are not that helpful in figuring this out.In an effort to help, I have enumerated here what the latest VS 2010 setup should include, complete with download links. When you install everything here, you will be able to develop ASP.NET 4.0 Web Forms and ASP.NET MVC 3 applications and web sites in addition to the other stuff your version of Visual Studio supports (e.g., Silverlight, WPF, etc.). These downloads will also include NuGet and the Entity Framework 4.1, so there is no need to download this software separately.Visual Studio 2010. First of all, you need to purchase and install Visual Studio 2010 itself. For the free Express version, you can download it from Visual Web Developer 2010 ExpressVisual Studio Service Pack 1 (released Spring 2011).This is a must-have download that fixes a bunch of bugs and a number of enhancements too including preliminary support for HTML5 and CSS3. See #4 below for better support of these web technologies. Download and install from VS 2010 SP1 download page. You can find details on the features of the service pack here. ASP.NET MVC3 Tools Update (released Spring 2011)If you are using ASP.NET MVC 3, then you should also download install this update for Visual Studio from ASP.NET MVC3 Tools Update download page. This update improves Visual Studio's support for MVC 3, including better scaffolding, NuGet, Entity Framework 4.1, and more. A good overview of the updates can be found in Phil Haack's blog post.Web Standards Update for Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 SP1 (released June 2011)This is an update to VS 2010 SP1 that "brings VS 2010 intellisense & validation as close to W3C specification as we could get via means of an extension". Download and install from Web Standards Update download page. A good description of the changes can be found in the Visual Web Developer Team blog post.Note: I don't control these download pages, so it is possible they will change. If so, I will do my best to update these links. This information was current as of June 24, 2011.

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  • Call for Abstracts Now Open for Microsoft ASP.NET Connections (Closing April 26)

    - by plitwin
    We are putting out a call for abstracts to present at the Fall 2010 Microsoft ASP.NET Connections conference in Las Vegas, Nov 9-13 2009. The due date for submissions is April 26, 2010. For submitting sessions, please use this URL: http://www.deeptraining.com/devconnections/abstracts Please keep the abstracts under 200 words each and in one paragraph. No bulleted items and line breaks, and please use a spell-checker. Do not email abstracts, you need to use the web-based tool to submit them. Please submit at least 3 abstracts, but it would help your chances of being selected if you submitted 5 or more abstracts. Also, you are encouraged to suggest all-day pre or post conference workshops as well. We need to finalize the conference content and the tracks layout in just a few short weeks, so we need your abstracts by April 26th. No exceptions will be granted on late submissions! Topics of interest include (but are not limited to):* ASP.NET Webforms* ASP.NET AJAX* ASP.NET MVC* Dynamic Data* Anything else related to ASP.NET For Fall 2010, we are having a seperate Silverlight conference where you can submit abstracts for Silverlight and Windows 7 Phone Development. In fact, you can use the same URL to submit sessions to Microsoft ASP.NET Connections, Silverlight Connections, Visual Studio Connections, or SQL Server Connections. The URL again is:http://www.deeptraining.com/devconnections/abstracts Please realize that while we want a lot of the new and the cool, it's also okay to propose sessions on the more mundane "real world" stuff as it pertains to ASP.NET. What you will get if selected:* $500 per regular conference talk.* Compensation for full-day workshops ranges from $500 for 1-20 attendees to $2500 for 200+ attendees.* Coach airfare and hotel stay paid by the conference.* Free admission to all of the co-located conferences* Speaker party* The adoration of attendees* etc. Your continued suport of Microsoft ASP.NET Connections and the other DevConnections conferences is appreciated. Good luck and thank you,Paul LitwinMicrosoft ASP.NET Conference Chair

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