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  • Classes missing if application runs for a long time

    - by Rogach
    I have a funny problem - if my application runs for a long time ( 20h), then sometimes I get NoClassDefFound error - seems like JVM decided that the class is not going to be used anyway and GCd it. To be a bit more specific, here's an example case: object ErrorHandler extends PartialFunction[Throwable,Unit] { def isDefinedAt(t: Throwable) = true def apply(e: Throwable) =e match { // ... handle errors } } // somewhere else in the code... try { // ... long running code, can take more than 20 hours to complete } catch (ErrorHandler) And I get the following exception: Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: org/rogach/avalanche/ErrorHandler$ If that try/catch block runs for smaller amounts of time, everything works as expected. If anyone is interested, here is the codebase in question: Avalanche I need to note that I saw this and similar problems only on Cent OS 5 machines, using JRE 6u26 and Scala 2.9.1 / 2.9.2. What could be the cause of this problem?

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  • Quick 2D sight area calculation algorithm?

    - by Rogach
    I have a matrix of tiles, on some of that tiles there are objects. I want to calculate which tiles are visible to player, and which are not, and I need to do it quite efficiently (so it would compute fast enough even when I have a big matrices (100x100) and lots of objects). I tried to do it with Besenham's algorithm, but it was slow. Also, it gave me some errors: ----XXX- ----X**- ----XXX- [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] ----XXX- ----X**- ----XXX- (raw version) (Besenham) (correct, since tunnel walls are still visible at distance) (@ is the player, X is obstacle, * is invisible, - is visible) I'm sure this can be done - after all, we have NetHack, Zangband, and they all dealt with this problem somehow :) What algorithm can you recommend for this? EDIT: Definition of visible (in my opinion): tile is visible when at least a part (e.g. corner) of the tile can be connected to center of player tile with a straight line which does not intersect any of obstacles.

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  • NetBeans behaves differently if project is run via "Run Project" or build.xml>run

    - by Rogach
    I slightly modified the build-impl.xml file of my NetBeans project. (Specifically, I made it to insert build time into program code). If I run project via build.xml "run" target, I get behavior I expect - the program displays build time and date. But if I run project using standard (and most obvious, used it always) button "Run Main Project", I get totally another result (no build date). Moreover, if I insert any code into build.xml, I still get result if I run the target explicitly and no result if it is run simply by NetBeans. And this leads me to conclusion, that this button uses another method to run my application. My question is: what does that button do? What method does it call? And can it be configured to run the needed target of make file?

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  • Is there a way to tell JVM to optimize my code before processing?

    - by Rogach
    I have a method, which takes much time to execute first time. But after several invocations, it takes about 30 times less time. So, to make my application respond to user interaction faster, I "warm-up" this method (5 times) with some sample data on initialization of application. But this increases app start-up time. I read, that JVM's can optimize and compile my java code to native, thus speeding things up. I wanted to know - maybe there is some way to explicitly tell JVM that I want this method to be compiled on startup of application?

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  • What would be the good name for this operation?

    - by Rogach
    I see that Scala standard library misses the method to get ranges of objects in the collection, that satisfy the predicate: def <???>(p: A => Boolean): List[List[A]] = { val buf = collection.mutable.ListBuffer[List[A]]() var elems = this.dropWhile(e => !p(e)) while (elems.nonEmpty) { buf += elems.takeWhile(p) elems = elems.dropWhile(e => !p(e)) } buf.toList } What would be the good name for such method? And is my implementation good enough?

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