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  • Howto add a changed file to an older (not last) commit in Git

    - by David Klein
    Hey, I changed several things over the last hour and committed them step by step. But I just realized I've forgot to add a changed file some commits ago. The Log looks like this: GIT TidyUpRequests u:1 d:0> git log commit fc6734b6351f6c36a587dba6dbd9d5efa30c09ce Author: David Klein <> Date: Tue Apr 27 09:43:55 2010 +0200 The Main program now tests both Webservices at once commit 8a2c6014c2b035e37aebd310a6393a1ecb39f463 Author: David Klein <> Date: Tue Apr 27 09:43:27 2010 +0200 ISBNDBQueryHandler now uses the XPath functions from XPath.fs too commit 06a504e277fd98d97eed4dad22dfa5933d81451f Author: David Klein <> Date: Tue Apr 27 09:30:34 2010 +0200 AmazonQueryHandler now uses the XPath Helper functions defined in XPath.fs commit a0865e28be35a3011d0b6091819ec32922dd2dd8 <--- changed file should go here Author: David Klein <> Date: Tue Apr 27 09:29:53 2010 +0200 Factored out some common XPath Operations Any ideas? :)

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  • Podcast Show Notes: The Role of the Cloud Architect

    - by Bob Rhubart
    Ron Batra James Baty If you want to understand what a cloud architect does, what better way than to talk to people in that role? In this program that’s exactly what we’ll do. Joining me for this conversation are cloud architects Ron Batra and Dr. James Baty. Ron is an Oracle ACE Director and product director for cloud computing at AT&T , and Jim is Vice President of Oracle’s Global Enterprise Architecture Program . This interview was recorded on June 12, 2012. The Conversation Listen to Part 1: How cloud computing is driving the supply-chaining of IT and the democratization of the activity of architecture. Listen to Part 2 (July 12): A discussion of DevOps, cloud computing, and the increasing velocity of IT. Listen to Part 3 (July 19): Why architects need to up their game to thrive and succeed in a cloud-driven world. Coming Soon A conversation about the International SOA, Cloud & Service Technology Symposium with a panel that features Thomas Erl and several Oracle community members who will be presenting at that event.

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  • Prolog Family tree

    - by Tania
    Hi I have a Question in prolog , I did it but its not showing answers When i ask about the brothers,sisters,uncles,aunts This is what I wrote, what's wrong ? /*uncle(X, Y) :– male(X), sibling(X, Z), parent(Z, Y).*/ /*uncle(X, Y) :– male(X), spouse(X, W), sibling(W, Z), parent(Z, Y).*/ uncle(X,Y) :- parent(Z,Y), brother(X,Z). aunt(X,Y) :- parent(Z,Y), sister(X,Z). sibling(X, Y) :- parent(Z, X), parent(Z, Y), X \= Y. sister(X, Y) :- sibling(X, Y), female(X). brother(X, Y) :- sibling(X, Y), male(X). parent(Z,Y) :- father(Z,Y). parent(Z,Y) :- mother(Z,Y). grandparent(C,D) :- parent(C,E), parent(E,D). aunt(X, Y) :– female(X), sibling(X, Z), parent(Z, Y). aunt(X, Y) :– female(X), spouse(X, W), sibling(W, Z), parent(Z, Y). male(john). male(bob). male(bill). male(ron). male(jeff). female(mary). female(sue). female(nancy). mother(mary, sue). mother(mary, bill). mother(sue, nancy). mother(sue, jeff). mother(jane, ron). father(john, sue). father(john, bill). father(bob, nancy). father(bob, jeff). father(bill, ron). sibling(bob,bill). sibling(sue,bill). sibling(nancy,jeff). sibling(nancy,ron). sibling(jell,ron). And one more thing, how do I optimize the rule of the brother so that X is not brother to itself.

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  • SQL Split function that handles string with delimeter appearing between text qualifiers?

    - by Ron
    There are several SQL split functions, from loop driven, to using xml commands, and even using a numbers table. I haven't found one that supports text qualifiers. Using the example string below, I would like to split on ",", but not when it appears between double or single quotes. Example data: [email protected], "Sally \"Heat\" Jones" <[email protected]>, "Mark Jones" <[email protected]>, "Stone, Ron" <[email protected]> Should return a table: [email protected] "Sally \"Heat\" Jones" <[email protected]> "Mark Jones" <[email protected]> "Stone, Ron" <[email protected]> I know this is a complex query/function, but any suggestions or any guidance would be mucho appreciated.

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  • Ubuntu 12.04 LTS: Error message "Failed to execute child process"

    - by Ron
    I am an Ubuntu-newbie and just started working with Ubuntu (version 12.04 LTS) a couple of days ago. I wanted to add a launcher icon to desktop for launching an application I previously installed. Up to now I can only launch it by typing setsid matlab -desktop into my terminal. Now there is the following problem with the execution via the desktop icon: Whenever I click the desktop icon, I get the following error message: "Failed to execute child process" I would like to add a screenshot, but unfortunately as a new user, I am not allowed to... In the main menu from where I added the icon via drag'n'drop to desktop there is also a permission to execute the .desktop file. I also tried to look for advice on the error message "Failed to execute child process..." but could not find anything useful. Now does anybody have an idea what I am missing? Sorry if this is a stupid question ;) ...but as I just said: I just started with Ubuntu... Thanks to everybody in advance for their help! :) And let me know if you should need any more information... Regards, Ron

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  • Membership numbers

    - by Ron Bruce
    I currently use phpMyAdmin 3.2.4 to monitor and manage the membership numbers for my organization members website. Not to long ago the member numbers jumped from 750 to 1,000,000 just over night? I am not sure how to fix this. I am new at this and I am not that famaliar of how this all works. This working with MySQL database. Also where so I fined on line manuals for phpMyAdmin and MySql? Respectfully Ron

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  • dual-boot windows7+8

    - by ron shaw
    i partitioned my 500gb hdd into 2partitions named the 2nd partition windows8 and tried to enter my windows8 OS on my laptop on the 2nd partition (200gb)size but the OS didnt give me the option to which partition to load it on. so i cancelled the loading and tried again but the same result. what can i do to resolve this situation thanks if you can help RON SHAW

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  • How to install non Microsoft USB device driver on PC without admin rights?

    - by Ron
    I am running Win 7x32 secured corporate laptop. My USB audio device has .exe installer file which is not possible to execute because of having no admin rights. Is it possible to embed driver files in the system without installation? All attempts of unpacking the .exe file got failed. 7zip is extracting files without extensions and Universal Extractor says that .exe file is 7zip self extracting archive. Thank you Ron

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  • Show Notes: Getting Past the Cloud Hype

    - by Bob Rhubart
    This week’s ArchBeat podcast features an unvarnished bit of conversation culled from a recent virtual meet-up. These meet-ups are informal conversations among architects, many of who have participated in previous ArchBeat programs. There’s no prearranged topic, so the participants talk about whatever is on their minds. The most recent meet-up included Oracle ACE Director Ran Batra, director of cloud computing product development with AT&T, and Daniel Templeton, principal product manager for Oracle Grid Engine, and the man behind Dan T’s GridBlog. The conversation took place at the end of the year – and the end of the decade – a time when most tech publications feature their predictions for the coming year.  I wanted a different spin on that theme, so I asked Ron and Dan to talk about the technologies about which they weren’t all that optimistic.   I found that ten-minute chunk of conversation particularly interesting, so that’s what you’re going to hear this week. Listen Get Social If you have questions or comment for Ron and/or Daniel you can connect via the following: Ron Batra Blog | Twitter | LinkedIn | Oracle Mix | Oracle ACE Profile Daniel Templeton Blog | Twitter | LinkedIn Coming Up Oracle ACE Director Debra Lilley talks about her role in the UKOUG’s development group and that group’s collaboration with Oracle on Oracle Fusion Applications. Dr Frank Munz, author of Middleware and Cloud Computing: Oracle Fusion Middleware on Amazon Web Services and Rackspace Cloud. Stay tuned: http://feeds2.feedburner.com/OtnArch2ArchRSS   del.icio.us Tags: oracle,oracle technology network,archbeat,cloud computing,software architect,podcast Technorati Tags: oracle,oracle technology network,archbeat,cloud computing,software architect,podcast

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  • WPF: Link from grid to form

    - by Ron H
    What I need is a grid with all employees data, and a link to a single employees form. I'm ok with filling the grid with data. my questions are: how to create the link? how to send the parameter (employeeid) to the single-employee page, and make it open with the correct data. Thanks, Ron

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  • problems adding an App Engine app to a Google Apps domains

    - by Ron
    We have been adding domains to our app without any issues for past couple months, following these instructions https://developers.google.com/appengine/articles/domains Since yesterday we have not been able to, when clicking Activate this service we get this error message "An error occurred while trying to install this application. Please try again later." We have tried this also with older domains and with different apps and getting the same error, so the problem seems to be more widespread, not isolated to particular domains / apps. Does anyone know how to solve? Thanks Ron

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  • The HTG Guide to Using a Bluetooth Keyboard with Your Android Device

    - by Matt Klein
    Android devices aren’t usually associated with physical keyboards. But, since Google is now bundling their QuickOffice app with the newly-released Kit-Kat, it appears inevitable that at least some Android tablets (particularly 10-inch models) will take on more productivity roles. In recent years, physical keyboards have been rendered obsolete by swipe style input methods such as Swype and Google Keyboard. Physical keyboards tend to make phones thick and plump, and that won’t fly today when thin (and even flexible and curved) is in vogue. So, you’ll be hard-pressed to find smartphone manufacturers launching new models with physical keyboards, thus rendering sliders to a past chapter in mobile phone evolution. It makes sense to ditch the clunky keyboard phone in favor of a lighter, thinner model. You’re going to carry around in your pocket or purse all day, why have that extra bulk and weight? That said, there is sound logic behind pairing tablets with keyboards. Microsoft continues to plod forward with its Surface models, and while critics continue to lavish praise on the iPad, its functionality is obviously enhanced and extended when you add a physical keyboard. Apple even has an entire page devoted specifically to iPad-compatible keyboards. But an Android tablet and a keyboard? Does such a thing even exist? They do actually. There are docking keyboards and keyboard/case combinations, there’s the Asus Transformer family, Logitech markets a Windows 8 keyboard that speaks “Android”, and these are just to name a few. So we know that keyboard products that are designed to work with Android exist, but what about an everyday Bluetooth keyboard you might use with Windows or OS X? How-To Geek wanted look at how viable it is to use such a keyboard with Android. We conducted some research and examined some lists of Android keyboard shortcuts. Most of what we found was long outdated. Many of the shortcuts don’t even apply anymore, while others just didn’t work. Regardless, after a little experimentation and a dash of customization, it turns out using a keyboard with Android is kind of fun, and who knows, maybe it will catch on. Setting things up Setting up a Bluetooth keyboard with Android is very easy. First, you’ll need a Bluetooth keyboard and of course an Android device, preferably running version 4.1 (Jelly Bean) or higher. For our test, we paired a second-generation Google Nexus 7 running Android 4.3 with a Samsung Series 7 keyboard. In Android, enable Bluetooth if it isn’t already on. We’d like to note that if you don’t normally use Bluetooth accessories and peripherals with your Android device (or any device really), it’s best practice to leave Bluetooth off because, like GPS, it drains the device’s battery more quickly. To enable Bluetooth, simply go to “Settings” -> “Bluetooth” and tap the slider button to “On”. To set up the keyboard, make sure it is on and then tap “Bluetooth” in the Android settings. On the resulting screen, your Android device should automatically search for and hopefully find your keyboard. If you don’t get it right the first time, simply turn the keyboard on again and then tap “Search for Devices” to try again. If it still doesn’t work, make sure you have fresh batteries and the keyboard isn’t paired to another device. If it is, you will need to unpair it before it will work with your Android device (consult your keyboard manufacturer’s documentation or Google if you don’t know how to do this). When Android finds your keyboard, select it under “Available Devices” … … and you should be prompted to type in a code: If successful, you will see that device is now “Connected” and you’re ready to go. If you want to test things out, try pressing the “Windows” key (“Apple” or “Command”) + ESC, and you will be whisked to your Home screen. So, what can you do? Traditional Mac and Windows users know there’s usually a keyboard shortcut for just about everything (and if there isn’t, there’s all kinds of ways to remap keys to do a variety of commands, tasks, and functions). So where does Android fall in terms of baked-in keyboard commands? There answer to that is kind of enough, but not too much. There are definitely established combos you can use to get around, but they aren’t clear and there doesn’t appear to be any one authority on what they are. Still, there is enough keyboard functionality in Android to make it a viable option, if only for those times when you need to get something done (long e-mail or important document) and an on-screen keyboard simply won’t do. It’s important to remember that Android is, and likely always will be a touch-first interface. That said, it does make some concessions to physical keyboards. In other words, you can get around Android fairly well without having to lift your hands off the keys, but you will still have to tap the screen regularly, unless you add a mouse. For example, you can wake your device by tapping a key rather than pressing its power button. However, if your device is slide or pattern-locked, then you’ll have to use the touchscreen to unlock it – a password or PIN however, works seamlessly with a keyboard – other things like widgets and app controls and features, have to be tapped. You get the idea. Keyboard shortcuts and navigation As we said, baked-in keyboard shortcut combos aren’t necessarily abundant nor apparent. The one thing you can always do is search. Any time you want to Google something, start typing from the Home screen and the search screen will automatically open and begin displaying results. Other than that, here is what we were able to figure out: ESC = go back CTRL + ESC = menu CTRL + ALT + DEL = restart (no questions asked) ALT + SPACE = search page (say “OK Google” to voice search) ALT + TAB (ALT + SHIFT + TAB) = switch tasks Also, if you have designated volume function keys, those will probably work too. There’s also some dedicated app shortcuts like calculator, Gmail, and a few others: CMD + A = calculator CMD + C = contacts CMD + E = e-mail CMD + G = Gmail CMD + L = Calendar CMD + P = Play Music CMD + Y = YouTube Overall, it’s not a long comprehensive list and there’s no dedicated keyboard combos for the full array of Google’s products. Granted, it’s hard to imagine getting a lot of mileage out of a keyboard with Maps but with something like Keep, you could type out long, detailed lists on your tablet, and then view them on your smartphone when you go out shopping. You can also use the arrow keys to navigate your Home screen over shortcuts and open the app drawer. When something on the screen is selected, it will be highlighted in blue. Press “Enter” to open your selection. Additionally, if an app has its own set of shortcuts, e.g. Gmail has quite a few unique shortcuts to it, as does Chrome, some – though not many – will work in Android (not for YouTube though). Also, many “universal” shortcuts such as Copy (CTRL + C), Cut (CTRL + X), Paste (CTRL + V), and Select All (CTRL + A) work where needed – such as in instant messaging, e-mail, social media apps, etc. Creating custom application shortcuts What about custom shortcuts? When we were researching this article, we were under the impression that it was possible to assign keyboard combinations to specific apps, such as you could do on older Android versions such as Gingerbread. This no long seems to be the case and nowhere in “Settings” could we find a way to assign hotkey combos to any of our favorite, oft-used apps or functions. If you do want custom keyboard shortcuts, what can you do? Luckily, there’s an app on Google Play that allows you to, among other things, create custom app shortcuts. It is called External Keyboard Helper (EKH) and while there is a free demo version, the pay version is only a few bucks. We decided to give EKH a whirl and through a little experimentation and finally reading the developer’s how-to, we found we could map custom keyboard combos to just about anything. To do this, first open the application and you’ll see the main app screen. Don’t worry about choosing a custom layout or anything like that, you want to go straight to the “Advanced settings”: In the “Advanced settings” select “Application shortcuts” to continue: You can have up to 16 custom application shortcuts. We are going to create a custom shortcut to the Facebook app. We choose “A0”, and from the resulting list, Facebook. You can do this for any number of apps, services, and settings. As you can now see, the Facebook app has now been linked to application-zero (A0): Go back to the “Advanced settings” and choose “Customize keyboard mappings”: You will be prompted to create a custom keyboard layout so we choose “Custom 1”: When you choose to create a custom layout, you can do a great many more things with your keyboard. For example, many keyboards have predefined function (Fn) keys, which you can map to your tablet’s brightness controls, toggle WiFi on/off, and much more. A word of advice, the application automatically remaps certain keys when you create a custom layout. This might mess up some existing keyboard combos. If you simply want to add some functionality to your keyboard, you can go ahead and delete EKH’s default changes and start your custom layout from scratch. To create a new combo, select “Add new key mapping”: For our new shortcut, we are going to assign the Facebook app to open when we key in “ALT + F”. To do this, we press the “F” key while in the “Scancode” field and we see it returns a value of “33”. If we wanted to use a different key, we can press “Change” and scan another key’s numerical value. We now want to assign the “ALT” key to application “A0”, previously designated as the Facebook app. In the “AltGr” field, we enter “A0” and then “Save” our custom combo. And now we see our new application shortcut. Now, as long as we’re using our custom layout, every time we press “ALT + F”, the Facebook app will launch: External Keyboard Helper extends far beyond simple application shortcuts and if you are looking for deeper keyboard customization options, you should definitely check it out. Among other things, EKH also supports dozens of languages, allows you to quickly switch between layouts using a key or combo, add up to 16 custom text shortcuts, and much more! It can be had on Google Play for $2.53 for the full version, but you can try the demo version for free. More extensive documentation on how to use the app is also available. Android? Keyboard? Sure, why not? Unlike traditional desktop operating systems, you don’t need a physical keyboard and mouse to use a mobile operating system. You can buy an iPad or Nexus 10 or Galaxy Note, and never need another accessory or peripheral – they work as intended right out of the box. It’s even possible you can write the next great American novel on one these devices, though that might require a lot of practice and patience. That said, using a keyboard with Android is kind of fun. It’s not revelatory but it does elevate the experience. You don’t even need to add customizations (though they are nice) because there are enough existing keyboard shortcuts in Android to make it usable. Plus, when it comes to inputting text such as in an editor or terminal application, we fully advocate big, physical keyboards. Bottom line, if you’re looking for a way to enhance your Android tablet, give a keyboard a chance. Do you use your Android device for productivity? Is a physical keyboard an important part of your setup? Do you have any shortcuts that we missed? Sound off in the comments and let us know what you think.     

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  • How do I start bash in 13.04?

    - by Maik Klein
    I have a bash script that I need to execute. It seems that I can't run in in my terminal because it has a slightly different syntax. I could run the first file like bash ./configure but it produces a makefile that I can not use. If I try bash make it tells me that it can't execute make. How do I run this make file in bash? I tried cd /usr/bin ./bash but it tells me that it can't find bash. So how do I start bash?

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  • Learning resource for 3d modeling

    - by Maik Klein
    I want to start learning 3d modeling. I already have experience with maya and 3dsmax but I made a long pause (2 years) Now I have free access to maya, 3dsmax and blender (I am a student). I know that all tools are very powerful so I thought I just pick the one with the best learning materials. The best site that I found is http://www.digitaltutors.com/11/index.php and it has over 7600 videos for maya. Maybe you can recommend me some other learning sites that are as good as digitaltutors?

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  • [GEEK SCHOOL] Network Security 1: Securing User Accounts and Passwords in Windows

    - by Matt Klein
    This How-To Geek School class is intended for people who want to learn more about security when using Windows operating systems. You will learn many principles that will help you have a more secure computing experience and will get the chance to use all the important security tools and features that are bundled with Windows. Obviously, we will share everything you need to know about using them effectively. In this first lesson, we will talk about password security; the different ways of logging into Windows and how secure they are. In the proceeding lesson, we will explain where Windows stores all the user names and passwords you enter while working in this operating systems, how safe they are, and how to manage this data. Moving on in the series, we will talk about User Account Control, its role in improving the security of your system, and how to use Windows Defender in order to protect your system from malware. Then, we will talk about the Windows Firewall, how to use it in order to manage the apps that get access to the network and the Internet, and how to create your own filtering rules. After that, we will discuss the SmartScreen Filter – a security feature that gets more and more attention from Microsoft and is now widely used in its Windows 8.x operating systems. Moving on, we will discuss ways to keep your software and apps up-to-date, why this is important and which tools you can use to automate this process as much as possible. Last but not least, we will discuss the Action Center and its role in keeping you informed about what’s going on with your system and share several tips and tricks about how to stay safe when using your computer and the Internet. Let’s get started by discussing everyone’s favorite subject: passwords. The Types of Passwords Found in Windows In Windows 7, you have only local user accounts, which may or may not have a password. For example, you can easily set a blank password for any user account, even if that one is an administrator. The only exception to this rule are business networks where domain policies force all user accounts to use a non-blank password. In Windows 8.x, you have both local accounts and Microsoft accounts. If you would like to learn more about them, don’t hesitate to read the lesson on User Accounts, Groups, Permissions & Their Role in Sharing, in our Windows Networking series. Microsoft accounts are obliged to use a non-blank password due to the fact that a Microsoft account gives you access to Microsoft services. Using a blank password would mean exposing yourself to lots of problems. Local accounts in Windows 8.1 however, can use a blank password. On top of traditional passwords, any user account can create and use a 4-digit PIN or a picture password. These concepts were introduced by Microsoft to speed up the sign in process for the Windows 8.x operating system. However, they do not replace the use of a traditional password and can be used only in conjunction with a traditional user account password. Another type of password that you encounter in Windows operating systems is the Homegroup password. In a typical home network, users can use the Homegroup to easily share resources. A Homegroup can be joined by a Windows device only by using the Homegroup password. If you would like to learn more about the Homegroup and how to use it for network sharing, don’t hesitate to read our Windows Networking series. What to Keep in Mind When Creating Passwords, PINs and Picture Passwords When creating passwords, a PIN, or a picture password for your user account, we would like you keep in mind the following recommendations: Do not use blank passwords, even on the desktop computers in your home. You never know who may gain unwanted access to them. Also, malware can run more easily as administrator because you do not have a password. Trading your security for convenience when logging in is never a good idea. When creating a password, make it at least eight characters long. Make sure that it includes a random mix of upper and lowercase letters, numbers, and symbols. Ideally, it should not be related in any way to your name, username, or company name. Make sure that your passwords do not include complete words from any dictionary. Dictionaries are the first thing crackers use to hack passwords. Do not use the same password for more than one account. All of your passwords should be unique and you should use a system like LastPass, KeePass, Roboform or something similar to keep track of them. When creating a PIN use four different digits to make things slightly harder to crack. When creating a picture password, pick a photo that has at least 10 “points of interests”. Points of interests are areas that serve as a landmark for your gestures. Use a random mixture of gesture types and sequence and make sure that you do not repeat the same gesture twice. Be aware that smudges on the screen could potentially reveal your gestures to others. The Security of Your Password vs. the PIN and the Picture Password Any kind of password can be cracked with enough effort and the appropriate tools. There is no such thing as a completely secure password. However, passwords created using only a few security principles are much harder to crack than others. If you respect the recommendations shared in the previous section of this lesson, you will end up having reasonably secure passwords. Out of all the log in methods in Windows 8.x, the PIN is the easiest to brute force because PINs are restricted to four digits and there are only 10,000 possible unique combinations available. The picture password is more secure than the PIN because it provides many more opportunities for creating unique combinations of gestures. Microsoft have compared the two login options from a security perspective in this post: Signing in with a picture password. In order to discourage brute force attacks against picture passwords and PINs, Windows defaults to your traditional text password after five failed attempts. The PIN and the picture password function only as alternative login methods to Windows 8.x. Therefore, if someone cracks them, he or she doesn’t have access to your user account password. However, that person can use all the apps installed on your Windows 8.x device, access your files, data, and so on. How to Create a PIN in Windows 8.x If you log in to a Windows 8.x device with a user account that has a non-blank password, then you can create a 4-digit PIN for it, to use it as a complementary login method. In order to create one, you need to go to “PC Settings”. If you don’t know how, then press Windows + C on your keyboard or flick from the right edge of the screen, on a touch-enabled device, then press “Settings”. The Settings charm is now open. Click or tap the link that says “Change PC settings”, on the bottom of the charm. In PC settings, go to Accounts and then to “Sign-in options”. Here you will find all the necessary options for changing your existing password, creating a PIN, or a picture password. To create a PIN, press the “Add” button in the PIN section. The “Create a PIN” wizard is started and you are asked to enter the password of your user account. Type it and press “OK”. Now you are asked to enter a 4-digit pin in the “Enter PIN” and “Confirm PIN” fields. The PIN has been created and you can now use it to log in to Windows. How to Create a Picture Password in Windows 8.x If you log in to a Windows 8.x device with a user account that has a non-blank password, then you can also create a picture password and use it as a complementary login method. In order to create one, you need to go to “PC settings”. In PC Settings, go to Accounts and then to “Sign-in options”. Here you will find all the necessary options for changing your existing password, creating a PIN, or a picture password. To create a picture password, press the “Add” button in the “Picture password” section. The “Create a picture password” wizard is started and you are asked to enter the password of your user account. You are shown a guide on how the picture password works. Take a few seconds to watch it and learn the gestures that can be used for your picture password. You will learn that you can create a combination of circles, straight lines, and taps. When ready, press “Choose picture”. Browse your Windows 8.x device and select the picture you want to use for your password and press “Open”. Now you can drag the picture to position it the way you want. When you like how the picture is positioned, press “Use this picture” on the left. If you are not happy with the picture, press “Choose new picture” and select a new one, as shown during the previous step. After you have confirmed that you want to use this picture, you are asked to set up your gestures for the picture password. Draw three gestures on the picture, any combination you wish. Please remember that you can use only three gestures: circles, straight lines, and taps. Once you have drawn those three gestures, you are asked to confirm. Draw the same gestures one more time. If everything goes well, you are informed that you have created your picture password and that you can use it the next time you sign in to Windows. If you don’t confirm the gestures correctly, you will be asked to try again, until you draw the same gestures twice. To close the picture password wizard, press “Finish”. Where Does Windows Store Your Passwords? Are They Safe? All the passwords that you enter in Windows and save for future use are stored in the Credential Manager. This tool is a vault with the usernames and passwords that you use to log on to your computer, to other computers on the network, to apps from the Windows Store, or to websites using Internet Explorer. By storing these credentials, Windows can automatically log you the next time you access the same app, network share, or website. Everything that is stored in the Credential Manager is encrypted for your protection.

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  • Java PlayFramework & Python Django GAE

    - by Maik Klein
    I already know Java, C# and C++. Now I want to start with web development and I saw that some really big sites are built with Python/C++. I like the coding style of Python, it looks really clean, but some other things like no errors before runtime is really strange. However, I don't know what I should learn now. I started with Python but then I saw that Google App Engine also supports Java and the PlayFramework looks amazing too. Now I am really confused. Should I go with Python or Java? I found the IDE for Python "PyCharm" really amazing for web development. Does Java have something similar, eclipse maybe? I know that this question isn't constructive, but it will help me with my decision. What are pro and cons of both languages?

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  • Which SSL do I need?

    - by Maik Klein
    I need to buy a ssl certificate. Now there are so many different alternatives with a huge price range. I know the very basic differences of browser compatibility and security level. But I need a "cheap" ssl certificate. My homepage looks like this http://www.test.com Now if I go to the loginpage i should switch to https like this https:/www.test.com/login I am also considering to secure the whole site if the user has singed in. Now there are sites which are offering SSl for 7$/year. Would this do the job? Or would you recommend me to get something more expensive like this one? I want to add paypal support in a later version of my website and I don't want to save money on the wrong end. What would you recommend me?

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  • How to Access the Control Panel in Windows 8

    - by Matthew Klein
    With the old Windows Start menu, you could add the Control Panel as a menu or a drop-down list. With Windows 8, you can pin the Control Panel to the Start Screen and taskbar but first you need to know where it is. One of the chief complaints about Windows 8 (or any new version of Microsoft’s operating system) is “where did such-and-such go?” With Windows 8, when MS removed the Start button and Start Menu, it threw a lot of people for a loop. Because the Start Menu was like an old familiar hang out; one of those places that no matter how it changed over the years, it was a fairly reliable place to find stuff whether it was your Documents folder, Devices, Printers, the ability to search your programs and files, and of course, the Control Panel. There are about four ways (so far) to access the Control Panel in Windows 8 Preview Release. HTG Explains: What Is RSS and How Can I Benefit From Using It? HTG Explains: Why You Only Have to Wipe a Disk Once to Erase It HTG Explains: Learn How Websites Are Tracking You Online

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  • Questions about XNA

    - by Maik Klein
    I've read tons of different threads about XNA, but I still have some questions. First of all: I have 2 years of experience programming and C# is my main language, so XNA would fit perfectly for me, but I have some concerns. People mentioned that C# has a performance loss compared to C++. Is this true? XNA only supports DirectX 9. I found the ANX framework which is pretty similar to XNA but it is capable of DirectX 11. Would this be a good alternative ? Because I'm worried about the performance loss of C#, I searched for a C++ framework and found SFML. It's based on C++ but can be integrated into C#. I already have some experience with UDK, but I am really interested in creating more by myself ( lighting physics etc ). I didn't start yet, what would you recommend me to use / learn ? I am going to create a first person shooter (3D) and I have plenty of time for this. My aim is realtime lighting, realtime global illumination, image-based reflections etc. I want to develop for Windows. Edit: I found something interesting: OpenTK. It supports the latest version of OpenGL which is on the same level as DX11 (if my knowledge is correct). It makes use of mono.

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  • Is there a way to use scala with html5?

    - by Maik Klein
    I want to create a very simple 2d multiplayer browsergame in html5. Something like Scalatron I mainly want to do this to improve my scala skills, the problem is I would have to code the clientside code in javascript and the serverside code in scala. This would result in duplicated code. Another option would be to ignore the html5 part and write it in opengl. But I would still prefer to have a html5 game. I could do this is in javascript, but then it would destroy the whole purpose of learning scala. Is there a way to use scala with html5? Or what would you recommend me to do?

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  • 5 Ways Microsoft Can Improve the Windows 8 Start Screen

    - by Matt Klein
    After having used Windows 8 over the past few months, we’ve found a few ways Microsoft could immediately improve the Start Screen to make it less disorienting and more usable, not only for tablets but desktops and laptops as well. It’s safe to say that the one thing Windows 8 doesn’t lack is criticism. Since the Consumer Preview debuted in February, it has proven to be one of the most polarizing Windows releases ever. But regardless of whether you love or hate it, Windows 8 is where Microsoft’s venerable operating system is headed. Portable computing is here to stay and if the company is to survive, let alone remain relevant, it has to change, adapt, embrace, and extend. Perhaps the single most universally controversial change to Windows is Microsoft’s decision to remove the Start button (or orb, if you’ve moved beyond XP) and with it, what we know to be the Start Menu. In their place we now have a Start hot corner (a workable alternative) and the newly redesigned Metro Start Screen. The Start Screen is, if nothing else, different. Beyond a doubt, there has not been such a radical redesign of Windows’ Start functionality since it went to a two-column design with a nested “All Programs” menu in Windows XP. The Start Screen can be a little jarring because it requires users to not only relearn what they’ve known for nearly two decades but to also rethink the way they interact with Windows. However, the Start Screen maintains its core elements: a Start “menu”, a place for all installed programs (All apps), and a search pane. The Start Screen is attractive, clean, bold, and very imperfect. Here are five changes we’d like to see in the Start Screen before Windows 8 goes gold … How to Make Your Laptop Choose a Wired Connection Instead of Wireless HTG Explains: What Is Two-Factor Authentication and Should I Be Using It? HTG Explains: What Is Windows RT and What Does It Mean To Me?

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  • Can't start Eclipse Juno (Ubuntu 12.10)

    - by Maik Klein
    I installed eclipse though the unbuntu software center but I experienced some issues and I wanted to install the official eclipse version. I downloaded eclipse classic 4.2.1 http://www.eclipse.org/downloads/download.php?file=/eclipse/downloads/drops4/R-4.2.1-201209141800/eclipse-SDK-4.2.1-linux-gtk-x86_64.tar.gz Extracted it, but if I double click "eclipse" it doesn't do anything. Any ideas how I can fix this?

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  • Game Engine with a real time renderer

    - by Maik Klein
    I am studying computer graphics since 3 semester and we just started with opengl. I really enjoy it and want to create my own little engine for learning purpose. I already read tons of different forum posts and saw the following engines. Panda3d, Ogre3d, NeoAxis, Irrlicht and Horde3d(graphics only). Now I don't want to use something like unity or cryengine because I want to start more lowlevel. Which of those engines is suited for realtime rendering? Something that cryengine offers - no baked lightmaps. Or at least gives me the option to add a realtime renderer?

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  • Game Engines with real time lighting

    - by Maik Klein
    I am studying computer graphics since 3 semesters and we just started with OpenGL. I really enjoy it and want to create my own little engine for learning purposes. I already read tons of different forum posts and saw the following engines. Panda3d, Ogre3d, NeoAxis, Irrlicht and Horde3d(graphics only). Now I don't want to use something like Unity or CryEngine because I want to start more low level. Which of those engines is suited for real-time rendering? Something that CryEngine offers - no baked lightmaps. Or at least gives me the option to add a real-time renderer?

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  • Problems with brother printer drivers on 64bit 12.04

    - by Jeff Klein
    I'm running 12.04 64bit on a toshiba satellite laptop. I have a Brotrher MFC-J825dw printer. I've installed brothers driver for it and the cupswrapper but it won't print. I says it is receiving data but it never shows up in the queue. I've also tried the text only generic driver and the same thing happens. I think some dependencies are missing for the cups wrapper and when I try to find it it says it can't be installed. Nopt sure if that's the problem because it doesn't explain the generic driver failure. In any case, any ideas?

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