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  • Router block some sites

    - by Mahesha999
    Hi I was using ADSL Modem/Router earlier. The device is quite old Pronet PN-ADSL 101 E/U model (pics: http://bit.ly/P2YaWy, http://bit.ly/OA700l) Since it had only one RJ45 out, I bought new Wireless Router TPLink TL-WR941ND. It has 4 RJ45 out and 3 wireless antennas. I configured my old router in bridge. Now, if I have to connect my pc to Internet through the old router, I have to enter username and password. Then I connected the RJ45 output of old router to the WAN in of new router. and ran the CD of new router. It configured the new router in PPPoE by saving the username and password in router to dial automatically. So now I have to just plug in the wires in my new routers any RJ45 out. I am able to access the Internet when I connect through new router (both wired and wirelessly), but some sites are getting blocked. Most notably yahoo.com (though ymail.com is working), Microsoft.com. msn.com. These sites work perfectly fine when I connect my pc directly to my old router and enter username and password manually. (However others like google.com. facebook.com works fine when connect through new router) So here these some sites need some parameter set but I am unable to find them out. Can anyone help me. My friend said he also faced same problem. Surprisingly he advised me to see if the same websites will work through Opera turbo mode and boom they worked. So what could be the problem?

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  • Weird Network Behavior of Home Router

    - by Stilgar
    First of all I would like to apologize because what you are going to read will be long and confusing but I am fighting this issue for 3 days now and am out of ideas. At home I have the following setup 50Mbps Internet connects into a home router A 2 desktop computers connect to router A via standard FTP LAN cables including one where the cable is ~20m long. a second router B connects to router A via standard FTP LAN cable X (~20m long). several devices connect to the wireless network of router B and there are a couple of desktop computers connected to it through FTP LAN cables. For some reason computers connected to router B when it is connected via cable X have very slow Internet connection. It is like 5 times slower than what is expected. This is the actual problem I am trying to solve. Interesting facts If a computer is connected to cable X directly instead of through router B the Internet speed is just fine (up to the 50Mbps I get from the ISP). Tested with two computers. I have tried replacing router B with another router C and the problem persists. If I connect router B via another cable to the same ports with the same settings everything seems to work fine and computers connected to router B have quite fast Internet I have tested mainly via Speedtest.net but I have also achieved similar speeds when downloading a file The upload speed is quite higher than the download speed in all cases. Note that my ISP usually has higher upload speed (unless it manages to hit the 50Mbps cap) It seems like the speed when connecting through router B with cable X is reduced 4-5 times no matter what the original speed is. For example via router B I get 10Mbps speed to local servers where I get 50Mbps when connected on router A. If I use a distant server where the ISP is only able to provide 25Mbps I get 4-5Mbps on router B. WiFi is slower than LAN on both routers (which is normal) but the reduced speed is reduced proportionally for WiFi. In addition the upload speed is normally higher from the ISP and it is also reduced proportionally. I have tried two different network configurations. One where I have NAT behind NAT where router B connects to router A via the WAN port and has its own DHCP. Second where router B connects to router A via standard LAN port and has DHCP disabled. In this configuration router B serves as a switch and the Network Gateway for computers connected to router B is the internal IP address of router A. Both configurations work just fine but both manifest the reduced speed issue. pings seem to work just fine As far as I can tell none of the cables is crossed The RJ45 setup for cable X orange orange-white brown brow-white blue blue-white green green-white This is a big problem for me since cable X passes through walls and floors and is very hard to replace. I also may have gotten some of the facts wrong because I am almost going crazy with this issue and testing includes going several floors up and down the staircase. One hypothesis I came up with is that the cable is defective in such a way that the voltage from the router affects its performance. When it is connected to a computer it performs just fine but the router has less power. Related hypothesis includes the cable being affected by electricity cables in the walls when the voltage is low. (I know nothing about electricity) So any ideas what to do, what to test or what the issue may be?

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  • Huawei HG8245T Router - not connecting to another router

    - by BubbaK
    I just got a fiber optic connection installed at home and due to the build of the house, it's mostly cement/bricks, the wireless connection isn't received throughout the house. Previously, to combat this issue, I just ran a hardwire from the modem downstairs and upstairs and had it connected to a secondary (DLink) router. It did the job of getting me seamless wireless internet access everywhere. The issue is now with the new Huawei router, this setup isn't working. I have connected everything as previously, but it seems that the other (DLink) routers are not picking up the connection. I have tried everything and am totally lost as what to do to overcome this problem. Any help would be appreciated.

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  • Router to WIFI Client to Router (New solution for distance when repeater doesnt help)

    - by Kangarooo
    Ethernet to TL-WR340G with WIFI enabled Using TL-WA500 tried repeater mode which was not good enough and had password problems (could not connect if using either ASCII or Normal password in one way then in repeater worked other way) and also could not forward (repeat) WPA/WPA2 security. So since this repeater can also be as client, I made it as client and used another router (TL-WR740N) to get from wire connection from that client and all was working for a little bit. Every machine is set up to be auto DHCP. 1st when setting up client mode I found it working after doing reset. Then after some tens of minutes internet stopped working. When I removed WiFi client then all went back to normal. Where is the problem and how to make this work? Ethernet- TL-WR340G(AutoDHCP) ==> wifi ==> TL-WA500 TL-WA500 wifi client mode(AutoDHCP) ==> wire ==> TL-WR740N TL-WR740N router mode (AutoDHCP) ==> My Computer In other words: TL-WR340G ) ) ) ) TL-WA500 ===== TL-WR740N ==== PC1 ) ) WiFi === Wire

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  • How can I add a wireless router to a wired router?

    - by Tester101
    The Setup: wired D-link (EBR-2310) router connected to my cable modem. Wireless NetGear N300 (WNR2000v3) router connected to a LAN port on the wired router. What I'm trying to do: I'm trying to setup the wireless router to be a separate network, that only accesses the internet through the wired router. What I've done so far. I setup the wireless router's WAN port to get an address from ISP (which should be coming from my wired router running DHCP), and the LAN as a subnet (192.168.1). Wired router's LAN is 192.168.0. The problem: I'm not able to connect to the internet from the wireless router. At one point my wired router showed that it was handing out an IP to the wireless router, but that is not happening anymore. The question: Is what I'm trying to do possible? Am I not thinking about this properly? Do I need to buy a better wired router, with 2 WAN ports? How can I configure these routers to work together?

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  • Macintosh computers cannot connect to router unless we re-start the modem and router

    - by dwwilson66
    We have a small office network with DSL and a Netgear WNR-2000 wireless router acting as a DHCP server. There are nine devices connected to the router, wirelessly and wired. Whenever a Mac computer tries to connect, it's unsuccessful until we restart the router. Each of the possible devices that can connect to the network is listed in a table to assign certain IP addresses to certain MAC addresses. I am running WPA-PSK security. I can view the router status and see that the Mac's MAC address is visible to the router, but with a 169.* IP address, even though I'm assigning its MAC address to an IP address within my subnet. All non-Mac devices attached to the network connect properly, and can access the network properly even AFTER the Mac has not successfully connected. The network includes Windows devices, Roku boxes, printers and internet ready TVs. This to me, would point to a DHCP issue with how Mac communicates with my network. One interesting thing to note is that if a Mac connects and is prevented from sleeping, it will stay connected indefinitely; reissuing the security cert from the router works fine. I'm not sure if that's supposed to sever & re-establish a connection with the updated credentials or not, but I do stay connected. If the Mac sleeps and is awakened while the security cert is still valid, it connects fine. If the security certificate expires while the Mac is asleep, we need to restart the router. Restarting the router will ALWAYS assigns the proper IP addresses to the Mac equipment. I have heard anecdotally that Mac doesn't play well with 802.11n; I have not tested any other Wireless protocols. There's a couple issues here: First, I found this on Stack, Mac laptop crashing wireless router, but it's not rally applicable since the router isn't crashing. But, it does give some clues about Mac's accessing the network. I did change my encryption from WEP to WPA-PSK, but after about a week, we're still experiencing the issue. I'm not really sure if there's anything else useful in that question. Second, I'm considering getting a 802.11c router and hooking it up to the wireless N router. the 802.11c router would handle all the Mac traffic, and would be set up as a Mac-only subnet. Everything else would remain as is. However, I'm not sure if this is doable on a technology level...do I need a bridge or is this some way to do this with regular consumer gear?

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  • Two Routers - 1 Port Straight to First Router

    - by apples
    At my house we have two Wifi routers one's connected directly to the modem and the other is plugged in down stairs as a second network(Directly connected to the first router) Is there a way that I could make it so that I have the second router have its own network, but have one or two ports that would act as if they were directly connected to the first router? That way I can port forward to devices on the second router. Here are the information about the routers: Router 1 - Linksys WRT54G Running stock firmware Router 2 - Linksys E900 Running Tomato Firmware So to summarize what I'm asking is how would I have two networks from two routers but be able to connect directly to the first router through one of the ports on the second router. Here's a Visio Drawing of what I would like to look like

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  • Ubuntu 10.10 Ad-Hoc Setup (from Wireless Router, to Ubuntu Server/Desktop to Wireless Router)

    - by user60375
    Okay, so I know there are different approaches for this, but I will explain my story briefly before getting to the technical stuff. My fiancée and I are going through some financial issues (as I assume a lot of us are). We ended up having to move from our house and stay with some friends/family for 6 months, just to get ourselves caught up. (Medical bills, among other issues,etc). So this is where it gets fun. At our friends house, we are staying in the loft setup which is not near the cable modem and wireless router. I have a "hand-crafted" media center running XBMC, an Ubuntu 10.10 Server/Desktop (multi-purpose, very powerful and tons drive space), two working laptops, a between the two of us we have multiple wireless devices/phones. Now our friends Wireless router doesn't have any options for assigning IP addresses, but my router does. My current setup is: Friends Cable Modem -- Friend's Wireless Router -- Ubuntu 10.10 Server -- My Wireless Router (local-link from Friend's wireless (incoming) to sharing connection on ETH0 (outgoing)) -- to all devices. (Wireless Modem, Ubuntu Server that share's it's wireless incoming connection to the ethernet port my Wireless router share's with the rest of the devices). I setup my router to use default settings from my friend's router, using Google's DNS on my router (disabled DNS setup on Ubuntu Server), everything is assigned nicely and runs smooth. My Ubuntu server was given the address 10.42.43.1 (assuming standard from Network-Manager). (On the Ubuntu machine that shares to my wireless router; I have some server apps installed, but mainly just use Samba/NFS/Tangerine action. My problem/goal is that every device has no problem of accessing the internet from my router, the media-center has an assigned ip address, all services from all devices (ZeroConf, Avanhi, Bonjour, GIT, SSH, FTP, Apache2, etc) all work correctly except from my Ubuntu Server (which serves the wireless connection to ETH0 to another Wireless Router). The Ubuntu 10.10 Server/Desktop is not broadcasting anything (the Zeroconf Service Discovery 0.4 Gnome Applet shows the services from the Ubuntu server but no other computers can see them). I can access it from my Media-Center (Running Xbuntu 10.04) if I direct it to 10.42.43.1, no problem. But I cannot access Tangerine (Daapd) and the Samba shares do not show up on any computers for 10.42.43.1 (not in the WORKGROUP which Samba is setup simple and default but I can direct computers to that address and the shares will add except on a damn Windows 7 parition). Is this an issue with how I have my router setup and possible the gateway? An issue with Network-Manager? And issue with my Ubuntu Server/Desktop? I know there is a lot to that, but it's simpler than I probably have explained? Any help would be appreciated. If you need more details, I can provide them. If there is a better way of my attempting this home-network, please let me know. Thanks in advance for the help.

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  • Connectiong adsl router/modem and router with bridgemode

    - by Zvonko Telefonko
    I have one adsl modem/router which is not "top" of the line and it lack allot of options which I need. I was able to acquire one Cisco router recently which has all options that I need ( like DMZ, VPN, port forwarding, etc). I'm interested, if I connect the old modem/router to new Cisco router using bridge mode, will I be able to use all the features on the Cisco? For instance, the old router is lacking of port forward options. Does this mean that I will not be able to use port forwarding on Cisco router either or, since I will be using bridge mode, this will not affect Cisco router and it will work as the modem is in him? thank you

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  • SSH through standard Belkin router to Asus Tomato router

    - by Luke
    I've set up SSH on the Tomato firmware on an Asus N10, via port 22 with key authentication. I've tested the keys by connecting with putty directly to the router when connected to its network. That works OK. But this router is behind a Belkin (F5D7632-4) router which also acts as modem and when I try to connect through with the (dynamic) public IP it times out. I'm guessing it's something to do with the NAT? My putty settings are taken from various online tutorials, but it's set up for port 22, with the correct key as mentioned. The Belkin router has port forwarding to the Asus (192.168.2.3) for port 22 TCP and UDP set up. It's now tough to see what to do in order to connect to the Asus router with an external IP - if it's even possible. Ideally I would have liked to have only needed to use the Asus router, but as it doesn't act as a modem, I need to connect it to the Belkin to use Tomato's features. Perhaps there's a solution here too? Network: Internet -> Belkin modem/router -> Asus router (Tomato SSH) -> Devices

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  • Access router set up as a bridge behind another router

    - by Alari Truuts
    I have a problem my ISP is refusing to help me with, even though they put up the whole system. Specifications: There's a Thomson TG784 router through which the internet comes in to the building, Behind that (for some reason) is a Juniper NetScreen 5XT - 105 Firewall/Router? which leads to an AMX nxa-enet24 switch that carries the connections all over the building and a series of Apple AirPorts for wifi. Problem: The first router (Thomson) is required for ipTV (by Elion). The tv or ipTV box has to be connected straight to the Thomson router. My service provider cannot see the Thomson router from their side, but see the Juniper, so we might think the Thomson has been configured as a bridge. I need a way to access the Thomson router and see it's configurations, because currently, when connecting a Samsung tv to that router (with elion app for ipTV viewing) or even a computer, it cannot access the internet and even if it could, it would update the Thomson router software, losing it's configurations which I need to preserve. I'm unable to find out the Thomson routers ip address to connect to it, and when directly conencting with a cat5 cable, it doesn't give me an ip address. Hope someone can show me the correct direction for solving my issue. Thank you all for reading, and I appreciate any help, Alari Truuts

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  • Router behind router network setup

    - by optimus
    My relative has bought a router instead of a switch which causes remote-access control issues on his network. His existing network has a 1st router where all PCs are connected via LAN cables. The 2nd router connnects to the 1st router and the remaining PCs are connected to the 2nd router via LAN cables. Normally, I would perform remote-access to help him out with some task. Now it seems all services behind the 2nd router are unavailable to me. How can I resolve this issue?

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  • Installing router - failed to verify router settings

    - by Andi
    I'm trying to install a TP-Link wireless router. I am using a modem an have a PPPoE connection. I connected the router to the computer and the modem, but in the last step of the Easy Setup it says " Failed to verify router settings. 1. Please check the WAN connection type and parameters. 2. Please check your connectivity and retry." The internet works fine if i connect the modem directly to the computer. When I connect the computer to the router, the wireless network is detected by other devices, but cannot be accessed. I accessed the router settings, and everything seems normal, except that it just says "Connecting...". It never manages to connect to the internet. I tried restarting the router and several walkthroughs on the web, but I couldn't get it to work.

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  • How to Reuse Your Old Wi-Fi Router as a Network Switch

    - by Jason Fitzpatrick
    Just because your old Wi-Fi router has been replaced by a newer model doesn’t mean it needs to gather dust in the closet. Read on as we show you how to take an old and underpowered Wi-Fi router and turn it into a respectable network switch (saving your $20 in the process). Image by mmgallan. Why Do I Want To Do This? Wi-Fi technology has changed significantly in the last ten years but Ethernet-based networking has changed very little. As such, a Wi-Fi router with 2006-era guts is lagging significantly behind current Wi-Fi router technology, but the Ethernet networking component of the device is just as useful as ever; aside from potentially being only 100Mbs instead of 1000Mbs capable (which for 99% of home applications is irrelevant) Ethernet is Ethernet. What does this matter to you, the consumer? It means that even though your old router doesn’t hack it for your Wi-Fi needs any longer the device is still a perfectly serviceable (and high quality) network switch. When do you need a network switch? Any time you want to share an Ethernet cable among multiple devices, you need a switch. For example, let’s say you have a single Ethernet wall jack behind your entertainment center. Unfortunately you have four devices that you want to link to your local network via hardline including your smart HDTV, DVR, Xbox, and a little Raspberry Pi running XBMC. Instead of spending $20-30 to purchase a brand new switch of comparable build quality to your old Wi-Fi router it makes financial sense (and is environmentally friendly) to invest five minutes of your time tweaking the settings on the old router to turn it from a Wi-Fi access point and routing tool into a network switch–perfect for dropping behind your entertainment center so that your DVR, Xbox, and media center computer can all share an Ethernet connection. What Do I Need? For this tutorial you’ll need a few things, all of which you likely have readily on hand or are free for download. To follow the basic portion of the tutorial, you’ll need the following: 1 Wi-Fi router with Ethernet ports 1 Computer with Ethernet jack 1 Ethernet cable For the advanced tutorial you’ll need all of those things, plus: 1 copy of DD-WRT firmware for your Wi-Fi router We’re conducting the experiment with a Linksys WRT54GL Wi-Fi router. The WRT54 series is one of the best selling Wi-Fi router series of all time and there’s a good chance a significant number of readers have one (or more) of them stuffed in an office closet. Even if you don’t have one of the WRT54 series routers, however, the principles we’re outlining here apply to all Wi-Fi routers; as long as your router administration panel allows the necessary changes you can follow right along with us. A quick note on the difference between the basic and advanced versions of this tutorial before we proceed. Your typical Wi-Fi router has 5 Ethernet ports on the back: 1 labeled “Internet”, “WAN”, or a variation thereof and intended to be connected to your DSL/Cable modem, and 4 labeled 1-4 intended to connect Ethernet devices like computers, printers, and game consoles directly to the Wi-Fi router. When you convert a Wi-Fi router to a switch, in most situations, you’ll lose two port as the “Internet” port cannot be used as a normal switch port and one of the switch ports becomes the input port for the Ethernet cable linking the switch to the main network. This means, referencing the diagram above, you’d lose the WAN port and LAN port 1, but retain LAN ports 2, 3, and 4 for use. If you only need to switch for 2-3 devices this may be satisfactory. However, for those of you that would prefer a more traditional switch setup where there is a dedicated WAN port and the rest of the ports are accessible, you’ll need to flash a third-party router firmware like the powerful DD-WRT onto your device. Doing so opens up the router to a greater degree of modification and allows you to assign the previously reserved WAN port to the switch, thus opening up LAN ports 1-4. Even if you don’t intend to use that extra port, DD-WRT offers you so many more options that it’s worth the extra few steps. Preparing Your Router for Life as a Switch Before we jump right in to shutting down the Wi-Fi functionality and repurposing your device as a network switch, there are a few important prep steps to attend to. First, you want to reset the router (if you just flashed a new firmware to your router, skip this step). Following the reset procedures for your particular router or go with what is known as the “Peacock Method” wherein you hold down the reset button for thirty seconds, unplug the router and wait (while still holding the reset button) for thirty seconds, and then plug it in while, again, continuing to hold down the rest button. Over the life of a router there are a variety of changes made, big and small, so it’s best to wipe them all back to the factory default before repurposing the router as a switch. Second, after resetting, we need to change the IP address of the device on the local network to an address which does not directly conflict with the new router. The typical default IP address for a home router is 192.168.1.1; if you ever need to get back into the administration panel of the router-turned-switch to check on things or make changes it will be a real hassle if the IP address of the device conflicts with the new home router. The simplest way to deal with this is to assign an address close to the actual router address but outside the range of addresses that your router will assign via the DHCP client; a good pick then is 192.168.1.2. Once the router is reset (or re-flashed) and has been assigned a new IP address, it’s time to configure it as a switch. Basic Router to Switch Configuration If you don’t want to (or need to) flash new firmware onto your device to open up that extra port, this is the section of the tutorial for you: we’ll cover how to take a stock router, our previously mentioned WRT54 series Linksys, and convert it to a switch. Hook the Wi-Fi router up to the network via one of the LAN ports (consider the WAN port as good as dead from this point forward, unless you start using the router in its traditional function again or later flash a more advanced firmware to the device, the port is officially retired at this point). Open the administration control panel via  web browser on a connected computer. Before we get started two things: first,  anything we don’t explicitly instruct you to change should be left in the default factory-reset setting as you find it, and two, change the settings in the order we list them as some settings can’t be changed after certain features are disabled. To start, let’s navigate to Setup ->Basic Setup. Here you need to change the following things: Local IP Address: [different than the primary router, e.g. 192.168.1.2] Subnet Mask: [same as the primary router, e.g. 255.255.255.0] DHCP Server: Disable Save with the “Save Settings” button and then navigate to Setup -> Advanced Routing: Operating Mode: Router This particular setting is very counterintuitive. The “Operating Mode” toggle tells the device whether or not it should enable the Network Address Translation (NAT)  feature. Because we’re turning a smart piece of networking hardware into a relatively dumb one, we don’t need this feature so we switch from Gateway mode (NAT on) to Router mode (NAT off). Our next stop is Wireless -> Basic Wireless Settings: Wireless SSID Broadcast: Disable Wireless Network Mode: Disabled After disabling the wireless we’re going to, again, do something counterintuitive. Navigate to Wireless -> Wireless Security and set the following parameters: Security Mode: WPA2 Personal WPA Algorithms: TKIP+AES WPA Shared Key: [select some random string of letters, numbers, and symbols like JF#d$di!Hdgio890] Now you may be asking yourself, why on Earth are we setting a rather secure Wi-Fi configuration on a Wi-Fi router we’re not going to use as a Wi-Fi node? On the off chance that something strange happens after, say, a power outage when your router-turned-switch cycles on and off a bunch of times and the Wi-Fi functionality is activated we don’t want to be running the Wi-Fi node wide open and granting unfettered access to your network. While the chances of this are next-to-nonexistent, it takes only a few seconds to apply the security measure so there’s little reason not to. Save your changes and navigate to Security ->Firewall. Uncheck everything but Filter Multicast Firewall Protect: Disable At this point you can save your changes again, review the changes you’ve made to ensure they all stuck, and then deploy your “new” switch wherever it is needed. Advanced Router to Switch Configuration For the advanced configuration, you’ll need a copy of DD-WRT installed on your router. Although doing so is an extra few steps, it gives you a lot more control over the process and liberates an extra port on the device. Hook the Wi-Fi router up to the network via one of the LAN ports (later you can switch the cable to the WAN port). Open the administration control panel via web browser on the connected computer. Navigate to the Setup -> Basic Setup tab to get started. In the Basic Setup tab, ensure the following settings are adjusted. The setting changes are not optional and are required to turn the Wi-Fi router into a switch. WAN Connection Type: Disabled Local IP Address: [different than the primary router, e.g. 192.168.1.2] Subnet Mask: [same as the primary router, e.g. 255.255.255.0] DHCP Server: Disable In addition to disabling the DHCP server, also uncheck all the DNSMasq boxes as the bottom of the DHCP sub-menu. If you want to activate the extra port (and why wouldn’t you), in the WAN port section: Assign WAN Port to Switch [X] At this point the router has become a switch and you have access to the WAN port so the LAN ports are all free. Since we’re already in the control panel, however, we might as well flip a few optional toggles that further lock down the switch and prevent something odd from happening. The optional settings are arranged via the menu you find them in. Remember to save your settings with the save button before moving onto a new tab. While still in the Setup -> Basic Setup menu, change the following: Gateway/Local DNS : [IP address of primary router, e.g. 192.168.1.1] NTP Client : Disable The next step is to turn off the radio completely (which not only kills the Wi-Fi but actually powers the physical radio chip off). Navigate to Wireless -> Advanced Settings -> Radio Time Restrictions: Radio Scheduling: Enable Select “Always Off” There’s no need to create a potential security problem by leaving the Wi-Fi radio on, the above toggle turns it completely off. Under Services -> Services: DNSMasq : Disable ttraff Daemon : Disable Under the Security -> Firewall tab, uncheck every box except “Filter Multicast”, as seen in the screenshot above, and then disable SPI Firewall. Once you’re done here save and move on to the Administration tab. Under Administration -> Management:  Info Site Password Protection : Enable Info Site MAC Masking : Disable CRON : Disable 802.1x : Disable Routing : Disable After this final round of tweaks, save and then apply your settings. Your router has now been, strategically, dumbed down enough to plod along as a very dependable little switch. Time to stuff it behind your desk or entertainment center and streamline your cabling.     

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  • cisco ePC 3208 router and captive portal

    - by Dejan Milosevic
    Ok, i have cisco ePC 3208 router, and cable internet goes in router via cable and router is emiting wireless. It can work without computer and it is working fine. Now i want to have capiteve portal with home page for my buisness and user logins. Is it possible that i use computer as gateway for captive portal, so when user goes to wireless it will redirected to computer local server for authorization and then passed by if user and pass is good, or i need another router or wifi acess point?

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  • Internet connectivity issues with one router but work ok with other router

    - by user825904
    I have one Tplink ADSL ROUTER and when i enter username and password on setup page then everything works fine. Now i have one more router Netgear router then when i enter same username and password then interworks ok for some 50% websites but for other 50% websites the page is not loaded and it hangs there. In the sats bar it says website found , waiting for reply and it hnags there and no site is displayed. I wonder which setting is different on these two routers. The Tplink router i have bought is from local shop but netgear router is from different country. Can that make some difference

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  • iPod Touch G4 disconnects from Belkin N+ Router at random intervals

    - by leeand00
    I have an iPod Touch G4 and a Belkin N+ Router F5D8235-4 v2, and for some reason the iPod Touch disconnects from the router at random intervals. Checking the settings in the iPod, it will read that it is still connected to the router, but before I can access the internet again, I have to turn on Airplane mode and then turn it off again to get any program to work with the Internet again. I've tried upgrading the firmware in the router, but that also doesn't seem to help. I'm using the wiresless mode 802.11b&802.11g&802.11n in the 20/40MHz frequency. Is there any way of fixing this issue? It doesn't happen with any of the other devices that are connected to the router. This post has been cross-posted here

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  • is it good to have or difference between ADSL Modem+WiFi Router and Separate ADSL Modem & Wi-Fi Router?

    - by vikas devde
    I have ADSL2 Modem which I got from my service provider, now I want to setup wireless(Wi-Fi) in my home. I went to shop, where I came to know that there are routers which come up with modem also but they are priced lil higher than the only wi-fi routers. Now it is obvious that I should go for only wi-fi one, as I already have modem. My question is, is there any difference between ADSL+router and only router? I think if I use ADSL+router, the speed will increase lilbit, as modem does modulate and demodulate signals, and router also generates wireless signal, that is time to take conversions is doubled, and if I use ADSL+modem, it will directly convert the signals to wireless, and time will be saved, so the overall speed will increase lilbit. This is what my concept is(Which might be wrong). What do you guys would suggest me? should I take my current modem away and buy an ADSL+router or I should keep my modem and buy only wi-fi one. Please tell me the difference and suggest me which one I should go with, and also suggest me which company router I should go for.

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  • Use router as external high powered Wi-Fi adapter

    - by skywinder
    I need a powerful external Wi-Fi adapter for a couple of days. I heard that some types of router support this mode, allowing me to connect the router to my notebook and just use it as an external Wi-Fi interface. Is it possible to connect a router as an external Wi-Fi adapter? How can I determine it? Updated: My purpose is to set the router to monitor mode and check networks around through my notebook to provide better configuration for my network (power, channels, etc). My internal notebook Wi-Fi adapter is too weak for this purpose. Should I use special drivers for that? If yes, can someone describe, step-by-step, how to do it? p.s. I want to use ASUS RT-N56U as an external Wi-Fi adapter on OS X or Ubuntu.

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  • My wifi internet router connection resets when more devices connected

    - by joeeoj
    The wifi internet router is connected directly to Internet cable. The main Pc is attached to it via LAN cable, while 1 laptop and 3 mobile phones connect to it via wifi. Whenever 2 or more devices connect via wifi, the internet connection breaks after one minute and internet connection resets. I tracked this behaviour for weeks, and came to conclusion: It seems like some 'device 1' got IP then it went to suspend mode. Then 'device 2' connected to router and got the same IP. Then the 'device 1' woke up from suspend mode and tried to use his old IP. The router sees that 2 same IP addresses exists and automatically reset internet connection. Is this possible? Have I tracked the problem correctly and how to solve it? The router is set to lease 100 IP addresses to devices who try to connect. The password is strong and no hacker's device is being connected to my wifi network. Tried changing password and AP's name.

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  • Wireless traffic stops when downloading large files at high speed: packets lost (Linksys WRT120N router)

    - by Torious
    The problem Note: First I'd like to understand WHY this is happening. Ofcourse, a solution would be nice too. :) When downloading a large file over HTTP at high-speeds, my wireless traffic basically stops: I can't open webpages and the download itself pauses. It pauses pretty much immediately after starting it; sometimes at 800 KB, sometimes at a few MB. After some time, the download (and other traffic) resumes, but the problem keeps reoccurring during the same download. The problem does not occur when using a wired connection through the same router (Linskys WRT120N). Also note that the connection is not dropped when this happens. It's just that the traffic stops and I can't browse to web pages, etc. (SYN packets are sent but nothing is received, etc.) Inspection with Wireshark shows that the following happens: Server sends data packets which are acknowledged by client Server sends a packet, but SEQ indicates some packets were lost (6 packets in one occurrence). Server sends a few more packets and client acknowledges these using "selective acknowledgement" Server stops sending data for a while (since the lost packets were not acknowledged or the router stops forwarding them?) Eventually, server does a "retransmission" and traffic resumes as normal. This all seems normal behavior to me when packet loss occurs. It's the consistent packet loss throughout a large, high-speed download that puzzles me. What might cause this? My own idea is the following: My internet is pretty fast (100 mbps), so when starting a large-file download, the router buffers the incoming data (since wireless introduces some slight delay / lower speed, in part due to other networks), but the buffer overflows and the router drops packets to regulate traffic (and because it has no choice). But how could that happen? Doesn't the TCP window size limit the amount of data that can go unacknowledged? So how can the router's buffer overflow if there can only be like 64 KB waiting to be acknowledged? Note: I've disabled TCP window scaling and dynamic window size through netsh options, in an attempt to fix this, but it doesn't seem to matter. Also, Wireshark shows a pattern of the server sending 2 packets (of 1514 bytes) and the client sending an ACK, so does that rule out a possible buffer overflow? And a few more subsequent packets are received... I'm at a loss here. Thanks for any insights. Things that are (probably) NOT the cause / I have experimented with The browser Various TCP options in Windows 7 (netsh etc.) Router settings such as MTU, beacon interval, UPnP, ...

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  • linksys wrt54g router to a Cisco router?

    - by jasondavis
    This may be a strange question but I have no clue. I currently have a basic linksys wrt54g router fo9r my home network. I am considering getting a rack/cabinet and running a home server or 2 and hooking up my home network to it. If I were to do0 this I could pick up a cisco rack mounted router and switch off ebay to use. So If I were to do this, would I just plugin in the cables for the cisco router from my dsl modem or is there more to it to get these working?

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  • "Safe" personal router use on apartment-wide network

    - by noisetank
    I recently moved into an apartment with internet included in my rent. This was a boon at first, but now I'm feeling limited. To get devices connected (wired or wireless), I have to whitelist the MAC addresses on mycampusnet.com. This is annoying (considering I'm well over the 10 device limit including my roommate's stuff), but what's really driving me mad is that I don't seem to have any semblance of a "local" network. I've relied heavily on static IPs and port forwarding in the past (accessing NAS and remote desktop) and (as far as I can understand), that functionality is nonexistent without my router set up. Also, as my wired and wireless devices don't always seem to make it onto the same subnet, I'm unable to use any of my iDevices with my Apple TV (I can, however, mirror to no less than four strangers' Apple TVs at any moment, which is a whole other level of discomforting). I've talked to the head of the apartment complex and she told me that they personally don't have any issue with my using a router, but the provider (CampusConnect) does not currently allow it. Apparently, enough people have put in complaints/requests about the restriction (the apartments are for graduate students and University staff, many of which need to set up things like VPNs for work reasons) to open up some sort of ticket to get the functionality in place, but all the calls I've made to get status updates have been a waste of time. My question is: If I plugged my router into the apartment network, what would happen? I've been told already that personal routers would "interfere with the wireless" and that they would shut my port down if I used one, but is that a legitimate thing or just something made up that sounds real to keep the average Joe from pushing it further? I'm guessing there's some way of configuring my router to keep it from disrupting the rest of the network, but it's not something they want to tell me for obvious reasons. Am I right? And if so, what are the chances that they'd notice the difference in traffic or whatever and shut off my port?

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