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  • Microsoft MVP for the Third Time

    - by shiju
    I just received an email from Microsoft which stating that I have been awarded as Microsoft MVP again for 2012!! Now I became a Microsoft MVP for the third time in a row. Here's the email below: Dear Shiju Varghese, Congratulations! We are pleased to present you with the 2012 Microsoft® MVP Award! This award is given to exceptional technical community leaders who actively share their high quality, real world expertise with others. We appreciate your outstanding contributions in ASP.NET/IIS technical communities during the past year. On this occasion, I would like to thank Microsoft, community leaders, fellow MVPs, my blog readers, my employer Marlabs and finally big thanks to my lovely wife Rosmi and to my daughter Irene Rose.

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  • Social meet up on Twitter for MEET Windows Azure on June the 7th

    - by shiju
    Get ready to MEET Windows Azure live on June the 7th. The Microsoft Windows Azure team is conducting an online event “Meet Windows Azure” on June 7th 2012 starting at 1 PM PDT. The event will be presented by Scott Guthrie. If you want to watch event  live, you can register here: http://register.meetwindowsazure.com/.   If you are planning to attend the event and want to be social, there is a Social meet up on Twitter event organized by Windows Azure MVP Magnus Martensson MEET Windows Azure Blog Relay: Roger Jennings (@rogerjenn): Social meet up on Twitter for Meet Windows Azure on June 7th Anton Staykov (@astaykov): MEET Windows Azure on June the 7th Patriek van Dorp (@pvandorp): Social Meet Up for ‘MEET Windows Azure’ on June 7th Marcel Meijer (@MarcelMeijer): MEET Windows Azure on June the 7th Nuno Godinho (@NunoGodinho): Social Meet Up for ‘MEET Windows Azure’ on June 7th Shaun Xu (@shaunxu) Let's MEET Windows Azure Maarten Balliauw (@maartenballiauw): Social meet up on Twitter for MEET Windows Azure on June 7th Brent Stineman (@brentcodemonkey): Meet Windows Azure (aka Learn Windows Azure v2) Herve Roggero (@hroggero): Social Meet up on Twitter for Meet Windows Azure on June 7th Paras Doshi (@paras_doshi): Get started on Windows Azure: Attend “Meet Windows Azure” event Online Simran Jindal (@SimranJindal): Meet Windows Azure – an online and in person event, social meetup #MeetAzure (+ Beer for Beer lovers) on June 7th 2012 Magnus Mårtensson (@noopman): Social meet up on Twitter for MEET Windows Azure on June 7th Kris van der Mast (@KvdM): Shiju Varghese (@shijucv) Social meet up on Twitter for MEET Windows Azure on June the 7th I hope to see you online for the social meet event on the 7th. My Twitter user name is @shijucv Call to action: Link to this blog post on your blog and I will update this post to link to you.

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  • Mobile enabled web apps with ASP.NET MVC 3 and jQuery Mobile

    - by shiju
    In my previous blog posts, I have demonstrated a simple web app using ASP.NET MVC 3 and EF Code First. In this post, I will be focus on making this application for mobile devices. A single web site will be used for both mobile browsers and desktop browsers. If users are accessing the web app from mobile browsers, users will be redirect to mobile specific pages and will get normal pages if users are accessing from desktop browsers. In this demo app, the mobile specific pages are maintained in an ASP.NET MVC Area named Mobile and mobile users will be redirect to MVC Area Mobile. Let’s add a new area named Mobile to the ASP.NET MVC app. For adding Area, right click the ASP.NET MVC project and  select Area from Add option. Our mobile specific pages using jQuery Mobile will be maintained in the Mobile Area. ASP.NET MVC Global filter for redirecting mobile visitors to Mobile area Let’s add an ASP.NET MVC Global filter for redirecting mobile visitors to Mobile area. The below Global filter is taken from the sample app http://aspnetmobilesamples.codeplex.com/ created by the ASP.NET team. The below filer will redirect the Mobile visitors to an ASP.NET MVC Area Mobile. public class RedirectMobileDevicesToMobileAreaAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute     {         protected override bool AuthorizeCore(System.Web.HttpContextBase httpContext)         {             // Only redirect on the first request in a session             if (!httpContext.Session.IsNewSession)                 return true;               // Don't redirect non-mobile browsers             if (!httpContext.Request.Browser.IsMobileDevice)                 return true;               // Don't redirect requests for the Mobile area             if (Regex.IsMatch(httpContext.Request.Url.PathAndQuery, "/Mobile($|/)"))                 return true;               return false;         }           protected override void HandleUnauthorizedRequest(AuthorizationContext filterContext)         {             var redirectionRouteValues = GetRedirectionRouteValues(filterContext.RequestContext);             filterContext.Result = new RedirectToRouteResult(redirectionRouteValues);         }           // Override this method if you want to customize the controller/action/parameters to which         // mobile users would be redirected. This lets you redirect users to the mobile equivalent         // of whatever resource they originally requested.         protected virtual RouteValueDictionary GetRedirectionRouteValues(RequestContext requestContext)         {             return new RouteValueDictionary(new { area = "Mobile", controller = "Home", action = "Index" });         }     } Let’s add the global filer RedirectMobileDevicesToMobileAreaAttribute to the global filter collection in the Application_Start() of Global.asax.cs file   GlobalFilters.Filters.Add(new RedirectMobileDevicesToMobileAreaAttribute(), 1); Now your mobile visitors will be redirect to the Mobile area. But the browser detection logic in the RedirectMobileDevicesToMobileAreaAttribute filter will not be working in some modern browsers and some conditions. But the good news is that ASP.NET’s browser detection feature is extensible and will be greatly working with the open source framework 51Degrees.mobi. 51Degrees.mobi is a Browser Capabilities Provider that will be working with ASP.NET’s Request.Browser and will provide more accurate and detailed information. For more details visit the documentation page at http://51degrees.codeplex.com/documentation. Let’s add a reference to 51Degrees.mobi library using NuGet We can easily add the 51Degrees.mobi from NuGet and this will update the web.config for necessary configuartions. Mobile Web App using jQuery Mobile Framework jQuery Mobile Framework is built on top of jQuery that provides top-of-the-line JavaScript in a unified User Interface that works across the most-used smartphone web browsers and tablet form factors. It provides an easy way to develop user interfaces for mobile web apps. The current version of the framework is jQuery Mobile Alpha 3. We need to include the following files to use jQuery Mobile. The jQuery Mobile CSS file (jquery.mobile-1.0a3.min.css) The jQuery library (jquery-1.5.min.js) The jQuery Mobile library (jquery.mobile-1.0a3.min.js) Let’s add the required jQuery files directly from jQuery CDN . You can download the files and host them on your own server. jQuery Mobile page structure The basic jQuery Mobile page structure is given below <!DOCTYPE html> <html>   <head>   <title>Page Title</title>   <link rel="stylesheet" href="http://code.jquery.com/mobile/1.0a3/jquery.mobile-1.0a1.min.css" />   <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.5.min.js"></script>   <script src="http://code.jquery.com/mobile/1.0a3/jquery.mobile-1.0a3.min.js"></script> </head> <body> <div data-role="page">   <div data-role="header">     <h1>Page Title</h1>   </div>   <div data-role="content">     <p>Page content goes here.</p>      </div>   <div data-role="footer">     <h4>Page Footer</h4>   </div> </div> </body> </html> The data- attributes are the new feature of HTML5 so that jQuery Mobile will be working on browsers that supporting HTML 5. You can get a detailed browser support details from http://jquerymobile.com/gbs/ . In the Head section we have included the Core jQuery javascript file and jQuery Mobile Library and the core CSS Library for the UI Element Styling. These jQuery files are minified versions and will improve the performance of page load on Mobile Devices. The jQuery Mobile pages are identified with an element with the data-role="page" attribute inside the <body> tag. <div data-role="page"> </div> Within the "page" container, any valid HTML markup can be used, but for typical pages in jQuery Mobile, the immediate children of a "page" are div element with data-roles of "header", "content", and "footer". <div data-role="page">     <div data-role="header">...</div>     <div data-role="content">...</div>     <div data-role="footer">...</div> </div> The div data-role="content" holds the main content of the HTML page and will be used for making user interaction elements. The div data-role="header" is header part of the page and div data-role="footer" is the footer part of the page. Creating Mobile specific pages in the Mobile Area Let’s create Layout page for our Mobile area <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head>     <title>@ViewBag.Title</title>     <link rel="stylesheet" href="http://code.jquery.com/mobile/1.0a3/jquery.mobile-1.0a3.min.css" />     <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.5.min.js"></script>     <script src="http://code.jquery.com/mobile/1.0a3/jquery.mobile-1.0a3.min.js"></script>     </head>      <body> @RenderBody()    </body> </html> In the Layout page, I have given reference to jQuery Mobile JavaScript files and the CSS file. Let’s add an Index view page Index.chtml @{     ViewBag.Title = "Index"; } <div data-role="page"> <div data-role="header">      <h1>Expense Tracker Mobile</h1> </div> <div data-role="content">   <ul data-role="listview">     <li>@Html.Partial("_LogOnPartial")</li>      <li>@Html.ActionLink("Home", "Index", "Home")</li>      <li>@Html.ActionLink("Category", "Index", "Category")</li>                          <li>@Html.ActionLink("Expense", "Index", "Expense")</li> </ul> </div> <div data-role="footer">           Shiju Varghese | <a href="http://weblogs.asp.net/shijuvarghese">Blog     </a> | <a href="http://twitter.com/shijucv">Twitter</a>   </div> </div>   In the Index page, we have used data-role “listview” for showing our content as List View Let’s create a data entry screen create.cshtml @model MyFinance.Domain.Category @{     ViewBag.Title = "Create Category"; }   <div data-role="page"> <div data-role="header">      <h1>Create Category</h1>             @Html.ActionLink("Home", "Index","Home",null, new { @class = "ui-btn-right" })      </div>       <div data-role="content">     @using (Html.BeginForm("Create","Category",FormMethod.Post))     {       <div data-role="fieldcontain">        @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Name)        @Html.EditorFor(model => model.Name)        <div>           @Html.ValidationMessageFor(m => m.Name)        </div>         </div>         <div data-role="fieldcontain">         @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Description)         @Html.EditorFor(model => model.Description)                   </div>                    <div class="ui-body ui-body-b">         <button type="submit" data-role="button" data-theme="b">Save</button>       </div>     }        </div> </div>   In jQuery Mobile, the form elements should be placed inside the data-role="fieldcontain" The below screen shots show the pages rendered in mobile browser Index Page Create Page Source Code You can download the source code from http://efmvc.codeplex.com   Summary We have created a single  web app for desktop browsers and mobile browsers. If a user access the site from desktop browsers, users will get normal web pages and get mobile specific pages if users access from mobile browsers. If users are accessing the website from mobile devices, we will redirect to a ASP.NET MVC area Mobile. For redirecting to the Mobile area, we have used a Global filer for the redirection logic and used open source framework 51Degrees.mobi for the better support for mobile browser detection. In the Mobile area, we have created the pages using jQuery Mobile and users will get mobile friendly web pages. We can create great mobile web apps using ASP.NET MVC  and jQuery Mobile Framework.

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  • Using TypeScript in ASP.NET MVC Projects

    - by shiju
    In the previous blog post Microsoft TypeScript : A Typed Superset of JavaScript, I have given a brief introduction on TypeScript. In this post, I will demonstrate how to use TypeScript with ASP.NET MVC projects and how we can compile TypeScript within the ASP.NET MVC projects. Using TypeScript with ASP.NET MVC 3 Projects The Visual Studio plug-in for TypeScript provides an ASP.NET MVC 3 project template for TypeScript that lets you to compile TypeScript from the Visual Studio. The following screen shot shows the TypeScript template for ASP.NET MVC 3 project The “TypeScript Internet Application” template is just a ASP.NET MVC 3 internet application project template which will allows to compile TypeScript programs to JavaScript when you are building your ASP.NET MVC projects. This project template will have the following section in the .csproject file <None Include="Scripts\jquery.d.ts" /> <TypeScriptCompile Include="Scripts\site.ts" /> <Content Include="Scripts\site.js"> <DependentUpon>site.ts</DependentUpon> </Content> .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } <Target Name="BeforeBuild"> <Exec Command="&amp;quot;$(PROGRAMFILES)\ Microsoft SDKs\TypeScript\0.8.0.0\tsc&amp;quot; @(TypeScriptCompile ->'&quot;%(fullpath)&quot;', ' ')" /> </Target> .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } The “BeforeBuild” target will allows you to compile TypeScript programs when you are building your ASP.NET MVC projects. The TypeScript project template will provide a typing reference file for the jQuery library named “jquery.d.ts”. The following default app.ts file referenced to jquery.d.ts 1: ///<reference path='jquery.d.ts' /> 2:   3: $(document).ready(function () { 4:   5: $(".btn-slide").click(function () { 6: $("#main").slideToggle("slow"); 7: $(this).toggleClass("active"); 8: }); 9:   10: }); .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } Using TypeScript with ASP.NET MVC 4 Projects The current preview version of TypeScript is not providing a project template for ASP.NET MVC 4 projects. But you can use TypeScript with ASP.NET MVC 4 projects by editing the project’s .csproject file. You can take the necessary settings from ASP.NET MVC 3 project file. I have just added the following section in the end of the .csproj file of a ASP.NET MVC 4 project, which will allows to compile all TypeScript when building ASP.NET MVC 4 project. <ItemGroup> <TypeScriptCompile Include="$(ProjectDir)\**\*.ts" /> </ItemGroup> <Target Name="BeforeBuild"> <Exec Command="&amp;quot;$(PROGRAMFILES)\ Microsoft SDKs\TypeScript\0.8.0.0\tsc&amp;quot; @(TypeScriptCompile ->'&quot;%(fullpath)&quot;', ' ')" /> </Target> .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; }

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  • NoSQL with RavenDB and ASP.NET MVC - Part 1

    - by shiju
     A while back, I have blogged NoSQL with MongoDB, NoRM and ASP.NET MVC Part 1 and Part 2 on how to use MongoDB with an ASP.NET MVC application. The NoSQL movement is getting big attention and RavenDB is the latest addition to the NoSQL and document database world. RavenDB is an Open Source (with a commercial option) document database for the .NET/Windows platform developed  by Ayende Rahien.  Raven stores schema-less JSON documents, allow you to define indexes using Linq queries and focus on low latency and high performance. RavenDB is .NET focused document database which comes with a fully functional .NET client API  and supports LINQ. RavenDB comes with two components, a server and a client API. RavenDB is a REST based system, so you can write your own HTTP cleint API. As a .NET developer, RavenDB is becoming my favorite document database. Unlike other document databases, RavenDB is supports transactions using System.Transactions. Also it's supports both embedded and server mode of database. You can access RavenDB site at http://ravendb.netA demo App with ASP.NET MVCLet's create a simple demo app with RavenDB and ASP.NET MVC. To work with RavenDB, do the following steps. Go to http://ravendb.net/download and download the latest build.Unzip the downloaded file.Go to the /Server directory and run the RavenDB.exe. This will start the RavenDB server listening on localhost:8080You can change the port of RavenDB  by modifying the "Raven/Port" appSetting value in the RavenDB.exe.config file.When running the RavenDB, it will automatically create a database in the /Data directory. You can change the directory name data by modifying "Raven/DataDirt" appSetting value in the RavenDB.exe.config file.RavenDB provides a browser based admin tool. When the Raven server is running, You can be access the browser based admin tool and view and edit documents and index using your browser admin tool. The web admin tool available at http://localhost:8080The below is the some screen shots of web admin tool     Working with ASP.NET MVC  To working with RavenDB in our demo ASP.NET MVC application, do the following steps Step 1 - Add reference to Raven Cleint API In our ASP.NET MVC application, Add a reference to the Raven.Client.Lightweight.dll from the Client directory. Step 2 - Create DocumentStoreThe document store would be created once per application. Let's create a DocumentStore on application start-up in the Global.asax.cs. documentStore = new DocumentStore { Url = "http://localhost:8080/" }; documentStore.Initialise(); The above code will create a Raven DB document store and will be listening the server locahost at port 8080    Step 3 - Create DocumentSession on BeginRequest   Let's create a DocumentSession on BeginRequest event in the Global.asax.cs. We are using the document session for every unit of work. In our demo app, every HTTP request would be a single Unit of Work (UoW). BeginRequest += (sender, args) =>   HttpContext.Current.Items[RavenSessionKey] = documentStore.OpenSession(); Step 4 - Destroy the DocumentSession on EndRequest  EndRequest += (o, eventArgs) => {     var disposable = HttpContext.Current.Items[RavenSessionKey] as IDisposable;     if (disposable != null)         disposable.Dispose(); };  At the end of HTTP request, we are destroying the DocumentSession  object.The below  code block shown all the code in the Global.asax.cs  private const string RavenSessionKey = "RavenMVC.Session"; private static DocumentStore documentStore;   protected void Application_Start() { //Create a DocumentStore in Application_Start //DocumentStore should be created once per application and stored as a singleton. documentStore = new DocumentStore { Url = "http://localhost:8080/" }; documentStore.Initialise(); AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas(); RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes); //DI using Unity 2.0 ConfigureUnity(); }   public MvcApplication() { //Create a DocumentSession on BeginRequest   //create a document session for every unit of work BeginRequest += (sender, args) =>     HttpContext.Current.Items[RavenSessionKey] = documentStore.OpenSession(); //Destroy the DocumentSession on EndRequest EndRequest += (o, eventArgs) => { var disposable = HttpContext.Current.Items[RavenSessionKey] as IDisposable; if (disposable != null) disposable.Dispose(); }; }   //Getting the current DocumentSession public static IDocumentSession CurrentSession {   get { return (IDocumentSession)HttpContext.Current.Items[RavenSessionKey]; } }  We have setup all necessary code in the Global.asax.cs for working with RavenDB. For our demo app, Let’s write a domain class  public class Category {       public string Id { get; set; }       [Required(ErrorMessage = "Name Required")]     [StringLength(25, ErrorMessage = "Must be less than 25 characters")]     public string Name { get; set;}     public string Description { get; set; }   } We have created simple domain entity Category. Let's create repository class for performing CRUD operations against our domain entity Category.  public interface ICategoryRepository {     Category Load(string id);     IEnumerable<Category> GetCategories();     void Save(Category category);     void Delete(string id);       }    public class CategoryRepository : ICategoryRepository {     private IDocumentSession session;     public CategoryRepository()     {             session = MvcApplication.CurrentSession;     }     //Load category based on Id     public Category Load(string id)     {         return session.Load<Category>(id);     }     //Get all categories     public IEnumerable<Category> GetCategories()     {         var categories= session.LuceneQuery<Category>()                 .WaitForNonStaleResults()             .ToArray();         return categories;       }     //Insert/Update category     public void Save(Category category)     {         if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(category.Id))         {             //insert new record             session.Store(category);         }         else         {             //edit record             var categoryToEdit = Load(category.Id);             categoryToEdit.Name = category.Name;             categoryToEdit.Description = category.Description;         }         //save the document session         session.SaveChanges();     }     //delete a category     public void Delete(string id)     {         var category = Load(id);         session.Delete<Category>(category);         session.SaveChanges();     }        } For every CRUD operations, we are taking the current document session object from HttpContext object. session = MvcApplication.CurrentSession; We are calling the static method CurrentSession from the Global.asax.cs public static IDocumentSession CurrentSession {     get { return (IDocumentSession)HttpContext.Current.Items[RavenSessionKey]; } }  Retrieve Entities  The Load method get the single Category object based on the Id. RavenDB is working based on the REST principles and the Id would be like categories/1. The Id would be created by automatically when a new object is inserted to the document store. The REST uri categories/1 represents a single category object with Id representation of 1.   public Category Load(string id) {    return session.Load<Category>(id); } The GetCategories method returns all the categories calling the session.LuceneQuery method. RavenDB is using a lucen query syntax for querying. I will explain more details about querying and indexing in my future posts.   public IEnumerable<Category> GetCategories() {     var categories= session.LuceneQuery<Category>()             .WaitForNonStaleResults()         .ToArray();     return categories;   } Insert/Update entityFor insert/Update a Category entity, we have created Save method in repository class. If  the Id property of Category is null, we call Store method of Documentsession for insert a new record. For editing a existing record, we load the Category object and assign the values to the loaded Category object. The session.SaveChanges() will save the changes to document store.  //Insert/Update category public void Save(Category category) {     if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(category.Id))     {         //insert new record         session.Store(category);     }     else     {         //edit record         var categoryToEdit = Load(category.Id);         categoryToEdit.Name = category.Name;         categoryToEdit.Description = category.Description;     }     //save the document session     session.SaveChanges(); }  Delete Entity  In the Delete method, we call the document session's delete method and call the SaveChanges method to reflect changes in the document store.  public void Delete(string id) {     var category = Load(id);     session.Delete<Category>(category);     session.SaveChanges(); }  Let’s create ASP.NET MVC controller and controller actions for handling CRUD operations for the domain class Category  public class CategoryController : Controller { private ICategoryRepository categoyRepository; //DI enabled constructor public CategoryController(ICategoryRepository categoyRepository) {     this.categoyRepository = categoyRepository; } public ActionResult Index() {         var categories = categoyRepository.GetCategories();     if (categories == null)         return RedirectToAction("Create");     return View(categories); }   [HttpGet] public ActionResult Edit(string id) {     var category = categoyRepository.Load(id);         return View("Save",category); } // GET: /Category/Create [HttpGet] public ActionResult Create() {     var category = new Category();     return View("Save", category); } [HttpPost] public ActionResult Save(Category category) {     if (!ModelState.IsValid)     {         return View("Save", category);     }           categoyRepository.Save(category);         return RedirectToAction("Index");     }        [HttpPost] public ActionResult Delete(string id) {     categoyRepository.Delete(id);     var categories = categoyRepository.GetCategories();     return PartialView("CategoryList", categories);      }        }  RavenDB is an awesome document database and I hope that it will be the winner in .NET space of document database world.  The source code of demo application available at http://ravenmvc.codeplex.com/

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  • NoSQL with MongoDB, NoRM and ASP.NET MVC

    - by shiju
     In this post, I will give an introduction to how to work on NoSQL and document database with MongoDB , NoRM and ASP.Net MVC 2. NoSQL and Document Database The NoSQL movement is getting big attention in this year and people are widely talking about document databases and NoSQL along with web application scalability. According to Wikipedia, "NoSQL is a movement promoting a loosely defined class of non-relational data stores that break with a long history of relational databases. These data stores may not require fixed table schemas, usually avoid join operations and typically scale horizontally. Academics and papers typically refer to these databases as structured storage". Document databases are schema free so that you can focus on the problem domain and don't have to worry about updating the schema when your domain is evolving. This enables truly a domain driven development. One key pain point of relational database is the synchronization of database schema with your domain entities when your domain is evolving.There are lots of NoSQL implementations are available and both CouchDB and MongoDB got my attention. While evaluating both CouchDB and MongoDB, I found that CouchDB can’t perform dynamic queries and later I picked MongoDB over CouchDB. There are many .Net drivers available for MongoDB document database. MongoDB MongoDB is an open source, scalable, high-performance, schema-free, document-oriented database written in the C++ programming language. It has been developed since October 2007 by 10gen. MongoDB stores your data as binary JSON (BSON) format . MongoDB has been getting a lot of attention and you can see the some of the list of production deployments from here - http://www.mongodb.org/display/DOCS/Production+Deployments NoRM – C# driver for MongoDB NoRM is a C# driver for MongoDB with LINQ support. NoRM project is available on Github at http://github.com/atheken/NoRM. Demo with ASP.NET MVC I will show a simple demo with MongoDB, NoRM and ASP.NET MVC. To work with MongoDB and  NoRM, do the following steps Download the MongoDB databse For Windows 32 bit, download from http://downloads.mongodb.org/win32/mongodb-win32-i386-1.4.1.zip  and for Windows 64 bit, download  from http://downloads.mongodb.org/win32/mongodb-win32-x86_64-1.4.1.zip . The zip contains the mongod.exe for run the server and mongo.exe for the client Download the NorM driver for MongoDB at http://github.com/atheken/NoRM Create a directory call C:\data\db. This is the default location of MongoDB database. You can override the behavior. Run C:\Mongo\bin\mongod.exe. This will start the MongoDb server Now I am going to demonstrate how to program with MongoDb and NoRM in an ASP.NET MVC application.Let’s write a domain class public class Category {            [MongoIdentifier]public ObjectId Id { get; set; } [Required(ErrorMessage = "Name Required")][StringLength(25, ErrorMessage = "Must be less than 25 characters")]public string Name { get; set;}public string Description { get; set; }}  ObjectId is a NoRM type that represents a MongoDB ObjectId. NoRM will automatically update the Id becasue it is decorated by the MongoIdentifier attribute. The next step is to create a mongosession class. This will do the all interactions to the MongoDB. internal class MongoSession<TEntity> : IDisposable{    private readonly MongoQueryProvider provider;     public MongoSession()    {        this.provider = new MongoQueryProvider("Expense");    }     public IQueryable<TEntity> Queryable    {        get { return new MongoQuery<TEntity>(this.provider); }    }     public MongoQueryProvider Provider    {        get { return this.provider; }    }     public void Add<T>(T item) where T : class, new()    {        this.provider.DB.GetCollection<T>().Insert(item);    }     public void Dispose()    {        this.provider.Server.Dispose();     }    public void Delete<T>(T item) where T : class, new()    {        this.provider.DB.GetCollection<T>().Delete(item);    }     public void Drop<T>()    {        this.provider.DB.DropCollection(typeof(T).Name);    }     public void Save<T>(T item) where T : class,new()    {        this.provider.DB.GetCollection<T>().Save(item);                }  }    The MongoSession constrcutor will create an instance of MongoQueryProvider that supports the LINQ expression and also create a database with name "Expense". If database is exists, it will use existing database, otherwise it will create a new databse with name  "Expense". The Save method can be used for both Insert and Update operations. If the object is new one, it will create a new record and otherwise it will update the document with given ObjectId.  Let’s create ASP.NET MVC controller actions for CRUD operations for the domain class Category public class CategoryController : Controller{ //Index - Get the category listpublic ActionResult Index(){    using (var session = new MongoSession<Category>())    {        var categories = session.Queryable.AsEnumerable<Category>();        return View(categories);    }} //edit a single category[HttpGet]public ActionResult Edit(ObjectId id) {     using (var session = new MongoSession<Category>())    {        var category = session.Queryable              .Where(c => c.Id == id)              .FirstOrDefault();         return View("Save",category);    } }// GET: /Category/Create[HttpGet]public ActionResult Create(){    var category = new Category();    return View("Save", category);}//insert or update a category[HttpPost]public ActionResult Save(Category category){    if (!ModelState.IsValid)    {        return View("Save", category);    }    using (var session = new MongoSession<Category>())    {        session.Save(category);        return RedirectToAction("Index");    } }//Delete category[HttpPost]public ActionResult Delete(ObjectId Id){    using (var session = new MongoSession<Category>())    {        var category = session.Queryable              .Where(c => c.Id == Id)              .FirstOrDefault();        session.Delete(category);        var categories = session.Queryable.AsEnumerable<Category>();        return PartialView("CategoryList", categories);    } }        }  You can easily work on MongoDB with NoRM and can use with ASP.NET MVC applications. I have created a repository on CodePlex at http://mongomvc.codeplex.com and you can download the source code of the ASP.NET MVC application from here

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  • ASP.NET MVC 3 RTM Released

    - by shiju
     The ASP.NET team has released RTM version of ASP.NET MVC 3. You can download the ASP.NET MVC 3 RTM from here and source code of ASP.NET MVC 3 can download from here. Microsoft has released the following products along with ASP.NET MVC 3.NuGetIIS Express 7.5SQL Server Compact Edition 4Web Deploy and Web Farm Framework 2.0Orchard 1.0WebMatrix 1.0 You can read more details from ScottGu's blog post Announcing release of ASP.NET MVC 3, IIS Express, SQL CE 4, Web Farm Framework, Orchard, WebMatrix .You can upgrade your ASP.NET MVC 2 projects to ASP.NET MVC 3 using MVC 3 Project Upgrade Tool. You can read more details about the MVC 3 Upgrade Tool from here. Demo Web App using ASP.NET MVC 3 RTM  You can download a demo web app using ASP.NET MVC 3 RTM from here. The demo app is explained in the below blog postsDeveloping web apps using ASP.NET MVC 3, Razor and EF Code First - Part 1Developing web apps using ASP.NET MVC 3, Razor and EF Code First - Part 2

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  • Dependency Injection in ASP.NET MVC NerdDinner App using Ninject

    - by shiju
    In this post, I am applying Dependency Injection to the NerdDinner application using Ninject. The controllers of NerdDinner application have Dependency Injection enabled constructors. So we can apply Dependency Injection through constructor without change any existing code. A Dependency Injection framework injects the dependencies into a class when the dependencies are needed. Dependency Injection enables looser coupling between classes and their dependencies and provides better testability of an application and it removes the need for clients to know about their dependencies and how to create them. If you are not familiar with Dependency Injection and Inversion of Control (IoC), read Martin Fowler’s article Inversion of Control Containers and the Dependency Injection pattern. The Open Source Project NerDinner is a great resource for learning ASP.NET MVC.  A free eBook provides an end-to-end walkthrough of building NerdDinner.com application. The free eBook and the Open Source Nerddinner application are extremely useful if anyone is trying to lean ASP.NET MVC. The first release of  Nerddinner was as a sample for the first chapter of Professional ASP.NET MVC 1.0. Currently the application is updating to ASP.NET MVC 2 and you can get the latest source from the source code tab of Nerddinner at http://nerddinner.codeplex.com/SourceControl/list/changesets. I have taken the latest ASP.NET MVC 2 source code of the application and applied  Dependency Injection using Ninject and Ninject extension Ninject.Web.Mvc.Ninject &  Ninject.Web.MvcNinject is available at http://github.com/enkari/ninject and Ninject.Web.Mvc is available at http://github.com/enkari/ninject.web.mvcNinject is a lightweight and a great dependency injection framework for .NET.  Ninject is a great choice of dependency injection framework when building ASP.NET MVC applications. Ninject.Web.Mvc is an extension for ninject which providing integration with ASP.NET MVC.Controller constructors and dependencies of NerdDinner application Listing 1 – Constructor of DinnersController  public DinnersController(IDinnerRepository repository) {     dinnerRepository = repository; }  Listing 2 – Constrcutor of AccountControllerpublic AccountController(IFormsAuthentication formsAuth, IMembershipService service) {     FormsAuth = formsAuth ?? new FormsAuthenticationService();     MembershipService = service ?? new AccountMembershipService(); }  Listing 3 – Constructor of AccountMembership – Concrete class of IMembershipService public AccountMembershipService(MembershipProvider provider) {     _provider = provider ?? Membership.Provider; }    Dependencies of NerdDinnerDinnersController, RSVPController SearchController and ServicesController have a dependency with IDinnerRepositiry. The concrete implementation of IDinnerRepositiry is DinnerRepositiry. AccountController has dependencies with IFormsAuthentication and IMembershipService. The concrete implementation of IFormsAuthentication is FormsAuthenticationService and the concrete implementation of IMembershipService is AccountMembershipService. The AccountMembershipService has a dependency with ASP.NET Membership Provider. Dependency Injection in NerdDinner using NinjectThe below steps will configure Ninject to apply controller injection in NerdDinner application.Step 1 – Add reference for NinjectOpen the  NerdDinner application and add  reference to Ninject.dll and Ninject.Web.Mvc.dll. Both are available from http://github.com/enkari/ninject and http://github.com/enkari/ninject.web.mvcStep 2 – Extend HttpApplication with NinjectHttpApplication Ninject.Web.Mvc extension allows integration between the Ninject and ASP.NET MVC. For this, you have to extend your HttpApplication with NinjectHttpApplication. Open the Global.asax.cs and inherit your MVC application from  NinjectHttpApplication instead of HttpApplication.   public class MvcApplication : NinjectHttpApplication Then the Application_Start method should be replace with OnApplicationStarted method. Inside the OnApplicationStarted method, call the RegisterAllControllersIn() method.   protected override void OnApplicationStarted() {     AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas();     RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes);     ViewEngines.Engines.Clear();     ViewEngines.Engines.Add(new MobileCapableWebFormViewEngine());     RegisterAllControllersIn(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly()); }  The RegisterAllControllersIn method will enables to activating all controllers through Ninject in the assembly you have supplied .We are passing the current assembly as parameter for RegisterAllControllersIn() method. Now we can expose dependencies of controller constructors and properties to request injectionsStep 3 – Create Ninject ModulesWe can configure your dependency injection mapping information using Ninject Modules.Modules just need to implement the INinjectModule interface, but most should extend the NinjectModule class for simplicity. internal class ServiceModule : NinjectModule {     public override void Load()     {                    Bind<IFormsAuthentication>().To<FormsAuthenticationService>();         Bind<IMembershipService>().To<AccountMembershipService>();                  Bind<MembershipProvider>().ToConstant(Membership.Provider);         Bind<IDinnerRepository>().To<DinnerRepository>();     } } The above Binding inforamtion specified in the Load method tells the Ninject container that, to inject instance of DinnerRepositiry when there is a request for IDinnerRepositiry and  inject instance of FormsAuthenticationService when there is a request for IFormsAuthentication and inject instance of AccountMembershipService when there is a request for IMembershipService. The AccountMembershipService class has a dependency with ASP.NET Membership provider. So we configure that inject the instance of Membership Provider. When configuring the binding information, you can specify the object scope in you application.There are four built-in scopes available in Ninject:Transient  -  A new instance of the type will be created each time one is requested. (This is the default scope). Binding method is .InTransientScope()   Singleton - Only a single instance of the type will be created, and the same instance will be returned for each subsequent request. Binding method is .InSingletonScope()Thread -  One instance of the type will be created per thread. Binding method is .InThreadScope() Request -  One instance of the type will be created per web request, and will be destroyed when the request ends. Binding method is .InRequestScope() Step 4 – Configure the Ninject KernelOnce you create NinjectModule, you load them into a container called the kernel. To request an instance of a type from Ninject, you call the Get() extension method. We can configure the kernel, through the CreateKernel method in the Global.asax.cs. protected override IKernel CreateKernel() {     var modules = new INinjectModule[]     {         new ServiceModule()     };       return new StandardKernel(modules); } Here we are loading the Ninject Module (ServiceModule class created in the step 3)  onto the container called the kernel for performing dependency injection.Source CodeYou can download the source code from http://nerddinneraddons.codeplex.com. I just put the modified source code onto CodePlex repository. The repository will update with more add-ons for the NerdDinner application.

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  • Persisting model state in ASP.NET MVC using Serialize HTMLHelper

    - by shiju
    ASP.NET MVC 2 futures assembly provides a HTML helper method Serialize that can be use for persisting your model object. The Serialize  helper method will serialize the model object and will persist it in a hidden field in the HTML form. The Serialize  helper is very useful when situations like you are making multi-step wizard where a single model class is using for all steps in the wizard. For each step you want to retain the model object's whole state.The below is serializing our model object. The model object should be a Serializable class in order to work with Serialize helper method. <% using (Html.BeginForm("Register","User")) {%><%= Html.Serialize("User",Model) %> This will generate hidden field with name "user" and the value will the serialized format of our model object.In the controller action, you can place the DeserializeAttribute in the action method parameter. [HttpPost]               public ActionResult Register([DeserializeAttribute] User user, FormCollection userForm) {     TryUpdateModel(user, userForm.ToValueProvider());     //To Do } In the above action method you will get the same model object that you serialized in your view template. We are updating the User model object with the form field values.

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  • Dependency Injection in ASP.NET Web API using Autofac

    - by shiju
    In this post, I will demonstrate how to use Dependency Injection in ASP.NET Web API using Autofac in an ASP.NET MVC 4 app. The new ASP.NET Web API is a great framework for building HTTP services. The Autofac IoC container provides the better integration with ASP.NET Web API for applying dependency injection. The NuGet package Autofac.WebApi provides the  Dependency Injection support for ASP.NET Web API services. Using Autofac in ASP.NET Web API The following command in the Package Manager console will install Autofac.WebApi package into your ASP.NET Web API application. PM > Install-Package Autofac.WebApi The following code block imports the necessary namespaces for using Autofact.WebApi using Autofac; using Autofac.Integration.WebApi; .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } The following code in the Bootstrapper class configures the Autofac. 1: public static class Bootstrapper 2: { 3: public static void Run() 4: { 5: SetAutofacWebAPI(); 6: } 7: private static void SetAutofacWebAPI() 8: { 9: var configuration = GlobalConfiguration.Configuration; 10: var builder = new ContainerBuilder(); 11: // Configure the container 12: builder.ConfigureWebApi(configuration); 13: // Register API controllers using assembly scanning. 14: builder.RegisterApiControllers(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly()); 15: builder.RegisterType<DefaultCommandBus>().As<ICommandBus>() 16: .InstancePerApiRequest(); 17: builder.RegisterType<UnitOfWork>().As<IUnitOfWork>() 18: .InstancePerApiRequest(); 19: builder.RegisterType<DatabaseFactory>().As<IDatabaseFactory>() 20: .InstancePerApiRequest(); 21: builder.RegisterAssemblyTypes(typeof(CategoryRepository) 22: .Assembly).Where(t => t.Name.EndsWith("Repository")) 23: .AsImplementedInterfaces().InstancePerApiRequest(); 24: var services = Assembly.Load("EFMVC.Domain"); 25: builder.RegisterAssemblyTypes(services) 26: .AsClosedTypesOf(typeof(ICommandHandler<>)) 27: .InstancePerApiRequest(); 28: builder.RegisterAssemblyTypes(services) 29: .AsClosedTypesOf(typeof(IValidationHandler<>)) 30: .InstancePerApiRequest(); 31: var container = builder.Build(); 32: // Set the WebApi dependency resolver. 33: var resolver = new AutofacWebApiDependencyResolver(container); 34: configuration.ServiceResolver.SetResolver(resolver); 35: } 36: } .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } The RegisterApiControllers method will scan the given assembly and register the all ApiController classes. This method will look for types that derive from IHttpController with name convention end with “Controller”. The InstancePerApiRequest method specifies the life time of the component for once per API controller invocation. The GlobalConfiguration.Configuration provides a ServiceResolver class which can be use set dependency resolver for ASP.NET Web API. In our example, we are using AutofacWebApiDependencyResolver class provided by Autofac.WebApi to set the dependency resolver. The Run method of Bootstrapper class is calling from Application_Start method of Global.asax.cs. 1: protected void Application_Start() 2: { 3: AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas(); 4: RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilters.Filters); 5: RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes); 6: BundleTable.Bundles.RegisterTemplateBundles(); 7: //Call Autofac DI configurations 8: Bootstrapper.Run(); 9: } .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } Autofac.Mvc4 The Autofac framework’s integration with ASP.NET MVC has updated for ASP.NET MVC 4. The NuGet package Autofac.Mvc4 provides the dependency injection support for ASP.NET MVC 4. There is not any syntax change between Autofac.Mvc3 and Autofac.Mvc4 Source Code I have updated my EFMVC app with Autofac.WebApi for applying dependency injection for it’s ASP.NET Web API services. EFMVC app also updated to Autofac.Mvc4 for it’s ASP.NET MVC 4 web app. The above code sample is taken from the EFMVC app. You can download the source code of EFMVC app from http://efmvc.codeplex.com/

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  • Dependency Injection in ASP.NET MVC NerdDinner App using Unity 2.0

    - by shiju
    In my previous post Dependency Injection in ASP.NET MVC NerdDinner App using Ninject, we did dependency injection in NerdDinner application using Ninject. In this post, I demonstrate how to apply Dependency Injection in ASP.NET MVC NerdDinner App using Microsoft Unity Application Block (Unity) v 2.0.Unity 2.0Unity 2.0 is available on Codeplex at http://unity.codeplex.com . In earlier versions of Unity, the ObjectBuilder generic dependency injection mechanism, was distributed as a separate assembly, is now integrated with Unity core assembly. So you no longer need to reference the ObjectBuilder assembly in your applications. Two additional Built-In Lifetime Managers - HierarchicalifetimeManager and PerResolveLifetimeManager have been added to Unity 2.0.Dependency Injection in NerdDinner using UnityIn my Ninject post on NerdDinner, we have discussed the interfaces and concrete types of NerdDinner application and how to inject dependencies controller constructors. The following steps will configure Unity 2.0 to apply controller injection in NerdDinner application. Step 1 – Add reference for Unity Application BlockOpen the NerdDinner solution and add  reference to Microsoft.Practices.Unity.dll and Microsoft.Practices.Unity.Configuration.dllYou can download Unity from at http://unity.codeplex.com .Step 2 – Controller Factory for Unity The controller factory is responsible for creating controller instances.We extend the built in default controller factory with our own factory for working Unity with ASP.NET MVC. public class UnityControllerFactory : DefaultControllerFactory {     protected override IController GetControllerInstance(RequestContext reqContext, Type controllerType)     {         IController controller;         if (controllerType == null)             throw new HttpException(                     404, String.Format(                         "The controller for path '{0}' could not be found" +         "or it does not implement IController.",                     reqContext.HttpContext.Request.Path));           if (!typeof(IController).IsAssignableFrom(controllerType))             throw new ArgumentException(                     string.Format(                         "Type requested is not a controller: {0}",                         controllerType.Name),                         "controllerType");         try         {             controller = MvcUnityContainer.Container.Resolve(controllerType)                             as IController;         }         catch (Exception ex)         {             throw new InvalidOperationException(String.Format(                                     "Error resolving controller {0}",                                     controllerType.Name), ex);         }         return controller;     }   }   public static class MvcUnityContainer {     public static IUnityContainer Container { get; set; } }  Step 3 – Register Types and Set Controller Factory private void ConfigureUnity() {     //Create UnityContainer               IUnityContainer container = new UnityContainer()     .RegisterType<IFormsAuthentication, FormsAuthenticationService>()     .RegisterType<IMembershipService, AccountMembershipService>()     .RegisterInstance<MembershipProvider>(Membership.Provider)     .RegisterType<IDinnerRepository, DinnerRepository>();     //Set container for Controller Factory     MvcUnityContainer.Container = container;     //Set Controller Factory as UnityControllerFactory     ControllerBuilder.Current.SetControllerFactory(                         typeof(UnityControllerFactory));            } Unity 2.0 provides a fluent interface for type configuration. Now you can call all the methods in a single statement.The above Unity configuration specified in the ConfigureUnity method tells that, to inject instance of DinnerRepositiry when there is a request for IDinnerRepositiry and  inject instance of FormsAuthenticationService when there is a request for IFormsAuthentication and inject instance of AccountMembershipService when there is a request for IMembershipService. The AccountMembershipService class has a dependency with ASP.NET Membership provider. So we configure that inject the instance of Membership Provider.After the registering the types, we set UnityControllerFactory as the current controller factory. //Set container for Controller Factory MvcUnityContainer.Container = container; //Set Controller Factory as UnityControllerFactory ControllerBuilder.Current.SetControllerFactory(                     typeof(UnityControllerFactory)); When you register a type  by using the RegisterType method, the default behavior is for the container to use a transient lifetime manager. It creates a new instance of the registered, mapped, or requested type each time you call the Resolve or ResolveAll method or when the dependency mechanism injects instances into other classes. The following are the LifetimeManagers provided by Unity 2.0ContainerControlledLifetimeManager - Implements a singleton behavior for objects. The object is disposed of when you dispose of the container.ExternallyControlledLifetimeManager - Implements a singleton behavior but the container doesn't hold a reference to object which will be disposed of when out of scope.HierarchicalifetimeManager - Implements a singleton behavior for objects. However, child containers don't share instances with parents.PerResolveLifetimeManager - Implements a behavior similar to the transient lifetime manager except that instances are reused across build-ups of the object graph.PerThreadLifetimeManager - Implements a singleton behavior for objects but limited to the current thread.TransientLifetimeManager - Returns a new instance of the requested type for each call. (default behavior)We can also create custome lifetime manager for Unity container. The following code creating a custom lifetime manager to store container in the current HttpContext. public class HttpContextLifetimeManager<T> : LifetimeManager, IDisposable {     public override object GetValue()     {         return HttpContext.Current.Items[typeof(T).AssemblyQualifiedName];     }     public override void RemoveValue()     {         HttpContext.Current.Items.Remove(typeof(T).AssemblyQualifiedName);     }     public override void SetValue(object newValue)     {         HttpContext.Current.Items[typeof(T).AssemblyQualifiedName]             = newValue;     }     public void Dispose()     {         RemoveValue();     } }  Step 4 – Modify Global.asax.cs for configure Unity container In the Application_Start event, we call the ConfigureUnity method for configuring the Unity container and set controller factory as UnityControllerFactory void Application_Start() {     RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes);       ViewEngines.Engines.Clear();     ViewEngines.Engines.Add(new MobileCapableWebFormViewEngine());     ConfigureUnity(); }Download CodeYou can download the modified NerdDinner code from http://nerddinneraddons.codeplex.com

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  • ASP.NET Universal Providers (System.Web.Providers)

    - by shiju
    Microsoft Web Platform and Tools (WPT)  team has announced the release of ASP.NET Universal Providers that allows you to use Session, Membership, Roles and Profile providers along with all editions of SQL Server 2005 and later. This support includes Sql Server Express, Sql Server CE and Sql Azure.ASP.NET Universal Providers is available as a NuGet package and the following command will install the package via NuGet. PM> Install-Package System.Web.Providers The support for Sql Azure will help the Azure developers to easily migrate their ASP.NET applications to Azure platform. System.Web.Providers.DefaultMembershipProvider is the equivalent name for the current SqlMembershipProvider and you can put right connectionstring name in the configuration and it will work with any version of Sql Server based on the copnnection string. System.Web.Providers.DefaultProfileProvider is the equivalent provider name for existing System.Web.Profile.SqlProfileProvider and  System.Web.Providers.DefaultRoleProvider is the equivalent provider name for the existing System.Web.Security.SqlRoleProvider.

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  • ASP.NET MVC ModelCopier

    - by shiju
     In my earlier post ViewModel patten and AutoMapper in ASP.NET MVC application, We have discussed the need for  View Model objects and how to map values between View Model objects and Domain model objects using AutoMapper. ASP.NET MVC futures assembly provides a static class ModelCopier that can also use for copying values between View Model objects and Domain model objects. ModelCopier class has two static methods - CopyCollection and CopyModel.CopyCollection method would copy values between two collection objects and CopyModel would copy values between two model objects. <PRE class="c#" name="code"> var expense=new Expense(); ModelCopier.CopyModel(expenseViewModel, expense);</PRE>The above code copying values from expenseViewModel object to  expense object.                For simple mapping between model objects, you can use ModelCopier but for complex scenarios, I highly recommending to using AutoMapper for mapping between model objects.

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  • Persisting model state in ASP.NET MVC using Serialize HTMLHelper

    - by shiju
    ASP.NET MVC 2 futures assembly provides a HTML helper method Serialize that can be use for persisting your model object. The Serialize  helper method will serialize the model object and will persist it in a hidden field in the HTML form. The Serialize  helper is very useful when situations like you are making multi-step wizard where a single model class is using for all steps in the wizard. For each step you want to retain the model object's whole state.The below is serializing our model object. The model object should be a Serializable class in order to work with Serialize helper method. <% using (Html.BeginForm("Register","User")) {%><%= Html.Serialize("User",Model) %> This will generate hidden field with name "user" and the value will the serialized format of our model object.In the controller action, you can place the DeserializeAttribute in the action method parameter. [HttpPost]               public ActionResult Register([DeserializeAttribute] User user, FormCollection userForm) {     TryUpdateModel(user, userForm.ToValueProvider());     //To Do } In the above action method you will get the same model object that you serialized in your view template. We are updating the User model object with the form field values.

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  • Installing ASP.NET MVC 2 RTM on Visual Studio 2010 RC

    - by shiju
    Visual Studio 2010 RC is built against the ASP.NET MVC 2 RC version but you easily install ASP.NET MVC 2 RTM on the Visual Studio 2010 RC. For installing ASP.NET MVC 2 RTM, do the following steps 1) Uninstall "ASP.NET MVC 2 ". 2) Uninstall "Microsoft ASP.NET MVC 2 – Visual Studio 2008 Tools". 3) Install the new ASP.NET MVC 2 RTM version for Visual Studio 2008 SP1. The above steps will enable you to use ASP.NET MVC 2 RTM version on the Visual Studio 2010 RC. Note : Don't uninstall Microsoft ASP.NET MVC 2 – Visual Studio 2010 Tools

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  • ASP.NET MVC Case Studies

    - by shiju
     The below are the some of the case studies of ASP.NET MVC Jwaala - Online Banking Solution Benefits after ASP.NET MVC Replaces Ruby on Rails, Linux http://www.microsoft.com/casestudies/Case_Study_Detail.aspx?casestudyid=4000006675 Stack Overflow - Developers See Faster Web Coding, Better Performance with Model-View-Controller http://www.microsoft.com/casestudies/Case_Study_Detail.aspx?casestudyid=4000006676 Kelley Blue Book - Pioneer Provider of Vehicle-Pricing Information Uses Technology to Expand Reach http://www.microsoft.com/casestudies/Case_Study_Detail.aspx?casestudyid=4000006272 

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  • Microsoft TypeScript : A Typed Superset of JavaScript

    - by shiju
    JavaScript is gradually becoming a ubiquitous programming language for the web, and the popularity of JavaScript is increasing day by day. Earlier, JavaScript was just a language for browser. But now, we can write JavaScript apps for browser, server and mobile. With the advent of Node.js, you can build scalable, high performance apps on the server with JavaScript. But many developers, especially developers who are working with static type languages, are hating the JavaScript language due to the lack of structuring and the maintainability problems of JavaScript. Microsoft TypeScript is trying to solve some problems of JavaScript when we are building scalable JavaScript apps. Microsoft TypeScript TypeScript is Microsoft's solution for writing scalable JavaScript programs with the help of Static Types, Interfaces, Modules and Classes along with greater tooling support. TypeScript is a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript. This would be more productive for developers who are coming from static type languages. You can write scalable JavaScript  apps in TypeScript with more productive and more maintainable manner, and later you can compiles to plain JavaScript which will be run on any browser and any OS. TypeScript will work with browser based JavaScript apps and JavaScript apps that following CommonJS specification. You can use TypeScript for building HTML 5 apps, Node.JS apps, WinRT apps. TypeScript is providing better tooling support with Visual Studio, Sublime Text, Vi, Emacs. Microsoft has open sourced its TypeScript languages on CodePlex at http://typescript.codeplex.com/    Install TypeScript You can install TypeScript compiler as a Node.js package via the NPM or you can install as a Visual Studio 2012 plug-in which will enable you better tooling support within the Visual Studio IDE. Since TypeScript is distributed as a Node.JS package, and it can be installed on other OS such as Linux and MacOS. The following command will install TypeScript compiler via an npm package for node.js npm install –g typescript TypeScript provides a Visual Studio 2012 plug-in as MSI file which will install TypeScript and also provides great tooling support within the Visual Studio, that lets the developers to write TypeScript apps with greater productivity and better maintainability. You can download the Visual Studio plug-in from here Building JavaScript  apps with TypeScript You can write typed version of JavaScript programs with TypeScript and then compiles it to plain JavaScript code. The beauty of the TypeScript is that it is already JavaScript and normal JavaScript programs are valid TypeScript programs, which means that you can write normal  JavaScript code and can use typed version of JavaScript whenever you want. TypeScript files are using extension .ts and this will be compiled using a compiler named tsc. The following is a sample program written in  TypeScript greeter.ts 1: class Greeter { 2: greeting: string; 3: constructor (message: string) { 4: this.greeting = message; 5: } 6: greet() { 7: return "Hello, " + this.greeting; 8: } 9: } 10:   11: var greeter = new Greeter("world"); 12:   13: var button = document.createElement('button') 14: button.innerText = "Say Hello" 15: button.onclick = function() { 16: alert(greeter.greet()) 17: } 18:   19: document.body.appendChild(button) .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } The above program is compiling with the TypeScript compiler as shown in the below picture The TypeScript compiler will generate a JavaScript file after compiling the TypeScript program. If your TypeScript programs having any reference to other TypeScript files, it will automatically generate JavaScript files for the each referenced files. The following code block shows the compiled version of plain JavaScript  for the above greeter.ts greeter.js 1: var Greeter = (function () { 2: function Greeter(message) { 3: this.greeting = message; 4: } 5: Greeter.prototype.greet = function () { 6: return "Hello, " + this.greeting; 7: }; 8: return Greeter; 9: })(); 10: var greeter = new Greeter("world"); 11: var button = document.createElement('button'); 12: button.innerText = "Say Hello"; 13: button.onclick = function () { 14: alert(greeter.greet()); 15: }; 16: document.body.appendChild(button); .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } Tooling Support with Visual Studio TypeScript is providing a plug-in for Visual Studio which will provide an excellent support for writing TypeScript  programs within the Visual Studio. The following screen shot shows the Visual Studio template for TypeScript apps   The following are the few screen shots of Visual Studio IDE for TypeScript apps. Summary TypeScript is Microsoft's solution for writing scalable JavaScript apps which will solve lot of problems involved in larger JavaScript apps. I hope that this solution will attract lot of developers who are really looking for writing maintainable structured code in JavaScript, without losing any productivity. TypeScript lets developers to write JavaScript apps with the help of Static Types, Interfaces, Modules and Classes and also providing better productivity. I am a passionate developer on Node.JS and would definitely try to use TypeScript for building Node.JS apps on the Windows Azure cloud. I am really excited about to writing Node.JS apps by using TypeScript, from my favorite development IDE Visual Studio. You can follow me on twitter at @shijucv

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  • EFMVC Migrated to .NET 4.5, Visual Studio 2012, ASP.NET MVC 4 and EF 5 Code First

    - by shiju
    I have just migrated my EFMVC app from .NET 4.0 and ASP.NET MVC 4 RC to .NET 4.5, ASP.NET MVC 4 RTM and Entity Framework 5 Code First. In this release, the EFMVC solution is built with Visual Studio 2012 RTM. The migration process was very smooth and did not made any major changes other than adding simple unit tests with NUnit and Moq. I will add more unit tests on later and will also modify the existing solution. Source Code You can download the source code from http://efmvc.codeplex.com/

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  • NoSQL with RavenDB and ASP.NET MVC - Part 2

    - by shiju
    In my previous post, we have discussed on how to work with RavenDB document database in an ASP.NET MVC application. We have setup RavenDB for our ASP.NET MVC application and did basic CRUD operations against a simple domain entity. In this post, let’s discuss on domain entity with deep object graph and how to query against RavenDB documents using Indexes.Let's create two domain entities for our demo ASP.NET MVC appplication  public class Category {       public string Id { get; set; }     [Required(ErrorMessage = "Name Required")]     [StringLength(25, ErrorMessage = "Must be less than 25 characters")]     public string Name { get; set;}     public string Description { get; set; }     public List<Expense> Expenses { get; set; }       public Category()     {         Expenses = new List<Expense>();     } }    public class Expense {       public string Id { get; set; }     public Category Category { get; set; }     public string  Transaction { get; set; }     public DateTime Date { get; set; }     public double Amount { get; set; }   }  We have two domain entities - Category and Expense. A single category contains a list of expense transactions and every expense transaction should have a Category.Let's create  ASP.NET MVC view model  for Expense transaction public class ExpenseViewModel {     public string Id { get; set; }       public string CategoryId { get; set; }       [Required(ErrorMessage = "Transaction Required")]            public string Transaction { get; set; }       [Required(ErrorMessage = "Date Required")]            public DateTime Date { get; set; }       [Required(ErrorMessage = "Amount Required")]     public double Amount { get; set; }       public IEnumerable<SelectListItem> Category { get; set; } } Let's create a contract type for Expense Repository  public interface IExpenseRepository {     Expense Load(string id);     IEnumerable<Expense> GetExpenseTransactions(DateTime startDate,DateTime endDate);     void Save(Expense expense,string categoryId);     void Delete(string id);  } Let's create a concrete type for Expense Repository for handling CRUD operations. public class ExpenseRepository : IExpenseRepository {   private IDocumentSession session; public ExpenseRepository() {         session = MvcApplication.CurrentSession; } public Expense Load(string id) {     return session.Load<Expense>(id); } public IEnumerable<Expense> GetExpenseTransactions(DateTime startDate, DateTime endDate) {             //Querying using the Index name "ExpenseTransactions"     //filtering with dates     var expenses = session.LuceneQuery<Expense>("ExpenseTransactions")         .WaitForNonStaleResults()         .Where(exp => exp.Date >= startDate && exp.Date <= endDate)         .ToArray();     return expenses; } public void Save(Expense expense,string categoryId) {     var category = session.Load<Category>(categoryId);     if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(expense.Id))     {         //new expense transaction         expense.Category = category;         session.Store(expense);     }     else     {         //modifying an existing expense transaction         var expenseToEdit = Load(expense.Id);         //Copy values to  expenseToEdit         ModelCopier.CopyModel(expense, expenseToEdit);         //set category object         expenseToEdit.Category = category;       }     //save changes     session.SaveChanges(); } public void Delete(string id) {     var expense = Load(id);     session.Delete<Expense>(expense);     session.SaveChanges(); }   }  Insert/Update Expense Transaction The Save method is used for both insert a new expense record and modifying an existing expense transaction. For a new expense transaction, we store the expense object with associated category into document session object and load the existing expense object and assign values to it for editing a existing record.  public void Save(Expense expense,string categoryId) {     var category = session.Load<Category>(categoryId);     if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(expense.Id))     {         //new expense transaction         expense.Category = category;         session.Store(expense);     }     else     {         //modifying an existing expense transaction         var expenseToEdit = Load(expense.Id);         //Copy values to  expenseToEdit         ModelCopier.CopyModel(expense, expenseToEdit);         //set category object         expenseToEdit.Category = category;       }     //save changes     session.SaveChanges(); } Querying Expense transactions   public IEnumerable<Expense> GetExpenseTransactions(DateTime startDate, DateTime endDate) {             //Querying using the Index name "ExpenseTransactions"     //filtering with dates     var expenses = session.LuceneQuery<Expense>("ExpenseTransactions")         .WaitForNonStaleResults()         .Where(exp => exp.Date >= startDate && exp.Date <= endDate)         .ToArray();     return expenses; }  The GetExpenseTransactions method returns expense transactions using a LINQ query expression with a Date comparison filter. The Lucene Query is using a index named "ExpenseTransactions" for getting the result set. In RavenDB, Indexes are LINQ queries stored in the RavenDB server and would be  executed on the background and will perform query against the JSON documents. Indexes will be working with a lucene query expression or a set operation. Indexes are composed using a Map and Reduce function. Check out Ayende's blog post on Map/Reduce We can create index using RavenDB web admin tool as well as programmitically using its Client API. The below shows the screen shot of creating index using web admin tool. We can also create Indexes using Raven Cleint API as shown in the following code documentStore.DatabaseCommands.PutIndex("ExpenseTransactions",     new IndexDefinition<Expense,Expense>() {     Map = Expenses => from exp in Expenses                     select new { exp.Date } });  In the Map function, we used a Linq expression as shown in the following from exp in docs.Expensesselect new { exp.Date };We have not used a Reduce function for the above index. A Reduce function is useful while performing aggregate functions based on the results from the Map function. Indexes can be use with set operations of RavenDB.SET OperationsUnlike other document databases, RavenDB supports set based operations that lets you to perform updates, deletes and inserts to the bulk_docs endpoint of RavenDB. For doing this, you just pass a query to a Index as shown in the following commandDELETE http://localhost:8080/bulk_docs/ExpenseTransactions?query=Date:20100531The above command using the Index named "ExpenseTransactions" for querying the documents with Date filter and  will delete all the documents that match the query criteria. The above command is equivalent of the following queryDELETE FROM ExpensesWHERE Date='2010-05-31' Controller & ActionsWe have created Expense Repository class for performing CRUD operations for the Expense transactions. Let's create a controller class for handling expense transactions.   public class ExpenseController : Controller { private ICategoryRepository categoyRepository; private IExpenseRepository expenseRepository; public ExpenseController(ICategoryRepository categoyRepository, IExpenseRepository expenseRepository) {     this.categoyRepository = categoyRepository;     this.expenseRepository = expenseRepository; } //Get Expense transactions based on dates public ActionResult Index(DateTime? StartDate, DateTime? EndDate) {     //If date is not passed, take current month's first and last dte     DateTime dtNow;     dtNow = DateTime.Today;     if (!StartDate.HasValue)     {         StartDate = new DateTime(dtNow.Year, dtNow.Month, 1);         EndDate = StartDate.Value.AddMonths(1).AddDays(-1);     }     //take last date of startdate's month, if endate is not passed     if (StartDate.HasValue && !EndDate.HasValue)     {         EndDate = (new DateTime(StartDate.Value.Year, StartDate.Value.Month, 1)).AddMonths(1).AddDays(-1);     }       var expenses = expenseRepository.GetExpenseTransactions(StartDate.Value, EndDate.Value);     if (Request.IsAjaxRequest())     {           return PartialView("ExpenseList", expenses);     }     ViewData.Add("StartDate", StartDate.Value.ToShortDateString());     ViewData.Add("EndDate", EndDate.Value.ToShortDateString());             return View(expenses);            }   // GET: /Expense/Edit public ActionResult Edit(string id) {       var expenseModel = new ExpenseViewModel();     var expense = expenseRepository.Load(id);     ModelCopier.CopyModel(expense, expenseModel);     var categories = categoyRepository.GetCategories();     expenseModel.Category = categories.ToSelectListItems(expense.Category.Id.ToString());                    return View("Save", expenseModel);          }   // // GET: /Expense/Create   public ActionResult Create() {     var expenseModel = new ExpenseViewModel();               var categories = categoyRepository.GetCategories();     expenseModel.Category = categories.ToSelectListItems("-1");     expenseModel.Date = DateTime.Today;     return View("Save", expenseModel); }   // // POST: /Expense/Save // Insert/Update Expense Tansaction [HttpPost] public ActionResult Save(ExpenseViewModel expenseViewModel) {     try     {         if (!ModelState.IsValid)         {               var categories = categoyRepository.GetCategories();                 expenseViewModel.Category = categories.ToSelectListItems(expenseViewModel.CategoryId);                               return View("Save", expenseViewModel);         }           var expense=new Expense();         ModelCopier.CopyModel(expenseViewModel, expense);          expenseRepository.Save(expense, expenseViewModel.CategoryId);                       return RedirectToAction("Index");     }     catch     {         return View();     } } //Delete a Expense Transaction public ActionResult Delete(string id) {     expenseRepository.Delete(id);     return RedirectToAction("Index");     }     }     Download the Source - You can download the source code from http://ravenmvc.codeplex.com

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  • Writing Unit Tests for ASP.NET Web API Controller

    - by shiju
    In this blog post, I will write unit tests for a ASP.NET Web API controller in the EFMVC reference application. Let me introduce the EFMVC app, If you haven't heard about EFMVC. EFMVC is a simple app, developed as a reference implementation for demonstrating ASP.NET MVC, EF Code First, ASP.NET Web API, Domain-Driven Design (DDD), Test-Driven Development (DDD). The current version is built with ASP.NET MVC 4, EF Code First 5, ASP.NET Web API, Autofac, AutoMapper, Nunit and Moq. All unit tests were written with Nunit and Moq. You can download the latest version of the reference app from http://efmvc.codeplex.com/ Unit Test for HTTP Get Let’s write a unit test class for verifying the behaviour of a ASP.NET Web API controller named CategoryController. Let’s define mock implementation for Repository class, and a Command Bus that is used for executing write operations.  [TestFixture] public class CategoryApiControllerTest { private Mock<ICategoryRepository> categoryRepository; private Mock<ICommandBus> commandBus; [SetUp] public void SetUp() {     categoryRepository = new Mock<ICategoryRepository>();     commandBus = new Mock<ICommandBus>(); } The code block below provides the unit test for a HTTP Get operation. [Test] public void Get_All_Returns_AllCategory() {     // Arrange        IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> fakeCategories = GetCategories();     categoryRepository.Setup(x => x.GetCategoryWithExpenses()).Returns(fakeCategories);     CategoryController controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage()                 {                     Properties = { { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, new HttpConfiguration() } }                 }     };     // Act     var categories = controller.Get();     // Assert     Assert.IsNotNull(categories, "Result is null");     Assert.IsInstanceOf(typeof(IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense>),categories, "Wrong Model");             Assert.AreEqual(3, categories.Count(), "Got wrong number of Categories"); }        The GetCategories method is provided below: private static IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> GetCategories() {     IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> fakeCategories = new List<CategoryWithExpense> {     new CategoryWithExpense {CategoryId=1, CategoryName = "Test1", Description="Test1Desc", TotalExpenses=1000},     new CategoryWithExpense {CategoryId=2, CategoryName = "Test2", Description="Test2Desc",TotalExpenses=2000},     new CategoryWithExpense { CategoryId=3, CategoryName = "Test3", Description="Test3Desc",TotalExpenses=3000}       }.AsEnumerable();     return fakeCategories; } In the unit test method Get_All_Returns_AllCategory, we specify setup on the mocked type ICategoryrepository, for a call to GetCategoryWithExpenses method returns dummy data. We create an instance of the ApiController, where we have specified the Request property of the ApiController since the Request property is used to create a new HttpResponseMessage that will provide the appropriate HTTP status code along with response content data. Unit Tests are using for specifying the behaviour of components so that we have specified that Get operation will use the model type IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> for sending the Content data. The implementation of HTTP Get in the CategoryController is provided below: public IQueryable<CategoryWithExpense> Get() {     var categories = categoryRepository.GetCategoryWithExpenses().AsQueryable();     return categories; } Unit Test for HTTP Post The following are the behaviours we are going to implement for the HTTP Post: A successful HTTP Post  operation should return HTTP status code Created An empty Category should return HTTP status code BadRequest A successful HTTP Post operation should provide correct Location header information in the response for the newly created resource. Writing unit test for HTTP Post is required more information than we write for HTTP Get. In the HTTP Post implementation, we will call to Url.Link for specifying the header Location of Response as shown in below code block. var response = Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.Created, category); string uri = Url.Link("DefaultApi", new { id = category.CategoryId }); response.Headers.Location = new Uri(uri); return response; While we are executing Url.Link from unit tests, we have to specify HttpRouteData information from the unit test method. Otherwise, Url.Link will get a null value. The code block below shows the unit tests for specifying the behaviours for the HTTP Post operation. [Test] public void Post_Category_Returns_CreatedStatusCode() {     // Arrange        commandBus.Setup(c => c.Submit(It.IsAny<CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>())).Returns(new CommandResult(true));     Mapper.CreateMap<CategoryFormModel, CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>();          var httpConfiguration = new HttpConfiguration();     WebApiConfig.Register(httpConfiguration);     var httpRouteData = new HttpRouteData(httpConfiguration.Routes["DefaultApi"],         new HttpRouteValueDictionary { { "controller", "category" } });     var controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage(HttpMethod.Post, "http://localhost/api/category/")         {             Properties =             {                 { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, httpConfiguration },                 { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpRouteDataKey, httpRouteData }             }         }     };     // Act     CategoryModel category = new CategoryModel();     category.CategoryId = 1;     category.CategoryName = "Mock Category";     var response = controller.Post(category);               // Assert     Assert.AreEqual(HttpStatusCode.Created, response.StatusCode);     var newCategory = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<CategoryModel>(response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result);     Assert.AreEqual(string.Format("http://localhost/api/category/{0}", newCategory.CategoryId), response.Headers.Location.ToString()); } [Test] public void Post_EmptyCategory_Returns_BadRequestStatusCode() {     // Arrange        commandBus.Setup(c => c.Submit(It.IsAny<CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>())).Returns(new CommandResult(true));     Mapper.CreateMap<CategoryFormModel, CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>();     var httpConfiguration = new HttpConfiguration();     WebApiConfig.Register(httpConfiguration);     var httpRouteData = new HttpRouteData(httpConfiguration.Routes["DefaultApi"],         new HttpRouteValueDictionary { { "controller", "category" } });     var controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage(HttpMethod.Post, "http://localhost/api/category/")         {             Properties =             {                 { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, httpConfiguration },                 { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpRouteDataKey, httpRouteData }             }         }     };     // Act     CategoryModel category = new CategoryModel();     category.CategoryId = 0;     category.CategoryName = "";     // The ASP.NET pipeline doesn't run, so validation don't run.     controller.ModelState.AddModelError("", "mock error message");     var response = controller.Post(category);     // Assert     Assert.AreEqual(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, response.StatusCode);   } In the above code block, we have written two unit methods, Post_Category_Returns_CreatedStatusCode and Post_EmptyCategory_Returns_BadRequestStatusCode. The unit test method Post_Category_Returns_CreatedStatusCode  verifies the behaviour 1 and 3, that we have defined in the beginning of the section “Unit Test for HTTP Post”. The unit test method Post_EmptyCategory_Returns_BadRequestStatusCode verifies the behaviour 2. For extracting the data from response, we call Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result of HttpResponseMessage object and deserializeit it with Json Convertor. The implementation of HTTP Post in the CategoryController is provided below: // POST /api/category public HttpResponseMessage Post(CategoryModel category) {       if (ModelState.IsValid)     {         var command = new CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand(category.CategoryId, category.CategoryName, category.Description);         var result = commandBus.Submit(command);         if (result.Success)         {                               var response = Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.Created, category);             string uri = Url.Link("DefaultApi", new { id = category.CategoryId });             response.Headers.Location = new Uri(uri);             return response;         }     }     else     {         return Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, ModelState);     }     throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest); } The unit test implementation for HTTP Put and HTTP Delete are very similar to the unit test we have written for  HTTP Get. The complete unit tests for the CategoryController is given below: [TestFixture] public class CategoryApiControllerTest { private Mock<ICategoryRepository> categoryRepository; private Mock<ICommandBus> commandBus; [SetUp] public void SetUp() {     categoryRepository = new Mock<ICategoryRepository>();     commandBus = new Mock<ICommandBus>(); } [Test] public void Get_All_Returns_AllCategory() {     // Arrange        IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> fakeCategories = GetCategories();     categoryRepository.Setup(x => x.GetCategoryWithExpenses()).Returns(fakeCategories);     CategoryController controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage()                 {                     Properties = { { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, new HttpConfiguration() } }                 }     };     // Act     var categories = controller.Get();     // Assert     Assert.IsNotNull(categories, "Result is null");     Assert.IsInstanceOf(typeof(IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense>),categories, "Wrong Model");             Assert.AreEqual(3, categories.Count(), "Got wrong number of Categories"); }        [Test] public void Get_CorrectCategoryId_Returns_Category() {     // Arrange        IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> fakeCategories = GetCategories();     categoryRepository.Setup(x => x.GetCategoryWithExpenses()).Returns(fakeCategories);     CategoryController controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage()         {             Properties = { { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, new HttpConfiguration() } }         }     };     // Act     var response = controller.Get(1);     // Assert     Assert.AreEqual(HttpStatusCode.OK, response.StatusCode);     var category = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<CategoryWithExpense>(response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result);     Assert.AreEqual(1, category.CategoryId, "Got wrong number of Categories"); } [Test] public void Get_InValidCategoryId_Returns_NotFound() {     // Arrange        IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> fakeCategories = GetCategories();     categoryRepository.Setup(x => x.GetCategoryWithExpenses()).Returns(fakeCategories);     CategoryController controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage()         {             Properties = { { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, new HttpConfiguration() } }         }     };     // Act     var response = controller.Get(5);     // Assert     Assert.AreEqual(HttpStatusCode.NotFound, response.StatusCode);            } [Test] public void Post_Category_Returns_CreatedStatusCode() {     // Arrange        commandBus.Setup(c => c.Submit(It.IsAny<CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>())).Returns(new CommandResult(true));     Mapper.CreateMap<CategoryFormModel, CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>();          var httpConfiguration = new HttpConfiguration();     WebApiConfig.Register(httpConfiguration);     var httpRouteData = new HttpRouteData(httpConfiguration.Routes["DefaultApi"],         new HttpRouteValueDictionary { { "controller", "category" } });     var controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage(HttpMethod.Post, "http://localhost/api/category/")         {             Properties =             {                 { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, httpConfiguration },                 { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpRouteDataKey, httpRouteData }             }         }     };     // Act     CategoryModel category = new CategoryModel();     category.CategoryId = 1;     category.CategoryName = "Mock Category";     var response = controller.Post(category);               // Assert     Assert.AreEqual(HttpStatusCode.Created, response.StatusCode);     var newCategory = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<CategoryModel>(response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result);     Assert.AreEqual(string.Format("http://localhost/api/category/{0}", newCategory.CategoryId), response.Headers.Location.ToString()); } [Test] public void Post_EmptyCategory_Returns_BadRequestStatusCode() {     // Arrange        commandBus.Setup(c => c.Submit(It.IsAny<CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>())).Returns(new CommandResult(true));     Mapper.CreateMap<CategoryFormModel, CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>();     var httpConfiguration = new HttpConfiguration();     WebApiConfig.Register(httpConfiguration);     var httpRouteData = new HttpRouteData(httpConfiguration.Routes["DefaultApi"],         new HttpRouteValueDictionary { { "controller", "category" } });     var controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage(HttpMethod.Post, "http://localhost/api/category/")         {             Properties =             {                 { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, httpConfiguration },                 { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpRouteDataKey, httpRouteData }             }         }     };     // Act     CategoryModel category = new CategoryModel();     category.CategoryId = 0;     category.CategoryName = "";     // The ASP.NET pipeline doesn't run, so validation don't run.     controller.ModelState.AddModelError("", "mock error message");     var response = controller.Post(category);     // Assert     Assert.AreEqual(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, response.StatusCode);   } [Test] public void Put_Category_Returns_OKStatusCode() {     // Arrange        commandBus.Setup(c => c.Submit(It.IsAny<CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>())).Returns(new CommandResult(true));     Mapper.CreateMap<CategoryFormModel, CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand>();     CategoryController controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage()         {             Properties = { { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, new HttpConfiguration() } }         }     };     // Act     CategoryModel category = new CategoryModel();     category.CategoryId = 1;     category.CategoryName = "Mock Category";     var response = controller.Put(category.CategoryId,category);     // Assert     Assert.AreEqual(HttpStatusCode.OK, response.StatusCode);    } [Test] public void Delete_Category_Returns_NoContentStatusCode() {     // Arrange              commandBus.Setup(c => c.Submit(It.IsAny<DeleteCategoryCommand >())).Returns(new CommandResult(true));     CategoryController controller = new CategoryController(commandBus.Object, categoryRepository.Object)     {         Request = new HttpRequestMessage()         {             Properties = { { HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, new HttpConfiguration() } }         }     };     // Act               var response = controller.Delete(1);     // Assert     Assert.AreEqual(HttpStatusCode.NoContent, response.StatusCode);   } private static IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> GetCategories() {     IEnumerable<CategoryWithExpense> fakeCategories = new List<CategoryWithExpense> {     new CategoryWithExpense {CategoryId=1, CategoryName = "Test1", Description="Test1Desc", TotalExpenses=1000},     new CategoryWithExpense {CategoryId=2, CategoryName = "Test2", Description="Test2Desc",TotalExpenses=2000},     new CategoryWithExpense { CategoryId=3, CategoryName = "Test3", Description="Test3Desc",TotalExpenses=3000}       }.AsEnumerable();     return fakeCategories; } }  The complete implementation for the Api Controller, CategoryController is given below: public class CategoryController : ApiController {       private readonly ICommandBus commandBus;     private readonly ICategoryRepository categoryRepository;     public CategoryController(ICommandBus commandBus, ICategoryRepository categoryRepository)     {         this.commandBus = commandBus;         this.categoryRepository = categoryRepository;     } public IQueryable<CategoryWithExpense> Get() {     var categories = categoryRepository.GetCategoryWithExpenses().AsQueryable();     return categories; }   // GET /api/category/5 public HttpResponseMessage Get(int id) {     var category = categoryRepository.GetCategoryWithExpenses().Where(c => c.CategoryId == id).SingleOrDefault();     if (category == null)     {         return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.NotFound);     }     return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK, category); }   // POST /api/category public HttpResponseMessage Post(CategoryModel category) {       if (ModelState.IsValid)     {         var command = new CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand(category.CategoryId, category.CategoryName, category.Description);         var result = commandBus.Submit(command);         if (result.Success)         {                               var response = Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.Created, category);             string uri = Url.Link("DefaultApi", new { id = category.CategoryId });             response.Headers.Location = new Uri(uri);             return response;         }     }     else     {         return Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, ModelState);     }     throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest); }   // PUT /api/category/5 public HttpResponseMessage Put(int id, CategoryModel category) {     if (ModelState.IsValid)     {         var command = new CreateOrUpdateCategoryCommand(category.CategoryId, category.CategoryName, category.Description);         var result = commandBus.Submit(command);         return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK, category);     }     else     {         return Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, ModelState);     }     throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest); }       // DELETE /api/category/5     public HttpResponseMessage Delete(int id)     {         var command = new DeleteCategoryCommand { CategoryId = id };         var result = commandBus.Submit(command);         if (result.Success)         {             return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.NoContent);         }             throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest);     } } Source Code The EFMVC app can download from http://efmvc.codeplex.com/ . The unit test project can be found from the project EFMVC.Tests and Web API project can be found from EFMVC.Web.API.

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  • ASP.NET MVC 3 Release Candidate 2 Released

    - by shiju
    Microsoft has shipped Release Candidate version 2 for ASP.NET MVC 3. You can download the  ASP.NET MVC 3 Release Candidate 2 from here . If you have installed Visual Studio Service Pack 1 Beta, you must install ASP.NET MVC 3 RC 2. Otherwise it will break the IntelliSense feature in the Razor views of ASP.NET MVC 3 RC1. The following are the some of the new changes in ASP.NET MVC 3 RC 2. Added Html.Raw Method Renamed "Controller.ViewModel" Property and the "View" Property To "ViewBag" Renamed "ControllerSessionStateAttribute" Class to "SessionStateAttribute" Fixed "RenderAction" Method to Give Explicit Values Precedence During Model Binding You can read more details from ScottGu’s blog post Announcing ASP.NET MVC 3 (Release Candidate 2)

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  • Developing web apps using ASP.NET MVC 3, Razor and EF Code First - Part 1

    - by shiju
    In this post, I will demonstrate web application development using ASP. NET MVC 3, Razor and EF code First. This post will also cover Dependency Injection using Unity 2.0 and generic Repository and Unit of Work for EF Code First. The following frameworks will be used for this step by step tutorial. ASP.NET MVC 3 EF Code First CTP 5 Unity 2.0 Define Domain Model Let’s create domain model for our simple web application Category class public class Category {     public int CategoryId { get; set; }     [Required(ErrorMessage = "Name Required")]     [StringLength(25, ErrorMessage = "Must be less than 25 characters")]     public string Name { get; set;}     public string Description { get; set; }     public virtual ICollection<Expense> Expenses { get; set; } }   Expense class public class Expense {             public int ExpenseId { get; set; }            public string  Transaction { get; set; }     public DateTime Date { get; set; }     public double Amount { get; set; }     public int CategoryId { get; set; }     public virtual Category Category { get; set; } } We have two domain entities - Category and Expense. A single category contains a list of expense transactions and every expense transaction should have a Category. In this post, we will be focusing on CRUD operations for the entity Category and will be working on the Expense entity with a View Model object in the later post. And the source code for this application will be refactored over time. The above entities are very simple POCO (Plain Old CLR Object) classes and the entity Category is decorated with validation attributes in the System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations namespace. Now we want to use these entities for defining model objects for the Entity Framework 4. Using the Code First approach of Entity Framework, we can first define the entities by simply writing POCO classes without any coupling with any API or database library. This approach lets you focus on domain model which will enable Domain-Driven Development for applications. EF code first support is currently enabled with a separate API that is runs on top of the Entity Framework 4. EF Code First is reached CTP 5 when I am writing this article. Creating Context Class for Entity Framework We have created our domain model and let’s create a class in order to working with Entity Framework Code First. For this, you have to download EF Code First CTP 5 and add reference to the assembly EntitFramework.dll. You can also use NuGet to download add reference to EEF Code First.    public class MyFinanceContext : DbContext {     public MyFinanceContext() : base("MyFinance") { }     public DbSet<Category> Categories { get; set; }     public DbSet<Expense> Expenses { get; set; }         }   The above class MyFinanceContext is derived from DbContext that can connect your model classes to a database. The MyFinanceContext class is mapping our Category and Expense class into database tables Categories and Expenses using DbSet<TEntity> where TEntity is any POCO class. When we are running the application at first time, it will automatically create the database. EF code-first look for a connection string in web.config or app.config that has the same name as the dbcontext class. If it is not find any connection string with the convention, it will automatically create database in local SQL Express database by default and the name of the database will be same name as the dbcontext class. You can also define the name of database in constructor of the the dbcontext class. Unlike NHibernate, we don’t have to use any XML based mapping files or Fluent interface for mapping between our model and database. The model classes of Code First are working on the basis of conventions and we can also use a fluent API to refine our model. The convention for primary key is ‘Id’ or ‘<class name>Id’.  If primary key properties are detected with type ‘int’, ‘long’ or ‘short’, they will automatically registered as identity columns in the database by default. Primary key detection is not case sensitive. We can define our model classes with validation attributes in the System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations namespace and it automatically enforces validation rules when a model object is updated or saved. Generic Repository for EF Code First We have created model classes and dbcontext class. Now we have to create generic repository pattern for data persistence with EF code first. If you don’t know about the repository pattern, checkout Martin Fowler’s article on Repository Let’s create a generic repository to working with DbContext and DbSet generics. public interface IRepository<T> where T : class     {         void Add(T entity);         void Delete(T entity);         T GetById(long Id);         IEnumerable<T> All();     }   RepositoryBasse – Generic Repository class public abstract class RepositoryBase<T> where T : class { private MyFinanceContext database; private readonly IDbSet<T> dbset; protected RepositoryBase(IDatabaseFactory databaseFactory) {     DatabaseFactory = databaseFactory;     dbset = Database.Set<T>(); }   protected IDatabaseFactory DatabaseFactory {     get; private set; }   protected MyFinanceContext Database {     get { return database ?? (database = DatabaseFactory.Get()); } } public virtual void Add(T entity) {     dbset.Add(entity);            }        public virtual void Delete(T entity) {     dbset.Remove(entity); }   public virtual T GetById(long id) {     return dbset.Find(id); }   public virtual IEnumerable<T> All() {     return dbset.ToList(); } }   DatabaseFactory class public class DatabaseFactory : Disposable, IDatabaseFactory {     private MyFinanceContext database;     public MyFinanceContext Get()     {         return database ?? (database = new MyFinanceContext());     }     protected override void DisposeCore()     {         if (database != null)             database.Dispose();     } } Unit of Work If you are new to Unit of Work pattern, checkout Fowler’s article on Unit of Work . According to Martin Fowler, the Unit of Work pattern "maintains a list of objects affected by a business transaction and coordinates the writing out of changes and the resolution of concurrency problems." Let’s create a class for handling Unit of Work   public interface IUnitOfWork {     void Commit(); }   UniOfWork class public class UnitOfWork : IUnitOfWork {     private readonly IDatabaseFactory databaseFactory;     private MyFinanceContext dataContext;       public UnitOfWork(IDatabaseFactory databaseFactory)     {         this.databaseFactory = databaseFactory;     }       protected MyFinanceContext DataContext     {         get { return dataContext ?? (dataContext = databaseFactory.Get()); }     }       public void Commit()     {         DataContext.Commit();     } }   The Commit method of the UnitOfWork will call the commit method of MyFinanceContext class and it will execute the SaveChanges method of DbContext class.   Repository class for Category In this post, we will be focusing on the persistence against Category entity and will working on other entities in later post. Let’s create a repository for handling CRUD operations for Category using derive from a generic Repository RepositoryBase<T>.   public class CategoryRepository: RepositoryBase<Category>, ICategoryRepository     {     public CategoryRepository(IDatabaseFactory databaseFactory)         : base(databaseFactory)         {         }                } public interface ICategoryRepository : IRepository<Category> { } If we need additional methods than generic repository for the Category, we can define in the CategoryRepository. Dependency Injection using Unity 2.0 If you are new to Inversion of Control/ Dependency Injection or Unity, please have a look on my articles at http://weblogs.asp.net/shijuvarghese/archive/tags/IoC/default.aspx. I want to create a custom lifetime manager for Unity to store container in the current HttpContext.   public class HttpContextLifetimeManager<T> : LifetimeManager, IDisposable {     public override object GetValue()     {         return HttpContext.Current.Items[typeof(T).AssemblyQualifiedName];     }     public override void RemoveValue()     {         HttpContext.Current.Items.Remove(typeof(T).AssemblyQualifiedName);     }     public override void SetValue(object newValue)     {         HttpContext.Current.Items[typeof(T).AssemblyQualifiedName] = newValue;     }     public void Dispose()     {         RemoveValue();     } }   Let’s create controller factory for Unity in the ASP.NET MVC 3 application. public class UnityControllerFactory : DefaultControllerFactory { IUnityContainer container; public UnityControllerFactory(IUnityContainer container) {     this.container = container; } protected override IController GetControllerInstance(RequestContext reqContext, Type controllerType) {     IController controller;     if (controllerType == null)         throw new HttpException(                 404, String.Format(                     "The controller for path '{0}' could not be found" +     "or it does not implement IController.",                 reqContext.HttpContext.Request.Path));       if (!typeof(IController).IsAssignableFrom(controllerType))         throw new ArgumentException(                 string.Format(                     "Type requested is not a controller: {0}",                     controllerType.Name),                     "controllerType");     try     {         controller= container.Resolve(controllerType) as IController;     }     catch (Exception ex)     {         throw new InvalidOperationException(String.Format(                                 "Error resolving controller {0}",                                 controllerType.Name), ex);     }     return controller; }   }   Configure contract and concrete types in Unity Let’s configure our contract and concrete types in Unity for resolving our dependencies.   private void ConfigureUnity() {     //Create UnityContainer               IUnityContainer container = new UnityContainer()                 .RegisterType<IDatabaseFactory, DatabaseFactory>(new HttpContextLifetimeManager<IDatabaseFactory>())     .RegisterType<IUnitOfWork, UnitOfWork>(new HttpContextLifetimeManager<IUnitOfWork>())     .RegisterType<ICategoryRepository, CategoryRepository>(new HttpContextLifetimeManager<ICategoryRepository>());                 //Set container for Controller Factory                ControllerBuilder.Current.SetControllerFactory(             new UnityControllerFactory(container)); }   In the above ConfigureUnity method, we are registering our types onto Unity container with custom lifetime manager HttpContextLifetimeManager. Let’s call ConfigureUnity method in the Global.asax.cs for set controller factory for Unity and configuring the types with Unity.   protected void Application_Start() {     AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas();     RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilters.Filters);     RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes);     ConfigureUnity(); }   Developing web application using ASP.NET MVC 3 We have created our domain model for our web application and also have created repositories and configured dependencies with Unity container. Now we have to create controller classes and views for doing CRUD operations against the Category entity. Let’s create controller class for Category Category Controller   public class CategoryController : Controller {     private readonly ICategoryRepository categoryRepository;     private readonly IUnitOfWork unitOfWork;           public CategoryController(ICategoryRepository categoryRepository, IUnitOfWork unitOfWork)     {         this.categoryRepository = categoryRepository;         this.unitOfWork = unitOfWork;     }       public ActionResult Index()     {         var categories = categoryRepository.All();         return View(categories);     }     [HttpGet]     public ActionResult Edit(int id)     {         var category = categoryRepository.GetById(id);         return View(category);     }       [HttpPost]     public ActionResult Edit(int id, FormCollection collection)     {         var category = categoryRepository.GetById(id);         if (TryUpdateModel(category))         {             unitOfWork.Commit();             return RedirectToAction("Index");         }         else return View(category);                 }       [HttpGet]     public ActionResult Create()     {         var category = new Category();         return View(category);     }           [HttpPost]     public ActionResult Create(Category category)     {         if (!ModelState.IsValid)         {             return View("Create", category);         }                     categoryRepository.Add(category);         unitOfWork.Commit();         return RedirectToAction("Index");     }       [HttpPost]     public ActionResult Delete(int  id)     {         var category = categoryRepository.GetById(id);         categoryRepository.Delete(category);         unitOfWork.Commit();         var categories = categoryRepository.All();         return PartialView("CategoryList", categories);       }        }   Creating Views in Razor Now we are going to create views in Razor for our ASP.NET MVC 3 application.  Let’s create a partial view CategoryList.cshtml for listing category information and providing link for Edit and Delete operations. CategoryList.cshtml @using MyFinance.Helpers; @using MyFinance.Domain; @model IEnumerable<Category>      <table>         <tr>         <th>Actions</th>         <th>Name</th>          <th>Description</th>         </tr>     @foreach (var item in Model) {             <tr>             <td>                 @Html.ActionLink("Edit", "Edit",new { id = item.CategoryId })                 @Ajax.ActionLink("Delete", "Delete", new { id = item.CategoryId }, new AjaxOptions { Confirm = "Delete Expense?", HttpMethod = "Post", UpdateTargetId = "divCategoryList" })                           </td>             <td>                 @item.Name             </td>             <td>                 @item.Description             </td>         </tr>          }       </table>     <p>         @Html.ActionLink("Create New", "Create")     </p> The delete link is providing Ajax functionality using the Ajax.ActionLink. This will call an Ajax request for Delete action method in the CategoryCotroller class. In the Delete action method, it will return Partial View CategoryList after deleting the record. We are using CategoryList view for the Ajax functionality and also for Index view using for displaying list of category information. Let’s create Index view using partial view CategoryList  Index.chtml @model IEnumerable<MyFinance.Domain.Category> @{     ViewBag.Title = "Index"; }    <h2>Category List</h2>    <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.unobtrusive-ajax.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>    <div id="divCategoryList">               @Html.Partial("CategoryList", Model) </div>   We can call the partial views using Html.Partial helper method. Now we are going to create View pages for insert and update functionality for the Category. Both view pages are sharing common user interface for entering the category information. So I want to create an EditorTemplate for the Category information. We have to create the EditorTemplate with the same name of entity object so that we can refer it on view pages using @Html.EditorFor(model => model) . So let’s create template with name Category. Let’s create view page for insert Category information   @model MyFinance.Domain.Category   @{     ViewBag.Title = "Save"; }   <h2>Create</h2>   <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script> <script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.unobtrusive.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>   @using (Html.BeginForm()) {     @Html.ValidationSummary(true)     <fieldset>         <legend>Category</legend>                @Html.EditorFor(model => model)               <p>             <input type="submit" value="Create" />         </p>     </fieldset> }   <div>     @Html.ActionLink("Back to List", "Index") </div> ViewStart file In Razor views, we can add a file named _viewstart.cshtml in the views directory  and this will be shared among the all views with in the Views directory. The below code in the _viewstart.cshtml, sets the Layout page for every Views in the Views folder.      @{     Layout = "~/Views/Shared/_Layout.cshtml"; }   Source Code You can download the source code from http://efmvc.codeplex.com/ . The source will be refactored on over time.   Summary In this post, we have created a simple web application using ASP.NET MVC 3 and EF Code First. We have discussed on technologies and practices such as ASP.NET MVC 3, Razor, EF Code First, Unity 2, generic Repository and Unit of Work. In my later posts, I will modify the application and will be discussed on more things. Stay tuned to my blog  for more posts on step by step application building.

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  • Building and Deploying Windows Azure Web Sites using Git and GitHub for Windows

    - by shiju
    Microsoft Windows Azure team has released a new version of Windows Azure which is providing many excellent features. The new Windows Azure provides Web Sites which allows you to deploy up to 10 web sites  for free in a multitenant shared environment and you can easily upgrade this web site to a private, dedicated virtual server when the traffic is grows. The Meet Windows Azure Fact Sheet provides the following information about a Windows Azure Web Site: Windows Azure Web Sites enable developers to easily build and deploy websites with support for multiple frameworks and popular open source applications, including ASP.NET, PHP and Node.js. With just a few clicks, developers can take advantage of Windows Azure’s global scale without having to worry about operations, servers or infrastructure. It is easy to deploy existing sites, if they run on Internet Information Services (IIS) 7, or to build new sites, with a free offer of 10 websites upon signup, with the ability to scale up as needed with reserved instances. Windows Azure Web Sites includes support for the following: Multiple frameworks including ASP.NET, PHP and Node.js Popular open source software apps including WordPress, Joomla!, Drupal, Umbraco and DotNetNuke Windows Azure SQL Database and MySQL databases Multiple types of developer tools and protocols including Visual Studio, Git, FTP, Visual Studio Team Foundation Services and Microsoft WebMatrix Signup to Windows and Enable Azure Web Sites You can signup for a 90 days free trial account in Windows Azure from here. After creating an account in Windows Azure, go to https://account.windowsazure.com/ , and select to preview features to view the available previews. In the Web Sites section of the preview features, click “try it now” which will enables the web sites feature Create Web Site in Windows Azure To create a web sites, login to the Windows Azure portal, and select Web Sites from and click New icon from the left corner  Click WEB SITE, QUICK CREATE and put values for URL and REGION dropdown. You can see the all web sites from the dashboard of the Windows Azure portal Set up Git Publishing Select your web site from the dashboard, and select Set up Git publishing To enable Git publishing , you must give user name and password which will initialize a Git repository Clone Git Repository We can use GitHub for Windows to publish apps to non-GitHub repositories which is well explained by Phil Haack on his blog post. Here we are going to deploy the web site using GitHub for Windows. Let’s clone a Git repository using the Git Url which will be getting from the Windows Azure portal. Let’s copy the Git url and execute the “git clone” with the git url. You can use the Git Shell provided by GitHub for Windows. To get it, right on the GitHub for Windows, and select open shell here as shown in the below picture. When executing the Git Clone command, it will ask for a password where you have to give password which specified in the Windows Azure portal. After cloning the GIT repository, you can drag and drop the local Git repository folder to GitHub for Windows GUI. This will automatically add the Windows Azure Web Site repository onto GitHub for Windows where you can commit your changes and publish your web sites to Windows Azure. Publish the Web Site using GitHub for Windows We can add multiple framework level files including ASP.NET, PHP and Node.js, to the local repository folder can easily publish to Windows Azure from GitHub for Windows GUI. For this demo, let me just add a simple Node.js file named Server.js which handles few request handlers. 1: var http = require('http'); 2: var port=process.env.PORT; 3: var querystring = require('querystring'); 4: var utils = require('util'); 5: var url = require("url"); 6:   7: var server = http.createServer(function(req, res) { 8: switch (req.url) { //checking the request url 9: case '/': 10: homePageHandler (req, res); //handler for home page 11: break; 12: case '/register': 13: registerFormHandler (req, res);//hamdler for register 14: break; 15: default: 16: nofoundHandler (req, res);// handler for 404 not found 17: break; 18: } 19: }); 20: server.listen(port); 21: //function to display the html form 22: function homePageHandler (req, res) { 23: console.log('Request handler home was called.'); 24: res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/html'}); 25: var body = '<html>'+ 26: '<head>'+ 27: '<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; '+ 28: 'charset=UTF-8" />'+ 29: '</head>'+ 30: '<body>'+ 31: '<form action="/register" method="post">'+ 32: 'Name:<input type=text value="" name="name" size=15></br>'+ 33: 'Email:<input type=text value="" name="email" size=15></br>'+ 34: '<input type="submit" value="Submit" />'+ 35: '</form>'+ 36: '</body>'+ 37: '</html>'; 38: //response content 39: res.end(body); 40: } 41: //handler for Post request 42: function registerFormHandler (req, res) { 43: console.log('Request handler register was called.'); 44: var pathname = url.parse(req.url).pathname; 45: console.log("Request for " + pathname + " received."); 46: var postData = ""; 47: req.on('data', function(chunk) { 48: // append the current chunk of data to the postData variable 49: postData += chunk.toString(); 50: }); 51: req.on('end', function() { 52: // doing something with the posted data 53: res.writeHead(200, "OK", {'Content-Type': 'text/html'}); 54: // parse the posted data 55: var decodedBody = querystring.parse(postData); 56: // output the decoded data to the HTTP response 57: res.write('<html><head><title>Post data</title></head><body><pre>'); 58: res.write(utils.inspect(decodedBody)); 59: res.write('</pre></body></html>'); 60: res.end(); 61: }); 62: } 63: //Error handler for 404 no found 64: function nofoundHandler(req, res) { 65: console.log('Request handler nofound was called.'); 66: res.writeHead(404, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'}); 67: res.end('404 Error - Request handler not found'); 68: } .csharpcode, .csharpcode pre { font-size: small; color: black; font-family: consolas, "Courier New", courier, monospace; background-color: #ffffff; /*white-space: pre;*/ } .csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; } .csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; } .csharpcode .str { color: #006080; } .csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; } .csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; } .csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; } .csharpcode .html { color: #800000; } .csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; } .csharpcode .alt { background-color: #f4f4f4; width: 100%; margin: 0em; } .csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; } If there is any change in the local repository folder, GitHub for Windows will automatically detect the changes. In the above step, we have just added a Server.js file so that GitHub for Windows will detect the changes. Let’s commit the changes to the local repository before publishing the web site to Windows Azure. After committed the all changes, you can click publish button which will publish the all changes to Windows Azure repository. The following screen shot shows deployment history from the Windows Azure portal.   GitHub for Windows is providing a sync button which can use for synchronizing between local repository and Windows Azure repository after making any commit on the local repository after any changes. Our web site is running after the deployment using Git Summary Windows Azure Web Sites lets the developers to easily build and deploy websites with support for multiple framework including ASP.NET, PHP and Node.js and can easily deploy the Web Sites using Visual Studio, Git, FTP, Visual Studio Team Foundation Services and Microsoft WebMatrix. In this demo, we have deployed a Node.js Web Site to Windows Azure using Git. We can use GitHub for Windows to publish apps to non-GitHub repositories and can use to publish Web SItes to Windows Azure.

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  • How to work RavenDB Id with ASP.NET MVC Routes

    - by shiju
    By default RavenDB's Id would be sperated by "/". Let's say that we have a category object, the Ids would be like "categories/1". This will make problems when working with ASP.NET MVC's route rule. For a route category/edit/id, the uri would be category/edit/categories/1. You can solve this problem in two waysSolution 1 - Change Id SeparatorWe can use different Id Separator for RavenDB Ids in order to working with ASP.NET MVC route rules. The following code specify that Ids would be seperated by "-" rather than the default "/"  documentStore = new DocumentStore { Url = "http://localhost:8080/" };  documentStore.Initialize();  documentStore.Conventions.IdentityPartsSeparator = "-"; The above IdentityPartsSeparator would be generate Ids like "categories-1"Solution 2 - Modify ASP.NET MVC Route Modify the ASP.NET MVC routes in the Global.asax.cs file, as shown in the following code  routes.MapRoute(     "WithParam",                                           // Route name     "{controller}/{action}/{*id}"                         // URL with parameters     );  We just put "*" in front of the id variable that will be working with the default Id separator of RavenDB

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  • Windows Azure PowerShell for Node.js

    - by shiju
    The Windows Azure PowerShell for Node.js is a command-line tool that  allows the Node developers to build and deploy Node.js apps in Windows Azure using Windows PowerShell cmdlets. Using Windows Azure PowerShell for Node.js, you can develop, test, deploy and manage Node based hosted service in Windows Azure. For getting the PowerShell for Node.js, click All Programs, Windows Azure SDK Node.js and run  Windows Azure PowerShell for Node.js, as Administrator. The followings are the few PowerShell cmdlets that lets you to work with Node.js apps in Windows Azure Create New Hosted Service New-AzureService <HostedServiceName> The below cmdlet will created a Windows Aazure hosted service named NodeOnAzure in the folder C:\nodejs and this will also create ServiceConfiguration.Cloud.cscfg, ServiceConfiguration.Local.cscfg and ServiceDefinition.csdef and deploymentSettings.json files for the hosted service. PS C:\nodejs> New-AzureService NodeOnAzure The below picture shows the files after creating the hosted service Create Web Role Add-AzureNodeWebRole <RoleName> The following cmdlet will create a hosted service named MyNodeApp along with web.config file. PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure> Add-AzureNodeWebRole MyNodeApp The below picture shows the files after creating the web role app. Install Node Module npm install <NodeModule> The following command will install Node Module Express onto your web role app. PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure\MyNodeApp> npm install Express Run Windows Azure Apps Locally in the Emulator Start-AzureEmulator -launch The following cmdlet will create a local package and run Windows Azure app locally in the emulator PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure\MyNodeApp> Start-AzureEmulator -launch Stop Windows Azure Emulator Stop-AzureEmulator The following cmdlet will stop your Windows Azure in the emulator. PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure\MyNodeApp> Stop-AzureEmulator Download Windows Azure Publishing Settings Get-AzurePublishSettings The following cmdlet will redirect to Windows Azure portal where we can download Windows Azure publish settings PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure\MyNodeApp> Get-AzurePublishSettings Import Windows Azure Publishing Settings Import-AzurePublishSettings <Location of .publishSettings file> The following cmdlet will import the publish settings file from the location c:\nodejs PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure\MyNodeApp>  Import-AzurePublishSettings c:\nodejs\shijuvar.publishSettings Publish Apps to Windows Azure Publish-AzureService –name <Name> –location <Location of Data centre> The following cmdlet will publish the app to Windows Azure with name “NodeOnAzure” in the location Southeast Asia. Please keep in mind that the service name should be unique. PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure\MyNodeApp> Publish-AzureService –name NodeonAzure –location "Southeast Asia” –launch Stop Windows Azure Service Stop-AzureService The following cmdlet will stop your service which you have deployed previously. PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure\MyNodeApp> Stop-AzureService Remove Windows Azure Service Remove-AzureService The following cmdlet will remove your service from Windows Azure. PS C:\nodejs\NodeOnAzure\MyNodeApp> Remove-AzureService Quick Summary for PowerShell cmdlets Create  a new Hosted Service New-AzureService <HostedServiceName> Create a Web Role Add-AzureNodeWebRole <RoleName> Install Node Module npm install <NodeModule> Running Windows Azure Apps Locally in Emulator Start-AzureEmulator -launch Stop Windows Azure Emulator Stop-AzureEmulator Download Windows Azure Publishing Settings Get-AzurePublishSettings Import Windows Azure Publishing Settings Import-AzurePublishSettings <Location of .publishSettings file> Publish Apps to Windows Azure Publish-AzureService –name <Name> –location <Location of Data centre> Stop Windows Azure Service Stop-AzureService Remove Windows Azure Service Remove-AzureService

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