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  • How to suppress or disable the shutdown option from indicator menu or shutdown dialog?

    - by user73093
    My goal is to allow user only to restart the system, and deny any shutdown (suspend, hibernate). I am running unity-2d. I 've managed to deny suspend and hibernate with polkit policy files like explained in How to disable shutdown/reboot/suspend/hibernate? I observed that is has somehow disable shutdown abilities, but hasn't removed "shutdown" entry from the indicator panel menu neither as well as the "shutdown..." button from the shutdown dialog. Pressing shutdown button at this point restarts lightdm, returning to the login screen. My goal is to remove any "shutdown" action and button. So, I 've added an ovveride file in /usr/share/glib-2.0/schemas that contains some rules: [com.canonical.indicator.session] suppress-shutdown-menuitem = true (all suppress-*-menuitem has "false" value by default in the schema) Compiling, restarting X, now there is an entry "close session..." in the indicator panel menu...: it's not what I want. at this point, if I set another entry suppress-logout-menuitem to true I got no entry in the indicator panel menu. Trying like this all combination doesn't give the opportunity to remove "shutdown" references/buttons without removing restart option. All I want is to remove any reference to "shutdown" but keep a "restart" option somewhere in the indicator menu... Thanks !

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  • Upstart: best way for shutdown hook?

    - by Binarus
    Hi, since Ubuntu relies on upstart for some time now, I would like to use an upstart job to gracefully shutdown certain applications on system shutdown or reboot. It is essential that the system's shutdown or reboot is stalled until these applications are shut down. The applications will be started manually on occasion, and on system shutdown should automatically be ended by a script (which I already have). Since the applications can't be ended reliably without (nearly all) other services running, ending the applications has to be done before the rest of the shutdown begins. I think I can solve this by an upstart job which will be triggered on shutdown, but I am unsure which events I should use in which manner. So far, I have read the following (partly contradicting) statements: There is no general shutdown event in upstart Use a stanza like "start on starting shutdown" in the job definition Use a stanza like "start on runlevel [06S]" in the job definition Use a stanza like "start on starting runlevel [06S]" in the job definition Use a stanza like "start on stopping runlevel [!06S]" in the job definition From these recommendations, the following questions arise: Is there or is there not a general shutdown event in Ubuntu's upstart? What is the recommended way to implement a "shutdown hook"? When are the events runlevel [x] triggered; is this when having entered the runlevel or when entering the runlevel? Can we use something like "start on starting runlevel [x]" or "start on stopping runlevel [x]"? What would be the best solution for my problem? Thank you very much, Binarus

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  • Best way to make a shutdown hook?

    - by Binarus
    Since Ubuntu relies on upstart for some time now, I would like to use an upstart job to gracefully shutdown certain applications on system shutdown or reboot. It is essential that the system's shutdown or reboot is stalled until these applications are shut down. The applications will be started manually on occasion, and on system shutdown should automatically be ended by a script (which I already have). Since the applications can't be ended reliably without (nearly all) other services running, ending the applications has to be done before the rest of the shutdown begins. I think I can solve this by an upstart job which will be triggered on shutdown, but I am unsure which events I should use in which manner. So far, I have read the following (partly contradicting) statements: There is no general shutdown event in upstart Use a stanza like "start on starting shutdown" in the job definition Use a stanza like "start on runlevel [06S]" in the job definition Use a stanza like "start on starting runlevel [06S]" in the job definition Use a stanza like "start on stopping runlevel [!06S]" in the job definition From these recommendations, the following questions arise: Is there or is there not a general shutdown event in Ubuntu's upstart? What is the recommended way to implement a "shutdown hook"? When are the events runlevel [x] triggered; is this when having entered the runlevel or when entering the runlevel? Can we use something like "start on starting runlevel [x]" or "start on stopping runlevel [x]"? What would be the best solution for my problem? Thank you very much

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  • How to shutdown VMware Fusion virtual machine on host shutdown

    - by Nikksno
    I have a Mac mini running Mavericks server. I installed the Atmail server + webmail vm [a linux centos distribution] in VMware Fusion Professional 6 with the VMware Tools addon. It works flawlessly. I've set it to start on boot and that works very reliably. However I've been looking for a way to also safely and gracefully shut it down whenever OS X shuts down for whatever reason. The Mac is connected to a UPS and configured to perform an automatic shutdown in case the battery starts running low so that's no additional problem. Now the first thing I did was to go into Fusion's prefs and select "Power off the vm" when closing it. However I noticed that for some arcane reason closing the vm window would actually forcibly power off the vm: so then I found this post that showed me how to change the default power options and I managed to have the vm cleanly shutdown when closing its window or quitting Fusion altogether. At this point I was hoping to have solved the problem but as it turns out upon invoking system shutdown OS X doesn't wait for the vm to shutdown and terminates Fusion before it has a chance to do so. At this point I started looking for a way to automate the process of shutting down the guest os via some advanced setting but had no luck in doing so. That's when I found a command to shut the vm down: vmrun and it worked. The only thing left was to find out a way to execute this script on os x shutdown and giving it a little time to power off completely. However this turned out to be a nightmare: I spent hours looking through several ways to do this with Startup Items, rc.shutdown, cron, launchd, etc... but none of them worked the way I had configured them. I have to say that I found very limited information on using launchd for a shutdown script execution and I know it's the latest thing in the OS X world so I'm hoping someone out there among you will be able to help me out with this. I still think this is an extremely basic feature to ask for and I was really surprised to find this little documentation on so many different aspects of this problem. Is Fusion too basic of an application for this? I really hope someone can help. Thank you very much in advance.

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  • Proper application shutdown before windows xp auto shutdown

    - by vashman
    I frequently leave the computer on playing a movie or downloading a file while I go to bed. I do use the 'shutdown computer when finished' feature of KMPlayer or getright or uTorrent or whatever program I am using. This method effectively shuts down the computer, but the problem is that there are some applications that seem to exit forcefully when doing this kind of shutdown, this being clearly reflected in winamp not saving the current playlist and config, messenger not saving the chat logs, etc. My goal here would be to have automatically close properly all applications when the auto/scheduled program triggers it. I am looking for some Windows shutdown mode/setting that does application closing like the user would do. I am not expecting to auto-click on save dialogs prompts, if this is needed I will do it before leaving the computer on for auto shutdown.

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  • How to create a "shutdown user" or "shutdown account"

    - by pcapademic
    Red Hat had a feature useful to me at the present time. There was an account, generally called "shutdown", and when you logged in with the account, the system shut down. In my specific case, I have Ubuntu Server running in a VM on my local system. The VM is running a web app, and when I'm done doing work, I want to shut down the VM. Unfortunately, I can't install VMware tools to get the "power button" based shutdown. Currently I login then sudo shutdown -h now, then type my password again, and things shutdown. Really, it's getting annoying all that waiting around and typing things. How do I replicate the "shutdown account" functionality in Ubuntu? A related question, were there any security gotchas that motivated people to stop using this kind of account?

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  • How to Shutdown PC by Pressing Power Button

    - by AgA
    I always Hibernate my PC. Sometimes when I boot, it does not recognize the mouse/keyboard or any USB devices. I've also setup it to go in sleep in 5 minutes. In that case I can't restart the PC so that USB starts working. When I press the Power button then it starts shutdown but asks confirmation twice one is for shutdown by force confirmation and then there is one more. When my USB is disabled I can't input these options. So I switch off the power. What I want is that upon pressing Power Button it should at once start shutdown without asking any more confirmations System details: Win-7 Home Premium 64 bit Intel i3 530 Asus P montherboard EDIT: It is Desktop PC

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  • Ubuntu 11.10 logs off when clicking shutdown

    - by Rourke
    As the title says: when I click Shutdown from the menu it logs off. When I click shutdown from the log-in menu it does nothing. I'm using a fresh install of Ubuntu 11.10. I can force it to shutdown by the command below, but I don't want to keep typing that whenever I want to shutdown my laptop. sudo shutdown -h now So it's probably processes which arn't closing. I'm a novice linux user, so I have no idea how to rule out the software causing this. I think it's either Gwibber/Empathy, perhaps Mozilla Thunderbird, because this is happening since I started using this. So a few questions: How do I rule out what software is causing this? How do I stop it from not closing on shutdown? If 1. and 2. don't work is it possible to add top command to the shutdown process? Edit: Rourke here. Somehow I cannot accept the below comment from mech-e as the solution. Thank you this was indeed the answer I was looking for!

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  • Shutdown Hangs for 5 Minutes on Kubuntu 14.04

    - by Augustinus
    I've had persistent problems with a 5 minute hang at shutdown for the last three versions of Kubuntu (13.04, 13.10, and now 14.04). I suspect this is not a KDE-specific problem. Recently, I performed a fresh installation of Kubuntu 14.04 from a live-USB, and shutdown worked normally for about a week. The hang-up is now happening again, and I can't figure out why. A brief description of the problem: The hang-up occurs with all methods of initiating a normal shutdown: Clicking the shutdown or restart button in KDE, sudo shutdown -h now, sudo reboot The shutdown splash screen appears. Using the down-arrow to access verbose messages, I see "Asking all remaining processes to terminate." This message remains for 5 minutes with no disk activity. Finally, a rapid series of messages flurries to the screen: * All processes ended within 300 seconds... [ OK ] nm-dispatcher.action: Caught signal 15, shutting down... ModemManager[852]: <warn> Could not acquire the 'org.freedesktop.ModemManager1' service name ModemManager[852]: <info> ModemManager is shut down * Deactivating swap... [ OK ] * Unmounting local filesystems... [ OK ] * Will now restart` Possible Sources of the Problem: Before the problem re-appeared, I have mainly been doing routine computing. I have kept the system up-to-date using apt-get upgrade and apt-get dist-upgrade. The only other notable incident was a power failure. I do not have the computer connected to a UPS, so the power failure resulted in an immediate shutdown. Could this have corrupted an important file which must be accessed at shutdown? Is there any way that could cause a 5-minute hang-up? Here is a list of packages that have been updated before the problem appeared: bash iotop dpkg dpkg-dev python3-software-properties libdpkg-perl software-properties-kde software-properties-common akonadi-backend-mysql libakonadiprotocolinternals1 akonadi-server firefox-locale-en firefox flashplugin-installer libqapt2 libqapt2-runtime thunderbird openjdk-7-jre-headless thunderbird-locale-en kubuntu-driver-manager qapt-deb-installer openjdk-7-jre qapt-batch icedtea-7-jre-jamvm libelf1 dpkg dpkg-dev libdpkg-perl libjbig0 gettext-base libgettextpo-dev libssl1.0.0 libgettextpo0 libasprintf-dev linux-headers-3.13.0-24 gettext libasprintf0c2 linux-headers-3.13.0-24-generic openssl linux-libc-dev gstreamer0.10-qapt kubuntu-desktop linux-image-extra-3.13.0-24-generic linux-image-3.13.0-24-generic I would appreciate any help with this.

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  • Allow shutdown/restart if logged in another terminal

    - by user20415
    I have Natty installed. Howto allow shutdown/restart if other user logged in another terminal, for example using CTRL-ALT-DEL? I've tried to add the following lines in /etc/sudoers: user ALL=(root)NOPASSWD:/sbin/reboot user ALL=(root)NOPASSWD:/sbin/halt user ALL=(root)NOPASSWD:/sbin/shutdown and sudo chmod 750 /sbin/shutdown sudo chmod 750 /sbin/reboot or create /etc/shutdown.allow but it doesn't help and I still get Gnome login mask.

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  • Can't shutdown Ubuntu (Wubi Installation)

    - by zsgre3nd3s7
    I downloaded Ubuntu 12.04 using Wubi. The installation went correctly and everything was working fine until I tried to shutdown. I clicked shutdown and then Ubuntu started shutdown, but as soon as I saw the Ubuntu logo with blank dots under, it froze. I had to perform a hard shutdown. After booting my computer back and going into Ubuntu, I tried shutting it down again but this time it took me on a black page with lots and lots of log writing on the screen and after a little while, it stopped writing stuff. I was able to input characters using the keyboard and everything, but it never shutdown. I had to perform a hard shutdown again. Now it always gives me a Ubuntu logo and freezes. What should I do? I know hard shutdowns are bad and want to avoid them. Is there anyway to make shutdowns work? I tried a reboot and it also froze on the Ubuntu logo. Sony VAIO Model E SVE17115FDB Laptop. Graphic card - AMD RADEON HD 7650M (and it installed correctly in Ubuntu). BIOS - H2O Bios. Processor - Intel i7-3612QM. Edit: I only installed the AMD/ATI proprietary drivers FGLRX, not the AMD/ATI post release drivers because they keep showing an error message. Here is jockey.log. Edit 2: Here is the log that i mentioned before that appeared on my screen, it appeared after i tried reinstalling my AMD driver but failed so i reinstalled the other one. Sorry for the quality i took those pictures with my phone.

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  • Trouble WIth Immediate Shutdown in Ubuntu 13.10 with Cinnamon

    - by Sneha429
    Just installed Ubuntu on my family's computer. I thought the Cinnamon desktop environment would be better for my parents who have only ever used Windows. Everything works great until I try to shut down. Shutting down while in Cinnamon desktop brings up a prompt window that says it will shutdown in 60 seconds and gives the option to either suspend or cancel. The suspend button does not suspend the computer. Allowing the timer to countdown merely logs the current user out. Under power management, I have selected Shutdown Immediately for Power button action. I still get the same prompt. I have tried toggling between the other options, but regardless of what option is selected, the shutdown button always brings up the suspend or cancel prompt with no way to shutdown immediately. I would prefer not to use the power button for this as it is partially concealed with the computer desk. The fastest way to shutdown is to log out (which says it will log out in 60 seconds but also has log out and cancel buttons, so I can immediately log out) and then shutdown. I would prefer to have it automatically shut down. Any and all suggestions are appreciated. Thank you!

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  • Hybrid Shutdown in Windows 8

    - by Moab
    Referring to this article published September 8, 2011, it gives instructions on how to to do a full (non-hybrid) shutdown in Windows 8 from the command line. We have an option in the UI to revert back to the Windows 7 shutdown/cold boot behavior, or since that’s likely a fairly infrequent thing, you can use the new /full switch on shutdown.exe. From a cmd prompt, run: shutdown /s /full / t 0 to invoke an immediate full shutdown. shutdown /s /full /t 0 I tried this in W8 Enterprise RTM trial, but did not work, so I did a shutdown /? and noticed they have changed the command for a Full shutdown It appears the /s switch now does the full shutdown as explained in the MS article, and the /hybrid switch does the hybrid shutdown for fast startup. Can anyone confirm this change in other RTM versions of Windows 8? Any Microsoft docs on this change are welcome.

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  • have a bash script remotely shutdown another computer on the lan

    - by gletscher
    Hi I want to write a bash script that when called shuts down another computer on the lan. Maybe using ssh? The other computer is an ubuntu machine. Now I'm not sure how to send e.g. a sudo shutdown -h now command from withing a bash script to the ssh after logging in. Also I'm not sure how to obtain the rights for the sudo command, hence how to handle the communication between the server and client from within a bash script. Any suggestions are greatly appreciated.

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  • Lenovo Y460 Shutdown/Reboot/Logoff doesn't work

    - by ultimatebuster
    This is a part of the massive dump of problems I'm encountering with my Lenovo Y460 and Ubuntu. Problem: Cannot shutdown/reboot/logoff. Logoff issue: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1791439 Shutdown and Reboot often freezes without doing anything. Currently can only use hard reset. Maybe related to the tricks I did to work around the ATI/Intel issue. See: Lenovo Y460 ATI PowerXpress issue I'm not sure where I can find the shutdown/reboot logs. If you tell me I'll be happy to provide them. Not sure what to do as of right now other than never shutdown/reboot or logoff

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  • How to see what's going on during shutdown

    - by Huygens
    Since a few weeks, Ubuntu freezes almost everytime when I shut it down. I know it because the shutdown animation stops and nothing is responsive: Ctrl+Alt+Del or AltGr+Syst+[r,e,i,s,u,b] don't make any difference. I have tried to look at various log files in /var/log but only INFO level message are logged. My hope to solve this problem would be to do a verbose shutdown, one where I could see what's going on, and so what's causing the problem, so I could start solving it. Therefore, as the title suggest it. Is there a way to see what's going on during shutdown? I could even go to the extreme of doing a step-by-step shutdown if this is the only way. Thanks for any tips.

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  • How to safely shutdown Guest OS in VirtualBox using command line

    - by Bakhtiyor
    I have Ubuntu 10.10 and using VirtualBox 3.2. As a Guest OS I have another Ubuntu in the VirtualBox. I am starting Guest Ubuntu automatically using following command once my Host Ubuntu boots: VBoxHeadless -startvm Ubuntu --vrdp on Then I can access to it with ssh or tsclient. Now I need to shutdown automatically Guest Ubuntu once I shutdown my Host Ubuntu. Does anybody know any safe method to automatically shutdown Guest Ubuntu with a command line? I have found out two ways one can shutdown Guest OS but I am not sure whether they are safe or not. Here are they: VBoxManage controlvm Ubuntu acpipowerbutton or VBoxManage controlvm Ubuntu poweroff

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  • How to make XFCE show the Shutdown Menu?

    - by topskip
    I have installed XFCE on an "Ubuntu Server" (in a Virtual Machine) so I have a small and fast environment. But when I want to log out, I usually (not always) see a gray shutdown and reboot button, but I like to be able to shutdown via that menu (I know of shutdown -h now, but the users of my machine don't necessarily know). I use the display manager 'slim'. Question: how can I enable these buttons permanently?

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  • Startup/Shutdown time in Xubuntu is increasing!

    - by Ankit
    I am a novice Xubuntu user on a dual-boot machine. The other OS I have is Windows 7. When I first began using Xubuntu, I had really fast startup and shutdown (much much faster than Windows 7 :) ). However, as I started using it more and more for my work, these times started rising. I do not have any problems with execution speed of running applications. My main concern is the shutdown time. Now it has gone above Windows shutdown time [startup time has only partially increase compared to shutdown]. I checked some similar questions like this. However, they seem to not answer my concern as I feel that the concerned users there experience a long wait before the screen goes blue. In my case, the screen goes blue (desktop session ends a blue screen with a moving slider appears) pretty fast. However, it remains blue for a long time. Another answer that I saw on google was to use dmesg and then stopping some services that I do not want. However, me being a novice could not completely understand what it meant

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  • Cannot reboot or even shutdown my ubuntu

    - by Romel Salwi
    I use ubuntu 11.10. I recently installed gnome shell. The problem I'm facing is that i'm not able to restart or shutdown from ubuntu. I clicked on restart or shutdown button and nothing happens. Just nothing. I even try to login from my unity shell and still the problem persists. Even more funny, when I boot into linux, and seeing the login screen, Still even after clicking on shutdown, I won't happen. What mistake have I performed? But I'm able to perform reboot with the command "sudo reboot". Any assistance please. Thanks in advance.

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  • I can't get suspend, hibernate and shutdown to work in Ubuntu 12.04

    - by Fostext
    I recently built a computer with these specs: Asus Motherboard, Intel i3 3.3 GHz dual processor, 8 GB of RAM. I installed 12.04 on a brand new hard drive. I partitioned the hard drive between root, home and swap like I have often read how to do. I cannot get this machine to properly shutdown. I have to hold the power button down now. Although, for the first few days it properly shutdown. I also cannot get the system to hibernate or suspend properly. I have read tons on this and watched many YouTube tutorials on how to fix both, but the computer never wakes up after suspend or hibernate. It just stays on a black screen. Can anyone help? I love 12.04 so far, but these setbacks are making me worried about stability and power management issues. Also, I wonder if it's really bad for the hard drive to force the CPU to shutdown.

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  • Prevent shutdown when rsnapshot is running

    - by highsciguy
    Since shutdowns during rsnapshot operation will lead to inconsistent/partial backups, I wonder how to delay the system shutdown while rsnapshot is active. The task is complicated by the fact that I need a solution which is compatible with non-expert users. I.e. I need to tell reliably to the user that he needs to wait until the process is finished and not to do a hard reset. Once this is the case shutdown should continue. A possible solution could be to replace the action of the window managers (mostly KDE) shutdown/restart/hibernate buttons by a script which first checks if rsync is active and shows a message if this is the case. But I do not know if this is possible in KDE.

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  • How to force a "do you really want to shutdown?" dialog in Windows 7?

    - by Vokuhila-Oliba
    Sometimes I want to choose "Logout current user", but then I hit "Shutdown" by accident. Nearly everywhere else Windows 7 is asking "do you really want to do this? Yes/No" - but that's not the case when I hit the "Shutdown" button. Windows 7 shuts down immediately without giving me the chance to correct my mistake. So I am wondering - why does Windows shut down immediately without asking "really do that?" in this case? Is there a way to change this behavior? For example, could I force Windows to display a dialog asking "Do you really want to shutdown?"? I tried to change this behavior with the policy editor. It seems to be very easy to completely remove the Shutdown button from the Start menu, but I couldn't find an entry to turn on such a Yes/No dialog.

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  • Netbook performs hard shutdown without warning on low battery power

    - by Steve Kroon
    My Asus EEE netbook performs a hard shutdown when it reaches low battery power, without giving any warning - i.e. the power just goes off, without any shutdown process. I can't find anything in the syslog, and no error messages are printed before it happens. I've had this problem on previous (K)Ubuntu versions, and hoped updating to Ubuntu Precise would help resolve the issue, but it hasn't. The option in the Power application for "when power is critically low" is currently blank - the only options are a (grayed-out) hibernate and "Power off". I have re-installed indicator-power to no effect. The time remaining reported by acpi is unstable, as is the time remaining reported by gnome-power-statistics. (For example, running acpi twice in succession, I got 2h16min, and then 3h21min remaining. These sorts of jumps in the remaining time are also in the gnome-power-statistics graphs.) It might be possible to write a script to give me advance warning (as per @RanRag's comment below), but I would prefer to isolate why I don't get a critical battery notification from the system before this happens, so that I can take action as appropriate (suspend/shutdown/plug in power) when I get a notification. Some additional information on the battery: [email protected]:~$ upower -i /org/freedesktop/UPower/devices/battery_BAT0 native-path: /sys/devices/LNXSYSTM:00/device:00/PNP0A08:00/PNP0C0A:00/power_supply/BAT0 vendor: ASUS model: 1005P power supply: yes updated: Fri Aug 17 07:31:23 2012 (9 seconds ago) has history: yes has statistics: yes battery present: yes rechargeable: yes state: charging energy: 33.966 Wh energy-empty: 0 Wh energy-full: 34.9272 Wh energy-full-design: 47.52 Wh energy-rate: 3.7692 W voltage: 12.61 V time to full: 15.3 minutes percentage: 97.248% capacity: 73.5% technology: lithium-ion History (charge): 1345181483 97.248 charging 1345181453 97.155 charging 1345181423 97.062 charging 1345181393 96.970 charging History (rate): 1345181483 3.769 charging 1345181453 3.899 charging 1345181423 4.061 charging 1345181393 4.201 charging [email protected]:~$ cat /proc/acpi/battery/BAT0/state present: yes capacity state: ok charging state: charging present rate: 332 mA remaining capacity: 3149 mAh present voltage: 12612 mV [email protected]:~$ cat /proc/acpi/battery/BAT0/info present: yes design capacity: 4400 mAh last full capacity: 3209 mAh battery technology: rechargeable design voltage: 10800 mV design capacity warning: 10 mAh design capacity low: 5 mAh cycle count: 0 capacity granularity 1: 44 mAh capacity granularity 2: 44 mAh model number: 1005P serial number: battery type: LION OEM info: ASUS

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  • Ubuntu 12.04 "Shutdown" or "Restart" logs out

    - by jenls
    While logged in as a sudo user, click the right top power icon, then select and click "Shutdown" menu, it comes up with a dialog asking if I want to close all programs. The dialog has two options: restart or shutdown. Choose either one logs me out. Syslog has the following line about restart: WARNING: Unable to restart system: Authorization is required This happened after I installed NTP and some OpenStack packages while working in a prototype project. My Ubuntu's software is up to date as of this writing. Anyone encountered the same problem in 12.04?

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