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  • ???????????I/O?SSD????!

    - by Yusuke.Yamamoto
    ????? ??:2010/11/25 ??:???? ?????????????????????I/O???????????????? Oracle Database 11g Release 2 ?????Database Smart Flash Cache?????????????????????????????????????????????????????? ???????????????????SSD????????????"?????(??)"???????????????????? Database Smart Flash Cache ???OLTP??+?????????????????OLTP??+OLTP???10????????? ????????? ????????????????? http://oracletech.jp/products/pickup/000076.html

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  • Internal drives vs USB-3 with external SSD or eSata with External SSD

    - by normstorm
    I have a need to carry VMWare Virtual Machines with me for work. These are very large files (each VM is 20GB or more) and I carry around about 40 to 50 VM's to simulate different software configurations for different client needs. Key: they won't fit on the internal hard drive of my current laptop. I currently execute the VM's from an external 7200RPM 2.5" USB-2 drive. I keep copies of the VM's on other 5400 external USB-2 drives. The VM's work from this drive, but they are slow, costing me much time and frustration. It can take upwards of 30 minutes just to make a copy of one of the VM's. They can take upwards of 10-15 minutes to fully launch and then they operate sluggishly. I am buying a new laptop (Core I7, 8GB RAM and other high-end specs). I intend to buy an SSD for the O/S volume (C:). This SSD will not be large enough to hold the VM's. I have always wanted a second internal hard drive to operate the VM's. To have two hard drives, though, I am finding that I will have to go to a 17" laptop which would be bulky/heavy. I am instead considering purchasing a 15" laptop with either an eSATA port or USB-3 ports and then purchasing two external drives. One of the drives might be an external SSD (maybe OCX brand) for operating the VM's and the other a 7400RPM 1TB hard drive for carrying around the VM's not currently in use. The question is which options would give me the biggest bang for the buck and the weight: 1) 2nd Internal SSD hard drive. This would mean buying a 17" laptop with two drive "bays". The first bay would hold an SSD drive for the C: drive. I would leave the first bay empty from the manufacture and then purchase/install an aftermarket SSD drive. This second SSD drive would have to be very large (256 GB), which would be expensive. I would still also need another external hard drive for carrying around the VM's not in use. 2) 2nd internal hard drive - 7400 RPM. Again, a 17" laptop would be required, but there are models available with on SSD drive for the C: drive and a second 7200 RPM hard drives. The second drive could probably be large enough to hold the VM's in use as well as those not in use. But would it be fast enough to drive the VM's? 3) USB-3 with External SSD. I could buy a 15" laptop with an SSD drive for the C: drive and a second hard drive for general files. I would operate the VM's from an external USB-3 SSD drive and have a third USB-3 external 7200 RPM drive for holding the VM's not in use. 4) eSATA with External SSD. Ditto, just eSATA instead of USB-3 5) USB-3 with External 7400 RPM drive. Ditto, but the drive running the VM's would be USB-3 attached 7400 RPM drives rather than SSD. 6) eSATA with External 7400 RPM drive. Dittor, but the drive running the VM's would be eSATA attached 7400 RPM drives rather than SSD. Any thoughts on this and any creative solutions?

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  • SSD -- Special settings for SSD as secondary drive?

    - by Borg17of20
    Hello all, I recently purchased an Intel SSD (X25-V 40GB) and I want to add it to my PC as a secondary drive (not the boot/system drive) so I can install specific software to it. Now, do I need to do anything special to ensure long life and peak performance with this as a secondary drive? I have Windows 7 Pro. by the way. All the literature I can find covers the use of a SSD as a boot/system drive under Windows 7, but I don't want to run it like that (I have my reasons). I'm wondering if things like TRIM still work if you don't use the SSD as the boot/system drive. If TRIM and the like still works, do I have to do anything special in order to enable it for my particular setup? Thanks.

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  • HP ENVY TouchSmart 15t-j000 Quad Edition + custom mSata Plextor M5M 64GB SSD

    - by Akash Ramani
    The ssd did not come along with the laptop, so i bought one myself and physically installed it. I've booted into Ubuntu from a USB drive and my goal is to install / and /home in the SSD. (because most of the actual media exists on the HDD) The only problem is i'm unable to detect the SSD while configuring the partitions. I know the SSD is not the problem because it recognizes in a different laptop. I've followed the instructions shown in https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UEFI but that still doesn't help in identifying the SSD partition. Any help would be appreciated. (p.s: I'm wondering if i have to prepare the SSD through windows or something like that)

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  • raid advice with SSD and two HDD

    - by Nin
    I have a new machine with one 128GB SSD and two 1TB HDD. On the SSD is the OS and my initial thought was to put the two HDD in RAID 1 for user data. After some more thought I came up with two other setups and now I'm in doubt :) Can someone advise what would be the best setup? 1: single SSD and HDD in RAID 1 (original thought) 2: Create 2 partitions on the HDD (128GB and 872GB). Put the two 872GB in RAID 1 and create another RAID 1 with the SSD and one 128GB HDD partition. 3: Create 2 partitions on the HDD (750/250), put the 705GB in RAID 1 and use the 2 250GB as backup and make automatic snapshots of the SSD to (one of) these partitions. I think the 2 main questions are: Is it advisable to create a raid array with only part of a drive and actively use the other part of that drive or should you always use the full disk? Is it advisable to create a raid 1 array with a SSD and HDD or will that blow the whole speed advantage of the SSD?

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  • Installation on SSD with Windows preinstalled

    - by ebbot
    I bought a laptop with this fancy SSD drive, fancy new UEFI aso. I figured at first Windows out Ubuntu in but after doing 3 DoA on 3 laptops in one day I realized that maybe keeping Windows could come in handy. So dual boot it is. And this is what I've got: Disk 1 - 500 Gb HD 300 Mb Windoze only says "Healthy" don't know what it's for. 600 Mb "Healthy (EFI partition)" 186.30 Gb NTFS "OS (C:)" "Healthy (Boot, Page File, Crash Dump, Primary Partition)" 258.45 Gb NTFS "Data (D:)" "Healthy" 20.00 Gb "Healthy (Recovery Partition)" Disk 2 - 24 Gb SSD 4.00 Gb "Healthy (OEM Partition)" 18.36 Gb "Healthy (Primary Partition)" So I'm not sure what the first partition on each drive does (the 300 Gb on the HD and the OEM Partition on the SSD. Nor do I know what Data (D:). I think the 2nd partition on the SSD is for some speedup of Windoze. I'm debating if I should shrink the OS (C:) drive to around 120 GB or so. Clear the Data (D:) and also use the whole SSD for Ubuntu. That would leave me 24 Gb for e.g. / on the SSD and some 320 Gb on the HD for /home and swap. Is this a reasonable setup? Do I need to configure fstab for the SSD differently to a HD?

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  • Trim on encrypted SSD--Urandom first?

    - by cb474
    My understanding (I'm not sure I'm getting this all right) is that if one uses Trim on an encrypted SSD, it defeats some of the security benefits, because the drive will write zeros to empty space (as files are deleted). See: http://www.askubuntu.com/questions/115823/trim-on-an-encrypted-ssd And: http://asalor.blogspot.com/2011/08/trim-dm-crypt-problems.html My question is: From the perspective of the performance of the SSD and the functioning of Trim, would it therefore be better to simply zero out the SSD, before setting up an encrypted system, rather than writing random data to the drive, with urandom, as one usually does? Would this basically leave one with the same level of security anyway? And more importantly, would it better enable the Trim functionality to work as intended, with the encrypted SSD?

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  • System doesn't boot when ubuntu is installed on an SSD

    - by Caetano Nichnich Nunes
    I've recently discovered Ubuntu and decided to give it a try. I am using a Samsung Series 5 p530u3c-ad1 which comes with a 24gb SSD and a ~500gb HDD, My intention is to set the system files to the ssd and the rest to the HDD. The system works fine if I do a direct install using only the HDD, but if I try using the SSD for the system files the computer doesn't boot-up, I do not know if the SSD is being recognized by the computer, I think so because I could install Ubuntu on it, but it doesn't appear on the boot order or the boot menu. I read some posts and tried using boot-repair which pointed me not to forget to set my system to boot from my SSD, unfortunately I cannot because of the issues mentioned above. Thanks for your time.

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  • SSD temperature sensor readout with hddtemp

    - by Dande Un
    It seems hddtemp cannot detect the temperature sensor of my SSD (Samsung EVO 840) properly.This is the bash output when running hddtemp: WARNUNG: Laufwerk /dev/sda scheint keinen Temperatur-Sensor zu haben. WARNUNG: Das bedeutet nicht, dass es keinen besitzt. WARNUNG: Falls Sie sicher sind, dass es einen besitzt, kontaktieren Sie mich bitte ([email protected]). WARNUNG: Siehe Optionen --help, --debug und --drivebase. /dev/sda: Samsung SSD 840 EVO 120G B [email protected]: kein Sensor I looked in the most recent .db file posted on http://nongnu.mirrors.hostinginnederland.nl//hddtemp/hddtemp.db, but it doesn't seem to list any SSD drives at all. Was anyone able to readout the temp-sensor of a SSD with hddtemp?

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  • Increase Performance of VS 2010 by using a SSD

    - by System.Data
    After searching on the internet for performance improvements when using Visual Studio 2010 with a solid state hard drive, I heard a lot of different opinions. A lot of people said that there isn't really a benefit when using a SSD, but in contrast others said the exact opposite. I am a bit confused with the contrasting opinions and I cannot really make a decision whether buying a SSD would make a difference. What are your experiences with this issue and which SSD did you use?

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  • installing ubuntu on SSD

    - by kunal
    Going to install Ubuntu 10.10 on new intel x25M 80GB SSD. It will be fresh install. I have been googling for past few days and getting overwhelming articles/blogs/Q&As. One particularly very useful being: Optimize for SSD (I could not post other links as i dont have enough credits) But with so many suggestions and differences of opinions (on different links) this simple OS install process seems to be daunting task to me and I really want to stick with ubuntu (although have used for very short period of time). Can someone help me by answering few questions (yes they are repeated as i couldnt comprehend the answers elsewhere) which file system (ext2/3/4 or something else)? (consider SSD life) can it be changed after installation? should i partition the disk? (as we do in traditional HDD) for now, no plan of dual booting. Only ubuntu will live on scarce space of 80GB SSD. i have 2 GB RAM, should i still allocate swap space (if i dont allocate swap space, can i still hibernate the machine)? will swap space impact SSD life? should i consider putting additional 1GB RAM to avoid swap space? Linux experience - absolute novice intended usage - heavy browsing, programming, regular video/music and some other non-CPU/RAM-intensive programs. will backup big files to an external hard drive. laptop config - 3 yr old vaio, core2 duo, 2GB RAM Please pardon the repetition and i really appreciate anyone helping me getting started with ubuntu.

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  • How To Dual Boot Windows 7 and Ubuntu in 32GB SSD

    - by Hussain
    In my System I have a 32GB SSD and a 500GB HDD. I want to dual Boot My Windows OS and Ubuntu OS in the Same SSD HardDisk..but i am Unable to do that...afterwards i tried to install Both the OS in my 500 GB HDD, but it then also is Not Dual Booting.... Then i have Tried to Boot my Ubuntu in 32 SSD & Windows 7 in HDD, So While Booting it Starts with Windows 7... So My Question is First of all How To Dual Boot Windows 7 and Ubuntu in 32 GB SSD.. and if Not Possible then... Why is it Not Booting From 500GB HDD.. Please Help Me..... Thanxx in Advance..

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  • Partitioning: SSD + HDD Encrypted

    - by wegsehen
    I have a new computer and thinking about partitioning. Situation is this: 60GB SSD 1TB HD On my laptop I'm using full encryption but what do you suggest for encryption? I heard, encryption is bad for SSDs. So I first thought of making SSD / and HDD als /home/ but then I'd be losing advantages of the SSD. Because all config-files would be on the HDD. Other way would be: SSD: / 15 GB unencrypted /home encrypted HDD: 1TB and store Pictures & Music on HDD and link the folders. But that would leave my personal files unencrypted. Also what's about SWAP? What would you suggest for partitioning?

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  • How to move Ubuntu to an SSD

    - by Bart van Heukelom
    My current situation is: One hard disk Dual boot Ubuntu 11.04 and Windows 7. Partitions: 100MB Windows System thingy 144GB Main Windows 160GB Ubuntu 4GB Swap 12GB System Restore stuff Now I want to install an 80GB SSD and move Ubuntu to it. AFAIK I need to: Shrink the 160GB Ubuntu partition to 80GB Copy it over to the SSD Change fstab to mount the SSD as / How do I do the second? And what do I need to do about Grub?

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  • Cloning a dual boot system from HDD to SSD

    - by Alex
    I'm planning on replacing my laptop's HDD with a 256GB SSD, but I have a dual-boot (12.04 and Windows 7) setup and I'd like to be able to directly migrate Ubuntu over without having to reinstall and lose all of my settings. GParted reports the following partition setup on my HDD. I am, of course, able to modify it if necessary. /dev/sda1 (NTFS) 66.92 out of 200.00 MB used I'm honestly not sure what this partition is for. Maybe for Windows 7 system files? I'm hesitant to mess with it. (edit; it turns out it is a partition for Windows recovery files in the event of OS corruption, so I don't want to remove it. Plus it also appears to be a major pain to remove anyways) /dev/sda2 (NTFS) 116.35 out of 339.06 GB used (boot) This partition is the C:/ drive on my Windows installation. I don't use it on my Ubuntu installation, except it is the boot partition and thus has grub on it. /dev/sda4 (extended) > /dev/sda5 (ext4) 14.49 out of 91.34 GB used > /dev/sda6 (linux-swap) 5.92 GB These are my Ubuntu partitions. /sda5 contains my documents and all of the files I use on Ubuntu, and (as far as I know) the system files for Ubuntu itself (it's the partition I created when prompted by the Live-DVD installer). /sda6 is, of course, the swap partition which I only need for hibernation (6GB of RAM). /dev/sda3 (NTFS) 9.89 out of 14.75 GB used This is an annoying partition that Lenovo created to store some drivers and files that I might need later on. For example, it allows me to use OneKeyRecovery for a quick factory recovery if absolutely necessary, not sure if that'll work on an SSD. It also contains not-so-important files for bloatware installation. In total, my HDD only has about 150GB of files on it so it should fit comfortably on the SSD. The problem is, I want to exactly migrate my files, partitions, OSes, MBR, etc. from my HDD to my SSD and I'm not quite sure how to do this. I've seen CloneZilla referenced before, but I'm not all too experienced and the documentation for it quite frankly seems a bit like a foreign language to me. So, put simply, is there any way I can exactly clone this HDD to an SSD without a massive headache? Also, if it matters, I'll probably be using an external hard drive case (as recommended in online tutorials) to externally attach the SSD to my laptop during the cloning process due to the lack of two hard drive slots in the machine.

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  • SSD I/O extremely slow installing/booting Ubuntu 12.04

    - by Menda
    These are some useful specs: Macbook Pro 7,1 OWC Mercury Extreme Pro 2,5" SATA SSD (120 GB). Has SandForce driver. Ubuntu 12.04 Desktop 32 bits. One 18 GB partition for GNU/Linux and 1.5 GB for SWAP. MD5 for the Ubuntu install CD is OK. I tried to install Ubuntu. It seems that everything is recognized, but there's a big problem: read and writes to the SSD are extremely slow. For example, the install process, which shouldn't take more than 20 minutes, it takes 7 hours. Then, booting up the computer takes about 20 minutes. I checked and the problem is definitely the SSD. Every access to any file is like 10 times slower than normal. I have tried to format the partition as Ext4 and Ext3 with the same problem. Trying to install other distros like Fedora 17, I have a similar problem. There's a "lag" with the SSD, but not so accused as in Ubuntu. Surprisingly, Debian 6.0 installs and works without any problem. Mac OS works pretty good as well in the other partition, so I discard it's an SSD problem. Thanks for your help!

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  • Unable to boot from new SSD after installing from USB

    - by user73725
    I'm using a new SSD with nothing on it. It's installed via USB drive, and boots from USB as well. While in Ubuntu I can see the SSD and other devices. When I install from the desktop (have tried from the boot screen as well), system restarts. It takes me to the boot screen, select boot from first hard disk, nothing, goes right back to boot screen. When I take the USB out, it hangs on "Verifing DMI." If I boot onto the USB I can see the correct files located in the SSD. I have a basic knowledge of computers. Give me any thing you think would help. No other OS's are loaded. Gigabyte ga-k8n-sli 1GB RAM AMD Athlon 64 x2 dual core 3800+ OCZ SSD Agility 3 120GB

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  • Still about SSD potentials...write and read speed

    - by Macroideal
    I have been working on SSD (solid state disk) for several months..Problems and Questions hit my head unexpectedly..Coz i am a virgin in ssd... Especially these days I was testing the write-read speed of ssd, which I was always caring.... however result turned out not good as I expected, or even worse Three kinds of read-write were implemented in my test read and write directly from and into ssd, with openning ssd as a whole device. in windows: _open("\\:g", ***).. It can be very tricky and hairy that you'd write a data with size of folds of 512, at the disk position of folds of 512bytes... So, If you wanto write just a byte or 4 bytes, you'v to write at least a whole sector one time. Read and write data from and into files located in SSD... Read and Write data from and into files in mechanical Disk I compared the pratices below...I found ssd sucks...the ssd performs worse than mechanical disk... so i am wondering where i can get the potential performance of ssd, since ssd is said to a substitute for mechanical disk in the future.. Nevertheless, I test ssd with a pro-hard-disk tools..ssd is like twice speedier than mechanical disk. So, why?

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  • Very slow write access to SSD disks on some Asus P8Z77 motherboards

    - by lenik
    I have Asus P8Z77-V LK motherboard, that ran Mint 13 (based on Ubuntu 12.04) just perfectly, but recently I've tried to install Mint 17 and noticed abysmal write performance. Write speed on SSD disk was about 1.5MB/sec, when it's supposed to be in 150-250MB/sec range. For write testing I've used dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda bs=10M count=10 while booted up from LiveCD. I have also tested the read speed with hdparm -tT /dev/sda and got about 440MB/sec -- that's normal. I can tell, the read performance has not degraded at all and is not an issue here. Since I had a few different SSD disks and few motherboards, I've tested and tested and here are results: Asus P8H77 works fine with Mint13, has very slow write speed starting from Mint14. Asus P8Z77-V LK works with Mint13, has very slow write speed starting from Mint14. Asus P8Z77-V PRO works with Mint13, and works just fine with Mint14, 15, 16 and 17. The only difference between "PRO" version and others is that it has extra SATA controller onboard (in addition to the Z77 chipset SATA controller) providing extra 2 SATA ports. SSD disks work fine with "PRO" version when connected to the native SATA ports as well as to the ports provided by extra SATA controller, so this does not look like a hardware issue. As far as I can tell, there's something changed in the kernel while going from 3.2 to 3.5, that affects the detection of onboard SATA controller for Asus P8*77 motherboards, that screws up the write speed for SSD drives. Could anyone shed some light on how to fix this issue or, possibly, give a pointer to a more suitable place to ask this question?

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  • Encrypt SSD or not?

    - by JamesBradbury
    My desktop machine is running Ubuntu 12.04 (and will probably stay with it until the next LTS). I've got a new 120GB SSD on the way as my existing 420GB spinning disk. If it makes any difference I'll be dual-booting with Windows 7 across both disks too. I've read some helpful answers here about /home setup and enabling TRIM, which I intend to follow. So most of my /home will be on the SSD, with only photos, videos and music on the spinning disk. The question is, when I reinstall Ubuntu from CD or USB, whether I should encrypt the SSD? Specifically: I'm reading that drive wear isn't much of an issue with modern SSDs as they last decades even if you spam them. Is this true? How big a performance reduction will encrypting cause (I have an i7 Sandybridge, so I guess it can cope)? Is it more important from a security point of view to encrypt an SSD? I think I read somewhere that it may be hard to reliably wipe data. By all means answer even if you only know about one of those things.

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  • partitioning ssd +hdd

    - by ALdaperan
    I recently bought an ssd drive 128 gb and i would like yo have your suggestions on partitiong and installing ubuntu 12.10 on it. First of all my drives are : HDD 640 Gb SSD Samsung 830 series 128 Gb Whats the best partitiong for theese drives ? 128 Gb is sure enormous amount of space only for / (root) . Is it a good choice if i make 2 partitions on ssd (20 Gb / and 100 /home) and leave hdd as backub drive for my data (files,movies,music etc) ? In this case what mount point must have hdd ? Can you suggest me the best partitiong for my drives ?

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  • Setting up lvm with HDD and SSD

    - by stonegrizzly
    My current hard drive is just about full and rather than just toss it and get a new one (since it works fine), I want to get a new drive and set them both up using lvm. While I'm at it, I also want to get an SSD to install the OS and applications on. This is my plan: Put / on the SSD (one partition) Put /tmp on a ram disk Put /var on a partition on my new drive Put /home on the rest of the new drive and my current drive using lvm. My goals are: Speed up boot time and application launch Minimize unnecessary writes to the SSD Never have to worry about which disk/partition to store my files on. I want the OS & lvm to take care of that Does this make sense? I'm fairly experienced with Ubuntu but I've never dealt with lvm before.

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  • What would cause SSD to become not detectable?

    - by Balthazar
    I recently purchased an Intel 520 120GB SSD and installed Ubuntu on it. Occasionally my system will freeze and I will have to ALT-PRINT SCREEN-REISUB to reboot. Sometimes it will reboot and work just fine. Other times it just hangs at a flashing prompt. If I boot from a Live USB I can run Boot-Repair and it will usually reboot fine the next go round. I have noticed today that when I am running the live USB and open Nautilus my SSD partitions will sporadically disappear and reappear. Even if they are mounted. I was thinking it was a poor connection, but I have tried a different SATA cable and a different SATA port. Is it possible I have a faulty SSD, or is there something different you have to do with SSDs to make sure they stay mounted (I was thinking like it has some sort of goofy power savings feature that needs to be disabled). I found the place in the bios where the SATA ports are listed. They are all set to AHCI(Chipset - SATA Mode = AHCI) The unmounting/remounting happens all the time. I think this is the relevant part of the syslog: http://pastebin.com/WxHdRAAq

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  • Acer S3 SSD and HD Deleted partitions?

    - by user207784
    I'm new to Linux and Ubuntu, and I think I have a problem. I have an Acer Aspire S3 with 20GB SSD and 320GB HD. I installed Ubuntu 12.04 64bit on it today, and when it asked about partitions, without knowing better, I erased the partitions. There is some information at https://help.ubuntu.com/community/AspireS3 about using the SSD and HD efficiently, but since I deleted the partitions, I don't know what to do. How can I recreate the partitions mentioned in the above link so that I can take advantage of having SSD and HD? I installed GParted, but I don't know what I should do now, and I don't want to screw things up further. I greatly appreciate any help that can be offered me. EDIT: I was playing with GParted, and I just realized that I can see dev/sda and dev/sdb, so perhaps I didn't do something horrible to my partitions. I am also sorry for asking such (dumb?) questions. At this point, is there a way to tell whether I have actually screwed up my partitions? Thanks, Joe

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  • Unsure about TRIM enabled on my SSD

    - by user84750
    I have a SSD OCZ Vertex4 installed on my laptop. I'm running Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. I have enable TRIM by adding "discard" to my fstab file. (also added option noatime). I rebooted my Ubuntu and followed These instructions here to test TRIM. The end results of my tempfile was all ffff's, when it should have read all zero's, which is telling me TRIM is not really working or enabled correctly. Did I miss something? Also, will it be a problem if only my /home directory is encrypted. AND if you ask why I have swap on my SSD, it's because I let Ubuntu set up my partition. When I have my SSD, I just wanted to install Ubuntu as fast as possible. =) I've done testing to see at which point it will start to use swap and it took a lot of applications open to finally use swap. I currently have 4 GB of memory. I might shrink this to like 512 MB or 1 GB the most. Here's some info about my file system setup. sudo hdparm -I /dev/sda1 | grep "TRIM supported" Data Set Management TRIM supported (limit 16 blocks) sudo fdisk -l /dev/sda Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sda1 * 2048 242016255 121007104 83 Linux /dev/sda2 242018302 250068991 4025345 5 Extended /dev/sda5 242018304 250068991 4025344 82 Linux swap / Solaris ls /dev/mapper control cryptswap1

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