Search Results

Search found 459 results on 19 pages for 'stefan hinker'.

Page 1/19 | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  | Next Page >

  • beginning oop php question: do constructors take the place of getter?

    - by Joel
    I'm working through this tutorial: http://www.killerphp.com/tutorials/object-oriented-php/php-objects-page-3.php At first he has you create a setter and getter method in the class: <?php class person{ var $name; function set_name($new_name){ $this->name=$new_name; } function get_name(){ return $this->name; } } php?> And then you create the object and echo the results: <?php $stefan = new person(); $jimmy = new person(); $stefan ->set_name("Stefan Mischook"); $jimmy ->set_name("Nick Waddles"); echo "The first Object name is: ".$stefan->get_name(); echo "The second Object name is: ".$jimmy->get_name(); ?> Works as expected, and I understand. Then he introduces constructors: class person{ var $name; function __construct($persons_name) { $this->name = $persons_name; } function set_name($new_name){ $this->name=$new_name; } function get_name(){ return $this->name; } } And returns like so: <?php $joel = new person("Joel"); echo "The third Object name is: ".$joel->get_name(); ?> This is all fine and makes sense. Then I tried to combine the two and got an error, so I'm curious-is a constructor always taking the place of a "get" function? If you have a constructor, do you always need to include an argument when creating an object? Gives errors: <?php $stefan = new person(); $jimmy = new person(); $joel = new person("Joel Laviolette"); $stefan ->set_name("Stefan Mischook"); $jimmy ->set_name("Nick Waddles"); echo "The first Object name is: ".$stefan->get_name(); echo "The second Object name is: ".$jimmy->get_name(); echo "The third Object name is: ".$joel->get_name(); ?>

    Read the article

  • Setting up a local AI server - easy with Solaris 11

    - by Stefan Hinker
    Many things are new in Solaris 11, Autoinstall is one of them.  If, like me, you've known Jumpstart for the last 2 centuries or so, you'll have to start from scratch.  Well, almost, as the concepts are similar, and it's not all that difficult.  Just new. I wanted to have an AI server that I could use for demo purposes, on the train if need be.  That answers the question of hardware requirements: portable.  But let's start at the beginning. First, you need an OS image, of course.  In the new world of Solaris 11, it is now called a repository.  The original can be downloaded from the Solaris 11 page at Oracle.   What you want is the "Oracle Solaris 11 11/11 Repository Image", which comes in two parts that can be combined using cat.  MD5 checksums for these (and all other downloads from that page) are available closer to the top of the page. With that, building the repository is quick and simple: # zfs create -o mountpoint=/export/repo rpool/ai/repo # zfs create rpool/ai/repo/s11 # mount -o ro -F hsfs /tmp/sol-11-1111-repo-full.iso /mnt # rsync -aP /mnt/repo /export/repo/s11 # umount /mnt # pkgrepo rebuild -s /export/repo/sol11/repo # zfs snapshot rpool/ai/repo/[email protected] # pkgrepo info -s /export/repo/sol11/repo PUBLISHER PACKAGES STATUS UPDATED solaris 4292 online 2012-03-12T20:47:15.378639Z That's all there's to it.  Let's make a snapshot, just to be on the safe side.  You never know when one will come in handy.  To use this repository, you could just add it as a file-based publisher: # pkg set-publisher -g file:///export/repo/sol11/repo solaris In case I'd want to access this repository through a (virtual) network, i'll now quickly activate the repository-service: # svccfg -s application/pkg/server \ setprop pkg/inst_root=/export/repo/sol11/repo # svccfg -s application/pkg/server setprop pkg/readonly=true # svcadm refresh application/pkg/server # svcadm enable application/pkg/server That's all you need - now point your browser to http://localhost/ to view your beautiful repository-server. Step 1 is done.  All of this, by the way, is nicely documented in the README file that's contained in the repository image. Of course, we already have updates to the original release.  You can find them in MOS in the Oracle Solaris 11 Support Repository Updates (SRU) Index.  You can simply add these to your existing repository or create separate repositories for each SRU.  The individual SRUs are self-sufficient and incremental - SRU4 includes all updates from SRU2 and SRU3.  With ZFS, you can also get both: A full repository with all updates and at the same time incremental ones up to each of the updates: # mount -o ro -F hsfs /tmp/sol-11-1111-sru4-05-incr-repo.iso /mnt # pkgrecv -s /mnt/repo -d /export/repo/sol11/repo '*' # umount /mnt # pkgrepo rebuild -s /export/repo/sol11/repo # zfs snapshot rpool/ai/repo/[email protected] # zfs set snapdir=visible rpool/ai/repo/sol11 # svcadm restart svc:/application/pkg/server:default The normal repository is now updated to SRU4.  Thanks to the ZFS snapshots, there is also a valid repository of Solaris 11 11/11 without the update located at /export/repo/sol11/.zfs/snapshot/fcs . If you like, you can also create another repository service for each update, running on a separate port. But now lets continue with the AI server.  Just a little bit of reading in the dokumentation makes it clear that we will need to run a DHCP server for this.  Since I already have one active (for my SunRay installation) and since it's a good idea to have these kinds of services separate anyway, I decided to create this in a Zone.  So, let's create one first: # zfs create -o mountpoint=/export/install rpool/ai/install # zfs create -o mountpoint=/zones rpool/zones # zonecfg -z ai-server zonecfg:ai-server> create create: Using system default template 'SYSdefault' zonecfg:ai-server> set zonepath=/zones/ai-server zonecfg:ai-server> add dataset zonecfg:ai-server:dataset> set name=rpool/ai/install zonecfg:ai-server:dataset> set alias=install zonecfg:ai-server:dataset> end zonecfg:ai-server> commit zonecfg:ai-server> exit # zoneadm -z ai-server install # zoneadm -z ai-server boot ; zlogin -C ai-server Give it a hostname and IP address at first boot, and there's the Zone.  For a publisher for Solaris packages, it will be bound to the "System Publisher" from the Global Zone.  The /export/install filesystem, of course, is intended to be used by the AI server.  Let's configure it now: #zlogin ai-server [email protected]:~# pkg install install/installadm [email protected]:~# installadm create-service -n x86-fcs -a i386 \ -s pkg://solaris/install-image/[email protected],5.11-0.175.0.0.0.2.1482 \ -d /export/install/fcs -i 192.168.2.20 -c 3 With that, the core AI server is already done.  What happened here?  First, I installed the AI server software.  IPS makes that nice and easy.  If necessary, it'll also pull in the required DHCP-Server and anything else that might be missing.  Watch out for that DHCP server software.  In Solaris 11, there are two different versions.  There's the one you might know from Solaris 10 and earlier, and then there's a new one from ISC.  The latter is the one we need for AI.  The SMF service names of both are very similar.  The "old" one is "svc:/network/dhcp-server:default". The ISC-server comes with several SMF-services. We at least need "svc:/network/dhcp/server:ipv4".  The command "installadm create-service" creates the installation-service. It's called "x86-fcs", serves the "i386" architecture and gets its boot image from the repository of the system publisher, using version 5.11,5.11-0.175.0.0.0.2.1482, which is Solaris 11 11/11.  (The option "-a i386" in this example is optional, since the installserver itself runs on a x86 machine.) The boot-environment for clients is created in /export/install/fcs and the DHCP-server is configured for 3 IP-addresses starting at 192.168.2.20.  This configuration is stored in a very human readable form in /etc/inet/dhcpd4.conf.  An AI-service for SPARC systems could be created in the very same way, using "-a sparc" as the architecture option. Now we would be ready to register and install the first client.  It would be installed with the default "solaris-large-server" using the publisher "http://pkg.oracle.com/solaris/release" and would query it's configuration interactively at first boot.  This makes it very clear that an AI-server is really only a boot-server.  The true source of packets to install can be different.  Since I don't like these defaults for my demo setup, I did some extra config work for my clients. The configuration of a client is controlled by manifests and profiles.  The manifest controls which packets are installed and how the filesystems are layed out.  In that, it's very much like the old "rules.ok" file in Jumpstart.  Profiles contain additional configuration like root passwords, primary user account, IP addresses, keyboard layout etc.  Hence, profiles are very similar to the old sysid.cfg file. The easiest way to get your hands on a manifest is to ask the AI server we just created to give us it's default one.  Then modify that to our liking and give it back to the installserver to use: [email protected]:~# mkdir -p /export/install/configs/manifests [email protected]:~# cd /export/install/configs/manifests [email protected]:~# installadm export -n x86-fcs -m orig_default \ -o orig_default.xml [email protected]:~# cp orig_default.xml s11-fcs.small.local.xml [email protected]:~# vi s11-fcs.small.local.xml [email protected]:~# more s11-fcs.small.local.xml <!DOCTYPE auto_install SYSTEM "file:///usr/share/install/ai.dtd.1"> <auto_install> <ai_instance name="S11 Small fcs local"> <target> <logical> <zpool name="rpool" is_root="true"> <filesystem name="export" mountpoint="/export"/> <filesystem name="export/home"/> <be name="solaris"/> </zpool> </logical> </target> <software type="IPS"> <destination> <image> <!-- Specify locales to install --> <facet set="false">facet.locale.*</facet> <facet set="true">facet.locale.de</facet> <facet set="true">facet.locale.de_DE</facet> <facet set="true">facet.locale.en</facet> <facet set="true">facet.locale.en_US</facet> </image> </destination> <source> <publisher name="solaris"> <origin name="http://192.168.2.12/"/> </publisher> </source> <!-- By default the latest build available, in the specified IPS repository, is installed. If another build is required, the build number has to be appended to the 'entire' package in the following form: <name>pkg:/[email protected]#</name> --> <software_data action="install"> <name>pkg:/[email protected],5.11-0.175.0.0.0.2.0</name> <name>pkg:/group/system/solaris-small-server</name> </software_data> </software> </ai_instance> </auto_install> [email protected]:~# installadm create-manifest -n x86-fcs -d \ -f ./s11-fcs.small.local.xml [email protected]:~# installadm list -m -n x86-fcs Manifest Status Criteria -------- ------ -------- S11 Small fcs local Default None orig_default Inactive None The major points in this new manifest are: Install "solaris-small-server" Install a few locales less than the default.  I'm not that fluid in French or Japanese... Use my own package service as publisher, running on IP address 192.168.2.12 Install the initial release of Solaris 11:  pkg:/[email protected],5.11-0.175.0.0.0.2.0 Using a similar approach, I'll create a default profile interactively and use it as a template for a few customized building blocks, each defining a part of the overall system configuration.  The modular approach makes it easy to configure numerous clients later on: [email protected]:~# mkdir -p /export/install/configs/profiles [email protected]:~# cd /export/install/configs/profiles [email protected]:~# sysconfig create-profile -o default.xml [email protected]:~# cp default.xml general.xml; cp default.xml mars.xml [email protected]:~# cp default.xml user.xml [email protected]:~# vi general.xml mars.xml user.xml [email protected]:~# more general.xml mars.xml user.xml :::::::::::::: general.xml :::::::::::::: <!DOCTYPE service_bundle SYSTEM "/usr/share/lib/xml/dtd/service_bundle.dtd.1"> <service_bundle type="profile" name="sysconfig"> <service version="1" type="service" name="system/timezone"> <instance enabled="true" name="default"> <property_group type="application" name="timezone"> <propval type="astring" name="localtime" value="Europe/Berlin"/> </property_group> </instance> </service> <service version="1" type="service" name="system/environment"> <instance enabled="true" name="init"> <property_group type="application" name="environment"> <propval type="astring" name="LANG" value="C"/> </property_group> </instance> </service> <service version="1" type="service" name="system/keymap"> <instance enabled="true" name="default"> <property_group type="system" name="keymap"> <propval type="astring" name="layout" value="US-English"/> </property_group> </instance> </service> <service version="1" type="service" name="system/console-login"> <instance enabled="true" name="default"> <property_group type="application" name="ttymon"> <propval type="astring" name="terminal_type" value="vt100"/> </property_group> </instance> </service> <service version="1" type="service" name="network/physical"> <instance enabled="true" name="default"> <property_group type="application" name="netcfg"> <propval type="astring" name="active_ncp" value="DefaultFixed"/> </property_group> </instance> </service> <service version="1" type="service" name="system/name-service/switch"> <property_group type="application" name="config"> <propval type="astring" name="default" value="files"/> <propval type="astring" name="host" value="files dns"/> <propval type="astring" name="printer" value="user files"/> </property_group> <instance enabled="true" name="default"/> </service> <service version="1" type="service" name="system/name-service/cache"> <instance enabled="true" name="default"/> </service> <service version="1" type="service" name="network/dns/client"> <property_group type="application" name="config"> <property type="net_address" name="nameserver"> <net_address_list> <value_node value="192.168.2.1"/> </net_address_list> </property> </property_group> <instance enabled="true" name="default"/> </service> </service_bundle> :::::::::::::: mars.xml :::::::::::::: <!DOCTYPE service_bundle SYSTEM "/usr/share/lib/xml/dtd/service_bundle.dtd.1"> <service_bundle type="profile" name="sysconfig"> <service version="1" type="service" name="network/install"> <instance enabled="true" name="default"> <property_group type="application" name="install_ipv4_interface"> <propval type="astring" name="address_type" value="static"/> <propval type="net_address_v4" name="static_address" value="192.168.2.100/24"/> <propval type="astring" name="name" value="net0/v4"/> <propval type="net_address_v4" name="default_route" value="192.168.2.1"/> </property_group> <property_group type="application" name="install_ipv6_interface"> <propval type="astring" name="stateful" value="yes"/> <propval type="astring" name="stateless" value="yes"/> <propval type="astring" name="address_type" value="addrconf"/> <propval type="astring" name="name" value="net0/v6"/> </property_group> </instance> </service> <service version="1" type="service" name="system/identity"> <instance enabled="true" name="node"> <property_group type="application" name="config"> <propval type="astring" name="nodename" value="mars"/> </property_group> </instance> </service> </service_bundle> :::::::::::::: user.xml :::::::::::::: <!DOCTYPE service_bundle SYSTEM "/usr/share/lib/xml/dtd/service_bundle.dtd.1"> <service_bundle type="profile" name="sysconfig"> <service version="1" type="service" name="system/config-user"> <instance enabled="true" name="default"> <property_group type="application" name="root_account"> <propval type="astring" name="login" value="root"/> <propval type="astring" name="password" value="noIWillNotTellYouMyPasswordNotEvenEncrypted"/> <propval type="astring" name="type" value="role"/> </property_group> <property_group type="application" name="user_account"> <propval type="astring" name="login" value="stefan"/> <propval type="astring" name="password" value="noIWillNotTellYouMyPasswordNotEvenEncrypted"/> <propval type="astring" name="type" value="normal"/> <propval type="astring" name="description" value="Stefan Hinker"/> <propval type="count" name="uid" value="12345"/> <propval type="count" name="gid" value="10"/> <propval type="astring" name="shell" value="/usr/bin/bash"/> <propval type="astring" name="roles" value="root"/> <propval type="astring" name="profiles" value="System Administrator"/> <propval type="astring" name="sudoers" value="ALL=(ALL) ALL"/> </property_group> </instance> </service> </service_bundle> [email protected]:~# installadm create-profile -n x86-fcs -f general.xml [email protected]:~# installadm create-profile -n x86-fcs -f user.xml [email protected]:~# installadm create-profile -n x86-fcs -f mars.xml \ -c ipv4=192.168.2.100 [email protected]:~# installadm list -p Service Name Profile ------------ ------- x86-fcs general.xml mars.xml user.xml [email protected]:~# installadm list -n x86-fcs -p Profile Criteria ------- -------- general.xml None mars.xml ipv4 = 192.168.2.100 user.xml None Here's the idea behind these files: "general.xml" contains settings valid for all my clients.  Stuff like DNS servers, for example, which in my case will always be the same. "user.xml" only contains user definitions.  That is, a root password and a primary user.Both of these profiles will be valid for all clients (for now). "mars.xml" defines network settings for an individual client.  This profile is associated with an IP-Address.  For this to work, I'll have to tweak the DHCP-settings in the next step: [email protected]:~# installadm create-client -e 08:00:27:AA:3D:B1 -n x86-fcs [email protected]:~# vi /etc/inet/dhcpd4.conf [email protected]:~# tail -5 /etc/inet/dhcpd4.conf host 080027AA3DB1 { hardware ethernet 08:00:27:AA:3D:B1; fixed-address 192.168.2.100; filename "01080027AA3DB1"; } This completes the client preparations.  I manually added the IP-Address for mars to /etc/inet/dhcpd4.conf.  This is needed for the "mars.xml" profile.  Disabling arbitrary DHCP-replies will shut up this DHCP server, making my life in a shared environment a lot more peaceful ;-)Now, I of course want this installation to be completely hands-off.  For this to work, I'll need to modify the grub boot menu for this client slightly.  You can find it in /etc/netboot.  "installadm create-client" will create a new boot menu for every client, identified by the client's MAC address.  The template for this can be found in a subdirectory with the name of the install service, /etc/netboot/x86-fcs in our case.  If you don't want to change this manually for every client, modify that template to your liking instead. [email protected]:~# cd /etc/netboot [email protected]:~# cp menu.lst.01080027AA3DB1 menu.lst.01080027AA3DB1.org [email protected]:~# vi menu.lst.01080027AA3DB1 [email protected]:~# diff menu.lst.01080027AA3DB1 menu.lst.01080027AA3DB1.org 1,2c1,2 < default=1 < timeout=10 --- > default=0 > timeout=30 [email protected]:~# more menu.lst.01080027AA3DB1 default=1 timeout=10 min_mem64=0 title Oracle Solaris 11 11/11 Text Installer and command line kernel$ /x86-fcs/platform/i86pc/kernel/$ISADIR/unix -B install_media=htt p://$serverIP:5555//export/install/fcs,install_service=x86-fcs,install_svc_addre ss=$serverIP:5555 module$ /x86-fcs/platform/i86pc/$ISADIR/boot_archive title Oracle Solaris 11 11/11 Automated Install kernel$ /x86-fcs/platform/i86pc/kernel/$ISADIR/unix -B install=true,inst all_media=http://$serverIP:5555//export/install/fcs,install_service=x86-fcs,inst all_svc_address=$serverIP:5555,livemode=text module$ /x86-fcs/platform/i86pc/$ISADIR/boot_archive Now just boot the client off the network using PXE-boot.  For my demo purposes, that's a client from VirtualBox, of course.  That's all there's to it.  And despite the fact that this blog entry is a little longer - that wasn't that hard now, was it?

    Read the article

  • MammothVPS Signup Video

    - by stefan.sedich
    We have posted a video showing the process involved in signing up for a VPS at MammothVPS check it out. As a special offer if you use the voucher code 'VIDEO' you can signup and receive 10% off for the first 12 months of your service. Cheers Stefan

    Read the article

  • Internationalize WebCenter Portal - Content Presenter

    - by Stefan Krantz
    Lately we have been involved in engagements where internationalization has been holding the project back from success. In this post we are going to explain how to get Content Presenter and its editorials to comply with the current selected locale for the WebCenter Portal session. As you probably know by now WebCenter Portal leverages the Localization support from Java Server Faces (JSF), in this post we will assume that the localization is controlled and enforced by switching the current browsers locale between English and Spanish. There is two main scenarios in internationalization of a content enabled pages, since Content Presenter offers both presentation of information as well as contribution of information, in this post we will look at how to enable seamless integration of correct localized version of the back end content file and how to enable the editor/author to edit the correct localized version of the file based on the current browser locale. Solution Scenario 1 - Localization aware content presentation Due to the amount of steps required to implement the enclosed solution proposal I have decided to share the solution with you in group components for each facet of the solution. If you want to get more details on each step, you can review the enclosed components. This post will guide you through the steps of enabling each component and what it enables/changes in each section of the system. Enable Content Presenter Customization By leveraging a predictable naming convention of the data files used to hold the content for the Content Presenter instance we can easily develop a component that will dynamically switch the name out before presenting the information. The naming convention we have leverage is the industry best practice by having a shared identifier as prefix (ContentABC) and a language enabled suffix (_EN) (_ES). So the assumption is that each file pair in above example should look like following:- English version - (ContentABC_EN)- Spanish version - (ContentABC_ES) Based on above theory we can now easily regardless of the primary version assigned to the content presenter instance switch the language out by using the localization support from JSF. Below java bean (oracle.webcenter.doclib.internal.view.presenter.NLSHelperBean) is enclosed in the customization project available for download at the bottom of the post: 1: public static final String CP_D_DOCNAME_FORMAT = "%s_%s"; 2: public static final int CP_UNIQUE_ID_INDEX = 0; 3: private ContentPresenter presenter = null; 4:   5:   6: public NLSHelperBean() { 7: super(); 8: } 9:   10: /** 11: * This method updates the configuration for the pageFlowScope to have the correct datafile 12: * for the current Locale 13: */ 14: public void initLocaleForDataFile() { 15: String dataFile = null; 16: // Checking that state of presenter is present, also make sure the item is eligible for localization by locating the "_" in the name 17: if(presenter.getConfiguration().getDatasource() != null && 18: presenter.getConfiguration().getDatasource().isNodeDatasource() && 19: presenter.getConfiguration().getDatasource().getNodeIdDatasource() != null && 20: !presenter.getConfiguration().getDatasource().getNodeIdDatasource().equals("") && 21: presenter.getConfiguration().getDatasource().getNodeIdDatasource().indexOf("_") > 0) { 22: dataFile = presenter.getConfiguration().getDatasource().getNodeIdDatasource(); 23: FacesContext fc = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance(); 24: //Leveraging the current faces contenxt to get current localization language 25: String currentLocale = fc.getViewRoot().getLocale().getLanguage().toUpperCase(); 26: String newDataFile = dataFile; 27: String [] uniqueIdArr = dataFile.split("_"); 28: if(uniqueIdArr.length > 0) { 29: newDataFile = String.format(CP_D_DOCNAME_FORMAT, uniqueIdArr[CP_UNIQUE_ID_INDEX], currentLocale); 30: } 31: //Replacing the current Node datasource with localized datafile. 32: presenter.getConfiguration().getDatasource().setNodeIdDatasource(newDataFile); 33: } 34: } With this bean code available to our WebCenter Portal implementation we can start the next step, by overriding the standard behavior in content presenter by applying a MDS Taskflow customization to the content presenter taskflow, following taskflow customization has been applied to the customization project attached to this post:- Library: WebCenter Document Library Service View- Path: oracle.webcenter.doclib.view.jsf.taskflows.presenter- File: contentPresenter.xml Changes made in above customization view:1. A new method invocation activity has been added (initLocaleForDataFile)2. The method invocation invokes the new NLSHelperBean3. The default activity is moved to the new Method invocation (initLocaleForDataFile)4. The outcome from the method invocation goes to determine-navigation (original default activity) The above changes concludes the presentation modification to support a compatible localization scenario for a content driven page. In addition this customization do not limit or disables the out of the box capabilities of WebCenter Portal. Steps to enable above customization Start JDeveloper and open your WebCenter Portal Application Select "Open Project" and include the extracted project you downloaded (CPNLSCustomizations.zip) Make sure the build out put from CPNLSCustomizations project is a dependency to your Portal project Deploy your Portal Application to your WC_CustomPortal managed server Make sure your naming convention of the two data files follow above recommendation Example result of the solution: Solution Scenario 2 - Localization aware content creation and authoring As you could see from Solution Scenario 1 we require the naming convention to be strictly followed, this means in the hands of a user with limited technology knowledge this can be one of the failing links in this solutions. Therefore I strongly recommend that you also follow this part since this will eliminate this risk and also increase the editors/authors usability with a magnitude. The current WebCenter Portal Architecture leverages WebCenter Content today to maintain, publish and manage content, therefore we need to make few efforts in making sure this part of the architecture is on board with our new naming practice and also simplifies the creation of content for our end users. As you probably remember the naming convention required a prefix to be common so I propose we enable a new component that help you auto name the content items dDocName (this means that the readable title can still be in a human readable format). The new component (WCP-LocalizationSupport.zip) built for this scenario will enable a couple of things: 1. A new service where a sequential number can be generate on request - service name: GET_WCP_LOCALE_CONTENTID 2. The content presenter is leveraging a specific function when launching the content creation wizard from within Content Presenter. Assumption is that users will create the content by clicking "Create Web Content" button. When clicking the button the wizard opened is actually running in side of WebCenter Content server, file executed (contentwizard.hcsp). This file uses JSON commands that will generate operations in the content server, I have extend this file to create two identical data files instead of one.- First it creates the English version by leveraging the new Service and a Global Rule to set the dDocName on the original check in screen, this global rule is available in a configuration package attached to this blog (NLSContentProfileRule.zip)- Secondly we run a set of JSON javascripts to create the Spanish version with the same details except for the name where we replace the suffix with (_ES)- Then content creation wizard ends with its out of the box behavior and assigns the Content Presenter instance the English versionSee Javascript markup below - this can be changed in the (WCP-LocalizationSupport.zip/component/WCP-LocalizationSupport/publish/webcenter) 1: //---------------------------------------A-TEAM--------------------------------------- 2: WCM.ContentWizard.CheckinContentPage.OnCheckinComplete = function(returnParams) 3: { 4: var callback = WCM.ContentWizard.CheckinContentPage.checkinCompleteCallback; 5: WCM.ContentWizard.ChooseContentPage.OnSelectionComplete(returnParams, callback); 6: // Load latest DOC_INFO_SIMPLE 7: var cgiPath = DOCLIB.config.httpCgiPath; 8: var jsonBinder = new WCM.Idc.JSONBinder(); 9: jsonBinder.SetLocalDataValue('IdcService', 'DOC_INFO_SIMPLE'); 10: jsonBinder.SetLocalDataValue('dID', returnParams.dID); 11: jsonBinder.Send(cgiPath, $CB(this, function(http) { 12: var ret = http.GetResponseText(); 13: var binder = new WCM.Idc.JSONBinder(ret); 14: var dDocName = binder.GetResultSetValue('DOC_INFO', 'dDocName', 0); 15: if(dDocName.indexOf("_") > 0){ 16: var ssBinder = new WCM.Idc.JSONBinder(); 17: ssBinder.SetLocalDataValue('IdcService', 'SS_CHECKIN_NEW'); 18: //Additional Localization dDocName generated 19: ssBinder.SetLocalDataValue('dDocName', getLocalizedDocName(dDocName, "es")); 20: ssBinder.SetLocalDataValue('primaryFile', 'default.xml'); 21: ssBinder.SetLocalDataValue('ssDefaultDocumentToken', 'SSContributorDataFile'); 22:   23: for(var n = 0 ; n < binder.GetResultSetFields('DOC_INFO').length ; n++) { 24: var field = binder.GetResultSetFields('DOC_INFO')[n]; 25: if(field != 'dID' && 26: field != 'dDocName' && 27: field != 'dID' && 28: field != 'dReleaseState' && 29: field != 'dRevClassID' && 30: field != 'dRevisionID' && 31: field != 'dRevLabel') { 32: ssBinder.SetLocalDataValue(field, binder.GetResultSetValue('DOC_INFO', field, 0)); 33: } 34: } 35: ssBinder.Send(cgiPath, $CB(this, function(http) {})); 36: } 37: })); 38: } 39:   40: //Support function to create localized dDocNames 41: function getLocalizedDocName(dDocName, lang) { 42: var result = dDocName.replace("_EN", ("_" + lang)); 43: return result; 44: } 45: //---------------------------------------A-TEAM--------------------------------------- 3. By applying the enclosed NLSContentProfileRule.zip, the check in screen for DataFile creation will have auto naming enabled with localization suffix (default is English)You can change the default language by updating the GlobalNlsRule and assign preferred prefix.See Rule markup for dDocName field below: <$executeService("GET_WCP_LOCALE_CONTENTID")$><$dprDefaultValue=WCP_LOCALE.LocaleContentId & "_EN"$> Steps to enable above extensions and configurations Install WebCenter Component (WCP-LocalizationSupport.zip), via the AdminServer in WebCenter Content Administration menus Enable the component and restart the content server Apply the configuration bundle to enable the new Global Rule (GlobalNlsRule), via the WebCenter Content Administration/Config Migration Admin New Content Creation Experience Result Content EditingContent editing will by default be enabled for authoring in the current select locale since the content file is selected by (Solution Scenario 1), this means that a user can switch his browser locale and then get the editing experience adaptable to the current selected locale. NotesA-Team are planning to post a solution on how to inline switch the locale of the WebCenter Portal Session, so the Content Presenter, Navigation Model and other Face related features are localized accordingly. Content Presenter examples used in this post is an extension to following post:https://blogs.oracle.com/ATEAM_WEBCENTER/entry/enable_content_editing_of_iterative Downloads CPNLSCustomizations.zip - WebCenter Portal, Content Presenter Customization https://blogs.oracle.com/ATEAM_WEBCENTER/resource/stefan.krantz/CPNLSCustomizations.zip WCP-LocalizationSupport.zip - WebCenter Content, Extension Component to enable localization creation of files with compliant auto naminghttps://blogs.oracle.com/ATEAM_WEBCENTER/resource/stefan.krantz/WCP-LocalizationSupport.zip NLSContentProfileRule.zip - WebCenter Content, Configuration Update Bundle to enable Global rule for new check in naming of data fileshttps://blogs.oracle.com/ATEAM_WEBCENTER/resource/stefan.krantz/NLSContentProfileRule.zip

    Read the article

  • Fünf Jahre Bonn-to-Code.Net – das muss gefeiert werden!

    - by WeigeltRo
    Als ich am 1. Januar 2006 die .NET User Group “Bonn-to-Code.Net” gründete (den genialen Namen ließ sich mein Kollege Jens Schaller in Anlehnung an das Motto meines Blogs einfallen), ahnte ich nicht, wie schnell sich alles entwickeln würde. So konnte, nach ein wenig Werbung über diverse Kanäle, bereits am 14. Februar 2006 das erste Treffen stattfinden und wenige Tage später wurde Bonn-to-Code.Net offiziell in den Kreis der INETA User Groups aufgenommen. Das ist nun etwas über fünf Jahre her und soll am 22. März 2011 um 19:00 (Einlass ab 18:30) gebührend gefeiert werden, und zwar im Rahmen unseres März-Treffens. Der Abend bietet Vorträge zu “Flow Design und seine Umsetzung mit Event Based Components” sowie “WCF Services mal anders” (ausführlichere Infos zu den Vortragsinhalten gibt es hier). Anschließend gibt es bei einer großen Verlosung neben Büchern auch hochkarätige Software-Preise zu gewinnen. Zusätzlich zu Lizenzen für JetBrains ReSharper und Telerik Ultimate Collection warten dieses Mal (mit freundlicher Unterstützung durch Microsoft Deutschland) je ein Windows 7 Ultimate und ein Office 2010 Professional Plus auf ihre glücklichen Gewinner. Und wer nicht zu spät kommt, kann auch ganz ohne Losglück eines von vielen kleinen Goodies abgreifen. Eine Anmeldung ist nicht erforderlich, eine Anfahrtsbeschreibung gibt es auf der Bonn-to-Code.Net Website. Es freut mich dabei besonders, dass wir zu diesem Termin u.a. einen Sprecher an Bord haben, der bereits beim Gründungstreffen dabei war: Stefan Lieser. Mittlerweile z.B. durch die Clean Code Developer Initiative bekannt, ist Stefan nur ein Beispiel für eine ganze Reihe von Sprechern auf den diversen Entwicklerkonferenzen, die ihre ersten Erfahrungen u.a. bei Bonn-to-Code.Net gemacht haben. …und was ist in den fünf Jahren so passiert? Einiges! Ein Community Launch Event in 2007, zwei Microsoft TechTalks (2007,2008), Gastsprecher aus ganz Deutschland und dem Ausland (JP Boodhoo, Harry Pierson). Doch nichts hat die fünf Jahre so geprägt wie die Zusammenarbeit mit “den Nachbarn aus Köln”. Zum Zeitpunkt der Gründung von Bonn-to-Code.Net gab es im gesamten Köln/Bonner Raum keine .NET User Group. Und so war es nicht ungewöhnlich, dass der erste Interessent, der sich auf meinen Blog-Eintrag vom 4. Januar 2006 hin meldete, aus Köln stammte: Albert Weinert. Kurze Zeit nach der Bonner Gruppe wurde dann – initiiert durch Angelika Wöpking und Stefan Lange – schließlich die .NET User Group Köln gegründet. Wobei Stefan wiederum vor dem Kölner Gründungstreffen Ende April bereits Bonner Treffen besucht hatte; insgesamt also eine Menge personeller Überlapp zwischen Köln und Bonn. Als nach einem etwas holprigen Start der Kölner Gruppe schließlich Albert und Stefan die Leitung übernahmen, war klar dass Köln und Bonn in vielerlei Hinsicht eng zusammenarbeiten würden. Sei es durch die Koordination von Themen und Terminen oder auch durch Werbung für die Treffen der jeweils anderen Gruppe. Der nächste Schritt kam dann mit der Beteiligung der Kölner und Bonner Gruppen an der Organisation des “AfterLaunch” im April 2008. Der große Erfolg dieser Veranstaltung war der Ansporn, in Bezug auf die Zusammenarbeit ein neues Kapitel aufzuschlagen. Anfang 2009 wurde zunächst der dotnet Köln/Bonn e.V. gegründet, um für eigene Großveranstaltungen ein solides Fundament zu schaffen. Im Mai 2009 folgte dann die erste “dotnet Cologne” – ein voller Erfolg. Und mit der “dotnet Cologne 2010” etablierte sich diese Konferenz als das große .NET Community Event in Deutschland. Am 6. Mai 2011 findet nun die “dotnet Cologne 2011” statt; hinter den Kulissen laufen die Vorbereitungen dazu bereits seit Monaten auf Hochtouren. Alles in allem sehr aufregende fünf Jahre, in denen viel passiert ist. Mal schauen, wie die nächsten fünf Jahre werden…

    Read the article

  • OpenVPN connected but not internet access on the client

    - by Stefan
    I've setup OpenVPN following this tutorial, and everything works fine except that I don't have an internet connection on the client while connected to VPN. http://www.howtoforge.com/internet-and-lan-over-vpn-using-openvpn-linux-server-windows-linux-clients-works-for-gaming-and-through-firewalls My VPS server config is as follows (Ubuntu): dev tun proto udp port 1194 ca /etc/openvpn/easy-rsa/keys/ca.crt cert /etc/openvpn/easy-rsa/keys/server.crt key /etc/openvpn/easy-rsa/keys/server.key dh /etc/openvpn/easy-rsa/keys/dh1024.pem user nobody group nogroup server 10.8.0.0 255.255.255.0 persist-key persist-tun status /var/log/openvpn-status.log verb 3 client-to-client push "redirect-gateway local def1" #set the dns servers push "dhcp-option DNS 8.8.8.8" push "dhcp-option DNS 8.8.4.4" log-append /var/log/openvpn comp-lzo plugin /usr/lib/openvpn/openvpn-auth-pam.so common-auth My client config is as follows (Windows 7): dev tun client proto udp remote XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX 1194 resolv-retry infinite nobind persist-key persist-tun ca ca.crt cert stefan.crt key stefan.key comp-lzo verb 3 auth-user-pass redirect-gateway local def1 I've turned off the firewall on the server for testing purposes (it doesn't help), and tried both wired and wireless connecting on the client. I've tried many Google results... but nothing seems to help. Can you help me? Thanks so far...

    Read the article

  • JAVA image transfer problem

    - by user579098
    Hi, I have a school assignment, to send a jpg image,split it into groups of 100 bytes, corrupt it, use a CRC check to locate the errors and re-transmit until it eventually is built back into its original form. It's practically ready, however when I check out the new images, they appear with errors.. I would really appreciate if someone could look at my code below and maybe locate this logical mistake as I can't understand what the problem is because everything looks ok :S For the file with all the data needed including photos and error patterns one could download it from this link:http://rapidshare.com/#!download|932tl2|443122762|Data.zip|739 Thanks in advance, Stefan p.s dont forget to change the paths in the code for the image and error files package networks; import java.io.*; // for file reader import java.util.zip.CRC32; // CRC32 IEEE (Ethernet) public class Main { /** * Reads a whole file into an array of bytes. * @param file The file in question. * @return Array of bytes containing file data. * @throws IOException Message contains why it failed. */ public static byte[] readFileArray(File file) throws IOException { InputStream is = new FileInputStream(file); byte[] data=new byte[(int)file.length()]; is.read(data); is.close(); return data; } /** * Writes (or overwrites if exists) a file with data from an array of bytes. * @param file The file in question. * @param data Array of bytes containing the new file data. * @throws IOException Message contains why it failed. */ public static void writeFileArray(File file, byte[] data) throws IOException { OutputStream os = new FileOutputStream(file,false); os.write(data); os.close(); } /** * Converts a long value to an array of bytes. * @param data The target variable. * @return Byte array conversion of data. * @see http://www.daniweb.com/code/snippet216874.html */ public static byte[] toByta(long data) { return new byte[] { (byte)((data >> 56) & 0xff), (byte)((data >> 48) & 0xff), (byte)((data >> 40) & 0xff), (byte)((data >> 32) & 0xff), (byte)((data >> 24) & 0xff), (byte)((data >> 16) & 0xff), (byte)((data >> 8) & 0xff), (byte)((data >> 0) & 0xff), }; } /** * Converts a an array of bytes to long value. * @param data The target variable. * @return Long value conversion of data. * @see http://www.daniweb.com/code/snippet216874.html */ public static long toLong(byte[] data) { if (data == null || data.length != 8) return 0x0; return (long)( // (Below) convert to longs before shift because digits // are lost with ints beyond the 32-bit limit (long)(0xff & data[0]) << 56 | (long)(0xff & data[1]) << 48 | (long)(0xff & data[2]) << 40 | (long)(0xff & data[3]) << 32 | (long)(0xff & data[4]) << 24 | (long)(0xff & data[5]) << 16 | (long)(0xff & data[6]) << 8 | (long)(0xff & data[7]) << 0 ); } public static byte[] nextNoise(){ byte[] result=new byte[100]; // copy a frame's worth of data (or remaining data if it is less than frame length) int read=Math.min(err_data.length-err_pstn, 100); System.arraycopy(err_data, err_pstn, result, 0, read); // if read data is less than frame length, reset position and add remaining data if(read<100){ err_pstn=100-read; System.arraycopy(err_data, 0, result, read, err_pstn); }else // otherwise, increase position err_pstn+=100; // return noise segment return result; } /** * Given some original data, it is purposefully corrupted according to a * second data array (which is read from a file). In pseudocode: * corrupt = original xor corruptor * @param data The original data. * @return The new (corrupted) data. */ public static byte[] corruptData(byte[] data){ // get the next noise sequence byte[] noise = nextNoise(); // finally, xor data with noise and return result for(int i=0; i<100; i++)data[i]^=noise[i]; return data; } /** * Given an array of data, a packet is created. In pseudocode: * frame = corrupt(data) + crc(data) * @param data The original frame data. * @return The resulting frame data. */ public static byte[] buildFrame(byte[] data){ // pack = [data]+crc32([data]) byte[] hash = new byte[8]; // calculate crc32 of data and copy it to byte array CRC32 crc = new CRC32(); crc.update(data); hash=toByta(crc.getValue()); // create a byte array holding the final packet byte[] pack = new byte[data.length+hash.length]; // create the corrupted data byte[] crpt = new byte[data.length]; crpt = corruptData(data); // copy corrupted data into pack System.arraycopy(crpt, 0, pack, 0, crpt.length); // copy hash into pack System.arraycopy(hash, 0, pack, data.length, hash.length); // return pack return pack; } /** * Verifies frame contents. * @param frame The frame data (data+crc32). * @return True if frame is valid, false otherwise. */ public static boolean verifyFrame(byte[] frame){ // allocate hash and data variables byte[] hash=new byte[8]; byte[] data=new byte[frame.length-hash.length]; // read frame into hash and data variables System.arraycopy(frame, frame.length-hash.length, hash, 0, hash.length); System.arraycopy(frame, 0, data, 0, frame.length-hash.length); // get crc32 of data CRC32 crc = new CRC32(); crc.update(data); // compare crc32 of data with crc32 of frame return crc.getValue()==toLong(hash); } /** * Transfers a file through a channel in frames and reconstructs it into a new file. * @param jpg_file File name of target file to transfer. * @param err_file The channel noise file used to simulate corruption. * @param out_file The name of the newly-created file. * @throws IOException */ public static void transferFile(String jpg_file, String err_file, String out_file) throws IOException { // read file data into global variables jpg_data = readFileArray(new File(jpg_file)); err_data = readFileArray(new File(err_file)); err_pstn = 0; // variable that will hold the final (transfered) data byte[] out_data = new byte[jpg_data.length]; // holds the current frame data byte[] frame_orig = new byte[100]; byte[] frame_sent = new byte[100]; // send file in chunks (frames) of 100 bytes for(int i=0; i<Math.ceil(jpg_data.length/100); i++){ // copy jpg data into frame and init first-time switch System.arraycopy(jpg_data, i*100, frame_orig, 0, 100); boolean not_first=false; System.out.print("Packet #"+i+": "); // repeat getting same frame until frame crc matches with frame content do { if(not_first)System.out.print("F"); frame_sent=buildFrame(frame_orig); not_first=true; }while(!verifyFrame(frame_sent)); // usually, you'd constrain this by time to prevent infinite loops (in // case the channel is so wacked up it doesn't get a single packet right) // copy frame to image file System.out.println("S"); System.arraycopy(frame_sent, 0, out_data, i*100, 100); } System.out.println("\nDone."); writeFileArray(new File(out_file),out_data); } // global variables for file data and pointer public static byte[] jpg_data; public static byte[] err_data; public static int err_pstn=0; public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException { // list of jpg files String[] jpg_file={ "C:\\Users\\Stefan\\Desktop\\Data\\Images\\photo1.jpg", "C:\\Users\\Stefan\\Desktop\\Data\\Images\\photo2.jpg", "C:\\Users\\Stefan\\Desktop\\Data\\Images\\photo3.jpg", "C:\\Users\\Stefan\\Desktop\\Data\\Images\\photo4.jpg" }; // list of error patterns String[] err_file={ "C:\\Users\\Stefan\\Desktop\\Data\\Error Pattern\\Error Pattern 1.DAT", "C:\\Users\\Stefan\\Desktop\\Data\\Error Pattern\\Error Pattern 2.DAT", "C:\\Users\\Stefan\\Desktop\\Data\\Error Pattern\\Error Pattern 3.DAT", "C:\\Users\\Stefan\\Desktop\\Data\\Error Pattern\\Error Pattern 4.DAT" }; // loop through all jpg/channel combinations and run tests for(int x=0; x<jpg_file.length; x++){ for(int y=0; y<err_file.length; y++){ System.out.println("Transfering photo"+(x+1)+".jpg using Pattern "+(y+1)+"..."); transferFile(jpg_file[x],err_file[y],jpg_file[x].replace("photo","CH#"+y+"_photo")); } } } }

    Read the article

  • What's up with LDoms: Part 4 - Virtual Networking Explained

    - by Stefan Hinker
    I'm back from my summer break (and some pressing business that kept me away from this), ready to continue with Oracle VM Server for SPARC ;-) In this article, we'll have a closer look at virtual networking.  Basic connectivity as we've seen it in the first, simple example, is easy enough.  But there are numerous options for the virtual switches and virtual network ports, which we will discuss in more detail now.   In this section, we will concentrate on virtual networking - the capabilities of virtual switches and virtual network ports - only.  Other options involving hardware assignment or redundancy will be covered in separate sections later on. There are two basic components involved in virtual networking for LDoms: Virtual switches and virtual network devices.  The virtual switch should be seen just like a real ethernet switch.  It "runs" in the service domain and moves ethernet packets back and forth.  A virtual network device is plumbed in the guest domain.  It corresponds to a physical network device in the real world.  There, you'd be plugging a cable into the network port, and plug the other end of that cable into a switch.  In the virtual world, you do the same:  You create a virtual network device for your guest and connect it to a virtual switch in a service domain.  The result works just like in the physical world, the network device sends and receives ethernet packets, and the switch does all those things ethernet switches tend to do. If you look at the reference manual of Oracle VM Server for SPARC, there are numerous options for virtual switches and network devices.  Don't be confused, it's rather straight forward, really.  Let's start with the simple case, and work our way to some more sophisticated options later on.  In many cases, you'll want to have several guests that communicate with the outside world on the same ethernet segment.  In the real world, you'd connect each of these systems to the same ethernet switch.  So, let's do the same thing in the virtual world: [email protected] # ldm add-vsw net-dev=nxge2 admin-vsw primary [email protected] # ldm add-vnet admin-net admin-vsw mars [email protected] # ldm add-vnet admin-net admin-vsw venus We've just created a virtual switch called "admin-vsw" and connected it to the physical device nxge2.  In the physical world, we'd have powered up our ethernet switch and installed a cable between it and our big enterprise datacenter switch.  We then created a virtual network interface for each one of the two guest systems "mars" and "venus" and connected both to that virtual switch.  They can now communicate with each other and with any system reachable via nxge2.  If primary were running Solaris 10, communication with the guests would not be possible.  This is different with Solaris 11, please see the Admin Guide for details.  Note that I've given both the vswitch and the vnet devices some sensible names, something I always recommend. Unless told otherwise, the LDoms Manager software will automatically assign MAC addresses to all network elements that need one.  It will also make sure that these MAC addresses are unique and reuse MAC addresses to play nice with all those friendly DHCP servers out there.  However, if we want to do this manually, we can also do that.  (One reason might be firewall rules that work on MAC addresses.)  So let's give mars a manually assigned MAC address: [email protected] # ldm set-vnet mac-addr=0:14:4f:f9:c4:13 admin-net mars Within the guest, these virtual network devices have their own device driver.  In Solaris 10, they'd appear as "vnet0".  Solaris 11 would apply it's usual vanity naming scheme.  We can configure these interfaces just like any normal interface, give it an IP-address and configure sophisticated routing rules, just like on bare metal.  In many cases, using Jumbo Frames helps increase throughput performance.  By default, these interfaces will run with the standard ethernet MTU of 1500 bytes.  To change this,  it is usually sufficient to set the desired MTU for the virtual switch.  This will automatically set the same MTU for all vnet devices attached to that switch.  Let's change the MTU size of our admin-vsw from the example above: [email protected] # ldm set-vsw mtu=9000 admin-vsw primary Note that that you can set the MTU to any value between 1500 and 16000.  Of course, whatever you set needs to be supported by the physical network, too. Another very common area of network configuration is VLAN tagging. This can be a little confusing - my advise here is to be very clear on what you want, and perhaps draw a little diagram the first few times.  As always, keeping a configuration simple will help avoid errors of all kind.  Nevertheless, VLAN tagging is very usefull to consolidate different networks onto one physical cable.  And as such, this concept needs to be carried over into the virtual world.  Enough of the introduction, here's a little diagram to help in explaining how VLANs work in LDoms: Let's remember that any VLANs not explicitly tagged have the default VLAN ID of 1. In this example, we have a vswitch connected to a physical network that carries untagged traffic (VLAN ID 1) as well as VLANs 11, 22, 33 and 44.  There might also be other VLANs on the wire, but the vswitch will ignore all those packets.  We also have two vnet devices, one for mars and one for venus.  Venus will see traffic from VLANs 33 and 44 only.  For VLAN 44, venus will need to configure a tagged interface "vnet44000".  For VLAN 33, the vswitch will untag all incoming traffic for venus, so that venus will see this as "normal" or untagged ethernet traffic.  This is very useful to simplify guest configuration and also allows venus to perform Jumpstart or AI installations over this network even if the Jumpstart or AI server is connected via VLAN 33.  Mars, on the other hand, has full access to untagged traffic from the outside world, and also to VLANs 11,22 and 33, but not 44.  On the command line, we'd do this like this: [email protected] # ldm add-vsw net-dev=nxge2 pvid=1 vid=11,22,33,44 admin-vsw primary [email protected] # ldm add-vnet admin-net pvid=1 vid=11,22,33 admin-vsw mars [email protected] # ldm add-vnet admin-net pvid=33 vid=44 admin-vsw venus Finally, I'd like to point to a neat little option that will make your live easier in all those cases where configurations tend to change over the live of a guest system.  It's the "id=<somenumber>" option available for both vswitches and vnet devices.  Normally, Solaris in the guest would enumerate network devices sequentially.  However, it has ways of remembering this initial numbering.  This is good in the physical world.  In the virtual world, whenever you unbind (aka power off and disassemble) a guest system, remove and/or add network devices and bind the system again, chances are this numbering will change.  Configuration confusion will follow suit.  To avoid this, nail down the initial numbering by assigning each vnet device it's device-id explicitly: [email protected] # ldm add-vnet admin-net id=1 admin-vsw venus Please consult the Admin Guide for details on this, and how to decipher these network ids from Solaris running in the guest. Thanks for reading this far.  Links for further reading are essentially only the Admin Guide and Reference Manual and can be found above.  I hope this is useful and, as always, I welcome any comments.

    Read the article

  • Translate report data export from RUEI into HTML for import into OpenOffice Calc Spreadsheets

    - by [email protected]
    A common question of users is, How to import the data from the automated data export of Real User Experience Insight (RUEI) into tools for archiving, dashboarding or combination with other sets of data.XML is well-suited for such a translation via the companion Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations (XSLT). Basically XSLT utilizes XSL, a template on what to read from your input XML data file and where to place it into the target document. The target document can be anything you like, i.e. XHTML, CSV, or even a OpenOffice Spreadsheet, etc. as long as it is a plain text format.XML 2 OpenOffice.org SpreadsheetFor the XSLT to work as an OpenOffice.org Calc Import Filter:How to add an XML Import Filter to OpenOffice CalcStart OpenOffice.org Calc andselect Tools > XML Filter SettingsNew...Fill in the details as follows:Filter name: RUEI Import filterApplication: OpenOffice.org Calc (.ods)Name of file type: Oracle Real User Experience InsightFile extension: xmlSwitch to the transformation tab and enter/select the following leaving the rest untouchedXSLT for import: ruei_report_data_import_filter.xslPlease see at the end of this blog post for a download of the referenced file.Select RUEI Import filter from list and Test XSLTClick on Browse to selectTransform file: export.php.xmlOpenOffice.org Calc will transform and load the XML file you retrieved from RUEI in a human-readable format.You can now select File > Open... and change the filetype to open your RUEI exports directly in OpenOffice.org Calc, just like any other a native Spreadsheet format.Files of type: Oracle Real User Experience Insight (*.xml)File name: export.php.xml XML 2 XHTMLMost XML-powered browsers provides for inherent XSL Transformation capabilities, you only have to reference the XSLT Stylesheet in the head of your XML file. Then open the file in your favourite Web Browser, Firefox, Opera, Safari or Internet Explorer alike.<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?><!-- inserted line below --> <?xml-stylesheet type="text/xsl" href="ruei_report_data_export_2_xhtml.xsl"?><!-- inserted line above --><report>You can find a patched example export from RUEI plus the above referenced XSL-Stylesheets here: export.php.xml - Example report data export from RUEI ruei_report_data_export_2_xhtml.xsl - RUEI to XHTML XSL Transformation Stylesheetruei_report_data_import_filter.xsl - OpenOffice.org XML import filter for RUEI report export data If you would like to do things like this on the command line you can use either Xalan or xsltproc.The basic command syntax for xsltproc is very simple:xsltproc -o output.file stylesheet.xslt inputfile.xmlYou can use this with the above two stylesheets to translate RUEI Data Exports into XHTML and/or OpenOffice.org Calc ODS-Format. Or you could write your own XSLT to transform into Comma separated Value lists.Please let me know what you think or do with this information in the comments below.Kind regards,Stefan ThiemeReferences used:OpenOffice XML Filter - Create XSLT filters for import and export - http://user.services.openoffice.org/en/forum/viewtopic.php?f=45&t=3490SUN OpenOffice.org XML File Format 1.0 - http://xml.openoffice.org/xml_specification.pdf

    Read the article

  • What's up with LDoms: Part 1 - Introduction & Basic Concepts

    - by Stefan Hinker
    LDoms - the correct name is Oracle VM Server for SPARC - have been around for quite a while now.  But to my surprise, I get more and more requests to explain how they work or to give advise on how to make good use of them.  This made me think that writing up a few articles discussing the different features would be a good idea.  Now - I don't intend to rewrite the LDoms Admin Guide or to copy and reformat the (hopefully) well known "Beginners Guide to LDoms" by Tony Shoumack from 2007.  Those documents are very recommendable - especially the Beginners Guide, although based on LDoms 1.0, is still a good place to begin with.  However, LDoms have come a long way since then, and I hope to contribute to their adoption by discussing how they work and what features there are today.  In this and the following posts, I will use the term "LDoms" as a common abbreviation for Oracle VM Server for SPARC, just because it's a lot shorter and easier to type (and presumably, read). So, just to get everyone on the same baseline, lets briefly discuss the basic concepts of virtualization with LDoms.  LDoms make use of a hypervisor as a layer of abstraction between real, physical hardware and virtual hardware.  This virtual hardware is then used to create a number of guest systems which each behave very similar to a system running on bare metal:  Each has its own OBP, each will install its own copy of the Solaris OS and each will see a certain amount of CPU, memory, disk and network resources available to it.  Unlike some other type 1 hypervisors running on x86 hardware, the SPARC hypervisor is embedded in the system firmware and makes use both of supporting functions in the sun4v SPARC instruction set as well as the overall CPU architecture to fulfill its function. The CMT architecture of the supporting CPUs (T1 through T4) provide a large number of cores and threads to the OS.  For example, the current T4 CPU has eight cores, each running 8 threads, for a total of 64 threads per socket.  To the OS, this looks like 64 CPUs.  The SPARC hypervisor, when creating guest systems, simply assigns a certain number of these threads exclusively to one guest, thus avoiding the overhead of having to schedule OS threads to CPUs, as do typical x86 hypervisors.  The hypervisor only assigns CPUs and then steps aside.  It is not involved in the actual work being dispatched from the OS to the CPU, all it does is maintain isolation between different guests. Likewise, memory is assigned exclusively to individual guests.  Here,  the hypervisor provides generic mappings between the physical hardware addresses and the guest's views on memory.  Again, the hypervisor is not involved in the actual memory access, it only maintains isolation between guests. During the inital setup of a system with LDoms, you start with one special domain, called the Control Domain.  Initially, this domain owns all the hardware available in the system, including all CPUs, all RAM and all IO resources.  If you'd be running the system un-virtualized, this would be what you'd be working with.  To allow for guests, you first resize this initial domain (also called a primary domain in LDoms speak), assigning it a small amount of CPU and memory.  This frees up most of the available CPU and memory resources for guest domains.  IO is a little more complex, but very straightforward.  When LDoms 1.0 first came out, the only way to provide IO to guest systems was to create virtual disk and network services and attach guests to these services.  In the meantime, several different ways to connect guest domains to IO have been developed, the most recent one being SR-IOV support for network devices released in version 2.2 of Oracle VM Server for SPARC. I will cover these more advanced features in detail later.  For now, lets have a short look at the initial way IO was virtualized in LDoms: For virtualized IO, you create two services, one "Virtual Disk Service" or vds, and one "Virtual Switch" or vswitch.  You can, of course, also create more of these, but that's more advanced than I want to cover in this introduction.  These IO services now connect real, physical IO resources like a disk LUN or a networt port to the virtual devices that are assigned to guest domains.  For disk IO, the normal case would be to connect a physical LUN (or some other storage option that I'll discuss later) to one specific guest.  That guest would be assigned a virtual disk, which would appear to be just like a real LUN to the guest, while the IO is actually routed through the virtual disk service down to the physical device.  For network, the vswitch acts very much like a real, physical ethernet switch - you connect one physical port to it for outside connectivity and define one or more connections per guest, just like you would plug cables between a real switch and a real system. For completeness, there is another service that provides console access to guest domains which mimics the behavior of serial terminal servers. The connections between the virtual devices on the guest's side and the virtual IO services in the primary domain are created by the hypervisor.  It uses so called "Logical Domain Channels" or LDCs to create point-to-point connections between all of these devices and services.  These LDCs work very similar to high speed serial connections and are configured automatically whenever the Control Domain adds or removes virtual IO. To see all this in action, now lets look at a first example.  I will start with a newly installed machine and configure the control domain so that it's ready to create guest systems. In a first step, after we've installed the software, let's start the virtual console service and downsize the primary domain.  [email protected] # ldm list NAME STATE FLAGS CONS VCPU MEMORY UTIL UPTIME primary active -n-c-- UART 512 261632M 0.3% 2d 13h 58m [email protected] # ldm add-vconscon port-range=5000-5100 \ primary-console primary [email protected] # svcadm enable vntsd [email protected] # svcs vntsd STATE STIME FMRI online 9:53:21 svc:/ldoms/vntsd:default [email protected] # ldm set-vcpu 16 primary [email protected] # ldm set-mau 1 primary [email protected] # ldm start-reconf primary [email protected] # ldm set-memory 7680m primary [email protected] # ldm add-config initial [email protected] # shutdown -y -g0 -i6 So what have I done: I've defined a range of ports (5000-5100) for the virtual network terminal service and then started that service.  The vnts will later provide console connections to guest systems, very much like serial NTS's do in the physical world. Next, I assigned 16 vCPUs (on this platform, a T3-4, that's two cores) to the primary domain, freeing the rest up for future guest systems.  I also assigned one MAU to this domain.  A MAU is a crypto unit in the T3 CPU.  These need to be explicitly assigned to domains, just like CPU or memory.  (This is no longer the case with T4 systems, where crypto is always available everywhere.) Before I reassigned the memory, I started what's called a "delayed reconfiguration" session.  That avoids actually doing the change right away, which would take a considerable amount of time in this case.  Instead, I'll need to reboot once I'm all done.  I've assigned 7680MB of RAM to the primary.  That's 8GB less the 512MB which the hypervisor uses for it's own private purposes.  You can, depending on your needs, work with less.  I'll spend a dedicated article on sizing, discussing the pros and cons in detail. Finally, just before the reboot, I saved my work on the ILOM, to make this configuration available after a powercycle of the box.  (It'll always be available after a simple reboot, but the ILOM needs to know the configuration of the hypervisor after a power-cycle, before the primary domain is booted.) Now, lets create a first disk service and a first virtual switch which is connected to the physical network device igb2. We will later use these to connect virtual disks and virtual network ports of our guest systems to real world storage and network. [email protected] # ldm add-vds primary-vds [email protected] # ldm add-vswitch net-dev=igb2 switch-primary primary You are free to choose whatever names you like for the virtual disk service and the virtual switch.  I strongly recommend that you choose names that make sense to you and describe the function of each service in the context of your implementation.  For the vswitch, for example, you could choose names like "admin-vswitch" or "production-network" etc. This already concludes the configuration of the control domain.  We've freed up considerable amounts of CPU and RAM for guest systems and created the necessary infrastructure - console, vts and vswitch - so that guests systems can actually interact with the outside world.  The system is now ready to create guests, which I'll describe in the next section. For further reading, here are some recommendable links: The LDoms 2.2 Admin Guide The "Beginners Guide to LDoms" The LDoms Information Center on MOS LDoms on OTN

    Read the article

  • What's up with LDoms: Part 2 - Creating a first, simple guest

    - by Stefan Hinker
    Welcome back! In the first part, we discussed the basic concepts of LDoms and how to configure a simple control domain.  We saw how resources were put aside for guest systems and what infrastructure we need for them.  With that, we are now ready to create a first, very simple guest domain.  In this first example, we'll keep things very simple.  Later on, we'll have a detailed look at things like sizing, IO redundancy, other types of IO as well as security. For now,let's start with this very simple guest.  It'll have one core's worth of CPU, one crypto unit, 8GB of RAM, a single boot disk and one network port.  CPU and RAM are easy.  The network port we'll create by attaching a virtual network port to the vswitch we created in the primary domain.  This is very much like plugging a cable into a computer system on one end and a network switch on the other.  For the boot disk, we'll need two things: A physical piece of storage to hold the data - this is called the backend device in LDoms speak.  And then a mapping between that storage and the guest domain, giving it access to that virtual disk.  For this example, we'll use a ZFS volume for the backend.  We'll discuss what other options there are for this and how to chose the right one in a later article.  Here we go: [email protected] # ldm create mars [email protected] # ldm set-vcpu 8 mars [email protected] # ldm set-mau 1 mars [email protected] # ldm set-memory 8g mars [email protected] # zfs create rpool/guests [email protected] # zfs create -V 32g rpool/guests/mars.bootdisk [email protected] # ldm add-vdsdev /dev/zvol/dsk/rpool/guests/mars.bootdisk \ [email protected] [email protected] # ldm add-vdisk root [email protected] mars [email protected] # ldm add-vnet net0 switch-primary mars That's all, mars is now ready to power on.  There are just three commands between us and the OK prompt of mars:  We have to "bind" the domain, start it and connect to its console.  Binding is the process where the hypervisor actually puts all the pieces that we've configured together.  If we made a mistake, binding is where we'll be told (starting in version 2.1, a lot of sanity checking has been put into the config commands themselves, but binding will catch everything else).  Once bound, we can start (and of course later stop) the domain, which will trigger the boot process of OBP.  By default, the domain will then try to boot right away.  If we don't want that, we can set "auto-boot?" to false.  Finally, we'll use telnet to connect to the console of our newly created guest.  The output of "ldm list" shows us what port has been assigned to mars.  By default, the console service only listens on the loopback interface, so using telnet is not a large security concern here. [email protected] # ldm set-variable auto-boot\?=false mars [email protected] # ldm bind mars [email protected] # ldm start mars [email protected] # ldm list NAME STATE FLAGS CONS VCPU MEMORY UTIL UPTIME primary active -n-cv- UART 8 7680M 0.5% 1d 4h 30m mars active -t---- 5000 8 8G 12% 1s [email protected] # telnet localhost 5000 Trying 127.0.0.1... Connected to localhost. Escape character is '^]'. ~Connecting to console "mars" in group "mars" .... Press ~? for control options .. {0} ok banner SPARC T3-4, No Keyboard Copyright (c) 1998, 2011, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. OpenBoot 4.33.1, 8192 MB memory available, Serial # 87203131. Ethernet address 0:21:28:24:1b:50, Host ID: 85241b50. {0} ok We're done, mars is ready to install Solaris, preferably using AI, of course ;-)  But before we do that, let's have a little look at the OBP environment to see how our virtual devices show up here: {0} ok printenv auto-boot? auto-boot? = false {0} ok printenv boot-device boot-device = disk net {0} ok devalias root /[email protected]/[email protected]/[email protected] net0 /[email protected]/[email protected]/[email protected] net /[email protected]/[email protected]/[email protected] disk /[email protected]/[email protected]/[email protected] virtual-console /virtual-devices/[email protected] name aliases We can see that setting the OBP variable "auto-boot?" to false with the ldm command worked.  Of course, we'd normally set this to "true" to allow Solaris to boot right away once the LDom guest is started.  The setting for "boot-device" is the default "disk net", which means OBP would try to boot off the devices pointed to by the aliases "disk" and "net" in that order, which usually means "disk" once Solaris is installed on the disk image.  The actual devices these aliases point to are shown with the command "devalias".  Here, we have one line for both "disk" and "net".  The device paths speak for themselves.  Note that each of these devices has a second alias: "net0" for the network device and "root" for the disk device.  These are the very same names we've given these devices in the control domain with the commands "ldm add-vnet" and "ldm add-vdisk".  Remember this, as it is very useful once you have several dozen disk devices... To wrap this up, in this part we've created a simple guest domain, complete with CPU, memory, boot disk and network connectivity.  This should be enough to get you going.  I will cover all the more advanced features and a little more theoretical background in several follow-on articles.  For some background reading, I'd recommend the following links: LDoms 2.2 Admin Guide: Setting up Guest Domains Virtual Console Server: vntsd manpage - This includes the control sequences and commands available to control the console session. OpenBoot 4.x command reference - All the things you can do at the ok prompt

    Read the article

  • Secure Deployment of Oracle VM Server for SPARC - aktualisiert

    - by Stefan Hinker
    Vor einiger Zeit hatte ich ein Papier mit Empfehlungen fuer den sicheren Einsatz von LDoms veroeffentlicht.  In der Zwischenzeit hat sich so manche veraendert - eine Aktualisierung des Papiers wurde noetig.  Neben einigen kleineren Rechtschreibkorrekturen waren auch ettliche Links veraltet oder geandert.  Der Hauptgrund fuer eine Ueberarbeitung war jedoch das Aufkommen eines zweiten Betriebsmodels fuer LDoms.  Ein einigen wenigen kurzen Worten:  Insbesondere mit dem Erfolg der T4-4 kam es immer oefter vor, dass die Moeglichkeiten zur Hardware-Partitionierung, die diese Platform bietet, genutzt wurden.  Aehnlich wie bei den Dynamic System Domains werden dabei ganze PCIe Root-Komplexe an eine Domain vergeben.  Diese geaenderte Verwendung machte eine Behandlung in diesem Papier notwendig.  Die aktualisierte Version gibt es hier: Secure Deployment of Oracle VM Server for SPARCSecond Edition Ich hoffe, sie ist hilfreich!

    Read the article

  • What's up with LDoms: Part 9 - Direct IO

    - by Stefan Hinker
    In the last article of this series, we discussed the most general of all physical IO options available for LDoms, root domains.  Now, let's have a short look at the next level of granularity: Virtualizing individual PCIe slots.  In the LDoms terminology, this feature is called "Direct IO" or DIO.  It is very similar to root domains, but instead of reassigning ownership of a complete root complex, it only moves a single PCIe slot or endpoint device to a different domain.  Let's look again at hardware available to mars in the original configuration: [email protected]:~# ldm ls-io NAME TYPE BUS DOMAIN STATUS ---- ---- --- ------ ------ pci_0 BUS pci_0 primary pci_1 BUS pci_1 primary pci_2 BUS pci_2 primary pci_3 BUS pci_3 primary /SYS/MB/PCIE1 PCIE pci_0 primary EMP /SYS/MB/SASHBA0 PCIE pci_0 primary OCC /SYS/MB/NET0 PCIE pci_0 primary OCC /SYS/MB/PCIE5 PCIE pci_1 primary EMP /SYS/MB/PCIE6 PCIE pci_1 primary EMP /SYS/MB/PCIE7 PCIE pci_1 primary EMP /SYS/MB/PCIE2 PCIE pci_2 primary EMP /SYS/MB/PCIE3 PCIE pci_2 primary OCC /SYS/MB/PCIE4 PCIE pci_2 primary EMP /SYS/MB/PCIE8 PCIE pci_3 primary EMP /SYS/MB/SASHBA1 PCIE pci_3 primary OCC /SYS/MB/NET2 PCIE pci_3 primary OCC /SYS/MB/NET0/IOVNET.PF0 PF pci_0 primary /SYS/MB/NET0/IOVNET.PF1 PF pci_0 primary /SYS/MB/NET2/IOVNET.PF0 PF pci_3 primary /SYS/MB/NET2/IOVNET.PF1 PF pci_3 primary All of the "PCIE" type devices are available for SDIO, with a few limitations.  If the device is a slot, the card in that slot must support the DIO feature.  The documentation lists all such cards.  Moving a slot to a different domain works just like moving a PCI root complex.  Again, this is not a dynamic process and includes reboots of the affected domains.  The resulting configuration is nicely shown in a diagram in the Admin Guide: There are several important things to note and consider here: The domain receiving the slot/endpoint device turns into an IO domain in LDoms terminology, because it now owns some physical IO hardware. Solaris will create nodes for this hardware under /devices.  This includes entries for the virtual PCI root complex (pci_0 in the diagram) and anything between it and the actual endpoint device.  It is very important to understand that all of this PCIe infrastructure is virtual only!  Only the actual endpoint devices are true physical hardware. There is an implicit dependency between the guest owning the endpoint device and the root domain owning the real PCIe infrastructure: Only if the root domain is up and running, will the guest domain have access to the endpoint device. The root domain is still responsible for resetting and configuring the PCIe infrastructure (root complex, PCIe level configurations, error handling etc.) because it owns this part of the physical infrastructure. This also means that if the root domain needs to reset the PCIe root complex for any reason (typically a reboot of the root domain) it will reset and thus disrupt the operation of the endpoint device owned by the guest domain.  The result in the guest is not predictable.  I recommend to configure the resulting behaviour of the guest using domain dependencies as described in the Admin Guide in Chapter "Configuring Domain Dependencies". Please consult the Admin Guide in Section "Creating an I/O Domain by Assigning PCIe Endpoint Devices" for all the details! As you can see, there are several restrictions for this feature.  It was introduced in LDoms 2.0, mainly to allow the configuration of guest domains that need access to tape devices.  Today, with the higher number of PCIe root complexes and the availability of SR-IOV, the need to use this feature is declining.  I personally do not recommend to use it, mainly because of the drawbacks of the depencies on the root domain and because it can be replaced with SR-IOV (although then with similar limitations). This was a rather short entry, more for completeness.  I believe that DIO can usually be replaced by SR-IOV, which is much more flexible.  I will cover SR-IOV in the next section of this blog series.

    Read the article

  • Das T5-4 TPC-H Ergebnis naeher betrachtet

    - by Stefan Hinker
    Inzwischen haben vermutlich viele das neue TPC-H Ergebnis der SPARC T5-4 gesehen, das am 7. Juni bei der TPC eingereicht wurde.  Die wesentlichen Punkte dieses Benchmarks wurden wie gewohnt bereits von unserer Benchmark-Truppe auf  "BestPerf" zusammengefasst.  Es gibt aber noch einiges mehr, das eine naehere Betrachtung lohnt. Skalierbarkeit Das TPC raet von einem Vergleich von TPC-H Ergebnissen in unterschiedlichen Groessenklassen ab.  Aber auch innerhalb der 3000GB-Klasse ist es interessant: SPARC T4-4 mit 4 CPUs (32 Cores mit 3.0 GHz) liefert 205,792 QphH. SPARC T5-4 mit 4 CPUs (64 Cores mit 3.6 GHz) liefert 409,721 QphH. Das heisst, es fehlen lediglich 1863 QphH oder 0.45% zu 100% Skalierbarkeit, wenn man davon ausgeht, dass die doppelte Anzahl Kerne das doppelte Ergebnis liefern sollte.  Etwas anspruchsvoller, koennte man natuerlich auch einen Faktor von 2.4 erwarten, wenn man die hoehere Taktrate mit beruecksichtigt.  Das wuerde die Latte auf 493901 QphH legen.  Dann waere die SPARC T5-4 bei 83%.  Damit stellt sich die Frage: Was hat hier nicht skaliert?  Vermutlich der Plattenspeicher!  Auch hier lohnt sich eine naehere Betrachtung: Plattenspeicher Im Bericht auf BestPerf und auch im Full Disclosure Report der TPC stehen einige interessante Details zum Plattenspeicher und der Konfiguration.   In der Konfiguration der SPARC T4-4 wurden 12 2540-M2 Arrays verwendet, die jeweils ca. 1.5 GB/s Durchsatz liefert, insgesamt also eta 18 GB/s.  Dabei waren die Arrays offensichtlich mit jeweils 2 Kabeln pro Array direkt an die 24 8GBit FC-Ports des Servers angeschlossen.  Mit den 2x 8GBit Ports pro Array koennte man so ein theoretisches Maximum von 2GB/s erreichen.  Tatsaechlich wurden 1.5GB/s geliefert, was so ziemlich dem realistischen Maximum entsprechen duerfte. Fuer den Lauf mit der SPARC T5-4 wurden doppelt so viele Platten verwendet.  Dafuer wurden die 2540-M2 Arrays mit je einem zusaetzlichen Plattentray erweitert.  Mit dieser Konfiguration wurde dann (laut BestPerf) ein Maximaldurchsatz von 33 GB/s erreicht - nicht ganz das doppelte des SPARC T4-4 Laufs.  Um tatsaechlich den doppelten Durchsatz (36 GB/s) zu liefern, haette jedes der 12 Arrays 3 GB/s ueber seine 4 8GBit Ports liefern muessen.  Im FDR stehen nur 12 dual-port FC HBAs, was die Verwendung der Brocade FC Switches erklaert: Es wurden alle 4 8GBit ports jedes Arrays an die Switches angeschlossen, die die Datenstroeme dann in die 24 16GBit HBA ports des Servers buendelten.  Das theoretische Maximum jedes Storage-Arrays waere nun 4 GB/s.  Wenn man jedoch den Protokoll- und "Realitaets"-Overhead mit einrechnet, sind die tatsaechlich gelieferten 2.75 GB/s gar nicht schlecht.  Mit diesen Zahlen im Hinterkopf ist die Verdopplung des SPARC T4-4 Ergebnisses eine gute Leistung - und gleichzeitig eine gute Erklaerung, warum nicht bis zum 2.4-fachen skaliert wurde. Nebenbei bemerkt: Weder die SPARC T4-4 noch die SPARC T5-4 hatten in der gemessenen Konfiguration irgendwelche Flash-Devices. Mitbewerb Seit die T4 Systeme auf dem Markt sind, bemuehen sich unsere Mitbewerber redlich darum, ueberall den Eindruck zu hinterlassen, die Leistung des SPARC CPU-Kerns waere weiterhin mangelhaft.  Auch scheinen sie ueberzeugt zu sein, dass (ueber)grosse Caches und hohe Taktraten die einzigen Schluessel zu echter Server Performance seien.  Wenn ich mir nun jedoch die oeffentlichen TPC-H Ergebnisse ansehe, sehe ich dies: TPC-H @3000GB, Non-Clustered Systems System QphH SPARC T5-4 3.6 GHz SPARC T5 4/64 – 2048 GB 409,721.8 SPARC T4-4 3.0 GHz SPARC T4 4/32 – 1024 GB 205,792.0 IBM Power 780 4.1 GHz POWER7 8/32 – 1024 GB 192,001.1 HP ProLiant DL980 G7 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon X7560 8/64 – 512 GB 162,601.7 Kurz zusammengefasst: Mit 32 Kernen (mit 3 GHz und 4MB L3 Cache), liefert die SPARC T4-4 mehr [email protected] ab als IBM mit ihrer 32 Kern Power7 (bei 4.1 GHz und 32MB L3 Cache) und auch mehr als HP mit einem 64 Kern Intel Xeon System (2.27 GHz und 24MB L3 Cache).  Ich frage mich, wo genau SPARC hier mangelhaft ist? Nun koennte man natuerlich argumentieren, dass beide Ergebnisse nicht gerade neu sind.  Nun, in Ermangelung neuerer Ergebnisse kann man ja mal ein wenig spekulieren: IBMs aktueller Performance Report listet die o.g. IBM Power 780 mit einem rPerf Wert von 425.5.  Ein passendes Nachfolgesystem mit Power7+ CPUs waere die Power 780+ mit 64 Kernen, verfuegbar mit 3.72 GHz.  Sie wird mit einem rPerf Wert von  690.1 angegeben, also 1.62x mehr.  Wenn man also annimmt, dass Plattenspeicher nicht der limitierende Faktor ist (IBM hat mit 177 SSDs getestet, sie duerfen das gerne auf 400 erhoehen) und IBMs eigene Leistungsabschaetzung zugrunde legt, darf man ein theoretisches Ergebnis von 311398 [email protected] erwarten.  Das waere dann allerdings immer noch weit von dem Ergebnis der SPARC T5-4 entfernt, und gerade in der von IBM so geschaetzen "per core" Metric noch weniger vorteilhaft. In der x86-Welt sieht es nicht besser aus.  Leider gibt es von Intel keine so praktischen rPerf-Tabellen.  Daher muss ich hier fuer eine Schaetzung auf SPECint_rate2006 zurueckgreifen.  (Ich bin kein grosser Fan von solchen Kreuz- und Querschaetzungen.  Insb. SPECcpu ist nicht besonders geeignet, um Datenbank-Leistung abzuschaetzen, da fast kein IO im Spiel ist.)  Das o.g. HP System wird bei SPEC mit 1580 CINT2006_rate gelistet.  Das bis einschl. 2013-06-14 beste Resultat fuer den neuen Intel Xeon E7-4870 mit 8 CPUs ist 2180 CINT2006_rate.  Das ist immerhin 1.38x besser.  (Wenn man nur die Taktrate beruecksichtigen wuerde, waere man bei 1.32x.)  Hier weiter zu rechnen, ist muessig, aber fuer die ungeduldigen Leser hier eine kleine tabellarische Zusammenfassung: TPC-H @3000GB Performance Spekulationen System QphH* Verbesserung gegenueber der frueheren Generation SPARC T4-4 32 cores SPARC T4 205,792 2x SPARC T5-464 cores SPARC T5 409,721 IBM Power 780 32 cores Power7 192,001 1.62x IBM Power 780+ 64 cores Power7+  311,398* HP ProLiant DL980 G764 cores Intel Xeon X7560 162,601 1.38x HP ProLiant DL980 G780 cores Intel Xeon E7-4870    224,348* * Keine echten Resultate  - spekulative Werte auf der Grundlage von rPerf (Power7+) oder SPECint_rate2006 (HP) Natuerlich sind IBM oder HP herzlich eingeladen, diese Werte zu widerlegen.  Aber stand heute warte ich noch auf aktuelle Benchmark Veroffentlichungen in diesem Datensegment. Was koennen wir also zusammenfassen? Es gibt einige Hinweise, dass der Plattenspeicher der begrenzende Faktor war, der die SPARC T5-4 daran hinderte, auf jenseits von 2x zu skalieren Der Mythos, dass SPARC Kerne keine Leistung bringen, ist genau das - ein Mythos.  Wie sieht es umgekehrt eigentlich mit einem TPC-H Ergebnis fuer die Power7+ aus? Cache ist nicht der magische Performance-Schalter, fuer den ihn manche Leute offenbar halten. Ein System, eine CPU-Architektur und ein Betriebsystem jenseits einer gewissen Grenze zu skalieren ist schwer.  In der x86-Welt scheint es noch ein wenig schwerer zu sein. Was fehlt?  Nun, das Thema Preis/Leistung ueberlasse ich gerne den Verkaeufern ;-) Und zu guter Letzt: Nein, ich habe mich nicht ins Marketing versetzen lassen.  Aber manchmal kann ich mich einfach nicht zurueckhalten... Disclosure Statements The views expressed on this blog are my own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Oracle. TPC-H, QphH, $/QphH are trademarks of Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC). For more information, see www.tpc.org, results as of 6/7/13. Prices are in USD. SPARC T5-4 409,721.8 [email protected], $3.94/[email protected], available 9/24/13, 4 processors, 64 cores, 512 threads; SPARC T4-4 205,792.0 [email protected], $4.10/[email protected], available 5/31/12, 4 processors, 32 cores, 256 threads; IBM Power 780 [email protected], 192,001.1 [email protected], $6.37/[email protected], available 11/30/11, 8 processors, 32 cores, 128 threads; HP ProLiant DL980 G7 162,601.7 [email protected], $2.68/[email protected] available 10/13/10, 8 processors, 64 cores, 128 threads. SPEC and the benchmark names SPECfp and SPECint are registered trademarks of the Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation. Results as of June 18, 2013 from www.spec.org. HP ProLiant DL980 G7 (2.27 GHz, Intel Xeon X7560): 1580 SPECint_rate2006; HP ProLiant DL980 G7 (2.4 GHz, Intel Xeon E7-4870): 2180 SPECint_rate2006,

    Read the article

  • Secure Deployment of Oracle VM Server for SPARC - updated

    - by Stefan Hinker
    Quite a while ago, I published a paper with recommendations for a secure deployment of LDoms.  Many things happend in the mean time, and an update to that paper was due.  Besides some minor spelling corrections, many obsolete or changed links were updated.  However, the main reason for the update was the introduction of a second usage model for LDoms.  In a very short few words: With the success especially of the T4-4, many deployments make use of the hardware partitioning capabilities of that platform, assigning full PCIe root complexes to domains, mimicking dynamic system domains if you will.  This different way of using the hypervisor needed to be addressed in the paper.  You can find the updated version here: Secure Deployment of Oracle VM Server for SPARCSecond Edition I hope it'll be useful!

    Read the article

  • What's up with LDoms: Eine Artikel-Reihe zum Thema Oracle VM Server for SPARC

    - by Stefan Hinker
    Unter dem Titel "What's up with LDoms" habe ich soeben den ersten Artikel einer ganzen Reihe veroeffentlicht.  Ziel der Artikelreihe ist es, das vollstaendige Feature-Set der LDoms zu betrachten.  Da das ganze recht umfangreich ist, werde ich hier von der Zweisprachigkeit abweichen und die Artikel ausschliesslich auf Englisch verfassen.  Ich bitte hierfuer um Verstaendnis. Den ersten Artikel gibt es hier: What's up with LDoms: Part 1 - Introduction & Basic Concepts Viel Spass beim Lesen!

    Read the article

  • Einstieg in Solaris 11

    - by Stefan Hinker
    Fuer alle die, die jetzt mit Solaris 11 anfangen wollen, gibt es eine gute Zusammenfassung der Neuerungen und Aenderungen gegenueber Solaris 10.  Zu finden als Support Dokument 1313405.1.Auch in OTN gibt es ein ganzes Portal zu Solaris 11.  Besonders hervorheben moechte ich hier die umfangreiche "How-To" Sammlung. Und nicht zuletzt gibt es natuerlich die "ganz normalen" Admin Guides.

    Read the article

  • 20 Jahre Solaris - 25 Jahre SPARC!

    - by Stefan Hinker
    Normalerweise wiederhole ich ja nicht einfach das, was woanders schon steht.  Hier mache ich eine Ausnahme... 20 Jahre Solaris - Und wer hat die ganzen Innovationspreise bekommen?25 Jahre SPARC - und kein bisschen muede :-) Wie die Geschichte weiter geht, steht ganz unten auf diesen Seite - also schnell nachsehen... Und wer's lieber als Video mag: 20 Jahre Solaris - 25 Jahre SPARC (Kaum zu glauben, ich habe nur die ersten 4 Jahre von Solaris "verpasst".  Die Zeit vergeht wohl doch...)

    Read the article

  • 20 Years of Solaris - 25 Years of SPARC!

    - by Stefan Hinker
    I don't usually duplicate what can be found elsewhere.  But this is worth an exception. 20 Years of Solaris - Guess who got all those innovation awards!25 Years of SPARC - And the future has just begun :-) Check out those pages for some links pointing to the past, and, more interesting, to the future... There are also some nice videos: 20 Years of Solaris - 25 Years of SPARC (Come to think of it - I got to be part of all but the first 4 years of Solaris.  I must be getting older...)

    Read the article

  • What's up with LDoms: Part 5 - A few Words about Consoles

    - by Stefan Hinker
    Back again to look at a detail of LDom configuration that is often forgotten - the virtual console server. Remember, LDoms are SPARC systems.  As such, each guest will have it's own OBP running.  And to connect to that OBP, the administrator will need a console connection.  Since it's OBP, and not some x86 BIOS, this console will be very serial in nature ;-)  It's really very much like in the good old days, where we had a terminal concentrator where all those serial cables ended up in.  Just like with other components in LDoms, the virtualized solution looks very similar. Every LDom guest requires exactly one console connection.  Envision this similar to the RS-232 port on older SPARC systems.  The LDom framework provides one or more console services that provide access to these connections.  This would be the virtual equivalent of a network terminal server (NTS), where all those serial cables are plugged in.  In the physical world, we'd have a list somewhere, that would tell us which TCP-Port of the NTS was connected to which server.  "ldm list" does just that: [email protected] # ldm list NAME STATE FLAGS CONS VCPU MEMORY UTIL UPTIME primary active -n-cv- UART 16 7680M 0.4% 27d 8h 22m jupiter bound ------ 5002 20 8G mars active -n---- 5000 2 8G 0.5% 55d 14h 10m venus active -n---- 5001 2 8G 0.5% 56d 40m pluto inactive ------ 4 4G The column marked "CONS" tells us, where to reach the console of each domain. In the case of the primary domain, this is actually a (more) physical connection - it's the console connection of the physical system, which is either reachable via the ILOM of that system, or directly via the serial console port on the chassis. All the other guests are reachable through the console service which we created during the inital setup of the system.  Note that pluto does not have a port assigned.  This is because pluto is not yet bound.  (Binding can be viewed very much as the assembly of computer parts - CPU, Memory, disks, network adapters and a serial console cable are all put together when binding the domain.)  Unless we set the port number explicitly, LDoms Manager will do this on a first come, first serve basis.  For just a few domains, this is fine.  For larger deployments, it might be a good idea to assign these port numbers manually using the "ldm set-vcons" command.  However, there is even better magic associated with virtual consoles. You can group several domains into one console group, reachable through one TCP port of the console service.  This can be useful when several groups of administrators are to be given access to different domains, or for other grouping reasons.  Here's an example: [email protected] # ldm set-vcons group=planets service=console jupiter [email protected] # ldm set-vcons group=planets service=console pluto [email protected] # ldm bind jupiter [email protected] # ldm bind pluto [email protected] # ldm list NAME STATE FLAGS CONS VCPU MEMORY UTIL UPTIME primary active -n-cv- UART 16 7680M 6.1% 27d 8h 24m jupiter bound ------ 5002 200 8G mars active -n---- 5000 2 8G 0.6% 55d 14h 12m pluto bound ------ 5002 4 4G venus active -n---- 5001 2 8G 0.5% 56d 42m [email protected] # telnet localhost 5002 Trying 127.0.0.1... Connected to localhost. Escape character is '^]'. sun-vnts-planets: h, l, c{id}, n{name}, q:l DOMAIN ID DOMAIN NAME DOMAIN STATE 2 jupiter online 3 pluto online sun-vnts-planets: h, l, c{id}, n{name}, q:npluto Connecting to console "pluto" in group "planets" .... Press ~? for control options .. What I did here was add the two domains pluto and jupiter to a new console group called "planets" on the service "console" running in the primary domain.  Simply using a group name will create such a group, if it doesn't already exist.  By default, each domain has its own group, using the domain name as the group name.  The group will be available on port 5002, chosen by LDoms Manager because I didn't specify it.  If I connect to that console group, I will now first be prompted to choose the domain I want to connect to from a little menu. Finally, here's an example how to assign port numbers explicitly: [email protected] # ldm set-vcons port=5044 group=pluto service=console pluto [email protected] # ldm bind pluto [email protected] # ldm list NAME STATE FLAGS CONS VCPU MEMORY UTIL UPTIME primary active -n-cv- UART 16 7680M 3.8% 27d 8h 54m jupiter active -t---- 5002 200 8G 0.5% 30m mars active -n---- 5000 2 8G 0.6% 55d 14h 43m pluto bound ------ 5044 4 4G venus active -n---- 5001 2 8G 0.4% 56d 1h 13m With this, pluto would always be reachable on port 5044 in its own exclusive console group, no matter in which order other domains are bound. Now, you might be wondering why we always have to mention the console service name, "console" in all the examples here.  The simple answer is because there could be more than one such console service.  For all "normal" use, a single console service is absolutely sufficient.  But the system is flexible enough to allow more than that single one, should you need them.  In fact, you could even configure such a console service on a domain other than the primary (or control domain), which would make that domain a real console server.  I actually have a customer who does just that - they want to separate console access from the control domain functionality.  But this is definately a rather sophisticated setup. Something I don't want to go into in this post is access control.  vntsd, which is the daemon providing all these console services, is fully RBAC-aware, and you can configure authorizations for individual users to connect to console groups or individual domain's consoles.  If you can't wait until I get around to security, check out the man page of vntsd. Further reading: The Admin Guide is rather reserved on this subject.  I do recommend to check out the Reference Manual. The manpage for vntsd will discuss all the control sequences as well as the grouping and authorizations mentioned here.

    Read the article

  • Hooking into comment_text() to add surrounding tag

    - by Stefan Glase
    Trying to hook into the function comment_text() supplied by Wordpress API to wrap the output of every comment into a <div>...</div> container I am running into the following problem: Without my added filter the output of comment_text() looks like this: <p>Hello User!</p> <p>Thank you for your comment.</p> <p>Stefan</p> Thats fine but as I said I would like to have it wrapped into a <div class="comment-text">...</div>. As far as I know the correct way doing this would be in adding a filter to functions.php of my theme and so I did: function stefan_wrap_comment_text($content) { return "<div class=\"comment-text\">". $content ."</div>"; } add_filter('comment_text', 'stefan_wrap_comment_text'); As I can see from the output the given filter works but it has a negative sideeffect to the first paragraph of the content as you can see in the following example. The first paragraph should be <p>Hello User!</p> but looks like this: Hello User!. <div class="comment-text"> Hello User! <p>Thank you for your comment.</p> <p>Stefan</p> </div> Any ideas or hints what I am doing wrong?

    Read the article

  • RIDC Accelerator for Portal

    - by Stefan Krantz
    What is RIDC?Remote IntraDoc Client is a Java enabled API that leverages simple transportation protocols like Socket, HTTP and JAX/WS to execute content service operations in WebCenter Content Server. Each operation by design in the Content Server will execute stateless and return a complete result of the request. Each request object simply specifies the in a Map format (key and value pairs) what service to call and what parameters settings to apply. The result responded with will be built on the same Map format (key and value pairs). The possibilities with RIDC is endless since you can consume any available service (even custom made ones), RIDC can be executed from any Java SE application that has any WebCenter Content Services needs. WebCenter Portal and the example Accelerator RIDC adapter frameworkWebCenter Portal currently integrates and leverages WebCenter Content Services to enable available use cases in the portal today, like Content Presenter and Doc Lib. However the current use cases only covers few of the scenarios that the Content Server has to offer, in addition to the existing use cases it is not rare that the customer requirements requires additional steps and functionality that is provided by WebCenter Content but not part of the use cases from the WebCenter Portal.The good news to this is RIDC, the second good news is that WebCenter Portal already leverages the RIDC and has a connection management framework in place. The million dollar question here is how can I leverage this infrastructure for my custom use cases. Oracle A-Team has during its interactions produced a accelerator adapter framework that will reuse and leverage the existing connections provisioned in the webcenter portal application (works for WebCenter Spaces as well), as well as a very comprehensive design patter to minimize the work involved when exposing functionality. Let me introduce the RIDCCommon framework for accelerating WebCenter Content consumption from WebCenter Portal including Spaces. How do I get started?Through a few easy steps you will be on your way, Extract the zip file RIDCCommon.zip to the WebCenter Portal Application file structure (PortalApp) Open you Portal Application in JDeveloper (PS4/PS5) select to open the project in your application - this will add the project as a member of the application Update the Portal project dependencies to include the new RIDCCommon project Make sure that you WebCenter Content Server connection is marked as primary (a checkbox at the top of the connection properties form) You should by this stage have a similar structure in your JDeveloper Application Project Portal Project PortalWebAssets Project RIDCCommon Since the API is coming with some example operations that has already been exposed as DataControl actions, if you open Data Controls accordion you should see following: How do I implement my own operation? Create a new Java Class in for example com.oracle.ateam.portal.ridc.operation call it (GetDocInfoOperation) Extend the abstract class com.oracle.ateam.portal.ridc.operation.RIDCAbstractOperation and implement the interface com.oracle.ateam.portal.ridc.operation.IRIDCOperation The only method you actually are required to implement is execute(RIDCManager, IdcClient, IdcContext) The best practice to set object references for the operation is through the Constructor, example below public GetDocInfoOperation(String dDocName)By leveraging the constructor you can easily force the implementing class to pass right information, you can also overload the Constructor with more or less parameters as required Implement the execute method, the work you supposed to execute here is creating a new request binder and retrieve a response binder with the information in the request binder.In this case the dDocName for which we want the DocInfo Secondly you have to process the response binder by extracting the information you need from the request and restore this information in a simple POJO Java BeanIn the example below we do this in private void processResult(DataBinder responseData) - the new SearchDataObject is a Member of the GetDocInfoOperation so we can return this from a access method. Since the RIDCCommon API leverage template pattern for the operations you are now required to add a method that will enable access to the result after the execution of the operationIn the example below we added the method public SearchDataObject getDataObject() - this method returns the pre processed SearchDataObject from the execute method  This is it, as you can see on the code below you do not need more than 32 lines of very simple code 1: public class GetDocInfoOperation extends RIDCAbstractOperation implements IRIDCOperation { 2: private static final String DOC_INFO_BY_NAME = "DOC_INFO_BY_NAME"; 3: private String dDocName = null; 4: private SearchDataObject sdo = null; 5: 6: public GetDocInfoOperation(String dDocName) { 7: super(); 8: this.dDocName = dDocName; 9: } 10:   11: public boolean execute(RIDCManager manager, IdcClient client, 12: IdcContext userContext) throws Exception { 13: DataBinder dataBinder = createNewRequestBinder(DOC_INFO_BY_NAME); 14: dataBinder.putLocal(DocumentAttributeDef.NAME.getName(), dDocName); 15: 16: DataBinder responseData = getResponseBinder(dataBinder); 17: processResult(responseData); 18: return true; 19: } 20: 21: private void processResult(DataBinder responseData) { 22: DataResultSet rs = responseData.getResultSet("DOC_INFO"); 23: for(DataObject dobj : rs.getRows()) { 24: this.sdo = new SearchDataObject(dobj); 25: } 26: super.setMessage(responseData.getLocal(ATTR_MESSAGE)); 27: } 28: 29: public SearchDataObject getDataObject() { 30: return this.sdo; 31: } 32: } How do I execute my operation? In the previous section we described how to create a operation, so by now you should be ready to execute the operation Step one either add a method to the class  com.oracle.ateam.portal.datacontrol.ContentServicesDC or a class of your own choiceRemember the RIDCManager is a very light object and can be created where needed Create a method signature look like this public SearchDataObject getDocInfo(String dDocName) throws Exception In the method body - create a new instance of GetDocInfoOperation and meet the constructor requirements by passing the dDocNameGetDocInfoOperation docInfo = new GetDocInfoOperation(dDocName) Execute the operation via the RIDCManager instance rMgr.executeOperation(docInfo) Return the result by accessing it from the executed operationreturn docInfo.getDataObject() 1: private RIDCManager rMgr = null; 2: private String lastOperationMessage = null; 3:   4: public ContentServicesDC() { 5: super(); 6: this.rMgr = new RIDCManager(); 7: } 8: .... 9: public SearchDataObject getDocInfo(String dDocName) throws Exception { 10: GetDocInfoOperation docInfo = new GetDocInfoOperation(dDocName); 11: boolean boolVal = rMgr.executeOperation(docInfo); 12: lastOperationMessage = docInfo.getMessage(); 13: return docInfo.getDataObject(); 14: }   Get the binaries! The enclosed code in a example that can be used as a reference on how to consume and leverage similar use cases, user has to guarantee appropriate quality and support.  Download link: https://blogs.oracle.com/ATEAM_WEBCENTER/resource/stefan.krantz/RIDCCommon.zip RIDC API Referencehttp://docs.oracle.com/cd/E23943_01/apirefs.1111/e17274/toc.htm

    Read the article

  • Changing a column collation

    - by Stefan
    Hey there, I have a database already set up. I am trying to change the collation to case sensitive on my username column so it restricts login parameters to what they signed up with. However I keep getting this: #1025 - Error on rename of './yebutno_ybn/#sql-76dc_8581dc' to './yebutno_ybn/user' (errno: 150) there is foreign key constraints due to related tables.... any ideas? this will save me a lot of hassle with the php side of things! Thanks, Stefan

    Read the article

  • Find folders with specific name and no symlink pointing to them

    - by Stefan
    Hey guys, I'm trying to write a shell script under linux, which lists all folders (recursively) with a certain name and no symlink pointing to it. For example I have /home/htdocs/cust1/typo3_src-4.2.11 /home/htdocs/cust2/typo3_src-4.2.12 /home/htdocs/cust3/typo3_src-4.2.12 Now I want to go through all subdirectories of /home/htdocs and find those folders typo3_*, that are not pointed to from somewhere. Should be possible with a shellscript or a command, but I have no idea how. Thanks for you help Stefan

    Read the article

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12  | Next Page >