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  • Scoring/analysis of Subjective testing for skills assessment

    - by ChrisBint
    I am lucky in the sense that I have been given the opportunity to be a 'Technical Troubleshooter' for our offshore development team. While I am confident and capable of dealing with most issues, I have come across something that I am not. Based on initial discussions with various team members both on and offshore, a requirement for a 'repeatable, consistent' skills assessment has been identified. In my opinion, the best way to achieve this would be a combination of objective and subjective tests. The former normally being an initial online skills assessment on various subjects, for example General C#, WCF and MVC. The latter being a technical test where the candidate would need to solve various problems and (hopefully) explain the thought processes involved with the solution whilst doing so. Obviously, the first method is consistent, repeatable and extremely accurate. The second is always going to be subjective and based on the approach, the solution (or possibly not) and other factors. The 'scoring' of this is also going to be down to the experience and skills of the assessor and this is where my problem lies; The person that is expected to be the assessor initially (me) has no experience. The people that will ultimately continue this process for other people will never remain the same due to project constraints and internal reasons, this changes the baseline for comparison. I am not aware of any suitable system that can be classed as consistent and repeatable for subjective tests with the 2 factors above, let alone if those did not exist. So anyway, I have to present a plan that will ultimately generate a skills/gap analysis and it is unlikely that I will be able to use an objective method (budget constraints most likely reason). The only option left is the subjective methods and the issues above. Does anyone have any suggestions for an approach that may tick all the boxes?

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  • Best Practise/Subjective: Implement a finite state automaton in OOP

    - by poeschlorn
    Hi guys, I am thinking about implementing a programm with finite state automaton in an OOP language like Java or C++. What would you think is the best way to implement this with a manageable amount of available states, regarding to good software design? Is it good to implement for each state an own class? If yes, how to do the bridge between two states? Thanks for any comment!

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  • How tough programmer are you? (subjective) The Guinness Book of Programming Records [closed]

    - by topright
    The Guinness Book of Programming Records. It is very interesting to know what we and our colleagues are capable of. I welcome you to tell us what is your best result/achievement and what are you most proud of as a programmer. PS. There are over 6000 subjective and even more argumentative questions on stackoverflow: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/tagged/subjective. I don't see reasons to close this very interesting question. Please, vote to reopen it!

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  • "Best" language /architecture for browser-based app with ODBC and sockets? (subjective)

    - by mawg
    Sorry to ask a subjective question, but I would welcome some advice. I am an experienced programmer of embedded s/w, but haven't done much network programming, although I have done a fair bit of hobbyist PHP. Anyway, I have to develop what is probably a fairly general type of app, as shown in this crude diagram --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- | Browser / user interface Takes input from user form and writes data to d/b. | | Also gets data and updates browser contents when when d/b contents are changed | | because of info received over TCP/IP. | |________________________________________________________________________________| | ODBC | |_______________________________________________________________________________| | database | |_______________________________________________________________________________| | ODBC | |_______________________________________________________________________________| | Socket (TCP/IP) | | Send data out when d/b is updated from browser. | | Also, update d/b when data are received over TCP/IP. | |_______________________________________________________________________________| As I say, I imagine this to be a fairly typical architecture? Am I right? Then client is insisting on MSIE - unless I can show compelling technical reasons for FireFox or other then it will have to be MSIE (are there any compelling technical reasons?). So, with MIE (almost) a given, I had though to use PHP, since I know it, but the client seems awfully keen on Java (which ought to be OK since I am conversant with C++) it woudl seem to make sense to use the same language for the "upper" interface between the web pages (which that app generates) and the d/b, and for the "lower" interface between the d/b and the socket. (a single language means a single set of tools since text approach, etc) So, the (probably highly subjective) question is "which language shoudl I choose". As I say, the client is keen on Java. Any compelling reason why not? Is it generally a good choice for the sort of thing described here? Any other hints & tips gratefully appreciated (and up-voted): URLs, books, tool chain suggestions, etc, etc

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  • Subjective question...would you use the Action delegate to avoid duplication of code?

    - by Seth Spearman
    Hello, I just asked a question that helps about using generics (or polymorphism) to avoid duplication of code. I am really trying to follow the DRY principle. So I just ran into the following code... Sub OutputDataToExcel() OutputLine("Output DataBlocks", 1) OutputDataBlocks() OutputLine("") OutputLine("Output Numbered Inventory", 1) OutputNumberedInventory() OutputLine("") OutputLine("Output Item Summaries", 1) OutputItemSummaries() OutputLine("") End Sub Should I rewrite this code to be as follows using the Action delegate... Sub OutputDataToExcel() OutputData("Output DataBlocks", New Action(AddressOf OutputDataBlocks)) OutputData("Output Numbered Inventory", New Action(AddressOf OutputNumberedInventory)) OutputData("Output Item Summaries", New Action(AddressOf OutputItemSummaries)) End Sub Sub OutputData(ByVal outputDescription As String, ByVal outputType As Action) OutputLine(outputDescription, 1) outputType() OutputLine("") End Sub I realize this question is subjective. I am just wondering about how religiously you follow DRY. Would you do this? Seth

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  • code review: Is it subjective or objective(quantifiable) ?

    - by Ram
    I am putting together some guidelines for code reviews. We do not have one formal process yet, and trying to formalize it. And our team is geographically distributed We are using TFS for source control (used it for tasks/bug tracking/project management as well, but migrated that to JIRA) with VS2008 for development. What are the things you look for when doing a code review ? These are the things I came up with Enforce FXCop rules (we are a Microsoft shop) Check for performance (any tools ?) and security (thinking about using OWASP- code crawler) and thread safety Adhere to naming conventions The code should cover edge cases and boundaries conditions Should handle exceptions correctly (do not swallow exceptions) Check if the functionality is duplicated elsewhere method body should be small(20-30 lines) , and methods should do one thing and one thing only (no side effects/ avoid temporal coupling -) Do not pass/return nulls in methods Avoid dead code Document public and protected methods/properties/variables What other things do you generally look for ? I am trying to see if we can quantify the review process (it would produce identical output when reviewed by different persons) Example: Saying "the method body should be no longer than 20-30 lines of code" as opposed to saying "the method body should be small" Or is code review very subjective ( and would differ from one reviewer to another ) ? The objective is to have a marking system (say -1 point for each FXCop rule violation,-2 points for not following naming conventions,2 point for refactoring etc) so that developers would be more careful when they check in their code.This way, we can identify developers who are consistently writing good/bad code.The goal is to have the reviewer spend about 30 minutes max, to do a review (I know this is subjective, considering the fact that the changeset/revision might include multiple files/huge changes to the existing architecture etc , but you get the general idea, the reviewer should not spend days reviewing someone's code) What other objective/quantifiable system do you follow to identify good/bad code written by developers? Book reference: Clean Code: A handbook of agile software craftmanship by Robert Martin

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  • The best terminal emulator for a heavy terminal user?

    - by Noah Goodrich
    I spend a lot of time at the command-line during the workday and at home too since I run Ubuntu exclusively. I've been using the default gnome terminal but I've reached a point where I'd really like to get my terminal tricked out so that my common tasks are as easy as possible. Specifically, I find that I spend of lot of time browsing code in the terminal and working in config files. On my wish list would be: Ability to have multiple screens, tabs, windows (I don't have a preference at this point) that I can easily switch between. Color coding for everything Easy to modify the aesthetics of the terminal (is it vain to want my terminal to look nice?) such as transparency, borders, etc.

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  • How do you explain more advanced computing concepts to a non super user?

    - by EvilChookie
    I often have to explain computing concepts to non super users, and I often do it by relating computing concepts to real life situations. I wouldn't mind seeing how other super users do it, and some really good explanations might come in handy instead of me having to wing it. So, how do you explain advanced computing topics to the 'normal' people? Notes: One explanation per answer, and let the best float to the top. CW turned on, since this is subjective. Also, feel free to edit my tags if you can think of better ones =)

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  • What should I be doing while I wait for a progress bar?

    - by Malnizzle
    So I am sitting here waiting for a progress bar to run (20 mins or so), and was wondering how best to use my time as a SysAdmin. I debated not posting this question briefly, as this could get flagged as subjective, but I think it's an important question, and a question that can be legitimately answered (per the FAQ) I know this something a lot of sys admins deal with, especially if they are client-based I would venture to guess. There is a lot of material out there about how to multi task, but SysAdmin work is unique in this area as well. I could switch over to another project, but I could get wrapped up in that, and forget about the original project I was working on, and that's hard if you are billing a client for your time, both for tracking your time, as well as being fair to that client. I could check ServerFault, but that isn't directly work related, I could sort my email, so on and so forth. What do you do, or what should I do when I have time waiting for a progress bar? Thanks! (download done, back to work!)

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  • How to estimate the contribution of an individual to a software project?

    - by Amit Kumar
    I work on a software project and would like to estimate the percentage out of the total contribution that I have put in the development of the software. Is there some tool doing this? Such a tool can be useful for appraisals or negotiations, for example. After all, we work for money (yes, not only money, put the point remains). I think there is enough hand-waving for the most important things. The estimation is very subjective (at least to me now) but I do not know of any tool that provides even a subjective estimate. I know of Sloccount that spells out the total effort using the lines of code but not on per-developer basis. My idea of an ideal tool for this purpose would: measure the complexity of the code (more complex is more effort, but more effort is not necessarily more contribution) measure the decomposibility/flexibility of the software (more decomposable is better) how much library code is used -- using library code speeds up the development process, increases the associated risk and requires the developer to know from before or learn about the library. be intelligent enough to differentiate between "who wrote the code", "who copied the code" and "who indented the code". It is difficult to differentiate between the complexity in the implementation and the intrinsic complexity of the problem. Perhaps a comparison can be made with an equivalent open source counterpart if there is, or for each submodule separately. If there is no such tool, is there no merit in having such a tool? Or do you believe in "I do work, I do not measure"? It takes time after all. Perhaps the project manager should do this estimation continuously, say, weekly. Are there any standards? Yes, standardization is difficult because every project has a different goal, but difficult does not mean it is not useful.

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  • Best practice - When to evaluate conditionals of function execution

    - by Tesserex
    If I have a function called from a few places, and it requires some condition to be met for anything it does to execute, where should that condition be checked? In my case, it's for drawing - if the mouse button is held down, then execute the drawing logic (this is being done in the mouse movement handler for when you drag.) Option one says put it in the function so that it's guaranteed to be checked. Abstracted, if you will. public function Foo() { DoThing(); } private function DoThing() { if (!condition) return; // do stuff } The problem I have with this is that when reading the code of Foo, which may be far away from DoThing, it looks like a bug. The first thought is that the condition isn't being checked. Option two, then, is to check before calling. public function Foo() { if (condition) DoThing(); } This reads better, but now you have to worry about checking from everywhere you call it. Option three is to rename the function to be more descriptive. public function Foo() { DoThingOnlyIfCondition(); } private function DoThingOnlyIfCondition() { if (!condition) return; // do stuff } Is this the "correct" solution? Or is this going a bit too far? I feel like if everything were like this function names would start to duplicate their code. About this being subjective: of course it is, and there may not be a right answer, but I think it's still perfectly at home here. Getting advice from better programmers than I is the second best way to learn. Subjective questions are exactly the kind of thing Google can't answer.

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  • I have bluescreen-phobia

    - by Charlie Somerville
    I'm scared of the Blue Screen of Death. Seriously. Whenever I hibernate or shutdown my computer, I have to turn the screen off in case it bluescreens during that process. Whenever I see a bluescreen, it makes my heart skip a beat and I jump a little - especially if it's on my own computer. I decided that this is getting ridiculous after I experienced a BSOD this evening. My computer booted back up and I decided to switch off the screen and leave the room. I came back about a minute later and it still hadn't got to the login screen. To find out what happened, I actually covered the screen with two A4 pages and gradually peeled them back after I saw that the screen wasn't blue. This is going way too far, but I can't help it. I am legitimately afraid of BSODs. Does anyone have any advice on how I can help myself?

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  • What is "The" book for database design?

    - by FarmBoy
    In programming, there is often a canonical book for a particular topic, like the dragon book for compilers, K&R for C, etc. Is their a book regarding modern database design that simply must be read by anyone that would hope to eventually design databases? I'm not looking for a bunch of recommendations here. The answer I'm looking for is either "Yes, it's [Title, author]." or "No, there are many good books on databases, but no one must-read."

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  • SysAdmin Career Question: Internal or Client Based

    - by Malnizzle
    ServerFault Community, It seems there are two positions SysAdmins find themselves in, either you are working for a non-IT services based single client (your employer) and providing in-house IT support or you work for a company who provides out sourced IT services to multiple clients. Right now I work for a company who does the latter, and I often consider how nice it would be doing the in-house side of things, to just have one network I am focused on and instead of feeling like I have a dozen bosses between clients and internal management, I would just have one set of management and people to appease. There is also the technical aspect of every client wanting something different, and having to manage numerous different technology platforms, or trying to force clients into using the technologies we prefer, neither situation is enjoyable. Is this just "the grass is greener on the other side" syndrome, or is there some legitimacy to the the stress of client based IT work compared to being an in-house IT guy? Thanks!

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  • Good book for a software developer doing part-time (Linux) system administration work

    - by Tony Meyer
    In many smaller organisations, developers often end up doing some system administration work (for obvious reasons). A lot of the time, they have great developer skills, but few system administration skills (perhaps all self-taught), and so have to learn as they go, which is fairly inefficient. Are there canonical (or simply great) books that would help in this situation? More advanced than just using a shell (presumably a developer can do that), but not aimed at someone that hopes to spend many years doing this work. Ideally, something fairly generic (although specific to a distribution would be OK), covering databases, networking, general maintenance, etc, not just one specific task. For the most part, I'm interested in shell-based work (i.e. no GUI installed), although if there's something outstanding I'm missing, please point it out. (As an analogy, replace "system administration" with C, and I'd want K&R, with C++ and I'd want Meyers' "Effective C++").

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  • Best Practice: Apache File Upload

    - by matnagel
    I am looking for a soultion for trusted users to upload pdf files via html forms (with maybe php involved). This is quite a standard ubuntu linux server with apache 2.x and php 5. I am wonderiung what are the benefits of the apache file upload module. There were no updates for some time, is it actively maintained? What are the advantages over traditional php upload with apache 2 without this module? http://commons.apache.org/fileupload I remember traditional php file upload is difficult with some pitfalls, will the apache file upload module improve the situation? The solution I am looking for will be part of an existing website and be integrated into the admin web frontend. Things I am not considering are webdav, ssh, ftp, ftps, ftp over ssh. Should work with a browser and without installing special client software, so I am asking about a browser based upload without special client side requirements. I can request a modern browser like firefox = 3.5 or modern webkit broser like chrome or safari from the users.

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  • Compressing with RAR vs ZIP

    - by FerranB
    A lot of people are compressing files with RAR, sending compressed files with RAR and so on. ZIP is more standard and works on all platforms. Windows users have ZIP included and linux users have no trouble with that file format. The tests I did sometime ago showed me that RAR compress better (some KyloBytes, no more) but not enough to use a non-free software when ZIP works on almost all the computers for free. Why do some people use RAR rather than ZIP for compressing?

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  • Best Network Antivirus for Windows XP

    - by Funky81
    I'm maintaining around 10 PC's with Windows XP as their Operating System. Currently we're using antivirus within each PC. Now I want to upgrade our antivirus. I'm searching antivirus with these criteria Network based Beside virus, can handle worm, and trojan If possible also built in firewall So which antivirus match with my criteria? Thanks

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  • Which linux distro for a laptop in windows environmet?

    - by Dev er dev
    I just got new laptop at work. What would you recommend as a linux distribution for it? All other developers are working under windows, and use windows tools. I'm currently using ArchLinux, but want to change it. I don't want to waste time configuring wireless, windows network shares, network pritners, projector, etc ... I want this stuff to just work, while still having sane and stable development evironment and tools. Is Ubuntu a good choice for this? I use gentoo at home, but don't think it is a good match for work environmet. EDIT: Note that we are working on cross platform apps, and deployment platform is almost always linux. There are very few windows apps that I have to use (like MS Project). It is just that everything else is windows centric. I use linux because I feel more productive with it, even if I have to dual boot to edit MS Project files.

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  • CentOS vs. Ubuntu

    - by DLH
    I had a web server that ran Ubuntu, but the hard drive failed recently and everything was erased. I decided to try CentOS on the machine instead of Ubuntu, since it's based on Red Hat. That association meant a lot to me because Red Hat is a commercial server product and is officially supported by my server's manufacturer. However, after a few days I'm starting to miss Ubuntu. I have trouble finding some of the packages I want in the CentOS repositories, and the third-party packages I've tried have been a hassle to deal with. My question is, what are the advantages of using CentOS as a server over Ubuntu? CentOS is ostensibly designed for this purpose, but so far I would prefer to use a desktop edition of Ubuntu over CentOS. Are there any killer features of CentOS which make it a better server OS? Is there any reason I shouldn't switch back to Ubuntu Server or Xubuntu?

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